CHAPTER XVI

VARIETIES OF STRAWBERRIES

A-i. et 1. Armstrong Cat. 21. 1918.
Origin unknown. Has been grown some in southern California but is now superseded by better sorts. Perfect. Plants at this Station very numerous, medium in vigor and height, productive; fruit hard to pick; medium to small, wedge-conic to blunt-cone, unattractive dark red, juicy, very firm, subacid; quality poor; late.

Abington. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 178:45. 1906. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:515. 1908.
Originated in 1895 as a chance seedling with Lester Blanchard, Abington, Massachusetts; introduced in 1905. At one time considered promising for commercial culture in the Northeast because of productiveness and of fair shipping qualities but has never become a leading variety. Perfect. Plants numerous, strongly vigorous, attacked by leaf-spot, very productive; fruit-stems long, thick, semi-erect; berries large, retain size well, wedge to round-conic or sometimes elongated, attractive light red, uniform; flesh light colored, moderately firm and juicy, mildly acid; fair to good; early midseason.

Abington Blush. 1. Card. Mon. 4:211, 277, fig. 1862.
A seedling of Wilson exhibited before the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society in Philadelphia in 1862 by G. M. Kohl, the originator. Fruit greenish white with deep scarlet blush; flesh white.

Abundance. 1. Flansburgh Cat. 8. 1914. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:62. 1918.
A seedling of Indiana, originated by H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan, in 1909. Perfect. At this Station, plants low growing, with dark green foliage among which are thickly intermingled showy, midseason blossoms; runners numerous; fruit of medium size, oval or blunt-conic, necked, unattractive light red; flesh light red, medium in juiciness and firmness, sprightly; one of the so-called fig-type varieties; fair; late.

Abundance (of Stevenson). 1. Can, Hort. 31:75. 1908.
E. B. Stevenson, Guelph, Ontario, received plants of this sort in 1908 from Messrs. Woodruff et Sons, New York, and reported it worth trying. Perfect. Plants vigorous, healthy, and productive; seeds yellow; fruit medium in size, attractive scarlet, moderately firm; fair; late midseason.

Abundant. 1. Mass. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 171. 1878.
Originated by Marshall P. Wilder, Dorchester, Massachusetts, and first exhibited by him before the Massachusetts Horticultural Society in 1878. Imperfect. Fruit large, conic, flattened; seeds sunken, red; color crimson; flesh red, solid, juicy; good.

Accident. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:5. 1916.
A chance seedling which originated with S. W. Moore, Springfield, Missouri, in 1894. Perfect. Fruit medium in size, crimson; good; early midseason.

Accomac. 1. Ann. Hort. 210. 1891. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:4. 1894.
Raised from seed in 1887 by McMath Brothers, Onley, Virginia. Perfect. On the grounds at this Station, plants vigorous; runners few resulting in low yields; fruit medium to large, long-conic, light red, soft, acid, of pleasing flavor; good; rather late, season short.

Acme. 1. Ore. Bien. Crop Pest et Hort. Rpt. 79. 1915.
A seedling of Clark which originated with Mrs. Mabel Kaiser, Salem, Oregon, about 1907. At the Oregon Station it was inferior to Clark in productivity and size of fruit. Perfect. Plants medium in size and vigor, semi-erect, unproductive, good plant-maker; fruit-stems short, stiff, holding fruit up well; seeds raised; fruit below medium in size, uniform, roundish oblate, regular, dark red; flesh dark red, very firm, acid, slightly astringent; fair.

Ada. 1. Mass. Sta. Bul. 2:25. 1888.
On trial at the Massachusetts Station in 1889. Plants weak, unproductive; fruit small, unattractive; poor; late.

Adams Favorite. 1. Penn. Sta. Rpt. 215. 1898-99.
Originated with Solomon Adams, Tamaqua, Pennsylvania, who sent it to the Pennsylvania Station for trial in 1896. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, unproductive; runners numerous; fruit large, blunt-conic, firm, acid; midseason.

Addison. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:63. 1918.
A cross of President by Marshall, originated at this Station in 1907 and sent out for trial in 1917. The variety has not held up to its earlier promises. Imperfect. Plants medium to few, vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit medium to very large, conic or blunt-wedge, necked, glossy medium red, juicy, variable in firmness, subacid; good; midseason.

Adonis. 1. U.S. Pat. Off. Rpt. 196. 1861.
Originated by William R. Prince, Flushing, New York, who introduced it about 1855. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, very productive; fruit large, roundish oblate, light scarlet, sprightly; late.

Advance. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:63. 1918.
A cross between Autumn and Cooper, originated in 1907 by Samuel Cooper, Delevan, New York. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants few, medium in vigor, size, and yield; autumn-bearing; fruit-stems short; berries medium in size and color, conic;.seeds much raised; flesh firm, mildly subacid, not highly flavored; fair; early.

Advance (of Printz). 1. N. Y. Sta. Rpt. 483. 1908.
Introduced about 1904 by Arthur B, Printz of Indiana. Perfect. At this Station the fruit is inferior in size, shape, and quality. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; leaves light green; flowers early; fruit-stems long, slender, prostrate; picks easily; calyx small, not leafy, discolored, flat, pale green; seeds slightly sunken; fruit of medium size, elongated, apex sharply pointed, color medium to light scarlet; flesh medium red, soft, acid, not high in flavor; poor to fair; early.

Advancer. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:4. 1894.
Originated with R. S. Cole, Harmons, Maryland, who introduced it about 1892. Perfect. Station plants medium in number, with good foliage, unproductive; fruit medium in size, dark red, firm; very good; season early, short.

Advocate. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:6. 1916.
Originated in Canada; introduced about 1890. Perfect. Fruit large, round-conic, firm; good.

Afrique. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:6. 1916.
Introduced about 1870 by Samuel Miller, Bluffton, Missouri. Imperfect. Fruit of medium size, round-conic, dark crimson, firm; good.

Afton. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 100:4. 1893.
A chance seedling which originated with C. W. Graham, Afton, New York, by whom it was introduced in 1894. Imperfect. Plants moderately vigorous, productive; runners numerous; leaves light green; fruit above medium in size, roundish conic, with a short neck, color very dark crimson; flesh dark, firm; good; early.

Agnes. 1. Peninsula Hort. Soc. Rpt. in. 1897.
Mentioned as a cross between Bubach and Pearl. Plants more vigorous than Bubach; fruit of good color, firm; earlier than Bubach.

Agriculturist. 1. Fuller Sm. Fr. Cult. 88, fig. 26. 1867.
A cross between Green Prolific and Georgia Mammoth, raised by Seth Boyden, Newark, New Jersey, about 1858. It was widely grown between 1865 and 1875, but was displaced by better sorts. The American Pomological Society placed this variety in its catalog in 1869 and removed it in 1883. Imperfect. Plants very vigorous, hardy, productive; leaves thick, dark green; fruit very large, irregular conic, with a long neck, light reddish crimson; flesh dark red, firm, juicy, sweet; good.

Aishkum. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 163. 1920.
A cross between Black Beauty and Pan American originated by H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan, and introduced by him in 1918. "Indian strain of everbearing strawberry." Perfect. Fair to good plant maker, productive, everbearing.

Akasa. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 163. 1920.
Originated by H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan. "Indian strain of everbearing strawberry." Imperfect. Fair to good plant maker, productive.

Alabama. 1. U. S. D. A. Pom. Rpt. 393. 1891. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:4. 1894.
Originated in 1886 by Julius Schnadelbach, Grand Bay, Alabama. Perfect. At this Station, plants with almost perfect foliage, numerous; fruit of medium size, round-conic, dark red, firm, subacid; fair; midseason.

Alaska. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:63. 1918.
A cross between Climax and Glen Mary originated by T. C. Kevitt, Athenia, New Jersey. Of little value at this Station. Perfect. Plants vigorous, injured by leaf-spot, medium in yield; fruit large to medium, irregular long-conic to wedge, necked, glossy, medium to dark red; seeds sunken; flesh firm, mild, sweet; fair; midseason.

Alaska (of Stayman). 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:6. 1916.
Originated with James Stayman, Leavenworth, Kansas. Offered for sale in 1902. Perfect. Fruit medium in size, round-conic to wedge-shape, dark crimson; flesh medium red, firm, subacid; fair.

Mden. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:63. 1918.
A cross between President and Marshall originated by this Station in 1907 and sent out for trial in 1917. It has not held up to its earlier promises. Imperfect. Plants medium in number, large, productive; fruit-stems long, prostrate; fruit large, round-conic, variable in color, juicy, medium to firm, mild, pleasantly flavored; good; midseason.

Alfonso XVIII. 1. Rural N. Y. 68:674. 1909.
Reported by the Rural New-Yorker in 1909 as a European sort of promise for the home garden. Perfect. Plants vigorous and healthy; fruit small to medium, conic, bright scarlet; flesh whitish, firm, sweet, rich; midseason.

Alice. 1. Ind. Sta. Bul. 73:80. 1898.
Sent out by S. B. Christian, Bradford, Ohio, in 1896. Imperfect. Plants productive; fruit large, regular; good.

Alice (of Hancock). 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 126. 1891.
Introduced in 1891 by P. B. Hancock, Casky, Kentucky. Fruit large, conic, light colored; medium in quality.

Alice Hathaway. 1. Ohio Sta. BuL z66:7o. 1905.
Originated with Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas, who introduced it in 1903. Perfect. Plants tall, vigorous: fruit of medium size, short-conic, light dull red; flesh red? moderately firm, pleasant.

Alice Maud. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 106. 1852. Princess Alice Maud. 2. Gard. Chron. 441. 1843.
Raised by James Trollop, Limpley Stoke, Wiltshire, England. Introduced in 1843. From 1850 to 1860 it was popular with the market gardeners around Washington, D. C. It was placed in the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1862 and removed in 1871. Perfect. Plants vigorous, requiring high cultivation; fruit large, conic, dark glossy scarlet in color; flesh light scarlet, juicy, rich; excellent.

All Season. 1. Lovett Cat. No. 108, 7. 1923.
A cross between Progressive and Early Jersey Giant originated in 1917 by John A. Kemp, Little Silver, New Jersey. Introduced in 1923 by J. T. Lovett, Little Silver, New Jersey. Described as having large, vigorous, productive plants; fruit large, bright crimson; everbearing.

Allen. 1. Rural N. Y. 55:498. 1896.
Sent out in 1895 by W. P. Allen, Jr., Salisbury, Maryland. Perfect. Fruit-stems weak; fruit medium to large; long-conic, necked, light scarlet, moderately firm, subacid; good; midseason.

Allie. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:214. 1912.
Originated with R. H. McDowell of Ohio about 1908. Perfect. Plants small, lacking in vigor; fruit-stems short, prostrate; calyx discolors; fruit medium in size, blunt-conic to nearly wedge-shape, dull light scarlet; flesh light in color, firm, juicy, mild, pleasant; midseason.

Almo. 1. N. Y. Sta. Rpt. 484. 1908.
A cross between Clyde and Crescent which originated in 1902 by J. A. Bauer, Judsonia, Arkansas. Imperfect. Plants at this Station medium in number, vigorous, productive, healthy; fruit medium to large, round-conic, dark red, very firm, rather acid; fair.

Almond. 1. Rural N. Y. 58:514. 1899.
Originated with J. H. Black, Son et Co., Hightstown, New Jersey, about 1895. Perfect. At this Station, plants vigorous, medium in number, healthy; fruit of medium size, roundish, dark red, moderately firm, juicy; fair; midseason.

Alpha. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 93. 1883.
A cross between Wilson and Doctor Nicaise originated by Charles Arnold, Paris, Ontario, about 1877. Alpha was placed in the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1891, but was removed at the next revision of the catalog in 1897. Perfect. Plants vigorous and productive; fruit large, ovate-conic, firm, light red; good; very early.

Alpha (of Riehl). 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:6. 1916.
Originated with E. H. Riehl, Alton, Illinois. Described as an " Everbearer."

Alton. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:6. 1916.
Originated with E. H. Riehl, Alton, Illinois. Described as an " Everbearer."

Alvin. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:64. 1918.
Originated about 1908 by Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas, by crossing Klondike with Climax. Imperfect. Station plants very few, medium in size and vigor, productive, healthy; fruit large, wedge to round-conic, dull light red, very juicy, medium firm, sprightly; poor; midseason.

Amanda. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:516. 1908.
Amanda was originated by Z. T. Mumma, Bluffton, Ohio, in 1904, as a cross between Sample and Maximus. Perfect. Plants very numerous, vigorous, tall, susceptible to leaf-spot, very productive; fruit-stems long, thick, erect; berries large, of good size throughout the season, wedge to round-conic, the largest deeply furrowed and occasionally cox-combed, glossy light to dark red, variable; seeds much sunken; flesh well colored to the center, juicy, very firm, pleasantly acid, agreeably flavored; good; midseason.

Amateur. 1. Rural N. Y. 43:495, fig. 241. 1884.
Sent out in 1884 by Reuben C. Hart, West Farmington, Connecticut, who raised it from mixed seed of Lennig and Green Prolific, pollinated with Charles Downing. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, productive, subject to rust; fruit large, round, light scarlet; flesh white, soft, sweet; good; midseason.

Amateur (of Pain). 1. Gard. Mon. 8:278. 1866.
Mentioned in 1866 as having been originated by J. A. Pain. Imperfect. Plants productive; fruit large, conic, crimson, with fine flavor.

America. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 978. 1869.
Raised by J. Keech, Waterloo, New York, who exhibited it in Rochester, in 1866. America was added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1875, and removed in 1879. Perfect. Fruit large, obtuse-conic, often wedge-shape, crimson; flesh firm, juicy, rich, subacid.

America (of Virginia). 1. Mich. Sta. BuL 122:6. 1895.
Sent out by the Cleveland Nursery Company, Rio Vista, Virginia, about 1892. A seedling of Great American. Perfect. Plants vigorous, runners few; fruit medium in size, round-conic, attractive dark scarlet, firm; midseason.

American. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:7. 1916.
Originated with H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan, who listed it in 1910. Perfect.

American Queen. 1. U. S. Pat. Off. Rpt. 198. 1861.
A seedling of Montevideo Pine originated by G. W. Huntsman, Flushing, New York. Introduced about 1850. Imperfect. Plants productive; fruit very large, conic, bright scarlet, acid; good; midseason.

Americus. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:52. 1911.
A cross between Louis Gauthier and Pan American originated in 1905 by Harlow Rockhill, Conrad, Iowa. Perfect. Plants at this Station few, small, healthy, unproductive; autumn-bearing; new plants often bloom as soon as they take root; fruit medium in size, roundish, light red, medium juicy, firm, mildly subacid; fair; late.

Amwell. 1. Rural N. Y. 62:518. 1903.
Sent out by Thomas R. Hunt, Lambertville, New Jersey, about 1901. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, productive; calyx large; fruit large, conic, dark crimson, sweet; very good.

Angelique. 1. Mag. Hort. 28:400. 1862.
Raised by William Prince, Flushing, New York, prior to 1862. Plants vigorous, hardy and productive; fruit large, conic, bright scarlet, juicy; excellent.

Angola. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:64. 1918.
A cross between President and Marshall raised at this Station in 1907. Imperfect. Plants very numerous, vigorous, healthy, very productive; fruit-stems long, thick, prostrate; fruit very large to medium, round-conic to blunt-wedge, glossy, medium to light red, very juicy, bruises easily, medium firm, sprightly; good; midseason.

Anlo. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:184. 1898.
Originated with A. D. Leffel, Anlo, Ohio. Introduced about 1895. Imperfect. Plants numerous; fruit large, irregular round-conic, dull scarlet, moderately firm; good; late midseason.

Anna Forest. 1. Rural N. Y. 46:512. 1887. 2. N. Y. Sta. BuL 64:5. 1894.
Originated in Ross County, Ohio, about 1880. Perfect. At this Station, plants form runners very slowly, unproductive; fruit medium to large, round-conic, glossy dark red, firm, with whitish flesh, mildly subacid; fair; midseason.

Anna Kennedy. 1. Lovett Cat. 4. 1895. 2* N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:184. 1898.
A cross between Jersey Queen and an unknown seedling raised by J. T. Lovett, Little Silver, New Jersey, about 1885, and introduced by him in 1895. Imperfect. Plants moderately vigorous and rather unproductive; fruit-stems short, erect; fruit of medium size, roundish, light scarlet, firm; flesh light; fair; early.

Annie Hubach. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:7. 1916. Anna. 2. Ore. Bien. Crop Pest et Hort. Rpt. 54. 1915.
Originated by Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas, as a cross between Warfield and Thompson. Introduced in 1903. Perfect. Plants weak, moderately productive; fruit-stems short; fruit medium in size, round-conic, with a slight neck, light crimson; flesh pale red, firm, subacid; fair; early midseason.

Annie Laurie. 1. Am. Card. 15:435. 1894. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 91:190. 1895.
Originated about 1889 by John F. Beaver, Dayton, Ohio. The fine quality and handsome appearance of this sort has made it a desirable variety for the home garden in some sections. Perfect. Plants at this Station very vigorous, numerous, moderately productive; fruit medium to large, oblate, bright red, moderately firm; good; late.

Apache. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 163:61. 1898.
Originated with James Stayman, Leavenworth, Kansas, who introduced it about 1895. Perfect. Plants moderately productive, very vigorous; runners numerous; fruit medium in size, long-conic, light scarlet, rather soft; poor; early midseason.

Arabine. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 164. 1920.
Originated in 1914 by S. H. Warren, Weston, Massachusetts. Plants at this Station lacking in constitution, unproductive; fruit above medium to small, light red, tender, juicy, mildly subacid; inferior.

Arcade. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:65. 1918.
A cross between President and Marshall raised at this Station in 1907. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, productive; fruit-stems long, thick; sepals long, broad; fruit large, retains size well, conic or wedge, glossy medium red, very juicy, firm, pleasantly flavored, sprightly; good; midseason.

Arena. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:7. 1916.
A seedling of Wilson which originated about 1870 with George Robbins, Menomonie, Wisconsin. Fruit of medium size, round-conic, light crimson; good; early midseason.

Argyle. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:65. 1918.
Raised at this Station in 1907 as a cross between President and Marshall. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, healthy, productive; calyx small; fruit above medium to very large, round-conic, glossy, medium to dark red, juicy, firm, mild, sweet, highly flavored; very good; midseason.

Ariadne. 1. Mag. Hort. 25:498. 1859.
Originated by William Prince, Flushing, New York; introduced in 1859. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, very tall, very productive, with large, dark green foliage; fruit-stems tall, strong, erect; fruit large, conic, slightly necked, light scarlet, sweet, finely flavored.

Arizona. 1. Cal. Sta. Rpt. 379. 1895-97. Arizona Everbearing. 2. Am. Pom, Soc. Cat. 44. 1901. Mexican. 3. Am. Gard. 20:24. 1899.
A chance seedling supposed to be from Jessie or Gandy which originated in Phoenix, Arizona. Introduced about 1890. In the hot sections of Arizona and the Pacific Southwest where resistance to drouth and heat is important, Arizona was a popular variety between 1895 and 1905. The American Pomological Society placed Arizona in its catalog in 1901, but it was removed at the next revision of the catalog in 1909. Perfect. Plants few; fruit medium in size, round-conic, light scarlet; flesh light red, soft, mild, subacid; good; midseason.

Arkansas. Arkansas Black: 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:516. 1908.
A seedling of unknown parentage originated in 1900 by Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas. Perfect. At this Station, plants few, medium in vigor, productive; fruit large to medium, round-conic, very dark red, firm, mildly acid; good to very good; early.

Arkansas Traveler. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:5. 1894.
Originated with T. G. Michel, Judsonia, Arkansas; introduced in 1891. Perfect. At this Station, plants very numerous, with excellent foliage, unproductive; fruit medium to large, borne on long prostrate stems, round-conic, dark red, firm, subacid; fair to good; midseason, lasting about 10 days.

Arlington. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 241. 1886.
Introduced about 1885. Perfect. Plants hardy, vigorous, moderately productive; fruit medium in size, roundish conic, bright crimson, soft, juicy, acid; good; midseason.

Arnold Pride. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 167. 1882.
A cross between Wilson and Doctor Nicaise, originated about 1877 by Charles Arnold, Paris, Ontario. Perfect. Plants very vigorous, very productive; fruit large, irregular conic, dull scarlet, firm, moderately juicy, mildly subacid, pleasant; late.

Arnout. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 176:7. 1899. 2. N. Y. Sta. Rpt. 485. 1908.
Originated with J. L. Arnout, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania; introduced in 1905. An unusually productive sort but berries unattractive in appearance. Semi-perfect to perfect. Plants at this Station, medium in number and vigor, susceptible to leaf-spot, very productive; fruit large to medium, wedge or round-conic, dull dark red, firm, mildly acid; good; midseason.

Aroma. 1. Col. 0. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 219. 1887. 2. Can. Hort. 19:2, fig. 871. 1896. 3. Va. Sta. Tech. Bui. 11:8. 1916.
For a large berry of very good quality, Aroma is now a splendid commercial sort from the Mississippi to the Atlantic. The berries are uniform in size, firm, and keep and ship well. The plants are resistant to disease, withstand drouth well, are very productive and are adapted to nearly all strawberry soils, although they prefer clay and silt loams. Aroma is a seedling of Cumberland and originated in 1889 with E. W. Cruse, Leavenworth, Kansas; introduced in 1892. The American Pomological Society placed the variety in its list of recommended fruits in 1909.
Perfect. Plants numerous, medium in vigor and height, healthy, very productive; leaves small, thin, light green, smooth, glossy. Flowers late midseason; petals 6-8; stamens numerous; receptacle large. Fruit midseason to late, ripening period long, withstands drouth well, a good shipper; fruit-stems short, thick, erect; pedicels short, thick; calyx large, flat to slightly raised, well colored, leafy; sepals long, broad; berries large, uniform in size, chunky wedge to blunt-conic; apex obtuse, often indented; color attractive light to medium red, glossy; seeds raised; flesh well colored to the center, juicy, very firm, pleasantly sprightly; quality good.

Arrow. 1. Am. Gard. 17:498, 627. 1896.
A seedling of Haverland which it closely resembles, originated in 1890 with E. W. Cone, Menomonie, Wisconsin. Imperfect. Plants moderately numerous, vigorous and moderately productive; fruit medium in size, shape of Haverland, light crimson, firm, subacid; very good; midseason.

Ashland. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:8. 1916. Sixteen to One. 2. Ore. Bien. Crop Pest et Hort. Rpt. 87. 1915.
This was one of several unnamed seedlings received by George Irwin, Ashland, Oregon, from M. Crawford, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, about 1892. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, erect, productive; fruit medium to large, irregular round-conic, light crimson; flesh medium red, soft, sweet; good; early midseason.

Ashton. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:65. 1918.
A cross between President and Marshall, raised at this Station in 1907. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems semi-erect; fruit large, round-conic, glossy medium to dark red; seeds raised; flesh juicy, firm, sprightly; good; midseason.

Athens. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:65. 1918.
Raised at this Station in 1907 as a cross between President and Marshall. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, usually healthy, very productive; fruit-stems thick, semi-erect; fruit large, irregular wedge to conic, usually necked, glossy medium to dark red, very juicy, firm, pleasantly flavored, sprightly; good; midseason.

Atkins Continuity. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:172. 1915.
Received at this Station in 1910 from William Fell, Hexham, England. Of little value. Perfect. Plants medium in number and vigor, unproductive, susceptible to leaf-spot; fruit above medium in size, round-conic or wedge, medium red, glossy, firm, mildly subacid, with a white center, inferior in flavor; fair; early.

Atlantic. 1. Rural N. Y. 42:424, fig. 367. 1883.
A chance seedling found about 1877 by D. L. Potter, Hammonton, New Jersey. In most places Atlantic failed, but in Oswego County, New York, it was a leading variety; valued for its lateness and remarkable shipping qualities. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, productive; fruit large, conic, dark crimson; flesh light red, very firm, subacid; good; late.

Auburn. 1. Ann. Hort. 210. 1891.
A seedling of Haverland which originated in 1886 with Samuel Gillespie, Butler County, Ohio. Imperfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, unproductive; fruit medium to large, round-conic, crimson; flesh bright scarlet, firm, subacid; good; early midseason.

Augwick. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 104:66. 1894.
Brought to notice about 1891. Imperfect. Plants vigorous; fruit large, firm; good; midseason.

Aurora. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:66. 1918.
A seedling of Prolific raised at this Station in 1907. Perfect. Plants numerous, very vigorous, injured by leaf-spot, medium in yield; fruit-stems short, thick, semi-erect; fruit large, retains size well, long-conic to long-wedge, glossy medium red, juicy, firm, pleasantly sprightly; good; late midseason.

Austin. 1. Fuller Sm. Fr. Cult 88. 1867. Austin Shaker. 2. Mag. Hort. 26:217, 308. 1860. Austin's Seedling. 3. U. S. Pat. Off. Rpt. 199. 1861.
Raised about 1856 at the Shaker settlement, Watervliet, New York. It was thought to be a seedling of Iowa. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, and productive; fruit large, roundish conic, light scarlet; flesh whitish, soft, acid; poor; late.

Australian. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 118:4. 1895. Australian Everbearing. 2. Ann. Hort. 134. 1893. Australian Crimson. 3. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 127. 1891.
Introduced in California in 1885 by E. J. Baldwin who is said to have secured plants from Australia where the variety originated. It was grown extensively around Los Angeles for shipping, until superseded by Brandywine. The American Pomological Society placed this variety in its catalog in 1899 and removed it in 1900. Perfect. Plants medium in number, heat and drouth resistant; fruit medium to large, round-conic, crimson; flesh medium red, very firm, subacid; good; very early.

Auto. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 218:195. 1902.
Said to have been brought from Germany prior to 1897 in which year it was introduced in this country by J. H. Thomas, Wyoming, Delaware. Perfect. Plants at this Station vigorous, numerous, medium productive; fruit lacks uniformity in size and shape, medium to very large, conical, attractive dark red, firm, moderately juicy, mild; fair to good; midseason.

Autumn. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 16. 1907. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:172. 1915.
A seedling of Pan American raised in 1902 by Samuel Cooper, Delevan, New York. Imperfect. Plants at this Station very few, very productive; autumn-bearing; fruit medium to small, broad-conic, flattened at the base, medium red, juicy, firm, sweet, pleasantly flavored; good; late.

Autumn Belle. 1. Ore. Bien. Crop Pest et Hort. Rpt. 56. 1915.
A cross between Magoon and a wild Oregon strawberry, raised by Benjamin Worsley, Svensen, Oregon. Perfect. Plants few, below medium in vigor, unproductive; fruit below medium in size, broad-conic, dark red; flesh medium to dark red, soft, sweet; fair.

Autumn King. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:66. 1918.
A cross between Autumn and Chesapeake raised by E. W. Townsend, Salisbury, Maryland, who introduced it in 1914. Perfect. Plants as grown at this Station very few, medium in vigor and yield, healthy; autumn-bearing; fruit medium in size, conic, necked, variable in color; flesh firm, medium juicy, mildly subacid, inferior in flavor; poor to fair; late.

Avery. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 163:66.
Originated with E. C. Avery of Pennsylvania, introduced about 1894. Very similar to Haverland. Imperfect. Plants lacking in vigor; fruit of medium size, long-conic, bright scarlet; flesh dark red, juicy, soft; very good; midseason.


Bachelor. 1. N. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 7. 1878.
Raised by E. W. Durand, Irvington, New Jersey, prior to 1878. Plants vigorous; fruit medium in size, attractive red, rich.

Backett Prolific. 1. Va, Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:9. 1916. Beckett's Prolific. 2. Gard. Mon. 21:239. 1879.
A cross between Wilson and Jucunda; introduced about 1875. Imperfect to semi-perfect. Fruit medium in size, conic, crimson, firm, subacid; very good; late midseason.

Bailey. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 154:31. 1904.
Sent to the Ohio Station in 1903 for trial. Perfect. Plants vigorous and unproductive; fruit of medium size, short-conic, slightly necked, dark crimson; flesh pink, firm; excellent.

Baldwin Pride. 1. Baldwin Cat. 9. 1909.
Introduced by O. A. D. Baldwin, Bridgman, Michigan. Perfect. Plants medium in number and vigor, unproductive; calyx large, detaching easily; fruit medium in size, irregular conic, dark red; flesh light red, subacid, moderately firm; fair to good; midseason.

Baltimore. 1. Townsend Cat. No. 22, 3. 1912-13. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:172. 1915. Supposed to have originated in Germany about 1884. E. W. Townsend et Sons, Salisbury, Maryland, introduced Baltimore in 1912. Perfect. Plants at this Station numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit large, irregular in shape, wedge, often coxcomb, glossy medium red, juicy, tender, with white center, sweet, mild, strongly aromatic; good; midseason.

Baltimore Scarlet. 1. U. S. Pat. Off. Rpt. 196. 1861.
Originated with Robert Buist, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; introduced before 1847. A leading sort in New York, Pennsylvania, and Maryland for a number of years. Imperfect. Fruit medium in size, blunt-conic, bright scarlet; very good; early.

Banana. 1. Am. Hort. Ann. 106. 1870.
A seedling of Agriculturist originated by J. D. Willard, Hartford, Connecticut; introduced in 1870. Fruit large, conic, with a long neck, light scarlet, soft, of Hautbois flavor.

Bancroft. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 5:10. 1889.
Introduced about 1880. Imperfect. Plants few, lacking in vigor and productivity; fruit medium to large, of the type of Manchester; early.

Banner. 1. Hyde Cat. 23. 1922.
A chance seedling which originated in 1899 on the Sweet Briar Ranch, Sweet Briar, California. Banner has shown little merit at this Station. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigor, and yield, healthy; fruit large to small, oblong-conic to wedge, glossy dark red; fruit-stems short, prostrate; flesh very firm, medium juicy, sweet, mild; good; early.

Banquet. 1. Rural N. Y. 43:635, fig. 374- 1884. 2. U. S. D. A. Rpt. 419, PI. IV. 1890. A cross between Miner and a wild strawberry raised in 1880 by J. R. Hawkins, Mountainville, New York. Valued for the home garden as it possessed the flavor and aroma of the wild berry. Imperfect to semi-perfect. Plants few, very vigorous; fruit medium in size, long-conic, dark crimson; flesh firm, light red, sweet, aromatic; very good; midseason.

Barkley. 1. Townsend Cat. No. 22, 2. 1912-13. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:172. 1915.
Found in the wild in 1905 by S. Barkley, Nanticoke, Maryland. Perfect. Plants at this Station large, numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit large to medium, conic or wedge, light to medium red, dull, firm, sweet, pleasantly flavored; good; early.

Barnes Mammoth. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 979. 1869.
Raised by D. H. Barnes, Poughkeepsie, New York. Perfect. Plants very vigorous and very productive; fruit large, roundish conic, crimson; flesh scarlet, firm, juicy, sprightly subacid; early.

Barrymore. 1. Rural N. Y. 67:586. 1908. 2. N. Y. Sta. BuL 385:313. 1914.
Raised in 1901 by H. L. Crane, Westwood, Massachusetts, by crossing Sample with a seedling from A. B. Howard. At this Station it made a fine record, producing large, unusually attractive berries of high quality. Perfect. Plants very productive, medium in vigor and height; fruit large, blunt-conic to wedge, glossy dark red, juicy, firm, pleasantly flavored, sprightly; very good; early midseason.

Barton. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 44:142. 1892. Barton's Eclipse. 2. Can. Exp. Farm BuL 62:27. 1909. Eclipse. 3. Mich. Sta. BuL 106:124. 1894.
A cross between Longfellow (of Webb) and Sharpless originated in 1882 by T. B. Barton, Columbus, Kentucky. This variety has been widely tested and is fairly productive of attractive fruit. The foliage rusts badly in some sections. Imperfect. At this Station, plants numerous, very vigorous; fruit large to very large, conical, rounding in large specimens, dark red, medium firm, subacid; good to very good; midseason.

Battenburg. 1. N. Y. Sta. BuL 336:52/ 1911.
A seedling raised by A. T. Goldsborough, Wesley Heights, Washington, D. C. Perfect. Plants at this Station few, of medium size and vigor, healthy, very productive; fruit large, wedge to round-conic, roughish, glossy light red, juicy, firm, sprightly or tart; good; midseason.

Bauer. 1. Ind. Sta. BuL 200:9. 1917. Bauer No. g. 2. Ohio Sta. BuL 236:216. 1912.
Originated with J. A. Bauer, Judsonia, Arkansas, who introduced it in 1909, Imperfect. Plants medium to few, vigorous, productive; fruit large, conic, light crimson; flesh light salmon, soft, acid; poor; late midseason.

Bayne Extra Early. 1. Kenrick Am. Orch. 304. 1845. Bayne's Early Scarlet. 2. U. S. Pat. Off. Rpt. 199. 1861.
A native sort discovered by Dr. J. H. Bayne, Alexandria, Virginia, and brought to notice about 1843 It was a popular sort around Norfolk and Baltimore from 1848 to 1860. Perfect. Plants productive; fruit round, deep scarlet, fine quality; very early.

Bayne Incomparable. 1. Kenrick Am. Orch. 304. 1845.
Originated with Dr. J. H. Bayne, Alexandria, Virginia, who introduced it about 1843. Plants very vigorous and very productive; fruit very large, roundish to coxcomb; flesh pale scarlet, firm, with a fine flavor.

Bayside. 1. Todd Cat. 5. 1913.
Originated in Maryland several years prior to 1913 in which year it was introduced by W. S. Todd, Greenwood, Delaware. Perfect. Plants of Gandy type but larger and more vigorous; fruit large, regular, round-conic, dark glossy red, firm; good.

Beacon. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 209. 1922. 2. N. Y. Sta. BuL 497:17. 1923.
Beacon was sent out from this Station several years ago as one of the best early strawberries. The fruits are about the handsomest of their season, and hold up well throughout adverse conditions at ripening time. The quality is excellent for an early strawberry. The plants are numerous, healthy, productive, vigorous, and bear the fruits on long pedicels which make picking easy. Beacon is a cross between President and Marshall which originated at this Station in 1911; introduced by the New York State Fruit Testing Association in 1923.
Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, tall, healthy, productive; leaves large, thick, dark green, smooth. Flowers early midseason; petals 5-8, large; stamens numerous; receptacle medium to large. Fruit early, ripening period long, picks easily, holds up well in size; fruit-stems long, thick, semi-erect to prostrate; pedicels long, slender; calyx large, flat or slightly raised, well colored, adherent; sepals narrow; berries large, uniform, blunt-wedge to blunt-conic, slightly furrowed and necked; apex obtuse; color dark glossy red; seeds mostly raised; flesh red to the center, juicy, firm, subacid, pleasantly flavored; quality good.

Beaderarena. 1. Etter Cat. 22. 1920.
A cross between Arena and Beder Wood, originated by Albert F. Etter, Ettersburg, California, in 1912. Imperfect. At this Station, plants very numerous, vigorous, healthy, productive; flowers hidden by the foliage; fruit above medium to small, irregularly roundish; seeds much sunken; glossy dark red; juicy, distinctly whitish at center, soft, subacid; fair; very late.

Beal. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 164. 1920.
A seedling of Belt, originated in 1912 by T. C. Kevitt, Athenia, New Jersey. Perfect. Plants at this Station numerous, vigorous, healthy, unproductive; fruit medium in size, conic, necked, dull dark red, medium juicy, very firm, subacid; poor; midseason.

Beauty. 1. N. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 8. 1878. Esse1. 2. III. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 201. 1879. Raised by E. W. Durand, Irvington, New Jersey, about 1870; introduced about 1876.
Perfect. Plants few, large, vigorous, very productive; fruit large, regular, conic, with a long neck, dark crimson; flesh light red, firm; very good; late.

Beauty (of Haynes). 1. N. Y. Sta. BuL 76:432. 1894.
Originated with J. H. Haynes, Delphi, Indiana, who introduced it in 1892. Imperfect. At this Station, plants numerous, with excellent foliage, productive; fruit medium to large, round-conic, glossy dark red, soft, juicy; early, season long.

Beaver. 1. N. Y. Sta. BuL 276:67. 1906.
A chance seedling of unknown parentage found about 1901 by J. F. Beaver, Dayton, Ohio. Perfect. Plants at this Station medium in number and vigor, injured by leaf-spot, not very productive; fruit above medium in size, round-conic, dull pale red, variable in color, firm, acid, whitish, picks with difficulty; fair; midseason.

Beavers. 1. Mich. Sta. Spec. Bul. 48:4. 1909.
Originated with C. E. Wightman, Mt. Vernon, Washington; brought to notice about 1904. Imperfect. Plants below medium in number, lacking vigor, unproductive; fruit below medium in size, broad-conic, dark red; flesh dark red, firm, acid; fair; midseason.

Beder Wood. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 263. 1891. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. BuL 11:10. 1916. Racster. 3. Rural N. Y. 50:527. 1891.
This old variety was in its day one of the most productive early strawberries. It was a favorite in western New York and in the Mississippi Valley, especially valued as a good pollinizer for other early sorts. It was also the most resistant to drouth of any of the standard strawberries and the fruits held their size throughout a long picking season. The variety is being discarded, however, because the fruits run small, are not very firm and are rather poor in quality. It is best adapted to heavy soils. This variety originated in 1881 with Beder Wood, Moline, Illinois. Mr. Wood sent plants to friends in Iowa for trial, whence the variety fell into the hands of John Racster of Davenport, who introduced it under his own name in 1890. Later the sort was sent out as Beder Wood. The American Pomological Society listed the variety in its catalog of recommended fruits in 1897.
Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigor and height, susceptible to leaf-spot, very productive; leaves small, narrow, dark green, smooth. Flowers very early and very numerous, even with the foliage, small; petals 6-8, small, not overlapping; stamens numerous. Fruit early, ripening period long; fruit-stems long, thick, prostrate; pedicels short; calyx small, fiat or slightly raised, well colored; sepals long, narrow; berries produced in large clusters, medium, uniform, round-conic; apex obtuse; color light red; seeds sunken; flesh juicy, medium to firm, soft under unfavorable conditions, whitish towards the center, brisk subacid, not highly flavored; fair in quality.

Beebe. 1. Lovett Cat. 4. 1891. 2. Mich. Sta. BuL 129:5. 1896.
A chance seedling which originated on the grounds of E. P. Beebe, Elizabeth, New Jersey, in 1885. Perfect. Plants medium in vigor and productivity; fruit medium in size, irregular, round-conic, light crimson, mild, subacid; good; midseason.

Beecher. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 109:234. 1896. Henry Ward Beecher. 2. Lovett Cat 4. 1893.
Originated by H. H. Allen, Hilton, New Jersey; introduced in 1893 by J. T. Lovett. Little Silver, New Jersey. A cross between Champion and Sharpless. Perfect. At this Station, plants numerous, unproductive; fruit-stems short; fruit large, round-wedge, dark red, firm; poor; early.

Beede. 1. Mass. Sta. Bul. 37:21. 1896.
Originated with G. F. Beede, Fremont, New Hampshire; introduced about 1901. Perfect. Plants numerous, medium in vigor and productivity; fruit large, conic, bright scarlet; good.

Beidler. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 276:67. 1906. Thompson No. 602. 2. III. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 293. 1905.
Originated by M. T. Thompson, Rio Vista, Virginia; introduced by him in 1905. Imperfect. At this Station, plants numerous, vigorous, very productive, injured by leaf-spot; fruit large to very large, wedge, sometimes coxcomb, light and dark red, green or pale at the tips, firm, juicy, acid; hardly fair; midseason.

Belle. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 308. 1891. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:5. 1894.
Originated about 1890 by M. T. Thompson, Lakewood, Ohio, from mixed seed. Perfect. Plants at this Station medium in number, with good foliage, unproductive; fruit medium to very large, holds size well, variable in shape, elongated-wedge, dark red, with greenish tips, juicy, acid; good; late.

Belle (of Moore). 1. Gard. Mon. 19:335. 1877.
Originated by J. B. Moore, Concord, Massachusetts; introduced in 1876. Perfect. Fruit very large, irregular, coxcombed, crimson, medium firm, subacid; poor.

Belle de Bordelaise. 1. Gard. Chron. 808. 1859. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 1007. 1869.
A cross between a Hautbois and White Alpine raised in 1854 by M. Lartey in France. Perfect. At this Station, plants remarkably vigorous, very productive; runners slender, reddish; fruit medium to small, oval or round-conic; fruit-stems very long, very deep red; calyx strongly reflexed; flesh juicy, soft, with a peculiar rich, rather strong flavor, not perceptibly acid.

Belle of La Crosse. 1. Ann. Hort. 201. 1892.
Introduced about 1889 by John A. Salzer, La Crosse, Wisconsin. Perfect. Plants moderately vigorous, productive; fruit large, round-conic, bright dark scarlet; flesh medium dark, firm, acid; good; late midseason.

Belmont. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 93. 1883. 2. Gard. Mon. 28:240. 1886. 3. Ar. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:330. 1890.
Originated about 1880 with Warren Huestis, Belmont, Massachusetts. Popular at one time on heavy soils in Massachusetts. Perfect. As grown at this Station, plants moderately vigorous and numerous, productive; fruit large, often coxcomb, oblong-conic, with thick neck, glossy red, firm, well flavored, subacid; good; late.

Belt. 1. U. S. D. A. Farmers' Bul. 1043:28. 1919. William Belt. 2. Am. Gard. 15:434. 1893-94. 3. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:101, fig. 18. 1916.
The berries of this variety are not firm enough for the market, but are especially valuable for home use because of their large size, handsome color and very good flavor.
The variety has long been a favorite in New England and New York. It should be planted, in fertile soils and receive the best culture, and even so grown there are many irregular berries, and plant and fruit suffer from drouth. The variety originated about 1888 with William Belt, Mechanicsburg, Ohio; introduced in 1896; included in the American Pomological Society's recommended fruit list in 1889.
Perfect. Plants numerous, variable in some localities, vigorous, spreading, susceptible to leaf-spot, an uncertain bearer; leaves of medium size and thickness, variable in color. Flowers early midseason; petals 6-8; receptacle small. Fruit late; fruit-stems long, thick, erect; calyx flat or depressed; sepals broad; berries large, irregular, round-conic to wedge; apex slightly pointed; color glossy, dark deep red; seeds raised; flesh dark red to the center, juicy, firm, sweet, mildly subacid; quality very good to best.

Ben Davis. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 166:70. 1905. 2. Mo. Bd. Hort. Rpt. 288. 1909.
Originated about 1900 with James Sons, Jr., Seligman, Missouri. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit medium in size, round-conic to long-conic, sometimes coxcombed, light crimson, unattractive; flesh light red, firm, mildly subacid; good; midseason.

Benancie. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:66. 1918.
A cross between 'Hubach and Hathaway', and Climax made by Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas, in 1908. Perfect. At this Station, plants few, medium in size and vigor, healthy, unproductive; fruit medium in size, wedge to blunt-conic, glossy dark red, juicy, firm, very sprightly, with dark red flesh; good; midseason.

Benjamin. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 154:31. 1904.
Originated in Minnesota; introduced in 1902. Perfect. Plants numerous, medium in vigor, productive; fruit large, long-conic, slightly necked, light scarlet; flesh pink, firm, dry; good.

Bennett. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 218:196. 1902.
Originated in 1890 by L. W. Bennett, Cincinnati, Ohio. Imperfect. Plants at this Station medium in number, vigorous, productive; fruit averages medium in size, wedge, dark red, juicy, moderately firm, sweet; good; late.

Benoy. 1. Ont. Fr. Exp. Sta. Rpt. 53. 1899. Ran Benoy. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 98:71. 1899.
A cross between Bubach and Jessie, raised by Ran Benoy, Matthews, Indiana. Perfect. Plants medium in number and vigor, productive; fruit large, coxcombed, crimson, not evenly colored; flesh white, firm, rather acid; good; midseason.

Benson. 1. Allen Cat. 15. 1920.
Introduced in 1919 by the W. F. Allen Company, Salisbury, Maryland, who received it from a Mr. Benson in western Maryland. Perfect. Plants few, medium in vigor and. productivity; fruit large, irregular conic, necked, medium red; flesh red, juicy, medium firm, subacid; fair; very early, ripening over a long period.

Berlin. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 72:4. 1889.
Originated in 1892 with A. H. Clark, Cambridge, Maryland, as a seedling of Bubach. Imperfect. Plants numerous; fruit medium to large, round-conic, dark crimson, firm; fair; midseason.

Berlin (of Schild). 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:173. 1915.
A seedling of Haverland, originated by H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan, in 1902. Imperfect. Station plants numerous, vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit densely clustered, above medium in size, long-conic to wedge, glossy light red, colors unevenly, very juicy, tart, with whitish center, soft, inferior in flavor; poor; midseason.

Bertrand. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 364:73. 1923.
On trial at the Ohio Station in 1914. Described as resembling Belt. Perfect. Plants medium in size, vigorous; leaves light green; calyx large, green, persistent; fruit large, regular, round-conic, a few wedge-shape, wrinkled and furrowed, uneven coloring from scarlet to crimson, frequently with white tips; flesh dark red, firm, sweet; excellent; midseason.

Beseck. 1. Rural N. Y. 47:195. 1888.
A chance seedling which originated about 1888 with P. M. Augur et Sons, Middlefield, Connecticut. Imperfect. Plants medium in number, tall, vigorous, productive; fruit large, round-conic, scarlet; flesh light red, moderately firm, sweet; good; midseason.

Bessie. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:53. 1911.
A chance seedling found by D. B. Boomhower, Greenville, New York, in 1899. Thought to be a cross between Haverland and Captain Jack. Perfect. At this Station, plants very numerous and vigorous, large, unhealthy, productive; flowers unusually large; fruit above medium in size but variable, irregular in shape, dull light red, very juicy, soft, mild, sweet, aromatic; good; midseason.

Bessie (of Schnadlebach). 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:338. 1890.
A seedling of Crescent which originated with Julius Schnadlebach, Grand Bay, Alabama; introduced in 1891. Imperfect. Plants numerous, very vigorous; fruit medium in size, conic, bright crimson, medium firm; flesh medium red; good; midseason.

Best. 1. Farmer Cat. 5. 1918.
Introduced in 1918 by L. J. Farmer, Pulaski, New York, who found it in a lot of plants received from the South several years previous. Worthy of trial. Perfect. Plants on the Station grounds, few, vigorous, healthy, unproductive; leaves large, thick, dark green; flowers late, large; fruit large, round-conic to blunt-wedge, glossy medium red; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate; calyx large, flat, leafy; flesh juicy, very firm, sprightly; good; midseason to late.

Bethel. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 176:4, 7. 1899.
Originated with H. W. Shockley, Donnelsville, Ohio; introduced about 1896. Imperfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, unproductive; fruit medium in size, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark, juicy; very good; late midseason.

Bethel (of Thomas). 1. N. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 173. 1912. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:173.
A chance seedling found growing where a field of strawberries had previously been plowed under, by R. F. Thomas, Kent County, Delaware, in 1906. Perfect. At this Station, plants medium in number and vigor, healthy, very productive; fruit above medium in size, irregular in shape, medium to dark red, juicy, firm, tart; fair; midseason.

Better Belt. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 160:207. 1911.
Introduced about 1909. Perfect. Plants small, vigorous; calyx small, persistent; fruit of medium size, round-conic, sometimes irregular, scarlet; flesh red, firm, juicy, mild.

Beverly. 1. Rural N. Y. 50:528. 1891. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:5. 1894.
Raised from seed of Miner in 1887 by B. M. Smith, Beverly, Massachusetts. In 1890 it received a silver medal from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society as the best seedling strawberry. It has been a popular sort in New England. Perfect. Plants at this Station, few, medium productive, with good foliage; fruit of medium size, firm; good; early, season long.

Bickle. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 100:4. Iet93.
Originated in Indiana; introduced about 1886. Imperfect. Plants medium in number and vigor, productive; fruit small, round-conic, light scarlet; flesh light, medium firm; fair; midseason.

BidwelL 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 42. 1879. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:330. 1890.
Originated in 1872 by Benjamin Hathaway, Little Prairie Ronde, Michigan, by crossing a seedling of Old Scarlet with "some modern variety." Introduced in 1877 under the temporary name of Centennial by H. E. Bidwell, South Haven, Michigan. This name was changed to Bidwell in 1880. The variety has been valued for home use for many years. Bidwell was placed in the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1879 and removed in 1899. Perfect. At this Station, plants stocky, vigorous, numerous, productive; fruit of medium size, long-conic, glossy dark red, moderately firm, subacid, not highly flavored; fair; early.

Big Ben. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 189:112. 1901.
On trial at the Michigan Station in 1900. Perfect. Plants medium in number, weak, unproductive; fruit small, round-conic, dark crimson, medium firm; fair; midseason.

Big Bob. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 43. 1883.
Originated by J. W. Nigh, Piqua, Ohio, as a cross between Russell and Wilson. Imperfect. Plants few; fruit medium in size, roundish, crimson; flesh medium red, soft, acid; poor; midseason.

Big Bob Baby. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:12. 1916.
A seedling of Big Bob originated by J. W. Nigh, Piqua, Ohio; introduced in 1885.

Big Bobs. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 62:27. 1909-
Originated by R. M. Shaw, Waterville, Nova Scotia. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous; fruit irregular, roundish or wedge-shaped to long, color variable, pale to deep red; flesh pale red, firm, juicy, subacid; good; late.

Big Early. 1. Ind. Sta. Bul. 200:9. 1917.
A chance seedling discovered in 1910 by E. Overman, Fairmount, Indiana. Imperfect. Plants numerous, tall, very vigorous, productive; leaves large, dark green; calyx of medium size, adherent; fruit medium to large, round-conic, medium red; flesh light red, soft, mildly subacid; fair; early.

Big Late. 1. Kellogg Cat. 64. 1917.
A chance seedling discovered in 1913 by George W. Davis, Brazil, Indiana. Imperfect. Plants at this Station numerous, medium in vigor, healthy, very productive; flowers cup-shaped; fruit variable in size, shape, and color; fruit-stems very long, thick, erect, carrying the fruit above the foliage; flesh juicy, very firm, sprightly; fair to good; late midseason.

Big Rock. 1. N. Y. Sta. BuL 401:173. 1915.
A seedling of Dawn originated in 1905 by H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan. Perfect. At this Station, plants numerous, productive; injured by leaf-spot; leaves very thick; fruit large, furrowed, irregular wedge, often necked, glossy medium red, not very juicy, firm, sweet; fair to good; midseason.

Big Wonder. 1. Kellogg Cat. 13. 1920.
A chance seedling discovered by one of the farm employees of R. M. Kellogg Company, Three Rivers, Michigan, in 1918. Perfect. Plants at this Station numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit above medium to small, conic, necked, dull light red, colors unevenly, medium in juiciness and firmness, white fleshed, subacid; good; midseason.

Billy Sunday. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 165. 1920.
A chance seedling found by D. P. Yost, Lancaster, Ohio, in 1907. Perfect. Plants numerous, unusually vigorous and tall, productive, injured by leaf-spot; leaves very large; petals large, crinkly; fruit large, wedge to round-conic, light red; fruit-stems long, thick, erect; flesh juicy, medium firm, mild; fair; midseason.

Bird. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 122:6. 1895.
A cross between Manchester and MtVernon, originated by W. F. Bird, Ann Arbor, Michigan; introduced about 1892. Imperfect. Plants numerous, vigorous; fruit large, long-conic, bright dark scarlet; flesh light red, firm; very good; early midseason.

Bisel. 1. Am. Card. 15:434. 1894. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 109:234. 1896. Dan Bisel. 3. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 230. 1894.
Originated with D. L. Bisel, Tonti, Illinois, in 1887; a seedling of Wilson. Imperfect. At this Station, plants numerous, productive, with good foliage; fruit-stems long, prostrate; fruit medium to large, round-conic, light red, firm, subacid; fair; midseason.

Bishop Orange. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 526. 1847. Bishop's Seedling. 2. Trans. Lond. Hort. Soc. 6:172. 1826.
Raised in 1819 from seed of Hudson Bay by Thomas Bishop, gardener to Col. Robert Smith, Methven Castle, Perthshire, England. Grown somewhat in this country for its handsome, high quality fruit. Imperfect. Fruit large, regular, conic, attractive light scarlet; flesh firm, highly flavored; late.

Bismarck. 1. Ark. Sta. Bul. 48:128. 1897. 2. Ont. Dept. Agr. Fr. Ont 303. 1914.
A cross between Bubach and Van Deman, raised by J. C. Bauer, Judsonia, Arkansas; introduced about 1895. The fruit is similar to Bubach but smaller in size and lighter in color. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, very productive; fruit large, round-conic, crimson; flesh pink, firm, sweet; very good; late midseason.

Bittner Early. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:216. 1912.
Originated with George Bittner, Milan, Ohio; introduced in 1897. Perfect. Plants few; fruit small, short-conic, dark red, colors unevenly; flesh red to white, firm, juicy, mild; good; early.

Bittner Late. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:217. 1912.
Originated with George Bittner, Milan, Ohio; introduced about 1907. Imperfect. Plants medium in number; fruit large, blunt-conic to wedge-shape, light attractive red; flesh light red, firm, juicy, subacid; good; midseason.

Bixler. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 130:49. 1896.
Originated with C. G. Bixler, Three Rivers, Michigan; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous; fruit large, long-conic, light scarlet; flesh light, firm; good; midseason.

Black Beauty. 1. N.J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 48. 1911. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:173. 1915.
Originated by H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan, in 1905; a cross between Dawn and one of his seedlings, No. 19, the parentage of which was Dawn by Ionia. Imperfect. As grown here, plants of medium size and vigor, productive, healthy; fruit-stems short, thick; fruit medium to large, wedge, necked, glossy dark red, very juicy, firm, tart, highly flavored; very good; early.

Black Defiance. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 108. 1869.
A cross between Green Prolific and Triomphe, originated about 1860 by E. W. Durand, Irvington, New Jersey. This variety was popular in the gardens of amateurs for many years. The American Pomological Society placed Black Defiance in its catalog in 1873, and removed it in 1897. Perfect. Plants few, vigorous, productive in heavy soils; fruit large, roundish conic, regular, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm, juicy, sprightly; very good; early.

Black Giant. 1. N. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 7. 1878.
Raised by E. W. Durand, Irvington, New Jersey; introduced about 1875. Perfect, Plants numerous, vigorous, unproductive in matted rows; fruit large, irregular round-comic, very dark crimson; flesh dark red, medium firm; good.

Black Prince. 1. Trans. Lond. Hort. Soc. 6:203. 1826. 2. Horticulturist 1:167, fig. 47. 1846-47.
Raised from seed in 1820 by John Wilmot, Isleworth, England. About 1841 it was imported to America where it was widely grown for fifteen years when it was displaced by Wilson. It is the parent of a number of American varieties, of which Wilson is supposed to be one. Imperfect. Plants medium in number, hardy, vigorous and productive; fruit large, roundish, regular, very dark glossy crimson; flesh dark crimson, firm, rich, highly flavored; midseason.

Black Prince (of Cuthill). 1. Gard. Chron. 483. 1849. 2. Bunyard Cat. 67. 1923.
Raised and introduced by a Mr. Cuthill, Oamberwell, England, about 1837. Imported into this country about 1848. It is valued in England for preserving. Plants vigorous, productive; fruit of medium size, long-conic, dark crimson; flesh scarlet, acid; good; very early.

Blaine. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:517. 1908.
A chance seedling found in 1902 by J. W. Blaine, Polk City, Iowa. It is thought to be a cross between Beder Wood and Lovett. Semi-perfect to perfect. On the Station grounds, plants numerous, vigorous, injured by mildew, unproductive; fruit-stems long, thick, erect; fruit large to medium, retaining its size, round-conic, glossy light red, very firm, pleasantly acid, well flavored; very good; late.

Bliss. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 209. 1922. 2. AT. Y. Sta. Bul. 497:17. 1923.
After a thorough test at this Station for several years, Bliss was recommended in 1922 to growers who want a late-midseason strawberry for home or market. The berries are large, handsome, bright red, glossy, uniform in size, shape, and color, and of exceedingly good quality. The flesh is well colored to the center and is sweet and rich and yet sprightly. The plants surpass most of the garden associates of this variety in resistance to drouth and are at the same time very vigorous, healthy and productive. Bliss originated at this Station as a cross between Chesapeake and Atkins Continuity, the seed of which was borne in 1911; introduced in 1923 by the New York Fruit Testing Association.
Perfect. Plants medium to numerous, vigorous, healthy, productive; leaves thick, variable in color. Flowers late midseason, large; petals 5-7, large; stamens numerous; receptacle medium in size. Fruit late midseason; fruit-stems long, thick, semi-erect; pedicels long, slender; calyx flat, well colored; sepals short, broad; berries large, plump, blunt-conic to blunt-wedge; apex slightly pointed; color bright red, very glossy; seeds variable in position; flesh well colored to the center, very juicy, firm, mild, sweet or pleasantly sprightly, highly flavored; good to very good in quality.

Blizzard. 1. Ore. Bien. Crop Pest et Hort. Rpt. 58. 1915.
Introduced in 1909 by the originator, C. F. Gardner, Osage, Iowa. Perfect. Plants few, lacking in vigor and productivity; fruit small, roundish conic, dark red; flesh medium red, soft, acid; good; late midseason.

Blonde. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 91:190. 1895.
Originated in 1890 as a supposed seedling of Haverland, with Granville Cowing, Muncie, Indiana. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants numerous, vigorous, moderately productive; fruit medium to large, round-conic, pale red; flesh pale red, acid; poor; late.

Bobolink. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 195:79. 1902.
A chance seedling which originated with Myer et Son, Bridgeville, Delaware, who introduced it about 1900. Perfect. Plants vigorous, unproductive; leaves numerous, large; fruit large, irregular conic, light crimson, soft, pleasing; early.

Bomba. 1. Rural N. Y. 45:461. 1886.
Originated in 1880 with William Parry, Parry, New Jersey, as a seedling of Crimson Cluster. Perfect. Plants at this Station vigorous, few, very productive; fruit large, round-conic, very dark red, dull; flesh dark, distinctly veined, firm, acid; very good; early, season long.

Bonanza. 1. Rural N. Y. 44:463, fig. 288. 1885. Pineapple. 2. N. Y. Sta. Rpt. 305. 1889.
Originated about 1880 with Henry Young, Ada, Ohio. This variety was first sent out as Bonanza, but was later reintroduced as Pineapple, under which name it has been more widely disseminated. Perfect. Plants medium in number; fruit above medium in size, irregular roundish to wedge-shape, with long neck, scarlet; flesh light red, soft, salvy with a banana flavor, acid; good; midseason.

Boquet. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpi. 209. 1922. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 497:18, PL 1923.
The berries of Boquet are large, blunt-conic, and borne in compact clusters at the ends of the fruit-stems. The color is a uniform light red, and the flesh is well colored to the center. The fruits are large, sweet, refreshing and much above the average for their .season. The crop ripens midway between Beacon and Bliss, early and late sorts sent out by this Station. The fruits ship and keep well. The plants are vigorous, productive, healthy, withstand drouths but unfortunately do not develop as many runners as growers like for rapid propagation. This is a cross between Chesapeake and Pan American made at this Station, the seeds being borne in 1911; introduced by the New York State Fruit Testing Association in 1923.
Perfect. Plants variable in number, vigorous, healthy, yielding fair to good crops; leaves large, thick, dark green, rugose, dull. Flowers late midseason, large; petals 6-8; stamens numerous; pistils tinged red; receptacle large. Fruit early midseason; fruit-stems numerous, short, thick, semi-erect, bearing fruit in dense clusters; pedicels short, thick; calyx small, variable in position, well colored; sepals short; berries very large, chunky, blunt-wedge to blunt-conic, the surface smooth or but faintly furrowed; apex very blunt, obtuse; color light red, glossy; seeds numerous, raised; flesh well colored to the center, juicyf very firm, subacid, pleasantly flavored; quality good.

Boston Pine. 1. Mag. Hort. 11:290, fig. 16. 1845. 2. Hovey Fr. Am. 1:27, PI. 1852. Bartlett. 3. Mag. Hort 28:446. 1862.
Raised in 1834 by C. M. Hovey, Boston, Massachusetts, from mixed seed, and was thought to be a cross between Grove End Scarlet and Keens Seedling. It was introduced in 1845. It was much grown around Boston from 1850 to 1865 as a pollinizer of Hovey. The American Pomological Society placed Boston Pine in its catalog in 1852, and removed it in 1879. Perfect. Plants numerous, very vigorous, hardy and productive; leaves large, pale dull green; fruit very large, roundish or slightly conic, regular, bright dark red; flesh pale scarlet, fine grained, firm, very juicy, rich; very good; early.

Boston Prize. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 186:4. 1907.
Originated in North Carolina; introduced about 1900. Imperfect. Plants few, vigorous, moderately productive; fruit of medium size, long-conic, sometimes wedge-shape, light crimson; flesh pink, medium firm, subacid; good; midseason.

Bostonian. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 91:190. 1895.
Originated with B. F. Lincoln, West Hingham, Massachusetts; introduced about 1894. Perfect. At this Station, plants vigorous, numerous, medium productive; fruit-stems good; fruit of medium size, necked, round-conic, dark red, soft; fair; medium early.

Boudinot. 1. Gard. Mon. 9:248. 1867. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 980. 1869.
Raised from seed of Wilson by Dr. H. Boudinot, Alexandria, Ohio, about 1862. Perfect. Plants numerous, productive; fruit large, roundish conic, scarlet; flesh light red, firm, subacid; good; early. Bouncer. 1. Rural N. Y. 55:434, 498. 1896. 2. JV. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:184. 1898.
Originated with a Mr. Ball of Connecticut; introduced without name in 1895 by G. H. et J. H. Hale, South Glastonbury, Connecticut; named Bouncer the following year. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, medium productive; fruit-stems long, erect; fruit large, irregular roundish, dark scarlet; flesh light, firm; fair to good; midseason.

Bountiful. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:517. 1908.
Raised in 1899 by J. E. Kuhns, Cliffwood, New Jersey, as a supposed cross between Glen Mary and Clyde. Perfect. As grown here, plants numerous, vigorous, attacked by leaf-spot, medium to productive; fruit large to medium, retains size well, round-conic, dark red, firm, mildly acid; good; midseason.

Bowman. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 44:142. 1892.
Originated with Mark T. Thompson, Cleveland, Ohio; introduced about 1890. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants stocky; leaves large, dark green; fruit-stems short, stiff; fruit medium to large, obtuse-conic, light red, soft; very good; medium early.

Bradley. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:518. 1908.
Originated at Cobden, Illinois, by J. H. Bradley, about 1896. A seedling of Crescent open to chance pollination by Tennessee and Crystal City. Perfect. Plants at this Station medium in number, vigorous, healthy, very productive; fruit-stems long, slender, semi-erect; fruit large to medium, round-conic to wedge, dull red, medium to firm, acid, inferior in flavor; poor; midseason.

Brandywine. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 76:432. 1894. 2. U. 5. D. A. Pom. Rpt. 27. 1894. 3, Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:14, fig. 1. 1916.
This old sort, at one time much grown in New York, is now being discarded because the plants are very susceptible to leaf diseases. It is still a leading variety about Los Angeles, California, where the berries ripen from early spring to late autumn. In New York fruit and plants suffer much from drouth. Brandywine is a very ornamental strawberry with its dark green foliage, large blossoms and handsome fruits. It is still grown in home gardens in the Hudson River Valley. This variety originated with E. C. Ingram, West Chester, Pennsylvania, in 1889; introduced in 1895. Its .parentage is supposed to be Glendale x Cumberland. In 1899 the American Pomological Society placed the name of this sort in its list of recommended fruits.
Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, susceptible to leaf-spot, productive; leaves large, thick, dark green, dull. Flowers midseason, large; petals 6-et, large, overlapping; stamens numerous; receptacle large. Fruit late; fruit-stems long, erect, carried well above the foliage, thick; pedicels long; calyx very large, often easily detached, flat or slightly raised, leafy, frequently discolored and unattractive, quickly changing from a pleasing green to a sickly greenish brown; sepals long, broad; berries large, usually retain size well, wedge to broadly round-conic, often quite wide at the base; apex obtuse; color dark red at first but quickly becoming dull and less attractive; seeds raised, yellowish; flesh dark salmon-red, juicy, firm, brisk subacid, well colored to the center, which is often hollow; quality good to very good.

Bright Ida. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 165. 1882.
Originated about 1872 by Charles Arnold, Paris, Ontario, as a seedling from a seedling of a cross between Doctor Nicaise and Wilson. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous and very productive; fruit large, round-conic, bright red, moderately firm, juicy, mild; good; midseason.

Brighton Pine. 1. Mag. Hort. 21:320. 1855.
A seedling of Boston Pine raised by John C. Scott, Brighton, Massachusetts; introduced in 1856. Grown near Boston about 1865. The American Pomological Society placed this variety in its catalog in 1862, and removed it in 1871. Perfect. Plants hardy and productive; fruit very similar to Boston Pine but darker in color; early.

Brilliant. 1. Horticulturist 3:70. 1848-49.
Raised about 1845 by William Prince, Flushing, New York, as a seedling of Crimson Cone. Perfect. Plants very vigorous and productive; fruit large, conic, dark crimson; excellent.

British Queen. 1. Gard. Chron. 427, 449. 1841. Myatt's British Queen. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 531. 1845.
This old English variety was raised by a Mr. Myatt, Dextford, England, who introduced it in 1841. Since that time it has been a leading sort in England. It was introduced into this country about 1842 but was never widely grown. The name was placed in the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1862 and removed in 1871. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, rather tender, require high cultivation, productive; fruit very large, roundish conic to wedge-shape, glossy, scarlet; flesh light red, firm, juicy, rich; excellent; early.

Brooklyn Scarlet. 1. Gen. Farmer 24:230, fig. 1863.
Raised from seed of Peabody Seedling in 1859 by A. S. Fuller, Ridgewood, New Jersey. Introduced in 1863 by the New York Tribune and for a time was popular as a home garden variety. Perfect. Plants few, dwarfish, hardy, vigorous and productive; fruit medium to large, regular, conic, slightly necked, bright scarlet; flesh soft, sweet; very good; very-early.

Brownie. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 189:113. 1901.
A cross between Cumberland and Black Defiance originated by LeRoy M. Brown et Son, Clyde, Ohio; introduced in 1899. Perfect. Plants few, vigorous, productive; fruit medium to large, round-conic, bright red; flesh light red, firm; good; midseason.

Brunette. 1. Ann. Hort. 210. 1891. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 91:190. 1895.
Originated in 1886 by Granville Cowing, Muncie, Indiana. It has been valuable in the home garden. Added to the American Pomological Society catalog in 1901, where it remained in the last catalog in 1909. Perfect. At this Station, plants numerous, vigorous, moderately productive, with good fruit-stems; fruit medium in size, round-conic, dark red, firm, sweet; good; midseason.

Bryan. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 195:79. 1902. W. J. Bryan. 2. Am. Gard. 22:618. 1901.
Originated in 1890 by J. M. Green, Salem, Indiana; introduced in 1900. Perfect. Plants few, lacking in vigor and productivity; fruit medium in size, oblate-conic, bright crimson; flesh light red, firm; good; midseason.

Bryant. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 91:190. 1895. Perkins No. 2. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 76:436. 1894.
A chance seedling of Crescent or Sharpless, originating in 1885 with L. J. Bryant, Newark, New York; introduced about 1891 as Eureka, but when it was discovered that another variety bore that name, it was designated Perkins No. 2 and in 1895 renamed Bryant. Perfect. As grown here, plants medium vigorous, numerous, unproductive, with good fruit-stems; fruit of medium size, round-conic, bright red, firm, with dark red flesh; fair; midseason to late.

Bubach. 1. U. 5. D. A. Rpt. 419. 1890. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:15, % 2+ 1916. Western Union. 3. Ohio Hort. Soc. Rpt. 152. 1886-j. Bubach No. 5. 4. Rural N. Y. 47:195, 460. 1888.
A quarter of a century ago Bubach was a standard sort in New York, but was discarded chiefly because the plants are not good plant makers, the berries are soft, irregular in shape, and do not ship well. The plants are very productive on heavy soils. The berries are large, handsome, of very good quality and hold their color well when canned. This variety was originated by J. G. Bubach, Princeton, Illinois, in 1882. It was introduced about 1886 as Bubach No. 5 to distinguish it from several other seedlings originated by Mr. Bubach. In 1889 the variety was added to the fruit list of the American Pomological Society. Bubach, Jr., introduced about 1901 and Improved Bubach introduced in 1911 do not differ materially from this Bubach.
Imperfect. Plants few, vigorous, low-growing and spreading, healthy, productive; leaves large, thick, dark green, glossy. Flowers early midseason, large; petals 5-6, small; receptacle small. Fruit midseason; fruit-stems short, weak, prostrate; pedicels short; calyx large, variable in position, well colored, adherent; sepals broad; berries large to very large, retain good size, uniform, irregular round-conic to wedge, the larger berries furrowed; apex blunt; color glossy, medium to light red, attractive; seeds large, even with the surface; flesh pale red at the center, juicy, rather soft, mildly subacid; quality fair to good.

Buist Prize. 1. Cultivator 3:349. 1846.
Originated in 1842 by Robert Buist, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; introduced in 1846. Popular near Philadelphia about 1850. Perfect. Fruit large, round-conic, scarlet, soft; good; midseason.

Bull Moose. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:173. 1915.
A cross between Sample and Glen Mary raised by T. C. Kevitt, Athenia, New Jersey, in 1901. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants large, vigorous, healthy, moderately productive; fruit-stems long, thick, semi-erect; fruit large to medium, blunt-conic, dull light red, juicy, very firm, sweet; good; midseason.

Bun Special. 1. Baldwin Cat. 12. 1920.
A chance seedling which originated about 1910 with E. M. Buechly, Greenville, Ohio. Perfect. The fruit is of good size, attractive in appearance and of fine flavor but rather soft for shipping. Plants at this Station medium to numerous, vigorous, productive; leaves large, dark green; flowers midseason; fruit-stems thick, prostrate; calyx raised; seeds sunken; fruit large, plump, conic to wedge, glossy medium to dark red, juicy, variable in firmness, subacid or sprightly, highly flavored; good; early.

Burnett. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 163:66. 1898.
Originated with Mark T. Thompson, Rio Vista, Virginia; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Plants medium in vigor and productivity; fruit large, round-conic, bright crimson; flesh dark red, firm; very good; midseason.

Burr.
Burr's Seedling. 1. Cultivator 4:264. 1847. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 673. 1857.
Raised by John Burr, Columbus, Ohio; introduced about 1836. Perfect. Plants vigorous, hardy and productive; fruit large, roundish conic, light scarlet; flesh tender, juicy, mild, pleasant; very good.

Burr New Pine. 1. Cultivator 4:264. 1847.
A cross between Hovey and Burr raised in 1845 by John Burr, Columbus, Ohio. Its good quality made it a popular sort with amateurs, but it required high cultivation and good care. The American Pomological Society placed this variety in its list of fruits promising well in 1852, in its catalog in 1860 from which it was removed in 1871, replaced in 1877 and removed again at the next session in 1879. Imperfect. Plants medium in number and vigor, tender to extremes of heat and cold, productive; fruit of medium size, roundish conic, light crimson; flesh whitish pink, soft, very juicy, sweet, rich, aromatic; best; very early.

Bush Cluster. 1. Rural N. Y. 60:493. 1901. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 146:30. 1903.
Raised by J. A. Bauer, Judsonia, Arkansas, as a cross between Crescent and Charles Downing; introduced in 1899. A perfect-flowered sort has been grown under this name. Imperfect. Plants numerous, productive; fruit of the type of Crescent, medium to small, irregular round-conic, dark red; flesh light red, medium firm; good; midseason.

Bushel Basket. 1. N. Y. St. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 163. 1919. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 165. 1920.
A chance seedling discovered in an old strawberry bed in 1912 by E. C. Ercanbrach, Auburn, New York. It was first called Auburn, then Ercanbrach, under which name it received the Barry Medal of the New York State Horticultural Society. Later it was changed to Bushel Basket and introduced about 1920 by A. B. Katkamier, Macedon, New York. Perfect. At this Station, plants medium in number, vigorous, healthy, productive; leaves large, light green; flowers midseason, large; fruit-stems erect; calyx large, raised, leafy, discolored; fruit large, oval, necked, dull light red, colors unevenly, medium juicy, very firm, sprightly, with inferior flavor; poor; late.

Buster. I. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 27:20. 1897. 2. AT. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:174. 191s.
A cross between Bubach and Sharpless made by C. C. Stone, Moline, Illinois; first sent out in 1895. Imperfect. As grown here, plants very numerous, vigorous, healthy, very productive; fruit-stems thick, semi-erect; calyx much depressed; fruit large, furrowed, roundish, dull light red, colors unevenly, juicy, with a white center, bruises easily, subacid, lacks flavor; fair; midseason.

Buster Brown. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:218. 1912.
Originated with J. W. Alt, Lancaster, Ohio, who introduced it in 1908. Perfect. Plants few, productive; foliage subject to leaf-spot; fruit medium to large, uniform, short wedge-shape, furrowed, red; flesh light, firm, subacid; excellent; midseason.


California. 1. Peninsula Hort. Soc. Rpt. 19. 1891. 2. U. S. D. A. Pom. Rpt. 265. 1892. Originated in Caroline County, Maryland; brought to notice about 1889. Perfect. Plants few, lacking vigor and productivity; fruit large, long-conic, sometimes coxcombed, dark glossy crimson; flesh bright crimson, firm, juicy, subacid; good; midseason.

California (of New Jersey). 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 290. 1921.
A cross between Glen Mary and Chesapeake, raised by T. C. Kevitt, Athenia, New Jersey; introduced in 1921 by William M. Hunt et Company, New York City. Semi-perfect. On the Station grounds, plants very few, medium in vigor, unproductive; fruit-stems short, thick, semi-erect; fruit large to medium, blunt-wedge to conic, glossy medium red, juicy, firm, sprightly; good; midseason.

Cameron.

Cameron Early. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 206:51. 1903.
Originated with J. W. Cameron, East Rochester, Ohio; introduced in 1902. Perfect. Plants of medium number, very vigorous, unproductive; foliage very coarse, subject to rust; fruit medium in size, round-conic, regular, bright crimson; flesh light red, firm, acid; fair; early.

Cameronian. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. iii:No. 7, 212. 1890. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:5. 1894. Originated with J. W. Cameron, East Rochester, Ohio; introduced in 1890. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants medium vigorous, few, moderately productive, with short fruit-stems; fruit medium to large, dark red, irregular in shape, firm; good; midseason.

Campbell. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:66. 1918. Campbell's Early. 2. N. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 28. 1916.
This variety originated with James Campbell, Newport, New Jersey, in 1910; introduced in 1916 by W. B. Kille, Swedesboro, New Jersey. Perfect. Plants medium or above in number, vigor, and height, healthy, productive; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate; pedicels long; berries of good size at the first pick under favorable conditions, otherwise smallish, dropping rapidly in size, wedge to conic, the smaller berries slightly necked, variable in color and glossiness, soon becoming dull and unattractive; flesh variable in color, pale red or whitish at the center, juicy, firm, subacid or pleasantly sprightly; good only when well ripened; very early.

Canfield. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:218. 1912.
Originated with T. B. Carlisle, Lisbon, Ohio; introduced about 1912. Imperfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, and productive; fruit of Haverland type, medium in size, conic, glossy red; flesh red, soft, juicy, mild; good; midseason.

Captain Jack. 1. Gard. Mon. 19:304. 1877. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:185. 1898. Bnrt. 3. Am. Gard. 10:260. 1889.
A chance seedling found by Samuel Miller, Bluffton, Missouri, on his farm about 1870. It soon became a standard sort, especially in the Rocky Mountain states. The plants are hardy, drouth resistant and produce an abundance of pollen, making them popular as pollinizers. Burt, which was introduced in 1890, said to have been found in a bed of Wilson and Colonel Cheney on the farm of a Miss Burt, Scriba, New York, proved identical with Captain Jack. The American Pomological Society added Captain Jack to its catalog in 1879, removed it in 1897, replaced it in 1901, where it remained in the last catalog in 1909. Perfect. Plants numerous, erect, vigorous, hardy, productive; fruit-stems prostrate; fruit of medium size, regular, round-conic, bright scarlet; flesh light red, very firm, acid; good; early midseason.

Cardinal. 1. Rural N. Y. 47:195, fig. 66, 460. 1888. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:331. 1890.
Raised from seed of Prince in 1884 by P. M. Augur et Son, Middlefield, Connecticut. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants weak, few, healthy, unproductive; fruit-stems erect; fruit medium in size, irregular in shape, bright red, soft, subacid; fair; midseason to late.

Cardinal (of Streator). 1. U. S. D. A. Yearbook 277, PI. 38. 1903.
Discovered among a lot of chance seedlings in his garden by George J. Streator, Ganettsville, Ohio, in 1896. Promising as grown here. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit-stems long, stout; calyx leafy; fruit above medium to large, retains size well, round-conic, sometimes wedge, dark red, firm, juicy, mildly acid; good; midseason. [Neither of these strawberries named 'Cardinal' fit the description of the 'Cardinal' strawberry that we grew in Georgia. It was a perfect-flowered, large-fruited, very sweet and productive berry that must have been developed after Hedrick's book was published. -ASC]

Carleton. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 62:28. 1909.
Originated in 1888 by William Saunders, at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada. Imperfect. Plants numerous, very vigorous; foliage subject to rust; fruit of medium size, round-conic or wedge-conic, pale red; flesh bright red, medium firm, juicy, subacid; good; late midseason.

Carmi. Carmi Beauty. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 195:79. 1902.
A chance seedling which originated in 1890. Imperfect. Plants few, vigorous, hardy and productive; fruit large, round-conic, light red, medium firm; good; early midseason.

CarmichaeL 1. Ohio Sta. Rpt. 247. 1887. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:331. 1890.
Originated with E. W. Reid, Bridgeport, Ohio; introduced about 1888. Has not proved of any value here. Imperfect. Plants at this Station weak, numerous, healthy, with dark green foliage; fruit medium in size, conic, light red, medium firm; fair; late.

Caroline. 1. Mass. Hart. Soc. Rpt. 147, 156. 1874.
Originated with J. B. Moore, Concord, Massachusetts; introduced about 1874. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous; fruit large, roundish, irregular, glossy crimson; flesh scarlet, rich, sprightly; midseason.

Carrie. 1. Rural N. Y. 55:598. 1896. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:185. 1898.
A seedling of Haverland, which originated with Mark T. Thompson, Rio Vista, Virginia; introduced about 1894. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1889, where it remained in the last catalog in 1909. Imperfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, and medium productive; fruit large, long-conic, bright scarlet; flesh light, medium firm, acid; good; late midseason.

Carrie Dumas. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 166:71. 1905.
Imperfect. Plants medium in number and vigor; fruit small, conic, bright red; flesh light red, soft; fair; early midseason.

Carrie Silvers. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 218:196. 1902.
Originated in 1893 by J. H. Black, Son et Company, Hightstown, New Jersey, by crossing a seedling of Sharpless and Warfield with Parker Earle. This variety made an excellent showing at this Station. Imperfect. Plants medium to large, vigorous, healthy, productive; leaves often very large, dark green; flowers midseason; fruit-stems short, prostrate; calyx raised; seeds raised; fruit large, drops rapidly in size, elongated to round-conic, necked, glossy dark red, firm, with dark flesh, pleasantly acid, well flavored; good to very good; midseason.

Cassandra. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 298. 1913.
Raised from open pollinated seed of Bubach at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada, in 1906. Semi-perfect. On the Station grounds, plants few, vigorous, very productive; fruit large, wedge to long-conic, light red, juicy, firm, pleasantly sprightly; good; season variable.

Catherine. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 178:48. 1906.
Originated with J. F. Cannon, Sussex County, Delaware; introduced about 1903. Imperfect. Plants medium in number and vigor, productive; fruit medium to small, short-conic, bright red; flesh red, medium firm, subacid; fair; early.

Centennial Favorite. 1. N. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 7. 1878.
Raised by E. W. Durand, Irvington, New Jersey; introduced in 1876. Perfect. Plants numerous; fruit large, irregular round-conic, light crimson; flesh medium red, medium firm, sweet; very good; late.

Cetywayo. 1. W. N. Y. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 120. 1880.
Raised by A. J. Caywood et Son, Marlboro, New York; introduced about 1880. Imperfect. Plants medium in vigor, subject to sun injury, productive; fruit large, irregular, roundish, frequently coxcombed, dark crimson; flesh firm, very juicy, acid.

Chairs Favorite. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:5. 1894. Chairs Early. 2. Rural N. Y. 55-514- 1896. Originated with Franklin Chairs, Anne Arundel County, Maryland. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants vigorous, healthy, numerous, unproductive, with good fruit-stems; fruit medium to large, round-conic, light red, soft; good; midseason.

Challenge. 1. Am. Gard. 20:510. 1899. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 276:58. 1906.
Originated about 1884 with. J. R. Peck, Breckenridge, Missouri; of little value at this Station. Perfect. Plants few, medium vigorous, unproductive, injured by leaf-spot; fruit-stems short, stout; fruit variable in size and shape, unattractive dull red, medium firm, juicy, inferior in flavor; poor; midseason.

Champion. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 982. 1869.
Originated with J. C. Neff, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, about 1860; included in the American Pomological Society's fruit catalog from 1879 to 1909. Once a popular commercial sort in the East, it is now largely displaced by Windsor, one of its seedlings closely resembling it. Berries large, round-conic, light crimson, firm; good; midseason.

Champion (of Lubke). 1. Weston Cat. 12. 1922.
Originated as a chance seedling about 1915 by Edward L. Lubke, New Buffalo, Michigan. Perfect. At this Station, plants medium to few, vigorous, productive; autumn-fruiting; flowers small, early; fruit of medium size, uniform, blunt-conic to wedge, necked, glossy medium red; seeds raised; flesh medium juicy, firm, subacid; fair; very early; resembles Progressive.

Champion Klondike. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:18. 1916.
In 1912, Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas, originated this sort as a cross between Sherman and Klondike-, Perfect. As grown here, plants very numerous, vigorous, very productive, attacked by mildew; leaves dark green; flowers midseason; fruit above medium in size, regular, round-conic, glossy light red; seeds sunken; flesh very juicy, very firm, decidedly sprightly; good; early to midseason.

Charles L 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:67. 1918.
A chance seedling found in the woods by George Hann, Bridgman, Michigan, about 1905. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants numerous, medium in vigor, severely injured by leaf-spot, productive; fruit-stems very short, thick, much prostrate; fruit large, retains size well, very blunt-conic, characteristically light red, dull, juicy, soft, with white flesh; mild; poor; medium early.

Charles Downing. 1. Mag. Hort. 33:299. 1867. 2- N- Y. Sta. Bul. 24:331. 1890. Downing. 3. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 28. 1897.
Raised from seed of Downer Prolific in 1860 by J. S. Downer, Fairview, Kentucky. This variety was a leading sort between 1870 and 1890. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1869, where it remained in the last catalog in 1909. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants very vigorous, medium in number, attacked by leaf-spot, variable in yield; fruit-stems long, slender; fruit medium to large, conic, bright red; flesh light red, firm, mildly subacid; good; season from early to late.

Charles Newman. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 160:208. 1911.
A cross between Aroma and Excelsior raised by Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas; introduced about 1909. Perfect. Plants numerous, small, vigorous; fruit-stems erect; fruit medium in size, roundish, blunt, irregular, dark crimson; flesh red, firm, mildly subacid; fair; early.

Charlie. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 91:191. 1895.
Raised from mixed seed by Mark T. Thompson, Rio Vista, Virginia; introduced in 1894. Imperfect. Plants at this Station vigorous, numerous, medium productive, with long fruit-stems; fruit of medium size, attractive red, round-conic, firm; fair; midseason.

Chaska. 1. Minn. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 226. 1921.
A cross between a seedling of Dunlap and Pocomoke, and Brandywine, raised in 1911 at the Minnesota Fruit Breeding Farm, Excelsior, Minnesota. Perfect. At this Station, plants numerous, vigorous, productive, injured by leaf-spot; leaves large; flowers midseason, small; fruit-stems very long, thick, erect; calyx large, leafy, raised; seeds sunken.; fruit large to medium, blunt-conic to wedge, glossy medium red, juicy, firm, pleasantly sprightly; good to very good; midseason.

Chellie. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 134:34. 1904.
Originated in 1896 with Nathan Barton, Camden, New Jersey. Perfect. Plants few, medium in vigor and productivity; fruit very large, very regular, conic, bright attractive crimson; flesh pink, moderately firm; excellent; midseason.

Chenango. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 176:7. 1899.
Originated with C. W. Graham, Afton, New York; introduced about 1897. Perfect. Plants weak; fruit of medium size, round-conic, light scarlet; flesh light red, juicy, acid; midseason.

Cherokee. 1. Ann. Hort. 134. 1893.
Introduced in 1893 by Julius Schnadelbach, Grand Bay, Alabama. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous and healthy; fruit medium in size, round-conic, many imperfect, dark crimson, firm; good; midseason.

Chesapeake. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 186:5, % 6. 1907. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 364:194. 1913.
This variety has rapidly attained high favor in the states along the Atlantic seaboard. Its most distinctive characters are vigor and healthiness of plant, and beauty and high quality of fruit. The surface of the berries is seldom broken by furrows or irregularities, and the fruits are unusually plump and glossy. The dark red flesh is aromatic and mildly acid. The plants do not multiply as rapidly as those of most varieties and should be set somewhat thickly. The variety is desirable also because there is little danger of frost since the plants bloom late, a valuable consideration in many localities. This variety was originated by J. W. Parks, Nanticoke, Maryland, about 1904; introduced two years later by W. F. Allen, Salisbury, Maryland. In 1909 the American Pomological Society added the variety to its list of recommended fruits.
Perfect. Plants few, vigorous, tall, usually healthy, productive; leaves above medium in size, wide, thick, dark green, glossy, rugose. Flowers late, large; petals 5-7; stamens medium in number; receptacle large. Fruit midseason or later; fruit-stems thick, semi-erect; pedicels long; calyx large, leafy, slightly depressed; sepals broad; berries large, dropping in size as the season advances, round-conic to wedge, the surface usually plump and unbroken; apex conical, seedy in the smaller berries; color beautiful glossy scarlet; seeds conspicuous, often markedly raised; flesh variable in color, very firm, juicy, mildly acid, pleasantly flavored; very good in quality. *

Chesapeake Wonder. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 165. 1920. Pride of New York. 2. Ibid. 169. 1920.
Introduced a few years ago by the Moore Seed Company, Philadelphia. Plants vigorous; berries very large, heart-shaped, with pointed tip, bright lively crimson; seeds prominent.

Chester. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:67. 1918.
A chance seedling of unknown parentage found in a yard in Chester, Pennsylvania, in 1912. Plants were sold locally in 1915. Perfect. As grown here, plants intermediate in number and vigor, healthy, very productive; fruit-stems thick, erect; fruit large, irregularly roundish to almost oblate, much furrowed, medium to dark red, unattractive, with dark red flesh, medium juicy, very firm, fig-like in type, sweet; good; midseason.

Cheyenne. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:5. 1894.
Originated with James Stayman, Leavenworth, Kansas; introduced about 1892. Imperfect. On the Station grounds, plants few, unproductive, with good foliage and short fruit-stems; fruit medium to large, variable in shape, with a prominent neck, attractive red, firm; very good; late.

Childs. 1. Childs Cat. 142. 1893.
Introduced in 1892 by John Lewis Childs, Floral Park, New York. Perfect. The stock as sent out was mixed, some of the plants being Iowa Beauty and others Gandy. The true Childs is dark crimson, sweet; good; early.

Chipman. 1. AT".Y. Sta. Bul. 309:520. 1908.
A chance seedling found in a plantation of Bubach and Tennessee about 1901 by a Mr. Chipman at Lincoln, Delaware. A leading sort in the southern part of the Chesapeake Peninsula. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants very numerous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems long, thick, prostrate; fruit large to medium, wedge to round-conic, sometimes elongated, surface irregular, attractive light and dark red, becoming dull, medium in firmness and juiciness, mildly acid; fair to good; early.

Chippewa. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:219. 1912.
A seedling of Haverland, which originated with E. M. Buechly, Greenville, Ohio; introduced about 1909. Imperfect. Plants medium in vigor; fruit of medium size, conic to wedge-shape, bright crimson; flesh scarlet, medium firm; fair; early midseason.

Chippewa (of Sibert). 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 165. 1920.
A cross between Black Beauty and Pan American raised by A. B. Sibert, Rochester, Indiana; introduced by H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan in 1911. Imperfect. Fruit large, dark red; fine quality. Chorlton. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 982. 1869.

Chorlton Prolific. 2. Horticulturist 14:466, fig. 1859.
Originated in 1852 by William Chorlton, New Brighton, New York, as a cross between Iowa and Burr New Pine. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous and productive; fruit large, roundish, necked, scarlet; flesh light scarlet, soft, acid; very good; early.

Cinderella. 1. Cult et Count Gent 44:470. 1879.
Sent out in 1876 by Oscar Felton, Mechanicsburg, New Jersey. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous and productive; fruit large, conic, often necked, bright scarlet; flesh light red, medium firm; very good; early.

Clara. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:174. 1915.
A cross between Sample and Belt, raised in 1903 by J. E. Kuhns, Cliffwood, New Jersey. Worthy of trial as grown at this Station. Perfect. Plants numerous, healthy, medium productive; fruit-stems thick, prostrate; fruit large, furrowed, wedge to irregular conic, glossy dark red, juicy, firm, sprightly; good to very good; midseason.

Clarence. 1. N.Y. Sta. Bul. 127:331. 1897.Thompson No. 101. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 109:237. 1896.
Originated with Mark T. Thompson, Rio Vista, Virginia; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Plants numerous, productive; fruit medium in size, round-conic, scarlet; flesh firm; good; late.

Clarence (of Black). 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:19. 19l6-
Originated with J. H. Black, Son et Company, Hightstown, New Jersey; introduced about 1899. Perfect. Fruit large, bright crimson, firm, acid; midseason.

Clark. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:20. 1916. Clark's Early. 2. Card. et For. 6:335. 1893. 3. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:6. 1894. Early Idaho. 4. Ore. Sta. Bul. 29:65. 1894. Hood River. 5. Mich. Sta. Bul. 195:77. 1902. Clark's Seedling. 6. Ohio Sta. Bul. 364:75. 1923.
This sort originated with Fred E. Clark, Portland, Oregon, about 1875; introduced in 1880. It is supposed to be a seedling of Wilson. In 1899 the variety was added to the American Pomological Society catalog under the name Hood River by which it is often known on the Pacific Coast. In Oregon it has long been a favorite for the market because of its firm attractive fruits. Perfect. Plants above medium in size, vigorous, healthy, erect, medium to numerous, lack somewhat in yield; fruit-stems variable in length, stout, upright, holding up the fruit well; fruit globose or globose-conic, regular, dark rich red; flesh very firm, dark red throughout, briskly subacid; quality averages medium although variable; midseason.

Class A. 1. Ind. Sta. Bul. 200:10. 1917.
Sent out by C. Nation, Gilead, Indiana. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, medium productive; fruit medium in size, conic, regular, dark red, with some green tips; flesh dark red, medium firm, subacid; fair; early midseason.

Class B. 1. Ind. Sta. Bul. 200:10. 1917.
Sent out by C. Nation, Gilead, Indiana. Imperfect. Plants medium in number, vigor and productivity; fruit large, irregular, conic, wedge to coxcomb, medium red; flesh pink, firm; fair; late midseason.

Cleveland. 1. Elliott Fr. Book 457. 1858.
Raised from seed in 1849 by Mrs. D. H. Lamb, Cleveland, Ohio; fruit large, varying from coxcomb to conic, irregular, dark crimson; flesh firm, with pineapple flavor, rich; very good.

Clifton. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:53. 1911.
A chance seedling found in a trial bed of several varieties by J. K. Losee, Elnora, New York, in 1905. Perfect. At this Station, plants of medium number and size, low-growing, healthy, very productive; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate; fruit variable in size, conic or wedge, dull medium red, juicy, firm, with a hard center, aromatic, tart; good; midseason.

Clima1. 1. Rural N. Y. 61:431. 1902. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 276:69. 1906.
A cross between Bubach and Hoffman, originated with and introduced by H. W. Graham, Wetipquin, Maryland. Once popular in Maryland and New Jersey. Added to the last catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1909. Perfect. Station plants medium in number and yield, vigorous; fruit above medium to large, drops in size, round-conic to blunt-wedge, dull dark red, firm, juicy, mildly acid; good; medium early.

Clingto. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 80:6. 1892.
Originated with T. et S. B. McMillan, Columbiana County, Ohio; introduced in 1889. Perfect. Plants numerous, lacking in vigor and productivity; fruit medium in size, round-conic, light crimson; flesh light red, medium firm; good; late midseason.

Clinton. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 982. 1869.
Raised by Elias Camfield, Newark, New Jersey; introduced about 1867. Perfect. Plants vigorous and productive; fruit large, roundish, crimson; flesh firm, juicy, rich, sprightly subacid; early.

Clinton (of Iowa). 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 81:6. 1892.
Originated in Iowa. Perfect. Plants vigorous, unproductive; fruit medium in size, round-conic, dark scarlet, medium firm; good; midseason.

Cloud. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:331. 1890.
A cross between Crescent and Wilson raised in 1886 by R. L. Cloud, Independence, Louisiana, which was much grown in the Gulf States between 1890 and 1900. Cloud was added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1899, and remained in the last catalog in 1909. Imperfect. As grown here, plants very numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit large, round-conic, dark red, very firm, brisk and sprightly; fair; midseason.

Clyde. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:6. 1894.
A seedling of Cyclone raised by James Stayman, Leavenworth, Kansas, who introduced it in 1890. At one time Clyde was widely grown for home use and local markets; it is now superseded by better sorts. The plants are very productive, and a strong moist soil is needed to carry out all the crop. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1899, and remained in the last catalog in 1909. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, very productive; foliage rusts badly in some places; fruit medium to large, regular, round-conic, light scarlet; flesh light, medium firm, subacid; good; early midseason.

Cobden King. 1. Am. Card. 17:627. 1896.
A seedling of Warfield which originated with John McCaffrey, Cobden, Illinois; introduced about 1895. Perfect. Plants numerous and vigorous; fruit above medium in size, round-conic, light crimson, medium firm; good; early midseason. 27

Cobden Queen. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 163:66. 1898.
A seedling of Wilson which originated with John McCaffrey, Cobden, Illinois; introduced about 1895. Imperfect. Plants numerous, vigorous and productive; fruit large, round-conic, regular, light scarlet; flesh medium red, firm, mildly subacid; good; midseason.

Cohansey. 1. Rural N. Y. 47:195. 1888. Cohanzick. 2. Wis. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 243. 1887.
Originated with George M. Cole, Deerfleld, New Jersey, as a seedling of Triomphe; introduced in 1886. Worthless at this Station. Perfect. Plants small, low growing, lacking in vigor, unproductive, few; fruit medium or below, roundish, dark red; poor; mid-season to late.

Colfax. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 982. 1869. 2. Gard. Mon. 11:90, fig. 1869.
Raised from seed by Schuyler Colfax, South Bend, Indiana, about 1855. Grown somewhat for home use and canning about 1870. Imperfect. Plants very numerous, very vigorous, tall,, very productive; fruit small, round, dark crimson; flesh soft, subacid; poor; late midseason.

Collingwood. 1. Am. Gard. 21:533. 1900.
Introduced about 1900. Said to be a cross between Clyde and Parker Earle. Perfect. Plants numerous, weak, unproductive; fruit medium in size, irregular, round-conic, bright crimson; flesh firm; very good; late midseason.

Collingwood (of Lovett). 1. N. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 34. 1913.
Originated with R. P. Lovett, Fallsington, Pennsylvania; thought to be a cross between President and Nich Ohmer. Imperfect. Plants numerous; fruit large, roundish, light crimson; flesh light red, medium firm; good; midseason.

Collins. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:67. 1918.
Raised in 1910 from seed of Beder Wood supposed to have been crossed with Pocomoke, by C. H. Collins, Bridgman, Michigan. Perfect. Plants at this Station, numerous, vigorous, very productive; fruit-stems very long, slender, prostrate; fruit large, retains size well, wedge, strongly necked, glossy medium to light red, firm, juicy, almost tart, with an unpleasant flavor; fair; midseason.

Colonel Cheney. 1. Am. Hort. Ann. 97. 1871.
Originated by Colonel J. B. Cheney, Wyoming County, New York, as a cross between Russell and Triomphe; introduced in 1870 by A. M. Purdy, Palmyra, New York. Grown considerably in western New York between 1875 and 1880. The American Pomological Society placed this variety in its catalog in 1875 and removed it in 1897. Imperfect. Plants numerous; fruit large, long-conic, bright scarlet; flesh light red, medium firm, acid; good; late.

Colonel Ellsworth. 1. Gen. Farmer 24:228. 1863. 2. Fuller Sm. Fr. Cult. 90. 1867.
Originated by A.*S. Fuller, Brooklyn, New York; introduced in 1863 by the New York Tribune. Placed in the American Pomological Society's catalog in 1875; removed at the next session in 1877. Perfect. Plants numerous, medium in vigor, very productive; fruit very large, irregular conic, with a long neck, dark scarlet; flesh firm, dry, sweet; good; early.

Colossus. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:520. 1908.
Introduced about 1908 by George R. Schauber, Ballston Lake, New York, who secured his plants from William Palmer, Grooms, New York. Imperfect. At this Station, plants medium in vigor and number, healthy, productive; fruit large to medium, retains size well, wedge to round-conic, attractive medium red, firm, mildly acid, not highly flavored; fair; early; does not pick easily.

Columbia. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 76:433. 1894.
Originated by Richard Bagg, Bridgeton, New Jersey. Plants lack productiveness; runners abundant; berries medium in size, pale crimson, soft; inferior.

Columbia (of Wild). 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:520. 1908. 2. Ibid. 401:174. 1915.
This variety was originated in 1900 by Henry W. Wild, Sarcoxie, Missouri; introduced by J. B. Wild et Brothers of Sarcoxie in 1906. The variety does not stand up well in drouths. The plants are sometimes variegated and stunted. Imperfect. Plants very numerous, vigorous, healthy, medium to tall, very productive; leaves unusually large, thick, dark green; flowers late, small; receptacle large; pistils often quite red; fruit-stems long, thick, erect; berries large, soon becoming small, wedge to round-conic, glossy light red; seeds much raised; flesh well colored, firm, agreeably flavored, pleasantly acid; good to very good; late.

Columbian. 1. U. S. D. A. Pom. Rpt. 265. 1892. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 109:234. 1896. A chance seedling discovered on the farm of Allen Robertson, Fruitland, Tennessee; introduced in 1892. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous; fruit small, roundish, light scarlet; flesh light red, firm; fair; early.

Columbus. 1. Horticulturist 2:99. 1847-48.
Raised by John Burr, Columbus, Ohio, as a cross between Hovey and Burr; introduced in 1847. Imperfect. Plants numerous, very productive; fruit large, roundish, dark crimson; flesh soft, sweet; good.

Comet. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:22. 1916.
Originated with a Mr. Speakman, Carthage, Missouri; introduced about 1890. Plants numerous; fruit small, dark crimson; flesh medium firm; poor.

Commander. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:521. 1908. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:22. 1916. Originated with Thomas Laxton, Bedford, England; introduced into this country about 1890. Of little value at this Station. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, injured by leaf-spot, productive; fruit-stems prostrate; fruit very large to medium, quite variable in shape, with irregularly furrowed surface, light to dark red, colors unevenly, very mild, not juicy, inferior in flavor; poor; midseason.

Commission. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:174. 1915.
Originated by H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan, in 1905 by crossing Dawn with one of his seedlings, No. 19, parentage of which was Dawn x Ionia. Perfect. As grown here, plants numerous, vigorous, productive, injured by leaf-spot; fruit-stems thick; fruit medium in size, irregular blunt-wedge, strongly necked, dull light red, very juicy, with whitish flesh, sweet, not highly flavored; fair; midseason.

Commonwealth. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 276:69. 1906.
Originated in 1900 by W. H. Monroe, Beverly, Massachusetts. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1909. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants few, medium vigorous, unproductive; fruit-stems short, thick; fruit variable in size and shape, dark glossy red, firm, juicy, not highly flavored; poor; late.

Compton. 1. Am. Gard. 22:473, fig. 101. 1901.
Originated by J. L. Allan, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; introduced about 1900. Perfect. Plants very vigorous, very productive; fruit medium in size, long-oval, dark crimson; very good; early midseason.

Connecticut Queen. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 269. 1885.
Introduced about 1884. Perfect. Plants numerous, very vigorous, unproductive; fruit of medium size, dull greenish red, firm; good; late midseason.

Consensus. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 85:8. 1897.
Originated with Henry Young, Ada, Ohio; introduced about 1892. Perfect. Plants vigorous, medium productive; fruit variable in size, from medium to large, irregular round-conic, dark scarlet, with green tips; flesh red, firm; good; late.

Consort. 1 N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:175. 1915.
A cross between Jessie and Warfield, originated by W. S. Butler, Merlin, Oregon, about 1900. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants numerous, vigorous, productive, healthy; fruit-stems thick, prostrate; fruit large, furrowed, wedge, necked, dull very dark red, firm, sweet, with very dark red flesh; good; midseason.

Continental. 1. Cult. et Count. Gent. 44:470. 1870.
Originated in 1873 by Oscar Felton, Mechanicsburg, New Jersey. Perfect. Plants medium in number; fruit large, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh medium red, firm; very good; late.

Cooney. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 165. 1920.
Originated in 1907 with John Semple, Oconomowoc, Wisconsin. Plants vigorous, healthy; fruit large, dark red; flesh red, firm; good; season a week later than Gandy.

Cooper. 1. Ill. Hort. Soc. Rpt 224. 1910. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:22. 1916.
Originated in 1903 by Samuel Cooper, Delevan, New York, as a seedling of Pan American, Although a seedling of a fall-bearing sort, this variety fruits only in the spring. Berries below medium in size, obtuse-conic, necked, dark crimson, firm, mildly sub-acid; good; midseason.

Cooper (of Michigan). 1. Weston Cat. 8, fig. 1922.
Originated in 1915 by B. F. Cooper, Cassopolis, Michigan. Perfect. At this Station, plants medium to few, vigorous, productive, healthy; leaves thick, large, dark green; flowers midseason, large, with crinkly petals; fruit-stems long, thick; pedicels very long, thick; calyx raised, poorly colored; fruit large, furrowed, irregular wedge to long-conic, green tipped, distinctly necked, variable in color, juicy, very firm, with whitish flesh, sweet; good; early.

Copernicus. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 85:7. 1897.
Originated with Henry Young, Ada, Ohio; introduced about 1895. Imperfect. Plants very vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit medium to large, irregular conic, dark scarlet, with green tips; flesh firm, acid; fair; late midseason.

Cordelia. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 298. 1913.
A seedling of Bubach raised in 1906 at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada. Plants medium in number; fruit large, roundish to wedge-shape, crimson; flesh medium red, medium firm, briskly subacid; good; late midseason.

Corinne. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:175. 1915.
Raised in 1900 by W. S. Butler, Merlin, Oregon, as a seedling of Jessie. Imperfect. Station plants very numerous, very vigorous, productive, healthy; flowers early, very small, hidden by the foliage; fruit-stems thick, prostrate; fruit of medium size, round-conic, broad at the base, glossy, medium to dark red, tender, bruises easily, medium juicy, sweet; good; midseason.

Cornelia. 1. Ohio Hort. Soc. Rpt. 192. 1883-84. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:331. 1890.
Raised by Matthew Crawford, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, from mixed seed in 1878. Imperfect. As grown here, plants numerous, unhealthy, lacking in vigor, productive; fruit small, obtuse-conic, dull dark red; flesh firm, scarcely acid, not highly flavored; poor; very late. :

Cornucopia. 1. Gen. Farmer 9:207. 1848.
Raised from seed of Hudson Bay, by William Prince, Flushing, New York; introduced about 1848. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, moderately productive; fruit large, conic, bright scarlet; flesh soft, sweet; good.

Country Gentleman. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:23. 1911.
Originated with R. N. Lewis, Red Hook, New York; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Fruit large, irregular conic, bright scarlet; flesh light red, soft; good.

Covell. 1. Ohio Sta. Rpt 247. 1887. CovilVs Early. 2. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 270. 1885.
Originated about 1882 with Charles Carpenter, Kelleys Island, Ohio. Perfect. Plants numerous, productive; fruit of medium size, roundish, dark crimson; flesh medium red, firm; good; very early.

Cowing. 1. Card. Mon. 13:245. 1871.
Originated with Granville Cowing, Muncie, Indiana, about 1867. Imperfect, Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit large, blunt-conic, crimson; flesh medium firm, subacid; very good; midseason.

Crawford. 1. Ohio Hort. Soc. Rpt. 64. 1886-87. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:331. 1890.
Raised in 1881 by Matthew Crawford, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, by whom it was introduced in 1889. Placed in the American Pomological Society's catalog in 1891 and remained in the last catalog in 1909. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants vigorous, very numerous, healthy, productive; fruit large, conic, glossy dark red, very firm, with scant juice; very good; late.

Cream. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 290. 1921.
Raised by Albert F. Etter, Ettersburg, California, as a cross between his seedling No. 330 and Trebla; introduced about 1921. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants numerous, lacking in vigor, dwarfish, very productive; flowers midseason, very small; fruit-stems slender, erect; fruit medium to small, plump, conic, very pale light red, unattractive, very juicy, medium firm, subacid; poor; very late.

Crescent. 1. U. S. D. A. Rpt. 419. 1890. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:23. 1916. Crescent Seedling. 3. Gard. Mon. 20:310. 1878. Park Beauty. 4. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 18. 1885. Boynton. 5. Ont. Dept. Agr. Fr. Ont. 303. 1914.
This sort originated in 1870 as a chance seedling with William Parmalee, New Haven, Connecticut. It was placed in the American Pomological Society's recommended fruit list in 1879. This variety was once a prime favorite in many parts of America because of productive plants adapted to a wide range of soils, but is now little grown because of poor quality and small berries. Imperfect. Plants very numerous, vigorous, healthy only in the most favorable locations, otherwise rusts badly, very productive; fruit-stems of medium length and thickness, erect; calyx easily detached; fruit medium in size, round-conic, glossy light red; flesh light red, medium in firmness, juicy, subacid; fair; early.

Crimson Cluster. 1. Rural N. Y. 45:482, 541. 1886. King Cluster. 2. Ibid. 45:510. 1886.
Originated in 1882 by E. W. Durand, Irvington, New Jersey. An English variety of this name, originated in 1860 by a Mrs. Clements, has also been tested in this country. Imperfect. Fruit medium to large, oval-conic, bright crimson, medium firm; very good; early midseason.

Crimson Cluster (of Maryland). 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 154:34. 1904.
A chance seedling supposed to be of Gandy which it resembles, originating in Anne Arundel County, Maryland; introduced about 1902. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit large, conic, regular, bright attractive crimson; flesh light red, firm, briskly subacid; good; late.

Crimson Cone. 1. Cultivator 3:348. 1846. 2. Fuller Sm. Fr. Cult. 90. 1867. Scotch Pineapple. 3. Barry Fr. Garden 346. 1851. Scotch Runner. 4. Thomas Am. Fruit Cult. 585. 1885.
An old sort which originated in this country before 1820. From 1840 to 1860 it was the leading variety near New York City. The plants received little care but as they were hardy and vigorous, much fruit was produced. An English variety with this name but having imperfect flowers was also known in this country. Crimson Cone was added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1862, and removed in 1869. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, hardy and productive; fruit of medium size, regular, long-conic, with a long neck, light glossy crimson; flesh medium red, firm, acid, aromatic; good; late.

Crimson Favorite. 1. Fuller Sm. Fr. Cult. 90. 1867.
Raised from seed of Wilson by A. S. Fuller, Ridgewood, New Jersey, who introduced it in 1863. Plants unproductive; fruit large, blunt-conic, dark glossy crimson; flesh firm, sprightly; very good.

Crimson Pine. 1. Cultivator 3:348; 1846.
Originated by William Prince, Flushing, New York; introduced about 1845. Perfect. Fruit large, conic, dark red, finely flavored; early.

Crockett. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 195:79. 1902.
Originated in Tennessee; introduced about 1900. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit of medium size, irregular oblong-conic, light crimson; flesh medium red, firm, subacid; good; early.

Crosby. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bid. 64:6. 1894.
Originated with Phineas Crosby, Clinton, Wisconsin; introduced about 1890. Perfect. At this Station, plants vigorous, numerous, with good foliage, productive; fruit medium in size, firm; good; midseason to late.

Crozier. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 186:5. 1907.
Originated with Randolph Crozier, Crimson Springs, West Virginia; introduced about 1907. Perfect. Plants numerous; fruit medium to large, long-conic to wedge-shape, dark glossy crimson; flesh light red, firm; good; early midseason.

Crystal City. 1. W. N. Y. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 119. 1880. Acme. 2. Del. Sta. Bul. 24:5. 1894.
A chance seedling which originated with E. Williams, Crystal City, Missouri; introduced about 1876. A small-fruited sort of the wild type, closely resembling Old Scarlet; valued for home use but too small for market. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1879, and removed in 1883. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous; fruit small, conic, necked, light glossy crimson; flesh pink, firm, sweet; good; very early.

Culp. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 364:75. 1923.
Received at the Ohio Station in 1912 from J. P. Culp. Imperfect. Plants productive; foliage scanty; fruit resembles Haverland, medium in size, regular, long-conic, unattractive scarlet; flesh light red, subacid; good; midseason.

Cumberland. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 48. 1883. Cumberland Triumph. 2. Gard. Mon. 16:278. 1874. Chambers. 3. Ohio Sta. Bul. Ill:No. 7, 212. 1890.
Raised by Amos Miller, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, from seed of Green Prolific supposed to have been fertilized by Jucunda; introduced in 1874. From 1880 to 1895 it was a standard sort for home use and local markets, but was too soft and light colored for the general market. The American Pomological Society placed this variety in its catalog in 1879, where it remained in the last catalog in 1909. Perfect. Plants numerous, erect, vigorous, productive; fruit large, very regular, round-conic, light scarlet; flesh light red, soft, mildly subacid; good; midseason.

Cushing. 1. Horticulturist 3:70. 1848-49.
Originated by Dr. W. D. Brincklé, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; introduced about 1845. Perfect. Fruit medium in size, round-conic, light scarlet; flesh soft, sprightly; good.

Cutter. 1. Mag. Hort. 23:542. 1859.
A chance seedling found in his garden near a bed of many sorts, by B. F. Cutter, Pelham, New Hampshire; introduced in 1859. A popular sort in New England from 1860 to 1875. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit medium in size, blunt, round-conic, slightly necked, bright scarlet; flesh scarlet, rather soft, juicy, sweet; good; early midseason.

Cyclone. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 76:433. 1894.
Originated in 1889 by E. W. Cruse, Leavenworth, Kansas, as a cross between Crescent and Cumberland. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants vigorous, numerous, moderately productive; fruit-stems good; fruit medium in size, long-conic, dark red, medium firm, sweet; fair to good; medium early.


DetD. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. eti:6. 1892. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:7. 1894.
Introduced about 1890 by J. A. Dobbins, Barnesville, Ohio. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants injured by unfavorable weather conditions, medium in number, unproductive; fruit medium to large, round-conic, dark red, firm; fair; midseason.

Daisy. 1. Rural N. Y. 43:495. 1884. Daisy Miller. 2. Ibid. 44:529, fig. 367. 1885.
Originated about 1880 with Samuel Miller, Bluffton, Missouri. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, unproductive; fruit large, ovate-conic, crimson, acid; midseason.

Daisy (of Zane). 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:332. 1890.
A cross between Crescent and Cumberland originated by T. G. Zane, New Jersey; introduced about 1889. Imperfect. Plants numerous, very vigorous, productive; foliage subject to rust; fruit medium in size, round-conic, light glossy red; flesh light red, rather soft, juicy, acid; fair; early midseason.

Dakota. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 148:55. 1897.
Originated in Bismarck, North Dakota, as a supposed seedling of Crescent; introduced about 1883. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, hardy and productive; fruit medium to large, long-conic, necked, bright scarlet; flesh soft, dry; good; midseason.

Damask Beauty. 1. Gard. Mon. 17:336. 1875.
Originated with a Mr. Snider, Tallmadge, Ohio; introduced about 1875. Perfect. Fruit medium in size, blunt, round-conic, bright scarlet; flesh light red, soft; very good; early midseason.

Danby. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:25. 1916.
Originated by H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan, in 1903 as a cross between two of his seedlings. Imperfect. On the Station grounds, plants few, vigorous, productive, healthy; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate; fruit very large, furrowed, wedge, glossy medium red, colors unevenly, juicy, medium firm, sprightly; good; late midseason.

Daniel Boone. 1. Mich. HorL Soc. RpL 194. 1883. 2* N- Y. Sta. Bul. 24:332. 1890. Originated in 1875 by A. D. Webb, Bowling Green, Kentucky. Imperfect. Plants at this Station, not vigorous, numerous, productive, with light green foliage; fruit medium in size, long-conic, bright red, firm, acid; fair to good; medium early.

Darling. 1. N. H. Sta. Bul. 74:100. 1900.
A seedling of Michel originated by Mark T. Thompson, Rio Vista, Virginia; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous; fruit small, regular, round-conic, sometimes with a short neck, light red; flesh medium red, medium firm, mildly subacid; good; early.

Darlington. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:175. 1915.
Originated in New Jersey about 1905 as a supposed seedling of Gandy; introduced in 1912. Perfect. At this Station, plants medium in number, vigor and yield, healthy; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate; fruit large, often furrowed, round-conic to a wide wedge, with poor apex, unattractive medium red, colors unevenly, very juicy, firm, subacid, aromatic; good; midseason.

Davis* 1. Rural N. Y. 46:589, figs. 326, 327. 1887.
Originated in 1875 with J. J. Davis, Warren County, New Jersey. Described as "an exaggerated Sharpless." Perfect. Plants vigorous, productive; fruit of the size and shape of Sharpless but more irregular and with green tips.

Dawn. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:26. 1916.
Originated by H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan, as a seedling of Moore Prolific; introduced about 1910. Plants medium in number; fruit above medium in size, round-conic, dark scarlet; flesh medium red, firm, subacid; good; late.

Dayton. 1. Ann. HorL 201. 1892. Dayton's Early. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:7. 1894.
A chance seedling discovered on his place by David Feicht, near Dayton, Ohio. Perfect. As grown here, plants medium in number, unproductive, with good foliage; fruit medium to large, symmetrical, long-conic, attractive light red, medium firm, mildly subacid, with a slight Alpine flavor; very good; medium early, the season lasting two weeks.

De Wet. 1. Rural N. Y. 63:542. 1904. General De Wet. 2. Ibid. 61:480. 1902.
A cross between Bubach and Parker Earle raised by T. C. Kevitt, Athenia, New Jersey; introduced in 1902. Imperfect. Plants few, vigorous, productive; fruit of medium size, short-conic, slightly necked, dark crimson; flesh red, firm, acid; good; late midseason.

Deacon. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:53. 1911.
Originated by George Goodell, Danvers Center, Massachusetts, as a supposed cross between Sample and Abington; introduced by C. S. Pratt, Reading, Massachusetts, in 1909. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants medium in number, size, vigor and yield, healthy; fruit large, conic or wedge, glossy medium red, juicy, firm, sweet, aromatic; good; midseason.

Deephaven. 1. Minn. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 226. 1921.
A cross between Dunlap and Progressive originated at the Minnesota Fruit Breeding Farm, Excelsior, Minnesota. Sent out about 1912 as Minnesota No. 41; named Deephaven in 1921. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, hardy; fruit large, round-conic, medium red, glossy; flesh light red, juicy, mildly subacid; good; ripens in the spring with Progressive, and fruits heavily in the fall on young runner plants.

DeLancey. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 364:76. 1923.
Received at the Ohio Station in 1911 from L. J. Libis. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit medium or above in size, round-conic to round-wedge, dark red; flesh salmon, firm, subacid; good; late midseason.

Delaware. 1. Am. Gard. 19:472. 1898.
Originated in Seaford, Delaware; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Plants vigorous, hardy, moderately productive; fruit large, broad-conic, bright scarlet; flesh whitish, firm, acid; fair; midseason.

Delaware Pride. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 211:66. 1918.
Originated in 1910 with G. E. Bunting et Sons, Selbyville, Delaware. Plants medium in number, vigorous, productive; fruit large, irregular wedge-conic, bright crimson; flesh medium red, moderately firm, subacid; good; midseason.

Delecto. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 165. 1920.
Raised by Albert F. Etter, Ettersburg, California, in 1912. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants medium in number and vigor, low growing, unproductive, healthy; leaves characteristically small and dark green; fruit-stems short; seeds distinctly raised; fruit medium in size, round-conic, slightly necked, dull dark red, very juicy, firm, sweet, aromatic; good; very late.

Delicious.
Found in an orchard in 1914, by J. A. Morgan, Scottsville, New York; thought to be a seedling of Sample. Perfect. Plants at this Station numerous, vigorous, productive, healthy; fruit-stems long, thick, prostrate; fruit large to medium, blunt-wedge to blunt-conic, glossy medium red, juicy, firm, highly flavored, sprightly; good; late midseason.

Delicious (of Michigan). 1. Kellogg Cat. 22. 1922.
Originated in 1918 by Travis Brothers, Cleveland, New York, as a cross between Atlantic and Fendall. Perfect. At this Station, plants numerous, vigorous, very productive, healthy; leaves dark green; fruit-stems long, thick, erect; calyx large, raised, leafy; fruit large to medium, long-wedge to long-conic, glossy light to medium red, colors unevenly, juicy, firm, sprightly; very good; late.

Delia K. 1. Can. Hort. 19:292, fig. 985. 1896.
A seedling of Sharpless raised by E. B. Stevenson, Guelph, Ontario, Canada; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Plants numerous; fruit of medium size, conic, scarlet, firm; good; late midseason.

Delmar. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 364:76. 1923.
Received at the Ohio Station in 1914 from G. W. Davis. Imperfect. Plants large, very vigorous; fruit medium in size, regular, round-conic to round-wedge, light glossy crimson; flesh firm, juicy, red, mildly subacid to sweet; excellent; late.

Desdemona. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 298. 1913.
Originated at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada, as a seedling of Bubach; introduced in 1913. Imperfect. Plants medium in number; fruit medium to large, wedge-shape, dark crimson; flesh dark red, medium firm, briskly subacid; good; late midseason.

Dew. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 59:25. 1890. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:7. 1894.
Originated in 1876 by H. F. Dew, Lansing, Michigan, as'a cross between Sharpless and Manchester. Perfect. Station plants vigorous, healthy, medium in number, productive; fruit large, irregular in form, dark red, soft; fair; midseason to late, ripening period long, lasting nearly three weeks.

Dewdrop. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:176. 1915.
A cross between Jucunda and a wild prairie strawberry, raised by H. F. Dew, Albion, Michigan, prior to 1887. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants few, medium in vigor and yield, healthy; fruit-stems long, thick, prostrate; calyx very large, raised, leafy; fruit large to very large, decidedly irregular, strongly furrowed, necked, variable in color, dull, firm, not juicy, with whitish flesh, hollow at the center, subacid; fair; late.

Dewey. 1. Rural N. Y. 45:509, fig. 308. 1886.
Raised by P. M. Augur, Middlefield, Connecticut, about 1883, as a cross between Jersey Queen and Prince of Berries. Perfect. Plants vigorous, healthy and productive; fruit of medium size, roundish, necked, bright crimson; flesh light red, moderately firm; fair; midseason.

Dewey (of Nimon). 1. Am. Card. 19:582. 1898.
A cross between Haverland and Parker Earle raised by James Nimon, Denison, Texas, about 1893. Perfect. Plants few, medium in vigor and productivity; foliage subject to rust; fruit of medium size, long-conic, dark red; flesh bright red, moderately firm, juicy, subacid; good; midseason.

Diadem. 1. Horticulturist 8: too. 1853.
Originated by William Prince, Flushing, New York; introduced about 1853. Imperfect. Plants vigorous; fruit large, roundish, light scarlet; flesh soft, acid; good.

Dicky. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:54. 1911.
A cross between Marshall and Sample, said to have originated with J. D. Gowing, North Reading, Massachusetts; introduced by C. S. Pratt, Reading, Massachusetts, in 1908. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants medium in number, size, vigor, and yield, healthy; fruit large, conic or wedge, glossy medium red, juicy, firm, tart, with an unpleasant flavor; poor; midseason.

Dighton. Dighton Rock. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:521. 1908.
Originated with A. B. Howard et Son, Belchertown, Massachusetts; introduced about 1908. Perfect. Plants at this Station, few, inferior in vigor, healthy, productive; fruit-stems thick, prostrate; calyx leafy; seeds sunken; fruit large to medium, dropping rapidly in size, round-conic, glossy dark red, firm, pleasantly acid, highly flavored, with dark red flesh; very good to best; midseason. Worthy of trial.

Discovery. New Discovery. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:186. 1915.
Raised in 1894 by L. H. Girton, Bristol, Indiana, as a cross between Warfield and Bubach. The variety is worthy of trial, as one of the firm "fig-type" berries. Perfect. Station plants large, vigorous, very productive, healthy; fruit-stems long, semi-erect; calyx large, raised, leafy; seeds raised; fruit large, blunt-wedge to oval, necked, glossy dark red, very firm, sweet, well flavored, with dark red flesh; very good; midseason.

Dixie. 1. N. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 44. 1902. Dixie Belle. 2. Md. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 26. 1907.
Originated in North Carolina; introduced about 1898. Imperfect. Plants numerous, medium in vigor and productivity; fruit large, irregular roundish, variable in color from light to dark scarlet; flesh light pink, soft, juicy, subacid; fair; midseason.

Dixon. 1. Rural N. Y. 63:553, fig. 241. 1904. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:54. 1911.
Originated about 1896 by Emil Grafe, Rossville, Staten Island, New York; it is supposed to be a seedling of Belt. Perfect. As grown here, plants very few, small, weak, unhealthy, unproductive; fruit medium to large, wedge, dull medium red, often green tipped, medium juicy, firm, tart, with an unpleasant flavor; poor; midseason.

Dr. BurrilL 1. Kellogg Cat. 64, PI. 1916. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:68. 1918.
The variety was originated by J. R. Reasoner, Urbana, Ilinois, in 1909, as a cross between Crescent and Dunlap. Very similar if not identical with Dunlap. Perfect. Plants numerous, intermediate in vigor and height, healthy, productive; fruit-stems semi-erect, branching; calyx distinctly raised; fruit large, symmetrical, conic to wedge, strongly necked, medium to dark red, glossy; flesh medium red throughout, variable in flavor and juiciness, firm, subacid; fair to good; midseason.

Doctor Nicaise. 1. Mag. Hort. 33:299. 1867. 2. Goeschke Erdbeeren 236. 1874.
Originated by a Dr. Nicaise, Chalons-sur-Marne, France; introduced into this country about 1864. The variety had little merit in this country for its fruit, but its strong everbearing tendency made it of value as a parent in breeding everbearing varieties. Perfect. Plants lacking in vigor and productivity; fruit very large, irregular coxcomb, bright scarlet; flesh medium firm, juicy, sweet; fair; early.

Doctor Warder. 1. Horticulturist 26:250. 18 71.
A cross between Fillmore and Victoria raised by Louis Ritz, Plainfield, New Jersey; introduced in 1871. Plants vigorous, hardy and productive; fruit large, long-conic, bright crimson; flesh light red, firm, acid; good; late.

Dole. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 195:79. 1902.
Originated by J. G. Dole, Ravenna, Ohio; introduced about 1896. Imperfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, productive; fruit of medium size, round-conic, bright scarlet; flesh light red, medium firm, mildly subacid; fair: late midseason.

Dollar. 1. Cat. Sta. Rpt. 378. 1895-97. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:27. 1916.
Originated with Oscar P. Pelton, Merchantsville, New Jersey; introduced about 1885. Dollar is the leading variety near Sacramento, California, where it is liked for its firm, bright, attractively colored fruit. The young plants bear as soon as rooted and steadily from late in April until autumn. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1899, where it remained in the last catalog in 1909. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, productive; fruit large, round-conic, light crimson; flesh medium red, firm, sub-acid; good; midseason; autumn-fruiting.

Dollar Junior. 1. Lovett Cat. 5. 1902.
A seedling of Dollar which originated in California; introduced about 1902. Perfect. Plants vigorous, healthy; fruit large, long-conic, dark red; flesh light red, firm, dry; good; midseason.

Dora. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 62:30. 1909.
A seedling of Crescent which originated with C. C. Stone, Moline, Illinois; introduced about 1895. Imperfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous; foliage subject to rust; fruit medium in size, conic to wedge-shape, bright red; flesh bright red, medium firm, juicy, acid; good; late midseason.

Dorchester. 1. Mass. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 171. 1878.
Raised by Marshall P. Wilder, Dorchester, Massachusetts; introduced about 1878. Imperfect. Fruit medium in size, conic, crimson; flesh whitish; fair.

Double Cropper. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 206:52. 1903.
Originated with a Mr. Crines, New Jersey, about 1890. Perfect. Plants numerous, hardy, vigorous, and productive; fruit of medium size, round-conic, dark glossy crimson; flesh pink, firm, juicy, acid; good; early; claimed to produce a fall crop.

Douglas. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:27. 1916.
Originated with P. J. Myers, Bridgman, Michigan, as a chance seedling; introduced in 1913. Perfect. Plants numerous; fruit medium in size, roundish, crimson, firm; midseason.

Downer Prolific. 1. Horticulturist 13:371. 1858. 2. Fuller Sm. Fr. Cult. 91. 1867.
Raised "from seed of the native Iowa strawberry" in 1854, by J. S. Downer, Elkton, Kentucky. From 1865 to 1880 Downer Prolific was a leading sort for home use and local market, the fruit being rather soft for distant shipment. It thrived under neglect. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1862, where it remained until 1897. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, healthy, hardy and productive; fruit medium in size, round-conic, light scarlet; flesh light red, soft, acid; good; early.

Downton. 1. Trans. Lond. Hort. Soc. 3:396, PL 15. 1820. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 529. 1845.
Originated from seed in 1817 by Thomas Andrew Knight, Downton Castle, Wiltshire, England. Introduced into this country about 1825, and was popular here for a few years. Perfect. Plants numerous, unproductive; fruit large, ovate or coxcomb, necked, dark purplish scarlet; flesh light red, firm, rich and aromatic; late.

Drought King. 1. Am. Card. 18:536. 1897. 2. Mich. Sta. Bul. 176:7. 1899.
Originated with D. Brandt, Bremen, Ohio; introduced about 1895. Imperfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit medium in size, round-conic, dark scarlet; flesh dark red, medium firm, juicy, acid; good; midseason.

Dual. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:219. 1912.
Originated with Frank Dual, Ohio; introduced about 1909. Perfect. Plants medium in number and productivity; fruit large, conic to wedge-shape, light red, scarlet; flesh light red, moderately firm, juicy, mild, sweet; good; early midseason.

Dubois. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 36:631. 1891.
Originated with M. D. Dubois, Newburgh, New York; introduced about 1889. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants similar to Sharpless; fruit distinctly dry and spongy; inferior in quality; unproductive.

Duchess. 1. Gard. Mon. 17:14. 1875. Early Dutchess. 2. Horticulturist 28:281. 1873.
Originated with D. H. Barnes, Poughkeepsie, New York; introduced in 1876. Popular as an early market sort near New York City about 1880. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1879 and removed in 1897. Perfect. Plants few, vigorous; fruit medium to large, round-conic, bright crimson; flesh light red, medium firm, briskly subacid; very good; early.

Duff. 1. Rural N. Y. 60:493. 1901.
Originated in North Carolina; introduced about 1900. Imperfect. Plants numerous, vigorous; fruit small, conic, bright scarlet; flesh medium red, firm, acid; fair; early.

Duluth. 1. Minn. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 226. 1921. Minnesota ioij. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:73. 1918.
A cross between Pan American and Dunlap originated at the Minnesota Fruit Breeding Farm, Excelsior, Minnesota, in 1909. Perfect. Plants at this Station few, medium in vigor, dwarfish, very productive per plant; autumn-fruiting; leaves small, dark green, thick; fruit-stems thick, erect; fruit above medium to small, irregular conic to blunt-wedge, broad and flat at the base, dull medium red, juicy, very firm, with hollow center, tart; good; midseason.

Duncan. 1. N. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 14. 1877. 2. Cult. et Count. Gent. 45:518. 1880.
A cross between Russell and Wilson, raised by J. L. Lucas, Ulster County, New York, by whom it was introduced in 1875. A European sort of this name was also tested in this country about 1855. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1879, and removed in 1897. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous; fruit of medium size, roundish, scarlet; flesh light red, firm; very good; early.

Duncan (of New Jersey). 1. Crawford Cat. 4. 1904. 2. Md. Sta. Bul. 211:66. 1918. A chance seedling found in New Jersey about 1894. Perfect. Plants numerous, moderately vigorous; fruit medium in size, uniform, round-conic, bright red; flesh bright red, firm, juicy, subacid; fair; midseason.

Dundee. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 526. 1845.
A Scotch variety grown somewhat in this country about 1850 to 1860. Imperfect. Plants hardy, very productive; fruit medium in size, roundish oval, regular, light scarlet; flesh firm, acid, rich; late.

Dunlap. 1. Am. Gard. 20:510. 1899. Senator Dunlap. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 154:56. 1904. 3. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:547. 1908.
High quality and handsome appearance of the berries make Dunlap a favorite for the garden and local markets in the northern states east of the Rocky Mountains. In some localities of this great region it is grown almost exclusively. The faults are that the berries are often too soft to ship well and many of them are small. The plants are hardy, healthy, and productive, but sometimes produce too many runners. Howard is taking the place of Dunlap in many parts of the East. Dunlap originated about 1890 with J. R. Reasoner, Urbana, Illinois; introduced in 1899 by M. Crawford, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio; entered in the fruit catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1909; parentage uncertain but possibly a seedling of Warfield.
Perfect. Plants very numerous, small but vigorous, healthy, very productive in number of berries but lacking in measured yield; leaves of medium size and color, thin, glossy. Flowers early midseason; petals 5-8; stamens medium in number; receptacle small. Fruit medium early, season short; fruit-stems long, slender, semi-erect; pedicels long, slender; calyx variable in size, reflexed, usually raised, often tinged red; sepals long; berries large to medium, drop rapidly in size as the season advances, round-conic or elongated-conic, usually with a distinct neck; apex pointed; color glossy, attractive light red, quickly changing to a dark red; seeds sunken; flesh well colored to the center, juicy, mild, pleasantly flavored; quality good.

Dunmore. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:176. 1915.
Raised by H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan, in 1905 as a cross between Dawn and a seedling of his, the parentage of which was Dawn by Ionia. Imperfect. At this Station, plants numerous, productive, healthy; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate; fruit variable in size, round-conic to wedge, glossy medium to dark red, colors unevenly, mild, medium juicy, soft; good; midseason.

Durand. 1. Rec. Hort. 2:62. 1868. Durand's Seedling. 2. Fuller Sm. Fr. Cult. 91, fig. 29. 1867.
Originated about 1864 by E. W. Durand, Irvington, New Jersey. Perfect. Plants medium in number and vigor, unproductive; fruit large, oblong to oblong-conic, scarlet; flesh whitish, firm, juicy; good.

Durand Favorite. 1. N. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 7. 1878.
Originated by E. W. Durand, Irvington, New Jersey; introduced about 1875. Plants medium in vigor, requiring high culture; fruit large, conic to wedge-shape, crimson.

Dutter. 1. Mich. Sta. BuL 80:6. 1892.
A cross between Jersey Queen and Sharpless originated by Jerry Dutter, Indiana; introduced in 1887. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit large, round-conic, light crimson; flesh medium red, medium firm; good; late midseason.



E. P. Roe. 1. Am. Gard. 12:481. 1891. 2. Ar. Y. Sta. Bul. 76:434. 1894.
A chance seedling which originated in the garden of W. B. Brown, Newburgh, New York; introduced in 1891. Another sort, which is pistillate and early has been sent out under this name. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants numerous, very unproductive; fruit medium in size, round-conic, borne on short fruit-stems, dark red, firm; very good; late.

Eagle. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 211:61. 1918.
On trial at the Maryland Station. Perfect. Plants medium in size and vigor, productive; fruit medium to large, irregular wedge-shape, crimson; flesh dark red, juicy, sub-acid; fair; early midseason.

Earliana. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:29. 1916.
Originated with J. L. Babcock, Norfolk, Virginia, about 1902. Perfect. Plants numerous; fruit small, round-conic, dark crimson, firm, subacid; early.

Earliest. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 109:235. 1896. Thompson's Earliest. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 146:38. 1903.
Originated with Mark T. Thompson, Rio Vista, Virginia. Perfect. Station plants numerous, moderately productive, healthy; fruit-stems short; fruit medium or below in size, round-conic, light red, firm, with whitish flesh, subacid; fair; very early.

Earliest (of Salzer). 1. Salzer Cat. 19. 1900. Salzer's Earliest. 2. Am. Gard. 19:742. 1898.
Introduced in 1893 by John A. Salzer, La Crosse, Wisconsin. Perfect. Fruit medium in size, long-conic, light crimson; flesh firm; good; early.

Earliest of All. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 160:209. 1911.
Introduced about 1906. Perfect. Plants very large, vigorous; fruit large, round-conic to wedge-shape, scarlet; flesh pink, firm, juicy, mildly subacid; fair; very early.

Early Beauty. 1, Ohio Sta. Bul. 146:31. 1903. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:522. 1908.
Originated in Iowa in 1898 as a seedling of Crescent. Perfect. As grown here, plants numerous, vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems long, slender; fruit above medium to small, round-conic to long-conic, light to medium red, mildly sweet, not high in flavor, with whitish flesh, medium to firm; fair; early.

Early Bird. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:29. 1916.
A seedling of Dunlap which originated with E. H. Riehl, Alton, Illinois. Perfect. Plants medium in number; fruit of medium size, round-conic, light crimson; flesh medium red, medium firm, subacid; good; early.

Early Bird (of Warren). 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 54:45. 1894.
Originated with S. H. Warren, Weston, Massachusetts. Perfect. Fruit small, irregular conic, light crimson; flesh medium firm; fair; early midseason.

Early Canada. 1. W. N. Y. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 24. 1882.
Originated with A. M. Smith, St. Catherines, Ontario; supposed to be a seedling of Wilson; introduced in 1878. Very similar to Wilson but ripens a week earlier. Perfect. Plants medium in number; fruit of medium size, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, very firm, acid; good; early.

Early Golden. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:219. 1912.
Originated with T. B. Carlisle, Lisbon, Ohio; introduced about 1909. Perfect. Plants medium in number, small; foliage scanty; fruit small, conic, bright red; flesh bright scarlet, firm, acid; good; very early.

Early Harvest. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 160:209. 1911.
Originated with Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas, as a cross between Thompson and Excelsior; introduced in 1908. Imperfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous; fruit of medium size, roundish, dark crimson; flesh red, soft, juicy, subacid; fair; early.

Early Hathaway. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 154:35. 1904. Texas. 2. Ont. Fr. Exp. Sta. Rpt. 81. 1903.
Originated in 1892 by Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas; introduced in 1902 by the originator as Early Hathaway, and in the same year as Texas by another firm. A very productive sort formerly grown in northern Alabama, Kentucky, and Maryland, but now being discarded because of its light color and lack of firmness. Added to the last catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1909 as Texas. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, productive; fruit medium in size, round-conic, light scarlet; flesh whitish, firm, acid; fair; early midseason.

Early Howard. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 211:67. 1918.
Originated with A. J. Howard, Somerset County, Maryland; introduced in 1912, Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous; fruit of medium size, uniformly round-conic, bright crimson; flesh red, firm, juicy, mildly subacid; fair; early.

Early Hudson. 1. Prince Treat. Hort. 75. 1828. Hudson (of Cincinnati). 2. Cultivator 3:349. 1846.
Thought to have originated in New York prior to 1790. About 1830 it was a leading variety around New York, and about 1845 the leading sort near Cincinnati. Imperfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit medium to large, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm, acid; very good; early midseason.

Early Jack. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 129:8. 1896.
Originated in Kansas; introduced about 1892. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, hardy and productive; fruit medium in size, irregular round-conic, light scarlet; flesh light red, soft; fair; early.

Early Jersey Giant. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:176. 1915.
Originated in 1907 by Walter Van Fleet, then of Little Silver, New Jersey. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants medium to numerous, large, vigorous, very productive, healthy; fruit-stems thick, erect; fruit large, oblong-conic to wedge, necked, dull medium red, not very juicy, coarse, sweet, not highly flavored; fair; early.

Early Market. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 166:72. 1905.
Originated with Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas; introduced in 1903. Perfect. Plants numerous, tall, vigorous; fruit of medium size, short-conic, light crimson; flesh medium red, soft; fair; eariy.

Early Miller. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 160:209. 1911.
A chance seedling which originated with Mrs. E. M. Kelly, Wicomico County, Maryland; introduced in 1910. Plants vigorous; fruit medium in size, round-conic, bright scarlet; flesh red, medium firm, juicy, mildly subacid; good; early.

Early Queen. 1. Gard. Mon. 16:279. 1874.
A seedling of Metcalf raised by Amos Miller, Carlisle, Pennsylvania; introduced in 1874. Perfect. Plants medium in vigor and productivity; fruit large, round-conic, bright crimson; good; early.

Early Queen (of Townsend). 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:177. 1915.
A seedling of unknown parentage which originated with E. W. Townsend, Jr., Salisbury, Maryland, in 1908. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants very numerous and vigorous, very productive, healthy; fruit-stems short, prostrate; fruit large, blunt-wedge to roundish, with a rough surface, glossy light red, colors unevenly, very juicy, tender, subacid, with dark red flesh; fair; midseason.

Early Robbins. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:30. 1916.
Originated with George M. Robbins, Bradford, Maine; introduced about 1898. Perfect. Plants few; fruit below medium in size, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh medium firm, sweet; fair; early.

Easypicker. 1. Minn. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 226. 1921.
A cross between Dunlap and Crescent originated at the Minnesota Fruit Breeding Farm, Excelsior, Minnesota; named in 1921. Imperfect. Plants at this Station very numerous, vigorous, low growing, very productive, healthy; leaves small, dark green; flowers small; receptacle large for the size of the flower; fruit-stems short, erect; calyx small, raised; fruit above medium to small, chunky conic, necked, glossy dark red, juicy, medium firm, subacid; fair; early.

Eaton. 1. Whitten Cat. 2. 1920.
A chance seedling found in an orchard by A. V. Eaton, Lafayette, Indiana, in 1913. Eaton has shown considerable merit at this Station. Semi-perfect to perfect. At this Station, plants numerous, very vigorous, productive, healthy; leaves large, dark green; flowers small; receptacle large for the size of the flowers; fruit-stems long, thick, semi-erect; calyx small, flat; fruit large to medium, blunt-wedge to blunt-conic, glossy medium red, very juicy, firm, sweet, with dark red flesh; good to very good; midseason.

Eberlein. 1. Horticulturist 3:70. 1848-49.
Originated with a Mr. Eberlein, Ohio; introduced in 1847. Perfect. Plants very productive; fruit medium in size, conic, dark scarlet; early.

Echo. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 189:112. 1901. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:522. 1908.
Introduced in 1901 by the Woodlawn Nurseries, Rochester, New York, who secured their plants from a grower near Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Echo is the leading variety in the Falmouth region in Massachusetts, where it is liked because of its productiveness, the stiff, upright fruit-stems, and the firmness of the fruit. Perfect. Station plants medium in number and yield, vigorous; fruit-stems thick, erect; fruit large to medium, drops in size, round-conic, dull red, juicy, firm, pleasant in flavor, with whitish flesh; good to very good; midseason.

Eclipse. 1. Fuller Sm. Fr. Cult. 92. 1867.
Originated by William Prince, Flushing, New York; introduced about 1855. Imperfect. Fruit small, conic, light bright crimson; flesh briskly subacid; good; season early, very short.

Edgar Queen.. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 81:7. 1892. 2. N. H. Sta. Bul. 74:99. 1900.
Originated in 1884 with B. O. Curtis, Paris, Illinois, as a seedling of Captain Jack. Imperfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, moderately productive; fruit large, irregular roundish, light scarlet; flesh light red, medium firm; good; late midseason.

Edith. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 130:150. 1896.
A chance seedling which originated with Mark T. Thompson, Rio Vista, Virginia; introduced about 1892. Imperfect. Plants medium in number, vigor, and productivity; fruit medium in size, round-conic, very dark crimson; flesh medium firm; good; late.

Edmund Wilson. 1. Lovett Autumn Cat. 3. 1913. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:68. 1918.
Originated by Walter Van Fleet, Little Silver, New Jersey, in 1907 by intercrossing several European and American sorts. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants numerous, very vigorous, healthy, productive; leaves unusually large and dark green; flowers very large, often nearly two inches across; fruit-stems short, thick; calyx of largest size; fruit large, retains size well, irregular-conic, broad at the base, dull dark red, medium juicy, firm, subacid, with dark red flesh; fair; midseason.

Edwards. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:31. 1916.
Originated in 1896 with B. M. Edwards, Franklin, New York, as a chance seedling. Imperfect. Plants numerous; fruit of medium size, wedge-shape to round-conic, dark crimson; flesh medium red, firm, acid; fair; midseason.

Edwards Favorite. 1. Ann. Hort. 201. 1892. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:7. 1894.
A chance seedling discovered in 1885 by R. S. Edwards, Highlands, Colorado. Thought to be a cross between Sharpless and Jucunda. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants medium to vigorous, numerous, moderately productive, with good fruit-stems; fruit medium to large, good red color, round-conic, soft, sweet; good; midseason to late.

Effie. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 166:72. 1905.
A chance seedling which originated in 1899 with Miss Effie Wiley, Dover, Delaware; introduced in 1903. Perfect. Fruit of medium size, conic, scarlet; flesh whitish, soft; fair; midseason.

Ekey. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 154:35- 1904. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:523. 1908,
Originated in 1898 with E. H. Ekey, Steubenville, Ohio, as a cross between Warfield and Belmont. Perfect. Plants at this Station of medium number and vigor, unhealthy, productive; fruit-stems short, thick; fruit large to medium, retains size well, very long-conic, dull dark red, green tipped; flesh dark red, acid, with an unpleasant flavor; poor; early.

Elate. 1. Johnson Cat. 6. 1922.
Introduced in 1917 by E. W. Johnson et Company, Salisbury, Maryland. Plants numerous, large, vigorous; fruit large, attractive red, firm.

Eldorado.
Plants were sent to this Station in 1916 from King Brothers Nursery, Dansville, New York. Said to have originated in Kansas. Similar to Splendid. Semi-perfect to perfect. At this Station, plants numerous, vigorous, healthy, very productive; receptacle prominent; fruit large, variable in shape, broad at the base, glossy light red, juicy, firm*, subacid, with whitish flesh; good; medium early.

Eleanor. 1. Mag. Hort. 14:219. 1848. Myatt's Eleanor. 2. Thompson Card. AssH 572. 1859. Crystal Palace. 3. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 985. 1869.
Originated by a Mr. Myatt, Deptford, England, in 1847; introduced into this country a few years later. Although never grown extensively, it was mentioned frequently in pomological literature. Long a popular sort near London, England. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, hardy and moderately productive; fruit large, long-conic, bright scarlet; flesh red, firm, juicy, acid; good; late.

Eleanor (of Coombe). 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 109:235. 1896.
A chance seedling which originated with a Mr. Coombe, Atlantic County, New Jersey; introduced in 1895. Perfect. Station plants vigorous, numerous, variable in yield; fruit medium or above, roundish, bright red, firm; good; early.

Eliza. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 680. 1857. Myatt's Eliza. 2, Mag. Hort. 7:71. 1841.
Raised by a Mr. Myatt, Deptford, England, about 1837; introduced into this country a few years later. It was never cultivated much outside of the gardens of amateurs. Eliza (of Rivers) was also tested here about 1860. Perfect. Plants few, vigorous, unproductive; fruit large, ovate or conic, necked, scarlet; flesh light scarlet, juicy; good.

Elma. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 218:196. 1902.
Originated in 1900 by J. H. Black, Son et Company, Hightstown, New Jersey, by crossing a seedling of Robbie and Nettie, with Joe. In 1898 another variety was sent out by them under this name, but it did not prove satisfactory and the name was transferred to the sort herein described. Imperfect. Station plants very few, medium in vigor, healthy, not productive; fruit-stems prostrate; fruit large to medium, retains size well, roundish to wedge, light red, colors unevenly, firm, sprightly, well flavored; good; late.

Elmira. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:220. 1912.
Originated with G. A. Parcell, Pine City, New York; introduced in 1910. Imperfect. Plants very numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit medium in size, conic to wedge-shape, scarlet to crimson; flesh dark red, firm, mild; good; early.

Elton. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 529. 1845. 2. Pom. Mag. 3:135, PI. 1830. Elton Pine. 3. Hoffy Orch. Comp. PL 1841. Originated in 1819 by Thomas Andrew Knight, Downton Castle, Wiltshire, England; introduced into this country a few years later where it was much grown from 1825 to 1845. It is still valued in England for preserving. Perfect. Plants vigorous, not fully hardy, productive; fruit large, ovate to coxcombed, dark glossy red; flesh dark red, firm, juicy, acid; very good; very late.

Emerald. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 5:14. 1889.
Introduced about 1887; said to have originated in Europe. Perfect. Plants lacking in vigor; foliage very subject to rust; fruit medium in size, irregular, round-conic, light red; flesh medium firm; fair; midseason.

Emily. 1. Puller Sm. Fr. Cult. 92. 1867.
Originated by G. W. Huntsman, Flushing, New York; introduced in 1864. Imperfect. Fruit large, roundish, scarlet; flesh whitish, sweet; very good.

Emily (of Thomas). 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:32. 1916.
Originated by W. H. Thomas, Highwood, Connecticut; introduced in 1885. Imperfect. Fruit medium in size, round-conic, dark crimson, firm.

Emma. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 168. 1882.
Introduced about 1870. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, moderately productive; fruit of medium size, roundish conic, scarlet, soft, juicy, acid; good.

Emperor. 1. Am. Gard. 20:510. 1899. 2. Ont. Dept. Agr. Fr. Ont. 306. 1914.
Originated by John Little, Granton, Ontario, in 1890. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit very large, conic, sometimes ribbed, dark red; flesh reddish pink, firm; good; late midseason.

Empress. 1. Am. Gard. 20:510. 1899. 2. Ont. Dept. Agr. Fr. Ont. 306. 1914.
Originated in 1890 by John Little, Granton, Ontario. Perfect. Resembles Emperor. Plants medium in number, vigorous and productive; fruit medium to large, irregular round-conic, dark red; flesh light red, soft, sweet; good; late midseason.

Endicott. 1. Mich. Hort Soc. Rpt. 167. 1882.
Originated in 1870 by G. W. Endicott, Villa Ridge, Illinois, as a cross between Wilson and Jucunda. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous and productive; fruit large, blunt-conic, necked, dull scarlet; flesh medium firm, juicy, mildly subacid; late midseason.

Enhance. 1. Rural N. Y. 47:460. 1888. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:332. 1890.
A cross between Windsor and Sharpless raised by Henry Young, Ada, Ohio; introduced in 1887. It has value in certain sections for the general market. Enhance was placed in the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1897, where it remained in the last catalog in 1909. Perfect. As grown here, plants few, vigorous, very productive, with short, erect fruit-stems; fruit large, conic, glossy red, firm, subacid; very good; late.

Enormous. 1. Rural N. Y. 55:498. 1896. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 109:235. 1896.
A seedling of Crescent which originated with B. O. Curtis, Paris, Illinois; introduced in 1895. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1899 where it remained in the last catalog in 1909. Imperfect. Station plants numerous, medium in yield, with good foliage; fruit large to very large, irregular wedge, bright red, firm; fair; late.

Epping. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 76:434. 1894. Yankee Doodle. 2. Mich. Sta. Bul. 100:14. l893. Dow's Seedling. 3. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:7. 1894.
Originated with George F. Dow, North Epping, New Hampshire; introduced about 1890 as Yankee Doodle, and later as Epping under which name it was more generally known. Imperfect. On the Station grounds, plants medium in number and yield, with tender foliage and good fruit-stems; fruit of medium size, round-conic, dark red, soft; good; midseason.

Equino1. 1. AT. Y, Sta. Bul. 91:191. 1895.
Originated with Mark T. Thompson, Rio Vista, Virginia; introduced in 1895. A very productive sort but of inferior quality. Perfect. Plants at this Station, medium vigorous, numerous, very productive, with good fruit-stems; fruit medium to large, dull red, round-conic, firm; poor; late.

Ernest. 1. Perm. Sta. RpL 216. 1898-99.
Originated with R. E. Rodgers, Snyder Creek, Pennsylvania; introduced about 1900. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous; foliage resistant to leaf-spot; fruit large, round-conic, bright crimson; flesh medium red, firm; good; midseason.

Ernest (of Townsend). 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:177. 1915.
A seedling of unknown parentage which originated with E. W. Townsend, Salisbury, Maryland, in 1907. Imperfect. At this Station, plants vigorous, productive, healthy; fruit large to medium, broad, blunt-wedge, glossy light red, subacid, medium juicy, moderately firm; fair; midseason.

Ernie. 1. Am. Gard. 25:436. 1904. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bui, 276:70. 1906.
A chance seedling which originated with Dr. S. Mandlin, Bridgman, Michigan, in 1895. Its high quality makes it worthy of trial. Perfect. Station plants medium in number, variable in health, productive, vigorous; fruit-stems thick, prostrate; calyx leafy, detaches easily; fruit above medium to large, drops in size, variable in shape, glossy dark red, sprightly, firm, well flavored, with dark red flesh; good to very good; medium early.

Essex County. 1. Rural N. Y. 47:195, fig. 67. 1888.
Originated with H. H. Alley, Hilton, New Jersey; introduced about 1887. Perfect. Plants vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit large, irregular, ovate, dark scarlet; flesh medium red, acid; good; early.

Estelle. 1. U. S. D. A. Pom. Rpt. 393. 1891.
Originated with C. Engle, Paw Paw, Michigan; introduced in 1891. Perfect. Fruit medium in size, round-conic, light crimson; flesh soft; good.

Ettersburg Seedlings. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:177. 1915.
Albert F. Etter, Ettersburg, California, sent out in 1913 a number of seedlings originated by him in 1905 between native California strawberries and various named varieties. The following have fruited at this Station, and all except the last five are described in Bulletin 401 of this Station: Nos. 71, 75, 76, 79, 80, 84, 2]^]y 89, 91, 93, 94, in, 112, 114, 116, 121, 222, 284, 432, 433, 450.

Eureka. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 55:7. 1889. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 76:434. 1894.
A seedling of Cumberland which originated in 1881 with George Townsend, Gordon, Ohio. Inferior to standard sorts. The name was added to the American Pomological Society's catalog in 1891, where it remained in the last catalog in 1909. Imperfect. On the Station grounds, plants very vigorous, healthy, very numerous, moderately productive; blossoms with Sharpless; fruit shaped like Sharpless, large, very glossy bright red, very firm; good; late.

Eureka (of Hubach). 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:68. 1918.
Originated in 1910 with Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas, as a cross between one of his seedlings and Klondike. Perfect. As grown here, plants medium in number, size, and vigor, healthy, very productive; flowers very early, large, show above the foliage; fruit-stems short, thick, erect; fruit large to medium, wedge, glossy dark red, juicy, firm, often with a hollow center, sprightly, with dark red flesh; good; very early.

Eurisko. 1. Etter Cat. 22. 1920.
Raised by Albert F. Etter, Ettersburg, California, in 1912 as a cross between Chesapeake and his seedling No. 20. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants unusually numerous, medium in vigor, productive, healthy; autumn-bearing; leaves rich dark glossy green, thick; flowers very late, large; fruit-stems long; seeds distinctly raised; fruit uniformly above medium in size, blunt-wedge to conic, with poorly developed apex, attractive dark red, juicy, subacid, with dark red flesh; fair; very late.

Evans. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:185. 1898.
Originated with G. R. Evans, Wicomico County, Maryland; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, medium productive; fruit large, round-conic, light scarlet; flesh light red, soft, acid; good; midseason.

Evening Star, 1. Mo. Sta. Bd. Hort. Rpt. 290. 1909. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 364:77. 1923. Originated in 1902 with James Sons, Seligman, Missouri. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, healthy and moderately productive; fruit large, round to blunt wedge-shape, light red; flesh light red, firm, acid; good; late.

Everbearer. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 206:52. 1903.
Introduced in 1893 by John A. Salzer, La Crosse, Wisconsin, as an " everbearer." Perfect. Plants few, weak; fruit small, regular, round-conic, dark scarlet, pleasant in flavor; early to late.

Evergreen. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 166:72. 1905.
Originated by Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas; introduced in 1903. Perfect. Plants numerous, very vigorous, moderately productive; fruit medium in size, long-conic, bright crimson; flesh red, medium firm, fair; early midseason.

Ewell. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 211:67- 1918.
A chance seedling which originated with a Mr. Ewell, Accomac County, Virginia! Perfect. Plants numerous, medium in vigor; fruit of medium size, round-conic, bright attractive red; flesh red, medium firm, juicy, subacid; fair; early.

Excelsior. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 154:35. 1904. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:524. 1908.
This old sort is still prized in many parts of the United States for its early, well-flavored berries which keep and ship particularly well. It is one of the few varieties with a distinctly sour berry that finds favor with consumers, The berries are small, dark red in color and ripen very early. The small size and acid fruits are the chief defects of the product. The plants are often injured by drouth and in many situations are unproductive. They do best grown in hills. Excelsior is giving way, in commercial plantations at least, to Howard. This variety originated about 1890 with Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas; introduced by J, C. Bauer of that place in 1892; parentage Hoffman by Wilson; added to the American Pomological Society's fruit catalog in 1899.
Perfect. Plants numerous, healthy, productive; leaves small, light green, dull, rugose, Flowers very early, small; petals 6-8; stamens variable in number; receptacle small. Fruit very early; fruit-stems short, prostrate; pedicels short, slender; calyx small, variable in position, often discolored; sepals short, narrow; berries medium to small, round-conic or globose; apex obtuse; color light to dark red, moderately glossy; seeds sunken; flesh usually dark red but variable, firm, juicy, decidedly tart; quality fair.

Excelsior (of Shaw). 1. Rural N. Y. 55:498. 1896.
Originated with James Shaw, South Hadley, Massachusetts; introduced in 1895; supposed to be a cross between Duchess and Crescent. Plants productive; fruit large, conical heart-shaped, soft; fair.

Exquisite. 1. Burbank Cat 12. 1916-17.
Raised about 1910 by Luther Burbank, Santa Rosa, California, as a descendant of one of his white seedling strawberries, a Chilian seedling, and Bubach. Perfect. Plants at this Station, very few, weak, low growing and dwarfish, very unproductive, healthy; flowers large, with the petal-edges recurved; fruit-stems short, erect; fruit variable in size and shape, unattractive pale red; flesh soft, very white; very good; very late.


Fae. 1. Ohio Sta. BuL 236:220, fig. 1912.
Originated with W. J. Alt, Lancaster, Ohio; introduced in 1908. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, productive; fruit large, blunt conical to broad wedge-shape, medium red; flesh light red, juicy, firm; good; midseason.

Fairdale. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 211:67. 1918.
Originated in 1905 with J. G. Harrison et Sons, Berlin, Maryland. Perfect. Plants moderately vigorous; berries large, roundish wedge-shaped, blunt, bright scarlet; flesh light red, firm, juicy, subacid; fair; midseason.

Fairfield. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 146:32. 1903. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:524. 1908.
A chance seedling found in an old peach orchard about 1895 by Martin Johnson, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Perfect. Station plants medium in number, vigorous, healthy, unproductive; fruit large, drops rapidly in size, round-conic to long-conic, glossy light to dark red, mildly acid, medium firm, inferior in flavor; fair; early. Its earliness is its greatest asset; disappointing in yield and flavor.

Fairmount 1. U. S. D. A, Pom. Rpt. 393. 1891.
Introduced in 1891 by Oakley Apgar, Califon, New Jersey. Perfect. Berries large, conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, moderately firm, subacid; very good; midseason.

Family Favorite. 1. Rural N. Y. 58:530. 1899.
Originated with Charles W. Momm, Irvington, New Jersey; introduced in 1898. Semi-perfect. Berries medium in size, round-conic, dark scarlet, firm, acid; good; midseason.

Fantastic. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 166. 1920.
Originated with Albert F. Etter, Ettersburg, California. Plants strong, vigorous; berries deepest red, fantastic shaped.

Farnsworth. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:332. 1890.
Originated with W. W. Farnsworth, Waterville, Ohio. Perfect. As grown here, plants vigorous, very numerous, not free from leaf-spot, productive; fruit conical, necked, light red, uniformly medium in size, too soft for shipping, very well flavored; very good; midseason. Felton. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:332. 1890.
Originated with Oscar Felton, Merchantsville, New Jersey; introduced about 1888. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants very vigorous, productive; fruit large, holds up in size, obtuse-conic, glossy dark red, firm, well flavored; very good; late, with long-ripening period.

Fendalcino. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 291. 1921.
Originated as a cross between Fendall and Ettersburg No. 121 by Albert F. Etter, Ettersburg, California. Imperfect. Berries large, bright red, moderately firm; good; early, with a tendency to be a double-cropper.

Fendalemo. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 166. 1920.
A seedling of Fendall originated by Albert F. Etter, Ettersburg, California. Plants vigorous; berries large, deep red; good.

Fendall. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 50. 1909. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:55. 1911.
A seedling of Belt originated in 1905 by Charles E. Fendall, Towson, Maryland; entered in the fruit catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1909. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants few, medium in size and vigor, healthy, productive; fruit large, retains size well, characteristically oblong-conic, necked, glossy light red, medium in juiciness and firmness, subacid; good; midseason. Lacks vigor and inferior in shape.

Ferndale Giant. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 364:77. 1923.
Introduced by T. C. Kevitt, Athenia, New Jersey, in 1912. Perfect. Plants vigorous, healthy; berries large, long-conical to wedge-shape, variable in color, usually crimson, firm, sweet; good; midseason.

Fifer. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:35. 1916. Gen. Fifer. 2. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 316. 1897.
Originated with C. C. Stone, Moline, Illinois; introduced about 1892. Perfect. Berries medium in size, round-conic, bright crimson; flesh light red, firm; good; late.

Fillbasket. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:180. 1915.
Received at this Station in 1910 from Vilmorin-Andrieux Nursery Company, Paris, France. Perfect. Berries medium in size, oblong-conic to wedge, dull light red; flesh whitish, sweet; good; late.

Fillmore. 1. Mag. Hort. 25:347. 1859.Feast's Fillmore. 2. Country Gent. 20:30. 1862.
Originated in 1852 with Samuel Feast et Sons, Baltimore, Maryland; included in the American Pomological Society's fruit catalog from 1862 to 1879. Perfect. Plants vigorous, healthy, productive; berries large, round-conic, obtuse, dark crimson, firm, sweet; good; early.

Finch. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 193. 1883. Finch's Prolific. 2. Gard. Mon. 23:241. 1881.
Originated in 1874 by Lewis Finch, Plainville, Ohio. Wilson is supposed to have been one of the parents. The American Pomological Society listed the variety in its fruit catalog from 1883 to 1897. Perfect. Berries large, round-conic, scarlet, firm; good; midseason.

First Prize. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 160:201, 210. 1911. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:181. 1915. A chance seedling originated in 1905 by E. M. Ruark, Sharptown, Maryland; introduced by E. W. Townsend et Sons, Salisbury, Maryland, in 1910. Perfect. Plants at this Station, medium in number and vigor, very productive, healthy; fruit-stems thick, prostrate; fruit very large, irregular wedge, with furrowed surface, light red, colors unevenly, green tipped, not very juicy, coarse, subacid; fair; early. Unattractive in shape, coarse in appearance, surpassed by other kinds.

First Quality. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:55. 1911
A seedling of Gandy and Sample, which originated with J. D. Gowing, North Reading, Massachusetts; introduced by C. S. Pratt, Reading, Massachusetts, in 1909. Perfect. At this Station, plants few, large, vigorous, healthy, medium in yield; leaves large, thick, dark green; flowers midseason, large; fruit-stems long, thick; calyx leafy, flat; seeds sunken; fruit large, retains size well, distinctly conic, glossy medium red, medium juicy, firm, sweet; very good; midseason. Worthy of trial.

Fisher. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:35. 1916. Prof. Fisher. 2. Rural N. Y. 58:514. 1899. 3, N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:541. 1908.
Originated by J. H. Black, Son et Company, Hightstown, New Jersey; introduced in 1899. Imperfect. Station plants few, vigorous, healthy, productive; leaves very large; fruit-stems medium to long, 'semi-erect; calyx often raised on a swollen neck; fruit large, retains size well, irregular wedge, with furrowed surface, light red, coarse in appearance, moderately firm, acid; fair to good; late.

Fleming. 1. Country Gent. 22:46. 1863.
Originated in 1859 with F. A. Fleming, Curwensville, Pennsylvania, as a cross between McAvoy Superior and Wilson. Imperfect. Berries large, round-conic, obtuse, dark scarlet, soft, sweet; good.

Flora Bell.
HalVs Seedling. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:8. 1894.
Originated by S. E. Hall, Cherry Valley, Illinois, about 1890. Imperfect. Station plants medium numerous, less productive than Sharpless but more so than Crescent, with very good foliage and good fruit-stems; blossoms about with Manchester and Sharpless; fruit medium in size, firm; fair; midseason.

Florella. 1. ///. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 293. 1905. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:525. 1908.
Originated in 1896 by J. P. H. Brown, Augusta, Georgia, as a cross between Bubach and Thompson; introduced in 1904. Perfect. As grown here, plants few, medium in vigor, healthy, unproductive; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate; berries variable in size and shape, glossy medium red, firm, acid, not high in flavor; fair; early. Not equal to the best varieties.

Florence. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:35. 1916. Clara. 2. Rural N. Y. 50:528. 1891.
Originated by Mark T. Thompson, Cleveland, Ohio; introduced in 1889. Perfect. Berries medium in size, round-conic, bright scarlet; flesh light red, firm; fair; midseason.

Flush. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:35. 1916. Flosch. 2. Am. Gard. 19:642. 1898. Flash. 3. Mich. Sta. Bul. 189:117. 1901.
Originated by Thomas Wilde, Wright, Michigan; introduced about 1896. Imperfect. Berries large, irregular, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm; very good; midseason.

Ford. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:69. 1918.
A chance seedling found growing wild about 1913 by a Mr. Granville, Brewington, Maryland. Semi-perfect to perfect. On the Station grounds, plants numerous, extremely vigorous, healthy, very productive; leaves of largest size, very thick, dark green; flowers very late, large; fruit-stems very long, thick, erect; calyx unusually large, flat, very leafy, attractive green, with long, broad sepals; berries of largest size, blunt-wedge to blunt-conic, glossy medium to dark red, coloring unevenly, very juicy, firm, sweet, with dark red flesh; good; very late. Worthy of trial. Since its introduction other plants have been sold for Ford, entirely unlike the variety just described.

Forest Rose. 1. Gard. Mon. 19:274. 1877.
A chance seedling which originated in 1869 with J. A. Fetters, Lancaster, Ohio; included in the American Pomological Society's fruit catalog from 1877 to 1883. Perfect. Plants, vigorous, productive; berries large, round-conic, obtuse, scarlet; flesh light red, firm, sweet; good; early.

Fort. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:36. 1916. Gov. Fort. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:182. 1915.
Originated as a cross between Sample and Glen Mary by T. C. Kevitt, Athenia, New Jersey, in 1906. Perfect. At this Station, plants few, medium in vigor, productive, healthy; fruit-stems long, thick, prostrate; fruit above medium in size, long-wedge to long-conic, dull light red; flesh whitish, medium juicy, subacid, very mild, low in flavor; poor; midseason. Surpassed by other varieties,

Forward. 1. N. Y. Sta. BuL 447:69. 1918.
An autumn-bearer originated in 1907 by Samuel Cooper, Delevan, New York, as a cross between Autumn and Cooper. This variety is so similar in both plant and fruit habits to Advance that the description of Advance will answer for both varieties.

Fountain. 1. Am. Gard. 18:536. 1897. 2. la. Sta. BuL 64:191, 196, 202. 1902.
Originated in Ohio; introduced in 1895. Perfect. Berries large, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm, acid; good; midseason.

Four Seasons. 1. N. Y. Sta. BuL 401:181. 1915.
Received at this Station in 1910 from Vilmorin-Andrieux Nursery Company, Paris, France. Perfect. Plants weak, unproductive; berries small, conic, whitish, unattractive, tart, insipid; poor; midseason.

Frances Cleveland. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. BuL 11:36. 1916, Mrs. Cleveland. 2. N. Y. Sta. BuL 24:338. 1890.
A seedling of Cumberland; originated in 1881 by George Townsend, Gordon, Ohio. Imperfect. Berries large, irregular round-conic, bright scarlet; flesh light red, firm; good; midseason.

Frances Willard. 1. N. Y. Sta. BuL 447:69. 1918.
Seeds of an unnamed seedling were sown in 1910 by D. J. Miller, Millersburg, Ohio. One of the resulting plants was named Frances Willard. Imperfect. As grown here, plants very numerous, vigorous, healthy, very productive; leaves unusually large, thick, dark green; fruit-stems long, thick; calyx distinctly raised; fruit large, retains size well, long-conic to long-wedge, strongly necked, light red, medium juicy, firm, subacid; fair to good; midseason. Flesh characters disappointing.

Francis. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 335. 1911. 2. Ohio Sta. BuL 364:91. 1923.
Originated in 1905 by Harlow Rockhill, Conrad, Iowa, as a cross between Louis Gauthier and Pan American. Perfect. Station plants few, vigorous, healthy, variable in yield; autumn-bearing; fruit-stems long, slender, prostrate; fruit above medium to small, round-conic, light red, firm, subacid, juicy; good; midseason. The new runner-plants blossom as soon as rooted.

Free Silver. 1. Rural N. Y. 56:471. 1897.
Originated by T. C. Kevitt, Athenia, New Jersey, as a cross between Bubach and Parker Earle. Perfect. Plants moderately vigorous; berries medium in size, long-conic, dark crimson, soft; good; midseason.

Fremont Williams. 1. Ohio Sta. BuL 166:73, % *905-
Originated in 1893 by Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas, as a cross between Gandy and Bush Cluster. Perfect. Plants large, vigorous; berries large, round-conic, light crimson, firm, subacid; good; late.

French* 1. Country Gent 22:367. 1863. French's Seedling. 2. Gard. Mon. 10:238. 1868.
Originated about 1858 by Lewis French, Moorestown, New Jersey, as a seedling of Hovey; a standard market sort late in the sixties. Perfect. Plants medium in size and vigor, productive; berries medium to large, round-conic, light scarlet; flesh light red, soft, sweet; good; early.

Friendship. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:69. 1918.
This is a seedling of Maximus found by J. F. Nickerson, Chatham, Massachusetts, in 1912. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants few, medium in vigor, very productive, injured by leaf-spot; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate; fruit variable in size, long-wedge to long-conic, strongly necked, light red, dull, juicy, medium firm, tart, with an unpleasant flavor; poor; midseason. Plants unhealthy; fruit disappointing.

Fuller* 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:36. 1916.
A chance seedling which originated with J. B. Fuller, Anna, Illinois; introduced in 1911. Perfect. Berries large, long-conic, dark crimson, firm; good; midseason.


Galceron. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 67:4. 1890. Galerson. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:8. 1894.
Originated in 1882 with a Mrs. Galceron, Atlanta, Georgia. Perfect. As grown here, plants vigorous, few, unproductive; leaves and fruit-stems good; fruit medium in size, symmetrical, attractive dark red, firm; poor; midseason to late.

Ganaugua. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:185. 1898.
A cross between Wilson and Sharpless raised by A. A. Mitchell, Palmyra, New York* introduced about 1896. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigor, and productivity; fruit of medium size, roundish, scarlet; flesh medium firm; fair; midseason.

Gandy. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:332. 1890. 2. Rural N. Y. 61:498. 1902. Candy's Prize. 3. Col. 0. Hart. Soc. Rpt. 69. 1887. First Season. 4. Am. Gard. 10:342. 1889.
The outstanding qualities of Gandy are handsome, deep red, firm fruits of very good quality, although the variety finds favor in many localities because of its late season, the fruits reaching the market the last of their kind. The plants are partial as to soils and thrive best in heavy rather than light soils. The fruits hold their color when canned very well, but are a little too acid for a prime canned product. The variety is grown more or less wherever strawberries are cultivated in the United States. Gandy was originated in 1885 by W. S. Gandy, Newport, New Jersey, as a cross between Jersey Queen and Glendale; introduced in 1888; added to the fruit list of the American Pomological Society in 1889.
Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous but low-spreading, variable in health, productive; leaves of medium size, thick, light green, dull, rugose. Flowers late, variable in size; petals 6-8, small; stamens very few to many; receptacle large. Fruit very late, holds up well in size; fruit-stems variable in length, thick, semi-erect to erect; pedicels short, slender; calyx large, raised, leafy, easily detached, well colored; sepals long, broad; berries large, round-conic; apex very obtuse; color light red at first, deepening to dark, rather dull red at maturity; seeds raised; flesh well colored to the center, very firm, briskly subacid, juicy; core hollow; quality good.

Ganto. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:37. 1916.
Originated at the Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station, College Park, Maryland, in 1911. Berries medium, conic, flattened, dull crimson, soft; fair; late.

Garden. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 167. 1882. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:332. 1890.
A seedling of Monarch which originated at Babylon, New York, about 1880. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants vigorous, numerous, variable in yield; fruit-stems long; good; season long.

Gardner. 1. Am. Gard. 17:627. 1896. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:185. 1898.
A chance seedling which originated about 1887 with C. F. Gardner, Osage, Iowa. Perfect. Plants medium in number and vigor, unproductive; fruit of medium size, irregular round-conic, light scarlet; flesh firm, acid; fair; early midseason.

Garibaldi. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 987. 1869.
Raised by W. A. Burgess, Glen Cove, New York; introduced before 1862. Perfect. Fruit medium in size, roundish blunt-conic, light scarlet; flesh soft, sweet; good; early.

Garretson. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 241. 1886.
Originated with a Mr. Garretson, on Long Island, New York; introduced in 1884. Imperfect. At this Station, plants lack in vigor and productiveness; fruit-stems short; fruit medium to large, round-conic, dull dark red, very firm, subacid; poor; midseason, ripening period long.

Garrison. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 160:210. 1911. Lady Garrison. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 166:76. 1905.
Introduced about 1901. Perfect. Plants numerous, medium in vigor and productivity; fruit medium in size, irregular, oblong, light scarlet; flesh pink, medium firm; good; midseason.

Geisler. 1. Ont. Fr. Exp. Sta. Rpt. 61. 1901. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 63:31. 1909.
A chance seedling found in Michigan; introduced in 1897. Perfect. Plants few, vigorous, unproductive; fruit large, roundish, dark glossy red; flesh red, firm, juicy, subacid; good; late.

Gem. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:38. 1916.
Originated in 1911 with A. F. Freeny, Wicomico County, Maryland. Perfect. Plants numerous; fruit large, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm, mildly subacid; late.

General Meade. 1. Mag. Hort. 32:273. 1866.
Originated with J. Keech, Waterloo, New York, as a cross between Russell and Triomphe; introduced in 1866. Fruit large, conic, light crimson; flesh firm; fair; midseason.

General Putnam. 1. Ann. Hort. 201. 1892. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:8. 1894.
Originated as a chance seedling in a bed of Cumberland and Crescent with J. E. Brown on the old Putnam farm, Brooklyn, Connecticut. Imperfect. As grown here, plants few, unproductive, with tender foliage; flowers very early; fruit-stems good; fruit medium to large, light red, round-conic, very soft, subacid; good; midseason.

General Scott. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 988. 1869.
Originated by W. A. Burgess, Glen Cove, New York; introduced about 1862. Perfect. Plants vigorous and productive; fruit large, roundish, necked, light scarlet; flesh whitish, medium firm, subacid; good; early.

Genesee. 1. Gen. Farmer 12:199. 1851. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 674. 1857.
Raised by Ellwanger et Barry, Rochester, New York, as a seedling of Hovey; introduced by them in 1851. Perfect. Plants vigorous, moderately productive; fruit large, roundish oblate, necked, dark scarlet; flesh soft, juicy, mildly subacid; fair; late.

George Washington. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:38. 1916.
Listed in 1912. Fruit medium to large, long wedge-shape, crimson; flesh light red, mildly subacid; fair; early.

Georgia Mammoth. 1. Fuller Sm. Fr. Cult. 92. 1867.
Originated by Charles A. Peabody, Columbus, Georgia; introduced about 1860. Plants vigorous; fruit medium to small, blunt-conic, dark crimson; flesh very firm, acid; good; late.

Germantown. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 674. 1857.
Originated with G. Young, Germantown, Pennsylvania; introduced about 1856. Perfect. Plants vigorous, very productive; fruit very large, regular, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh firm, sweet, highly flavored.

Gersonde. 1. Mich. Sta. Spec. Bul. 35:14. 1906.
Originated with Henry Gersonde, Bridgman, Michigan, in 1900. Imperfect. Plants numerous, vigorous; fruit of medium size, roundish conic, bright red; flesh light red, firm, juicy, acid; good; late.

Gertrude. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 316. 1897.
Originated with C. C. Stone, Moline, Illinois, in 1887, as a chance seedling. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, unproductive; fruit medium in size, round-conic, light crimson; flesh light red, medium firm; fair; early midseason.

Giant. 1. Am. Gard. 15:335. 1894. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 91:191. 1895.
A chance seedling which originated with Joseph Bailey, Marlboro, New York; introduced in 1893. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants vigorous, numerous, medium in yield; fruit-stems good; fruit medium to large, light red, medium firm; poor; late.

Giant (of Gardner). 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:39. 1916. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 364:78. 1923.
Originated with C. F. Gardner, Osage, Iowa; introduced in 1912. Said to be "a sport of Gardner." Perfect. Plants medium in size and vigor, very productive; fruit large, becoming small later in the season, round-conic to round-wedge, light red; flesh light red, soft, sweet; good; midseason.

Gibson. 1. Am. Gard. 20:641. 1899.
Originated in 1895 with J. H. Gibson, Marlboro, New York, as a chance seedling. Perfect. At this Station, plants vigorous, healthy, productive; berries large, irregular, globular, slightly conical, dark glossy crimson; flesh dark red, firm, mildly subacid; good; midseason.

Gill. I. Ohio Sta. Bul. 154:39, PI. 4. 1904. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:526. 1908.
A supposed cross between Beder Wood and a seedling of Bubach which originated about 1898 with E. H. Ekey, Steubenville, Ohio. Perfect. In some sections valued as an extra early sort for sandy soils. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants very few, weak, unhealthy in appearance, unproductive; fruit-stems thick; fruit medium to small, irregular in shape, medium red, moderately firm, mildly acid, low in flavor, whitish flesh; poor; very early.

Gillespie. 1. Ann. Hort. 210. 1891. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 44:143. 1892.
A seedling of Haverland which originated in 1886 with Samuel Gillespie, Butler County, Ohio. Perfect. Plants at this Station vigorous, few; fruit resembles Haverland in shape, but with longer neck and of lighter color; soft; of indifferent quality; midseason.

Gladstone, 1. Rural N. Y. 57:450, 527, fig. 241. 1898. 2. N. Y.Sta. Bul. 309:526. 1908. A chance seedling, supposed to be of Sharpless, which originated about 1893 with F. F. Merceron, Catawissa, Pennsylvania. Perfect. At this Station, plants few, vigorous, healthy, unproductive; fruit-stems stout; fruit large, retains size well, wedge, glossy dark red, medium firm, mildly acid, with dark red flesh; good; late midseason.

Glastonbury. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:55. 1911.
A cross between Haverland and Great Scott raised by J. H. Hale, Glastonbury, Connecticut, in 1901. Semi-perfect. Station plants few, medium in size and vigor, healthy, unproductive; fruit conic, glossy medium red, large, very juicy, firm, tart; good; midseason.

Glauer. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 189:115. 1901.
Originated with a Mr. Glauer of Colorado; introduced about 1890. Imperfect. Plants medium in number and vigor, productive; fruit medium to large, round-conic to wedge-shape, bright crimson; flesh medium red, medium firm, acid; good; midseason.

Glen Mary. 1. U. S. D. A. Pom. Rpt. 28. 1894. 2. Rural N. Y. 55:514. 1896. 3. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 276:70. 1906.
Once widely grown, Glen Mary is still prized in New York and New England for its productive plants and its handsome, well-flavored fruits. Several faults are causing it to be discarded in many strawberry regions. These are: The fruit-stems are too slender to hold the fruit off the ground; the foliage is susceptible to leaf-spot; the plants thrive only on very heavy and very fertile soils; and the blossoms are not self fertile, so that the fruits are often malformed. Glen Mary is still largely cultivated in the Hudson River Valley in this State. This sort was originated by J. A. Ingram, East Bradford, Pennsylvania, about 1890 as a chance seedling; introduced by W. F. Allen, Salisbury, Maryland, in 1896; placed in the American Pomological Society's fruit list in 1899.
Semi-perfect. Plants rather small, fairly vigorous, sometimes injured by leaf-spot, productive; leaves variable in size, dark green, thick, glossy, slightly rugose. Flowers early, rather large; petals 6-7; stamens few; receptacle large. Fruit midseason; fruit-stems variable in length and thickness, semi-erect to prostrate; pedicels long, thick; calyx medium to large, flat or slightly raised, often discolored; sepals long; berries large, irregular round-conic; apex often poorly pollinated, misshapen, irregular, obtuse; color dull red, often with whitish or light colored apex; seeds raised; flesh well colored to the center, firm, juicy, mildly subacid; quality good.

Glen Saint Mary. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 209. 1902.
Originated in 1916 by W. M. Ventling, Glen Saint Mary, Florida, as a cross between Klondike and Nich Ohmer. Perfect. Plants large, very vigorous, productive; foliage healthy; fruit large, broad-conic, dark red; flesh red, firm; good; midseason.

Glendale. 1. Ohio Hort. Soc. Rpt. 83. 1876-77.
A chance seedling found in Glendale Cemetery, Akron, Ohio, by W. B. Storer in 1871. It was grown considerably as a late sort until superseded by Gandy, one of its seedlings. In 1879 .Glendale was added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society from which it was removed in 1897. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, hardy, and productive; fruit medium to large, round-conic, scarlet; flesh light red, firm, acid; good; late.

Glenfield. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 76:434. 1894.
A cross between Warren and Glendale, originated by James Stayman, Leavenworth, Kansas; introduced about 1891. Perfect. As grown here, plants vigorous, few, unproductive, with good fruit-stems; fruit medium in size, dark red, long-conic; flesh dark red; good; midseason.

Glenwood. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 218:197. 1902.
Grown at this Station prior to 1902. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants medium in number, vigorous, injured by leaf-spot, productive; fruit above medium in size, irregular wedge, glossy dark red, medium firm, sweet, with dark red flesh; good; midseason.

Globe. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 213:7. 1904. 2. Ar. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:536. 1908.
Originated in 1898 with Eugene Sutherland, West Coxsackie, New York. Perfect. As grown here, plants medium in number and vigor, attacked by leaf-spot, very productive; fruit-bu'1 clusters conspicuous, showing above the foliage; fruit-stems thick, erect; fruit large to below medium, drops in size, irregular in shape, with very roughish surface, dull medium red, firm, acid; fair; midseason.

Glossy Cone. 1. N. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 7. 1878.
Originated about 1865 by E. W. Durand, Irvington, New Jersey. Perfect. Plants unproductive; fruit small, conic, scarlet; flesh medium firm; poor.

Gold. 1. Rural N. Y. 45:509. 1886. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:332. 1890.
Raised from mixed seed of Jersey Queen and Prince of Berries in 1880 by P. M. Augur, Middlefield, Connecticut. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants vigorous, numerous, unproductive; fruit-stems short; fruit large, flattened at the apex, necked, light red, firm, finely flavored; good; midseason.

Gold Coin. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 209. 1922.
The original plant was found in a shipment of Lucky Boy in 1919 by A. B. Katkamier, Macedon, New York. Semi-perfect. Plants at this Station very few, vigorous, healthy, very productive; autumn-bearing; leaves dark green; flowers small; fruit-stems long, thick, semi-erect; calyx depressed; fruit variable in size, blunt-wedge to blunt-conic, glossy medium red, moderately juicy, firm, subacid; fair to good; early midseason.

Gold Dollar. 1. Ore. Bien. Rpt. Bd. Hort. 103. 1911.
Originated with Z. Mills, Springbrook, Oregon, as a supposed seedling of Excelsior. It is grown somewhat in Oregon where it is considered one of the best early varieties for nearby markets. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, medium productive; fruit medium in size, uniform, round-conic, dark red; flesh medium red, rather soft, subacid; good; early.

Golden Defiance. 1. Gard. Mon. 16:279. 1874.
Originated with Amos Miller, Carlisle, Pennsylvania. In 1879 the name was added to the American Pomological Society's catalog, from which it was removed in 1883. Imperfect. At this Station, plants very vigorous, numerous; fruit medium to large, roundish or oblate-conic, bright red, not very firm, acid, pleasant; good; late.

Golden Gate. 1. N, Y. Sta. Bul. 309:526. 1908.
Originated in 1903 by S. H. Warren, Weston, Massachusetts, who introduced it in 1906. It is thought to be a seedling of Marshall. Semi-perfect. Station plants medium to numerous, vigorous, healthy, very productive; leaves large, dark green; fruit-stems short, prostrate; calyx large, leafy; seeds raised; fruit above medium to very large, wedge, necked, medium to dark red, glossy, very firm, mildly acid; good; medium early. Has many qualities to commend it.

Golden Seeded. 1. Cultivator 7:323. 1859. 2. Fuller Sm. Fr. Cult. 93. 1867.
Originated with W. H. Read, Port Dalhousie, Ontario, Canada; introduced in 1859. Perfect. Plants medium in number, unproductive; fruit medium in size, blunt-conic, dark crimson; flesh medium red, moderately firm, sweet; very good; early midseason.

Goldsborough. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 276:71. 1906.
Raised by A. T. Goldsborough, Washington, D. C, as a cross between a wild berry and British Queen. Imperfect. As grown here, plants very few, vigorous, unproductive; fruit-stems thick; fruit above medium to large, retains size well, round-conic to wedge, dull red, firm, mildly acid, well flavored; good; early to midseason.

Goliath. 1. Horticulturist 6:552. 1851.
An English sort grown somewhat in this country about 1860. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, hardy; fruit large, irregular coxcomb, bright scarlet; flesh light red, medium firm, acid; good; late.

Good Luck. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:527. 1908. 2. Ibid. 427:529, PI. 1916.
The fruits of Good Luck are distinguished by flesh so firm that they are hardly surpassed for shipping purposes. Moreover, they are large, handsome and very good in quality for those who like a sprightly strawberry. Besides this slight acidity they have a very distinctive flavor. Unfortunately the apex of the berries colors slowly so that much care must be taken in picking to avoid green tips. The plants are unusually satisfactory, especially as they are not susceptible to leaf-spot, but they must not be set too closely as they develop many runners. At the close of the season, especially in dry weather, the berries run small and show too many seeds. Good Luck originated with Elwood Pedrick, Cumberland County, Maryland, in 1904; introduced in 1907 by W. F. Allen, Salisbury, Maryland. In 1909 the American Pomological Society added the variety to its catalog list of fruits.
Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, tall, attacked by leaf-spot under unfavorable conditions, very productive; leaves medium in size, thickness and color, rugose, dull. Flowers midseason, large; petals 6-7; stamens variable in number; receptacle medium to large. Fruit late; fruit-stems long, thick, semi-erect; pedicels long; calyx large, flat, leafy, often surrounded at the base by small, fleshy protuberances; sepals long, broad; berries large, retain size fairly well, distinctly wedge with some coxcombs in the first pickings; apex a pointed wedge, inclined to green tips; color glossy medium red; seeds variable in position; flesh well colored to the center, juicy, firm, sprightly; quality good.

Goodell. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:181. 1915.
Originated in 1906 by Samuel Goodell, Seattle, Washington, as a cross between Marshall and a white seedling of Royal Sovereign and Louis Gauthier. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants few, small, weak, low growing, very productive; fruit-stems slender, prostrate; fruit above medium to small, blunt-wedge, often green tipped and poorly developed, glossy dark red, juicy, very firm, sweet, well flavored; good to very good; midseason.

Goodwin. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:181. 1915.
A cross between Dawn and a seedling of Dawn and Ionia, raised in 1905 by H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants few, vigorous, productive, attacked by leaf-spot; leaves large, very dark green; flowers large; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate; calyx large, flat; fruit large, conic, broad at the base, glossy dark red, very juicy and firm, well flavored, sprightly; very good; midseason.

Goree. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:56. 1911.
A chance seedling found in a bed of Brandywine in 1902 by J. W. Goree, Whitewright, Texas. Perfect. Plants at this Station few, medium in size and vigor, healthy, unproductive; fruit medium to small, conic, glossy dark red, very juicy, firm, subacid, highly flavored; good; midseason.

Governor Hoard. 1. Ann. Hort. 211. 1891. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 44:143. 1892. Loudon's No. 15. 3. Mich. Sta. Bul. 67:6. 1890.
A seedling of Sharpless raised in 1882 by F. W. Loudon, Janesville, Wisconsin. Perfect. Station plants vigorous, numerous, with dark green foliage; fruit large, round-conic, attractive dark red, medium firm, subacid; good; midseason.

Governor Rollins. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:527. 1908.
Raised from seed about 1900 by Benjamin M. Smith, Beverly, Massachusetts. Perfect. As grown here, plants medium in number, vigorous, healthy, productive; leaves large, dark green; fruit-stems short, thick, semi-erect; calyx very large, leafy, dark green, sometimes discolored; fruit large to medium, retains size well, variable in shape, dull medium to dark red, green tipped, firm, mildly acid, with pleasant flavor; good to very good; midseason.

Graham. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 142:153. 1897.
Originated with C. W. Graham, Afton, New York. Perfect. Plants medium in vigor and productivity; fruit of medium size, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, medium firm, acid; very good; midseason.

Grand Marie, 1. Ar. /. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 48. 1911. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:182. 1915. Originated by H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan, as a cross between Dawn and a seedling of Dawn and Ionia. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants vigorous, productive, healthy; leaves large; flowers large; fruit-stems thick, prostrate; calyx large, raised; fruit very large, oblong-conic, with a long, tapering apex, necked, glossy medium red, green-tipped, firm, sweet, with whitish flesh; good; early.

Grand Prize. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 166. 1920.
A chance seedling originating with H. L. McConnell et Son, Port Burwell, Ontario; introduced in 1915. Perfect. Plants vigorous; fruit similar in size and shape to Pocomoke, dark red; flesh dark red, firm; high in quality; ripens with Williams .

Granger. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:56. 1911.
A chance seedling which originated in 1908 with E. H. Ekey, Steubenville, Ohio. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants medium in number, vigor, and yield, healthy, leaves large, dark green; fruit-stems short, prostrate; calyx leafy; fruit large, long-conic, bright red, juicy, firm, pleasantly subacid, with dark red flesh; very good; late midseason or later.

Granville. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 54:45. 1894. 2. Rural N. Y. 62:518. 1903.
Originated with A. M. Nichols, Granville, Ontario, Canada, as a supposed seedling of Miner. Perfect. Plants at this Station, vigorous, numerous, attacked by leaf-spot, productive; fruit medium to large, round-conic, light to dark red, colors unevenly, not very juicy, medium firm, mildly subacid; fair to good; medium late.

Gray.
Gray Dollar. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:56. 1911. Dollar Mark. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 364:76. 1923.
Originated by A. G. Gray, Pekin, Indiana, as a seedling of Gandy; introduced by him about 1908. Perfect. At this Station, plants numerous, large, vigorous, healthy, moderately productive; fruit large, chunky-wedge, dull medium red, juicy, firm, variable in flavor; very good; midseason.

Great American. 1. N. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 8. 1878.
Originated by E. W. Durand, Irvington, New Jersey, about 1875. It was widely disseminated at high prices, but failed except in the region of its origin. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1879 from which it was removed in 1897. Perfect. Plants medium in number, productive; fruit large to very large, irregular, dark scarlet; flesh light red, medium firm; good; late.

Great Pacific. 1. III. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 360. 1886. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 44:143. 1892.
Originated about 1885 by D. J. Piper, Foreston, Illinois. Imperfect. Station plants very vigorous, numerous, productive; fruit-stems stout, upright; fruit large, conic, glossy bright red, firm, subacid; good; midseason.

Great Scott. 1. Rural N. Y. 59:674. 1900. 2. AT. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:528. 1908.
Raised from seed about 1899 as a cross between Bubach and Belmont by John Scott, Newton, Massachusetts. Imperfect. As grown here, plants few, lack vigor, healthy, unproductive; fruit-stems prostrate; calyx much sunken; fruit medium to very large, retains size well, decidedly variable in shape, glossy, light to dark red, firm, acid, inferior in flavor; poor; midseason. Of no value here.

Greek. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:70. 1918.
Originated with Sylvester Marshall, Athens, Ohio, in 1912. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants medium in number and vigor, healthy, productive; fruit-stems semi-erect, branching into long pedicels; calyx large, distinctly raised and with long, reflexed sepals tinged red; fruit above medium in size, long-conic, almost oblong, strongly necked, glossy medium red, juicy, very firm, sprightly, with red flesh; fair; midseason.

Green Prolific. 1. Mag. Hort. 29:382. 1863. 2. Puller Sm. Fr. Cult. 93, fig. 31. 1867. Newark Prolific. 3. Card. Mon. 8:280. 1866.
Originated about 1858 by Seth Boyden, Newark, New Jersey, as a cross between Hovey and Goliath. In spite of softness and poor quality, it was at one time a valuable sort in New Jersey. Green Prolific was added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1871 from which it was removed in 1881. Imperfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, hardy and productive; fruit large, round, pale crimson; flesh light red, rather soft, acid; poor; late.

Greensboro. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:42. 1916. Greensboro Favorite. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 166. 1920.
Originated with R. G. Thomas, Greensboro, North Carolina, in 1900. Plants vigorous; fruit medium in size, round-conic, dark red; good; early midseason.

Greenville. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 36:632. 1891. Buechiys Seedling. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:338. 1890.
A chance seedling which originated in 1883 with E. M. Buechiy, Greenville, Ohio. At one time valued for the general market on account of its great productivity. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1897 where it remained in the last catalog in 1909. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants very vigorous, very productive, numerous; fruit-stems short; fruit large, dark red, variable in shape, firm, with a strong flavor; fair; midseason.

Greenwood. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:56. 1911.
Originated with S. Hill, Greenwood, Massachusetts; introduced in 1909 by C. S. Pratt, Reading, Massachusetts. Perfect. Plants at this Station few, above medium in size and vigor, healthy, unproductive; fruit-stems characteristically long and slender-branched; fruit above medium to small, conic or wedge, medium juicy, firm, very mild, sweet, of inferior flavor; poor; late.

Grove End Scarlet. 1. Trans. Lond. Hort. Soc. 5:399. 1824. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 527. 1845.
An old English sort popular in this country from 1830 to 1840. Originated by William Atkinson, Grove End, England, about 1820; introduced into this country about 1830. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, and productive; fruit medium in size, roundish, light scarlet; flesh light red, firm, mildly subacid; good; early.

Gypsy. 1. Ohio Hort. Soc. Rpt. 57. 1881-82. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 36:632. 1891.
Originated in New Jersey; introduced about 1879. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1883 from which it was removed in 1897. Imperfect. At this Station, plants vigorous, numerous, low growing, medium productive; fruit-stems short; fruit of medium size, dark red, heart-shaped, firm, well flavored, round-conic, with dark red flesh; good; medium early. Fruit resembles Wilson but larger.


Haight. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 169:147. 1899. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:43. 1916.
Originated about 1886 with J. H. Haight, Osage, Iowa, as a seedling of Wilson. Perfect. Berries medium in size, conic, scarlet, moderately firm; fair; midseason.

Hall Beauty. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 166. 1920.
Originated with the Armstrong Nurseries, Ontario, California. Plants healthy, productive; berries large, well colored, aromatic; good.

Hall Favorite. 1. Am. Gard. 17:727. 1896.
Originated as a chance seedling in 1891 with J. W. Hall, Marion, Maryland. Perfect. Plants vigorous; berries medium in size, roundish, crimson, firm, acid; good; early.

Halley. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:223. 1912.
Originated at the Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station; parentage unknown. Perfect. Plants large, vigorous; berries large, conic, bright scarlet, firm, acid; good; early to late.

Ham. 1. Rural N. Y. 60:518. 1901. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 218:197. *902.
Originated in 1898 with J. H. Black, Son et Company, Hightstown, New Jersey, as a seedling of Mary and Sharpless crossed with Marshall. Perfect. As grown here, plants vigorous, healthy, medium in number; fruit large, decidedly wedge, very dark red, firm, juicy, well flavored; seeds raised; good; midseason. Fruit too dark in color.

Hammer. 1. Va. Sta. Tech, Bul. 11:43. 1916.
A chance seedling which originated with August Hammer, Bridgman, Michigan; introduced in 1915. Perfect. Berries large, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm, mildly subacid; good; midseason to late.

Hampden. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:333. 1890. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:43. 1916.
Originated in 1883 with J. W. Adams et Company, Springfield, Massachusetts. Imperfect. On the Station grounds, plants vigorous, numerous, very productive, severely injured by leaf-spot; fruit medium to large, oblong-conic, bright red, firm, subacid; good; midseason, ripening period long.

Hanbach. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:43. 1916.
Originated with T. M. Hanbach, Warrenton, Virginia, as a cross between Mascot and Gandy; introduced in 1912. Perfect. Berries medium, round-conic, light crimson, firm; good; late.

Hanks. 1. Wash. Nur. Cat. 18. 1923.
Introduced recently by the Washington Nursery Company, Toppenish, Washington, Semi-perfect to imperfect. In the Station beds, plants medium in number and yield, vigorous, healthy; autumn-bearing; flowers very early, very small; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate; fruit medium to small, roundish, glossy red, juicy, medium firm, sweet; good; very early.

Harlem Orange. 1. Mag. Hort. 18:407. 1852.
Raised by Thomas Edmondson, Baltimore, Maryland; introduced about 1850. Imperfect. Berries medium in size, conic, orange-scarlet, firm; good; early to midseason.

Harmon. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 100:7. 1893.
Introduced about 1892 by Slaymaker et Son, Dover, Delaware. Perfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries medium in size, round-conic, very dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm; very good; early.

Harrison. 1. Penn. Sta. Rpt. 216. 1898-99.
Originated by George W. Adams, Tamaqua, Pennsylvania; introduced about 1897. Perfect. Plants vigorous, healthy; berries large; runners numerous; midseason.

Hart Minnesota. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 415. 1882.
Originated in 1872 with John Hart, Winona, Minnesota; introduced in 1875; included in the American Pomological Society's fruit catalog from 1883 to 1897. Perfect. Plants vigorous, moderately productive; berries medium in size, round-conic, crimson, firm; good; midseason.

Hartnell. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:43. 1916.
Originated by a Mr. Hartnell, Oregon City, Oregon; introduced about 1913. Perfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries medium in size, round-conic, dark crimson, firm, mildly subacid; fair; midseason.

Hatch Experiment Station. 1. Am. Gard. 19:642. 1898. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:44. 1916.
Originated at the Hatch Experiment Station, Amherst, Massachusetts; introduced about 1892. Imperfect. Berries large, round-conic to obconic, crimson, firm, subacid; very good; late.

Hatfield. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 44:143. 1892. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:44. 1916.
Originated with William Cook, Camden County, New Jersey; introduced about 1889. Perfect. Plants at this Station, medium in vigor, healthy; fruit medium to large, conic, pleasant subacid; good; midseason.

Hathaway. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 989. 1869.
Originated by B. Hathaway, Little Prairie Ronde, Michigan; introduced about 1850. Perfect. Plants vigorous, very productive; berries large, roundish to oblong, dark scarlet; flesh light red, moderately firm, acid; good.

Hattie Jones. 1. Ind. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 104. 1889. Hattie. 2. Ind. Sta. Bul. 48:6, 8. 1894.
Originated with Adam Jones, Plainfield, Indiana; introduced about 1889. Perfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries medium in size, round-conic, light scarlet; flesh whitish, soft; poor; midseason.

Hattie Warfield. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 177:19, 22. 1899.
Originated with W. W. Sewall, Carthage, Missouri; introduced about 1897. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries medium in size, round-conic, deep scarlet, firm; good; midseason.

Haverland. 1. Col. 0. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 219. 1887. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:333. 1890. 3. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:44. 1916.
At the beginning of this century Haverland was considered about the best strawberry for home use and local markets and is still to be found in many gardens in the New England states. The berries are too soft and too light in color for distant markets. The crop ripens over a long season. The plants are very productive and the variety has a reputation of being very hardy, and its blossoms are said to be seldom injured by frost. The clusters are so heavy as to lie on the ground so that a mulch is always necessary for this sort. Dunlap makes the most satisfactory pollinizer. The variety originated in 1882 as a cross between Crescent and Sharpless with B. H. Haverland, Cincinnati, Ohio; introduced in 1887. The American Pomological Society added the variety to its list of recommended fruits in 1889.
Imperfect. Plants variable in number, tall, vigorous, healthy, very productive; leaves light to dark green, thin, smooth, glossy. Flowers early; petals 5-6; receptacle small. Fruit midseason; fruit-stems slender, too weak to hold up the fruit; pedicels short, slender; calyx large, raised, often leafy, easily detached, well colored; sepals long, narrow; berries medium to large, symmetrical, long-conic to wedge, sometimes necked; apex pointed; color glossy light red; seeds raised; flesh pale red, not very firm, juicy, sweet; mildly subacid; quality good.

Hawaii. 1. Am. Card. 19:608, 684. 1898.
Originated in 1895 with E. W. Wooster, Hancock Point, Maine, as a cross between Haverland and Parker Earle. Perfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries medium in size, conic, light crimson, moderately firm, subacid; good; early.

Hayden. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:44. 1916.
Originated with James Stayman, Leavenworth, Kansas; introduced about 1894. Perfect. Berries scarlet; flesh light red, firm, acid; good; midseason.

Hayes. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 148:53, 56. 1897. Hayes' Prolific. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:44. 1916.
Originated in Chester County, Pennsylvania; introduced in 1893. Imperfect. Berries medium in size, round-conic, dark crimson, moderately firm; fair; midseason.

Hazel. 1. Rural N. Y. 58:514. 1899. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 218:197. 1902-
Originated in 1897 as a seedling of Warfield and Sharpless crossed with Gandy by J. H. Black, Son et Company, Hightstown, New Jersey. Imperfect. At this Station, plants numerous, vigorous, healthy, with good foliage; fruit above medium in size, decreases rapidly, variable in shape, very light red, soft, subacid; good; midseason. An inferior variety.

Heflin. 1. Am. Gard. 25:436. 1904. Heflin Early. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 124:181. 1907.
Originated in North Carolina and introduced about 1902. Perfect. Berries medium in size, round-conic, bright crimson; flesh light red, firm, subacid; good; early.

Heflin and Hanbach. 1. Va. Sta. Bul. 91:84, 88. 1898.
Originated by T. M. Hanbach, Warrenton, Virginia; introduced about 1896. Imperfect. Plants vigorous; berries medium in size, irregular conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, moderately firm, acid; fair; midseason.

Helen. 1. Cult et Count, Gent. 43:409. 1878.
Originated with Robert Lewis, Castleton, New York; introduced about 1875. Perfect. Plants vigorous; berries medium in size, round-conic, light scarlet; flesh whitish, firm; very good; late.

Helen Browning. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:44. 1916.
Originated with C. A. Browning, Apponong, Rhode Island, as a chance seedling; introduced in 1913. Perfect. Berries medium in size, round-conic to irregular wedge, dull scarlet; flesh light red, firm, acid; good; moderately early.

Helen Chapman. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 85:13. 1897.
Imperfect. Plants healthy, moderately vigorous and productive; berries medium in size, conical, regular, light scarlet, firm, acid; good; midseason.

Helen Davis. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:182. 1915.
A chance seedling found by George W. Davis, Brazil, Indiana, in 1905. Perfect. Station plants very numerous and vigorous, productive, unhealthy; fruit-stems thick; fruit large, blunt-conic, dull light red, very juicy, tender, subacid, inferior in flavor; poor; midseason.

Helen Gould. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:528. 1908.
Originated about 1896 by J. R. Peck, Breckenridge, Missouri, as a cross between Jewell and Jessie. Imperfect. As grown here, plants very few, weak, healthy, unproductive; fruit-stems very short, thick, prostrate; fruit above medium to medium in size, round-conic to blunt-wedge, dull dark red, firm, pleasantly acid, well flavored, with dark red flesh; fair to good; midseason. General appearance unattractive.

Henderson. 1. Rural N. Y. 43:429* fig. 205. 1884.
Originated about 1879 by George Seymour, South Norwalk, Connecticut. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants vigorous, numerous, unproductive; fruit-stems erect; fruit medium in size, round to oblong, glossy red, soft, well flavored; very good; medium early. Not productive enough here to pay for cultivation.

Henry. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:45. 1916.
Originated as a chance seedling by J. O. Wadsworth, Wolcott, New York. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants numerous, vigorous, attacked by leaf-spot; fruit medium to large, drops rapidly in size, irregularly roundish, glossy dark red, nearly firm, juicy, with dark red flesh; good to very good; medium early.

Herald. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 85:13. 1897.
Originated with Henry Young, Ada, Ohio; introduced about 1895. Perfect. Plants vigorous; berries large, irregular, ribbed and coxcombed, dark scarlet, with green tips, firm; good; midseason.

Herbert. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:8. 1894.
Introduced by B. L. Carr, Saratoga Springs, New York, about 1890. Perfect. Plants at this Station few, very unproductive, with good foliage; fruit-stems short; fruit small to medium, firm; fair; midseason.

Herbst. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:45. 1916. Herbst No. 2. 2. Am. Gard. 17:627. 1896.
A seedling of Warfield originated by J. L. Herbst, Sparta, Wisconsin; introduced about 1892. Perfect. Plants productive; berries medium in size, round-conic, very dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm, acid; fair; midseason.

Hercules. Kellogg's Hercules. 1. Kellogg Cat. 24. 1918.
Originated about 1912 by F. L. Ossman, Fulton, Maryland, as a cross between Ozark and a Heritage seedling. Perfect. At this Station, plants few, medium in vigor and yield, healthy; calyx very large; fruit variable in size, wedge to conic, furrowed, dull dark red, colors unevenly, juicy, very firm, sweet, with dark red flesh; good; midseason.

Heritage. 1. N. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 44. 1909. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:57. 1911.
Originated in 1902 with J. E. Heritage, Marlton, New Jersey, as a cross between Barton and Marshall. Perfect. Station plants few, medium in size, vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems short, thick, semi-erect; fruit large, irregular, oblong-conic or wedge, glossy medium red, medium juicy, firm, subacid, highly flavored; very good; late. Surpassed by better kinds.

Hermia. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:45. 1916.
Originated in 1906 at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada, as a seedling of Belt. Perfect. Berries large, wedge-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm, subacid; good; midseason.

Hermit. 1. Ind. Sta. Bul. 38:8. 1892.
Originated with F. L. Piers, New Providence, Indiana; introduced about 1890. Perfect. Berries large, round-conic, bright crimson, firm; good; moderately early.

Hero. 1. Mass. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 171. 1878.
Originated by Marshal P. Wilder, Dorchester, Massachusetts; introduced in 1878. Berries large, long-conic, crimson; flesh medium red, not very juicy; fair.

Hero (of Bauer). 1. Rural N. Y. 61:480. 1902. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:45. 1916. Originated by J. C. Bauer, Judsonia, Arkansas; introduced in 1900. Perfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries large, round-conic to wedge shape, scarlet, firm, subacid; fair; early to midseason.

Hersey. 1. N. Y. Sta. BuL 109:235. 1896.
Originated with Samuel Hersey, Hingham, Massachusetts; introduced in 1893. Perfect. Station plants numerous, vigorous; fruit-stems medium; fruit small to medium, roundish, necked, light red, firm, with dark red flesh; fair; midseason.

Hervey Davis. 1. W. N. Y. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 54. 1879. 2. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 416. 1882. Originated in 1875 by J. B. Moore, Concord, Massachusetts. Perfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries large, round-conic, bright crimson; flesh whitish, moderately firm; good; midseason.

Hiawatha. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:45. 1916.
Originated with James Stayman, Leavenworth, Kansas, as a seedling of Aroma; introduced about 1893. Perfect. Berries medium in size, roundish, scarlet, firm; fair; midseason.

Hiawatha (of Warren). 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 166. 1920.
Originated by S. H. Warren, Auburndale, Massachusetts. Described as a " new sort ripening a few days ahead of Commonwealth, which it surpasses in size, color and flavor."

Highland. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:57. 1911. Highland Seedling. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 166:75. 1905-
A chance seedling discovered by T. B. Carlisle, Canfield, Ohio, about 1898. Imperfect. As grown here, plants numerous, large, very vigorous, healthy, productive; leaves large, dark green; flowers small, early; fruit-stems thick, prostrate, branching very freely; seeds deeply sunken; fruit large, conic, glossy light red, very juicy, tender, very tart; good; very early. Worthy of test.

Highland King. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:45. 1916.
Mentioned in 1914. Berries medium to large, oval-conic, crimson, mildly subacid; good; moderately early.

Hilton. 1. Rural N. Y. 45:461, fig. 280. 1886. Alley's No. p. 2. Ibid. 45:4, 102, fig. 2. 1886. Hilton Gem. 3. Thomas Am. Fruit Cult. 737. 1897.
Originated in 1881 by H. H. Alley, Hilton, New Jersey; supposed to be a seedling of Sharpless. Perfect to semi-perfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries large, irregular, round-conic to ovate, light crimson, firm, acid; good; midseason.

Hinman. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:333. 1890.
Hinsmore. 2. Mass. Sta. Bul. 21:6. 1893.
Originated as a chance seedling with a Mr. Hinman, Akron, Ohio; introduced in 1890. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants very vigorous, very numerous, severely injured by leaf-spot, unproductive; fruit medium in size, irregular round-conic, glossy red, firm; fair; midseason.

Hoffman. 1. Rural N. Y. 47:710. 1888. 2. U. S. D. A. Rpt. 252. 1892.
Originated from seed of Neunan in 1877 by H. Hoffman, Charleston, South Carolina. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants vigorous, very numerous, productive, healthy; fruit-stems erect, long, stout; fruit large, bright red, round-conic, firm, subacid; fair; early.

Holland. 1. Ark. Sta. Bul. 43:79, 82. 1896. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:186. 1898.
Originated as a chance seedling with C. A. Holland, Judsonia, Arkansas; introduced in 1895. Imperfect. Plants vigorous; berries large, round, scarlet; flesh dark red, moderately firm; good; midseason.

Homestead. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 316. 1897.
Originated with Edward W. Cone, Menomonie, Wisconsin; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Berries small, regular, round-conic, dark crimson, soft; very good; midseason.

Honey. 1. Cal. St. Bd. Hort. Rpt. 367. 1892. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:46. 1916.
Originated with S. L. Watkins, Grizzly Flats, California; apparently a form of Fragaria chiloensis; introduced about 1892. Perfect. Berries small, oblong, bright crimson, moderately firm, juicy, very sweet and aromatic; very good; has fruited for eight months of the year in California.

Honeymoon. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 166. 1920. 2. Mayer Cat. 7. 1920.
Originated by H. J. Sehild, Ionia, Michigan, as a cross between Black Beauty and Pan American; introduced in 1919. Perfect. Autumn-fruiting; berries large, roundish, deep red, very firm; good.

Honor. 1. Cassel Nur. Cat. 1924.
Originated in 1917 as a cross between Warfield and Superb by M. Cassel, Mantua, Ohio. Perfect. Plants at this Station, medium in number and height, vigorous, productive; flowers late; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate; calyx large, depressed; seeds raised; fruit medium to large, blunt-conic to wedge, medium to dark glossy red, juicy, firm, sub-acid, with red flesh; good; late midseason. Should be tested further.

Hooker. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 989. 1869. Hooker's Seedling. 2. Mag. Hort. 21:370. 1855.
Originated by H. E. Hooker, Rochester, New York; introduced in 1852; included in the American Pomological Society's catalog from 1858 to 1871. Perfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries large, round-conic to coxcomb, very dark crimson; flesh dark red, soft, sweet; very good; midseason.

Hoosier. 1. Am. Card. 19:534. 1898. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:46. 1916.
Originated by Ran Benoy, Matthews, Indiana; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Berries large, irregular round-conic to wedge-shape, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm; very good; midseason.

Horsey. 1. Hall Cat. 1920.
Originated in 1916 by John C. Horsey, Somerset County, Maryland, as a cross between Missionary and Klondike. Perfect. At this Station, plants medium in number and vigor, productive, healthy; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate; fruit above medium to small, blunt-conic, necked, glossy dark red, juicy, medium firm, with sprightly, red flesh; poor; midseason.

Hovey. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:46, fig. 9. 1916. Hovey's Seedling. 2. Mag. Hort. 6:284, fig- 9- 1840. 3. Hovey Fr. Am. 1:25, PL 1851.
Hovey was the first good strawberry to originate in America. It was originated by C. M. Hovey, Boston, Massachusetts, in 1834 and was introduced in 1838. While it was valued for home use rather than for market, it was a standard sort in many localities as late as 1880. According to the American Pomological Society the variety was being grown in sixteen states in 1889. The society included Hovey in its fruit catalog from 1852 to 1897. The variety has been gradually supplanted by better sorts so that it has been practically lost to cultivation since the close of the nineteenth century. For a further discussion of this variety see page 367.
Imperfect to semi-perfect. Plants numerous, large, vigorous, upright, medium in height, productive; leaves light to dark green, large, smooth, glossy. Flowers small; petals roundish, slightly overlapping, cupped; stamens few, imperfectly developed. Fruit midseason; fruit-stems intermediate in length and thickness; pedicels long, slender; calyx very small, reflexed; berries medium to large, round-conic, with a short neck; apex obtuse; color glossy dark red; seeds slightly sunken; flesh scarlet, firm, highly flavored, pleasantly acid; quality good.

Howard. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:47. 1916. Howard No. 27. 2, Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:224, fig. 1912. 3. Ibid. 364:79. 1923. Kellogg's Premier. 4. III. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 238. 1915. Premier. 5. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:75. 1918.
Probably Howard is being more highly spoken of than any other strawberry recently introduced. It is yet too soon to tell just what place it will take in home and commercial strawberry growing in New York. The berry is the type of that of the well-known Dunlap; ripens as early, is a lighter red, and the calyx has not the red tinge that Dunlap often has. The plants are more productive, the picking season is longer, and the berries are larger. Probably Howard will replace Dunlap which has long been the standard early berry in many parts of the country. This is the most promising of the large number of seedlings originated by A. B. Howard, Belchertown, Massachusetts. It was introduced in 1909. Since that time the variety has been widely advertised by the R. M. Kellogg Company, Three Rivers, Michigan, as Kellogg's Premier, stock of which had been secured from E. A. Riehl, Alton, Illinois.
Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, healthy, productive for an early berry; leaves thick, dark green, dull. Flowers medium early, variable in size, cup-shaped; petals large, 5-9, crinkly; receptacle small. Fruit early, ripening period long, holds up in size; fruit-stems short, prostrate; pedicels long, slender; calyx large, flat or slightly raised, somewhat leafy, well colored; sepals long, broad; berries large, long-conic to wedge, the largest berries furrowed on each side; apex pointed; color attractive glossy red; seeds sunken; flesh well colored to the center, juicy, pleasantly sprightly, firm; quality good.

Howard (of Black). 1. Rural N. Y. 60:514, fig. 220. 1901. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:224. 1912.
Originated in 1896 by J. H. Black, Son et Company, Hightstown, New Jersey, as a cross between Barton and Gandy. Perfect- Station plants vigorous, numerous, healthy; fruit medium to large, variable in shape, with poorly developed apex, light red, juicy, firm; good; late.

Howard (of Michigan). 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:47. Howard No. 2. 2. Mich. Sta. Bul. 206:53. 1903. G. W. Howard. 3. Ohio Sta. Bul. 134:42. 1904.
Originated in 1895 by G. W. Howard, Stevensville, Michigan, as a chance seedling. Imperfect. As grown here, plants numerous, healthy, productive; fruit large to very large, retains size well, round-conic to blunt-wedge, glossy light red, medium juicy, soft, subacid; fair; medium early.

Howell. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 241. 1886. Howell's Prolific. 2. Mo. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 49. 1884.
Originated about 1880 with S. S. Howell, Knox County, Tennessee. Perfect. Plants vigorous; berries large, conic, sometimes necked, dark crimson, firm, mildly subacid; good; midseason.

Hub. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:183. 1915.
Originated in 1901 by George P. Fuller, Melrose, Massachusetts, from a cross between Bubach and Belmont. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants very few, small, low growing, healthy, medium productive; fruit-stems slender, erect; fruit above medium to medium in size, blunt-conic, glossy dark red, very juicy, firm, sweet, pleasantly flavored; good; midseason. Lacks in size and yield.

Hubach. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:47. 1916.
Originated by Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas; introduced in 1912. Berries medium to large, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm, subacid; fair; early.

Hubach and Hathaway. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:48. 1916.
Originated by Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas; introduced in 1906. Perfect. Berries large, round-conic, bright crimson, firm, subacid; good; very early.

Huddleston. 1. Mich. St. Bd. Agr. Rpt. 101. 1887. Huddleston's Favorite. 2. W. N. Y. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 119. 1880.
Raised in 1874 by D. Huddleston, Dunreith, Indiana, as a cross between Wilson and Agriculturist. Imperfect. Berries large, round-conic, bright crimson, moderately firm, mild, subacid; good; late.

Hudson Bay. 1. Prince Pom. Man. 2:189. 1832.

Hudson's Bay Scarlet. 2. Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 494. 1831.
This variety may have originated near York River, Hudson Bay, Canada. It was grown commercially in North America prior to 1828, and about 1850 was largely cultivated for New York and Philadelphia markets. It passed out of cultivation about 1870. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries medium in size, ovate to conic, necked, dark glossy crimson; flesh pale red, acid; good; very late.

Hughson. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:183. 1915.
A chance seedling found in 1906 by Edward Hughson, Lake Mills, Wisconsin. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants numerous, vigorous, healthy, medium productive; fruit-stems thick, semi-erect; seeds deeply imbedded; fruit irregular in shape, large to medium, drops quickly in size, dull medium red, firm, tart, with whitish flesh, inferior in flavor; fair; early. Surpassed by other kinds.

Hummer. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:528. 1908.
Originated by John Kolyvard, Kalamazoo County, Michigan; placed in the fruit catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1906. Perfect. At this Station, plants numerous, vigorous, usually healthy, above medium in yield; leaves often very large; fruit-stems thick, erect; fruit very large to medium, variable in shape, often furrowed, dull light and dark red, mild, medium to firm, subacid; fair; late midseason or later.

Hundred Dollar. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:529. 1908.
Raised by Wick Hathaway, Madison, Ohio; introduced in 1901. Perfect. Station plants few, vigorous, healthy, very productive; fruit-stems long, slender; fruit large to medium, retains size well, wedge to round-conic, light and dark red, firm, not very juicy, mild, pleasant but not highly flavored; fair; midseason. Coarse in appearance and lacks in juiciness.

Hunn. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 91:187. 1895.
Originated in 1889 by C. E. Hunn, New York Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, New York, as a cross between Johnson Late and Sharpless. Imperfect. As grown here, plants medium in number and vigor, not very productive, attacked by leaf-spot; fruit-stems short, stout; fruit above medium to very large, drops rapidly in size, blunt round-conic to slight wedge, very dark glossy red, firm, juicy, with dark red flesh, well flavored; very good; very late. Has been tested in many parts of the state but never proved very popular on account of low yield and leaf-spot.

Hunterdon. 1. Hunt Cir. 1921.
A cross between President and Nich Ohmer originated in 1906 by Thomas R. Hunt, Lambertville, New Jersey. Imperfect. On the Station grounds, plants numerous, vigorous, very productive, attacked by leaf-spot; leaves roundish, often with four leaflets; fruit-stems long, thick, semi-erect; calyx leafy, very large; fruit feirge, drops in size, blunt-wedge to blunt-conic, glossy medium red, firm, with whitish flesh, medium juicy, sweet to subacid, hollow at the center; good; early midseason. Worthy of test; better than the average.

Huntley. 1. Am. Gard. 21:631. 1900. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 154:41. 1904.
Originated by H. D. Huntley, Chestnut Grove, Ohio. Perfect. Berries large, roundish, scarlet; good.

Huntsman. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 54:43. 1894.
Originated with W. A. Huntsman, Lawson, Missouri; introduced about 1891. Perfect. Plants vigorous; berries large, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm, acid; very good; midseason.

Hurlbert. 1. AT. Y. Sta. Bul. 36:632. 1891.
Introduced about 1889. Perfect. Plants at this Station of Sharpless type in growth and foliage, fairly productive; fruit-stems very stout, upright; fruit large, conical, dark glossy red, firm, with pleasing flavor, subacid; good.

Hustler. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:70. 191et Pinchot. 2. N. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 36. 1913.
A chance seedling found in 1910 by R. P. Lovett, Fallsington, Pennsylvania. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants very few, medium in vigor, healthy, productive if planted closely, healthy; flowers late; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate; fruit large, drops in size, round-conic, distinctly necked, attractive medium red, medium in juiciness and firmness, pleasantly sprightly, with red flesh; good; midseason. May have value as a sprightly variety but must be planted closely to secure a large yield.


Ida. 1. Gard. Mon. 8:184. 1866. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 990. 1869.
Originated with E. H. Cocklin, Shepherdstown, Pennsylvania, in 1856. Ida was added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1871 and removed in 1877. Imperfect. Plants very numerous, vigorous, very productive; fruit medium in size, roundish conic, dark red; flesh moderately firm, juicy, acid; good; early.

Ideal. 1. Am. Gard. 17:66. 1896. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:186. 1898.
Raised in 1889 by J. W. Kerr, Denton, Maryland, as a cross between Bubach and Hoffman. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, moderately productive; fruit large, round-conic, dark scarlet; flesh dark red, firm, acid; good; midseason.

Ideal (of Cooper). 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 166. 1920.
Introduced in 1917 by Samuel Cooper, Delevan, New York. As grown here the plants are few, of medium vigor, healthy, variable in yield; autumn-bearing; flowers early, small; fruit-stems short, thick, erect; fruit variable in size, round-conic, glossy medium red; flesh moderately juicy, tender, subacid; poor; early.

Ideal (of Haynes). 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:225. 1912.
Originated with J. W. Haynes, Delphi, Indiana; introduced in 1910. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit large, irregular, oval-conic to wedge-shape, slightly necked, with color variable from scarlet to pink; flesh salmon, soft, mild; good; late midseason.

Idora. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:225. 1912.
A chance seedling found in Idora Park, Youngstown, Ohio, by T. B. Carlisle, Lisbon, Ohio; introduced in 1909. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous; fruit large, blunt-conic to wedge-shape, dark red; flesh light red, soft, juicy, mild; good; midseason.

Ima. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 176:8. 1899.
Originated with Leroy Brown et Sons, Clyde, Ohio; introduced about 1896. Plants few, vigorous, subject to leaf-spot; fruit small, round-conic, scarlet; flesh firm; fair; midseason.

Indiana. 1. Ar. Y. Sta. Bul. 385:312. 1914.
Originated by H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan, in 1905 as a cross between Red Cross and a seedling, the parentage of which was Dawn by Ionia. When first grown at this Station Indiana made an excellent record, but its later performance has not held up to its earlier promises. It prefers heavy soils. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants medium in number, vigor, and height, healthy, productive; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate, much branched; pedicels long, slender; fruit large, retams size well, wedge, with furrowed surface, glossy dark red, medium juicy, very firm, mildly subacid, with well-colored flesh; good; medium early.

Indiana (of Teas). 1. Rural N. Y. 42:456. 1883. 2. Mich Sta. Bul. 55:13. 1889.
A seedling of Charles Downing which originated in 1875 with E. Y. Teas, Dunreith, Indiana. Plants numerous, vigorous, unproductive; fruit medium to large, round-conic, light crimson; flesh medium firm; good; early midseason.

Ionia.
Ionia Market. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:183. 1915.
A seedling of Parker Earle which originated in 1895 with H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants numerous, above medium in vigor and height, productive; fruit-stems thick, prostrate, much branched; fruit large, conic to wedge, necked, glossy medium to dark red, often green-tipped at the tapering apex, firm, subacid to tart; fair to good; early.

Iowa. 1. Gen. Farmer 9:208. 1848. 2. Fuller 5m. Fr. Cult. 94. 1867. Iowa Male. 3. Hooper W. Fr. Book 290. 1857. Early Washington. 4. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 40. 1875.
An old sort of western origin; introduced before 1835. From 1840 to 1860 it was a leading sort near Cincinnati, Ohio, where it was grown under the name of Early Washington. The plants thrived on poor soils and produced large crops of fruit which ripened early. The variety was placed in the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1875 as Early Washington, and was removed in 1879. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, very productive; fruit large, roundish, light orange-scarlet; flesh light red, tender, juicy, acid; poor; early.

Iowa (of Rockhill). 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:57. 1911.
A cross between Dunlap and Pan American originated in 1906 by Harlow Rockhill, Conrad, Iowa. Perfect. Plants at this Station, characteristically few, large, vigorous, healthy, very productive; autumn-bearing; fruit large, drops rapidly in size, round-conic, glossy light red, colors unevenly, not very juicy, tender, mildly subacid; fair; midseason.

Iowa Beauty. 1. Ann. Hort. 211. 1891. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 91:192. 1895.
Originated with C. E. Walworth, Marshall County, Iowa; introduced in 1891. Perfect. At this Station, plants moderately vigorous and productive, numerous; fruit-stems good; fruit medium to large, dark red, round-conic, moderately firm, well flavored; good; midseason.

Irena. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:58. 1911.
A cross supposed to be between Jessie and Warfield which originated in Wisconsin; introduced in 1896 by W. S. Butler, Chetek, Wisconsin. Perfect. Station plants characteristically tall, light green, medium in number, healthy, unproductive; fruit above medium to medium in size, wedge to conic, the surface irregular and roughish, dull light or dark red, inclined to green tips, medium juicy, firm, subacid; fair; very early.

Irene. 1. Rural N. Y. 60:518. 1901. 2. Ont. Dept. Ag. Fr. Ont. 308, fig. 1914.
Introduced about 1900. It has made an excellent record at the Ontario Agricultural College as a general market sort. Imperfect. Plants numerous, very vigorous, productive; fruit medium in size, regular, round-conic, dark glossy crimson; flesh bright red, firm, juicy, subacid; good; late midseason, long.

Irene (of Illinois). 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:50. 1916.
Originated with E. H. Riehl, Alton, Illinois; introduced in 1908. Perfect. Fruit medium to large, irregular conic, light crimson; flesh medium firm; good; midseason.

Isabella. 1. N. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 57. 1895. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:186. 1898. Gandy Belle. 3. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:8. 1894. No Name. 4. Mich. Sta. Bul. 130:50. 1896.
Originated with James Lippincott, Jr., Cumberland County, New Jersey; introduced about 1892 as No Name. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, moderately productive; fruit medium to large, irregular round-conic to wedge, dark crimson; flesh medium red, firm, acid; good; late.

Island. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:50. 1916. Island King. 2. Md. Sta. Bul. 160:212. 1911.
A seedling of Lovett which originated with Irwin Joyce, of Canada; introduced in 1909. Perfect. Plants numerous, medium in vigor; fruit medium to large, irregular roundish conic, dark crimson; flesh red, firm, juicy, mildly subacid; fair; midseason.

Itasca. 1. Gard. Mon. 28:366. 1886. Itaska. 2, N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:333. 1890.
Originated with J. H. Haynes, Delphi, Indiana, as a cross between Manchester and Seneca Queen; introduced in 1886. Imperfect. As grown here, plants medium vigorous, productive; fruit-stems long, slender; fruit round-conic, medium in size, firm, subacid; good; midseason.

Ivanhoe. 1. Rural N. Y. 48:522. 1889. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:333. 1890.
A cross between Crescent and President Lincoln raised by George W. Trowbridge, Glendale, Ohio, about 1881. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants vigorous, numerous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems stiff, erect; fruit large to very large, round-conic, bright glossy red, firm, with dark red flesh, well flavored; very good to best.


James. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:50. 1916. James E. 2. Peninsula Hort Soc. Rpt. 84. 1916.
Originated in Virginia; introduced in 1915. Perfect. Berries large, light crimson, moderately firm; good; early.

James Todd. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:183. 1915.
A chance seedling found in 1906 by Henry Schnell, Glasgow, Missouri. Imperfect. As grown here, plants vigorous, healthy, medium in number and yield; fruit-stems short, semi-erect; fruit large to medium, decreasing in size, irregular wedge or conic, glossy medium red, often with poorly developed apex, very juicy, firm, pleasantly flavored, sprightly; good; midseason. Of doubtful value.

James Vick. 1. Gard. Mon. 24:305. 1882. 2. AT. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:334. 1890. Moonstone. 3. W. N. Y. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 24. 1882. Vick. 4. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 216. 1891.
A chance seedling originated about 1878 by Samuel Miller, Bluffton, Missouri; included in the American Pomological Society's fruit catalog from 1883 to 1897. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants vigorous, stocky, numerous, healthy, set a wonderful crop but mature very few; fruit-stems short; fruit medium to small, round-conic, light glossy red, medium firm, acid; fair; medium late.

Jarbalo. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 142:150. 1897.
A seedling of Frances Cleveland originated by James Stayman, Leaven worth, Kansas; introduced about 1892. Perfect. Berries large, round-conic, light crimson, firm; good; midseason.

Jay Gould. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 91:192. 1895. Gould. 2. Del. Sta. Bul. 28:7. 1895.
Originated in eastern Ohio in 1887. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants very vigorous, numerous, unproductive; blossoms with Sharpless; fruit-stems long; fruit medium or below, glossy red, round-conic, firm; good; midseason.

Jenny. Jenny's Seedling. 1. Gen. Farmer 9:208. 1848. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 991. 1869.
Originated in 1845 by a Mr. Jenny, New Bedford, Massachusetts. Included in the American Pomological Society's fruit catalog from 1862 to 1869. Imperfect. Berries medium to large, round-conic, dark crimson, firm, acid; good; late.

Jenny Lind. 1. Mag. Hort. 20:132. 1854.
Originated in 1852 as a seedling of Old Scarlet by Isaac Fay, Cambridge, Massachusetts; included in the American Pomological Society's list of recommended fruits from 1862 to 1879. Perfect. Berries medium, conic, with a short neck, scarlet, firm, subacid; good; early.

Jerry Rusk. 1. Am. Gard. 20:510. 1899.
Originated with Ran Benoy, Matthews, Indiana, as a cross between Bubach and Jessie; introduced in 1894. Perfect. Berries large, irregular, crimson, firm, subacid; good; midseason.

Jersey Market. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 98:69. 1899.
Of New Jersey origin; introduced in 1896. Imperfect. Berries medium in size, round-conic, light crimson, firm; good; midseason.

Jersey Queen. 1. W. N. Y. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 27. 1881. 2. Rural N. Y. 42:787. 1883. Originated in 1878 by E. W. Durand, Irvington, New Jersey; included in the American Pomological Society's fruit catalog from 1881 to 1899. Imperfect. At this Station, plants vigorous, low growing, attacked by leaf-spot, productive; fruit large, round-conic to oblate-conic, glossy light red, soft, well flavored, subacid; very good; midseason.

Jessie. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 270. 1885. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 44. 1889. 3. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 218:197. 1902.
This old variety is now little grown in any part of the United States excepting central California and even there is being discarded. It was for so many years a standard and representative of so distinct a type that it is included among the major varieties in this text. The outstanding asset of the variety was its great adaptability to soils and climates.
This sort originated in 1880 with F. W. London, Janesville, Wisconsin, as a cross between Sharpless and Miner; introduced in 1886; cataloged by the American Pomological Society in 1889.
Semi-perfect to perfect. Plants variable in number and yield, vigorous, tall, susceptible to leaf-spot; leaves large, thin, light green, dull. Flowers midseason, large; petals 5-8, large; stamens variable in number; receptacle medium in size. Fruit midseason to late; fruit-stems long, slender, erect; pedicels long, slender; calyx variable in position; sepals intermediate in length and width; berries medium to very large, usually wedge but vary to irregularly round-conic, the largest berries often furrowed and occasionally coxcomb; apex obtuse; color glossy light to dark red; seeds sunken; flesh light red, firm, juicy, aromatic, subacid to pleasantly sprightly; quality good.

Jewel.
Originated in 1919 by George Brandvig as a chance seedling in a bed of Superb. Semi-perfect to imperfect. Station plants very few, weak, dwarfish, medium productive, healthy; autumn-bearing; flowers early, very small; fruit-stems short, prostrate; fruit medium to small, round-conic to blunt-conic, glossy medium red, juicy, medium firm, subacid, with red flesh; fair; early.

Jewell. 1. Rural N. Y. 43:445, fig. 212. 1884. 2. N. E. Homestead 265. 1885.
Originated in 1880 with P. M. Augur et Sons, Middlefield, Connecticut. Imperfect. As grown here, plants vigorous, very few, healthy, unproductive; fruit-stems very short; fruit large, oblong-conic, glossy dark red, firm, well flavored, acid; very good; early to midseason.

Jewell Improved. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 166. 1920.
A seedling of Miller raised on the Underwood Farm, Lake City, Minnesota. Perfect. Plants very productive; berries large, uniform, dark red, firm; good.

Jim. 1. Rural N. Y. 58:514. 1899. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 218:197. 1902.
Originated with J. H. Black, Son et Company, Hightstown, New Jersey. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants vigorous, numerous, healthy; fruit medium to large, drops in size, chunky round-wedge, light red, medium juicy, soft, well flavored; good; midseason.

Jim Dumas. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 160:202, 212. 1911.
Originated with Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas; introduced in 1907. Perfect. Berries medium in size, irregular conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm, acid; fair; early.

Joe. 1. Rural N. Y. 56:471. 1897. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 276:71. 1906. Joe Johnson. 3. Ibid. 447:71. 1918.
The outstanding merits of Joe are large, handsome, well-flavored berries, which are suitable for either home use or the markets. The plants are satisfactory in all respects except in hardiness, so that the variety is a favorite only in the comparatively warm strawberry regions of Maryland, New Jersey, Delaware, and eastern New York. The plants are exceedingly productive, therefore the variety is a very desirable kind for intensive culture. Joe originated with J. H. Black, Son et Company, Hightstown, New Jersey; introduced by this company in 1899.
Perfect. Plants few, vigorous, tall, healthy, productive when planted closely; leaves medium to very large, dark green, thick, dull, rugose. Flowers late, large; petals 5-7, large; stamens numerous; receptacle large. Fruit late midseason, holding up well in size; fruit-stems long, thick, semi-erect; pedicels long; calyx often large, leafy, usually fiat, well colored; sepals very broad; berries large to very large, blunt, round-conic or irregular wedge, the surface often furrowed; apex obtuse; color glossy dark red; seeds raised; flesh dark red throughout, firm, agreeably acid, highly flavored; quality very good.

Joe Crampton. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:71. 1918.
Found in an old patch of berries by Henry Gersandi, Berien County, Michigan; introduced in 1912. Perfect. Plants at this Station, below medium in vigor and number, severely injured by leaf-spot, unproductive; fruit-stems slender, erect; fruit variable in size, irregular blunt-conic to wedge, necked, dull light red, very juicy, firm, sprightly, with whitish center; good; very late. Inferior in plant and fruit characters.

Joe Wheeler. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:51. 1916. Gen. Joe Wheeler. 2. Md. Sta. Bul. 124:180. 1907.
A seedling of Thompson which originated in the South; introduced about 1905. Perfect. Plants small; berries medium in size, conic, with a slight neck, dark crimson, moderately firm; fair; early.

John H. Cook. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:71. 1918.
Raised by Dr. Walter Van Fleet, Washington, D. C, in 1908, as a chance seedling. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants few, medium in vigor and size, healthy, medium productive; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate; fruit medium to very large, irregularly wedge, furrowed, glossy, medium to dark red, juicy, firm, subacid, with hollow center; good; medium early. Has several qualities to commend it.

Johnson. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 124:182. 1907. Johnson's Early. 2. Am. Gard. 21:630. 1900.
Originated in 1893 with O. A. Johnson, Manokin, Maryland, as a cross between Crescent and Hoffman. Perfect. Berries large, round-conic or irregularly necked, light crimson; flesh light red, firm, acid; good; early.

Johnson Late. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:333. 1890.
Originated as a chance seedling in 1885 with R. Johnson, Shortsville, New York. Imperfect. At this Station, plants vigorous, stocky, low growing, injured by leaf-spot, unproductive; leaves thick, very dark green; fruit large, conic, very light red, soft, almost white, sweet; good; very late.

Jones Seedling. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:51. 1916.
Originated with Adams Jones, Plainfield, Indiana; introduced about 1888. Perfect. Berries large, conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm; good; midseason.

Jopp. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:52. 1916. Jopp1 s Favorite. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:71. 1918.
A chance seedling which originated with W. H. Jopp, Denton, Maryland, in 1911. Perfect. Station plants numerous, vigorous, healthy, unproductive; fruit-stems long, erect; fruit unusually large, blunt-wedge, necked, dull medium to dark red, juicy, firm, subacid, with red flesh; fair; very late.

Jucunda. 1. Mag. Hort. 28:30. 1862. . 2. Card, Mon. 8:280. 1866. Abraham Lincoln. 3. Horticulturist 24:232. 1869. President Lincoln. 4. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 415. 1882. Lincoln. 5. Gard. et For. 6:336. 1893.
This variety originated with John Salter, Hammersmith, England. It was imported to this country by W. R. Prince, Flushing, New York, in 1859, and for many years was a standard sort for heavy rich soils and intensive culture. The American Pomological Society added the variety to its list of recommended fruits in 1869. It has long been out of general culture on this side of the Atlantic. Perfect. Plants variable in number and in freedom from leaf-spot, usually productive, medium in height and vigor; fruit-stems long, thick, erect; calyx large, flat, leafy; sepals very broad; berries large, irregular blunt-wedge to blunt-conic, light red, somewhat dull and unattractive; flesh whitish towards the center, variable in firmness, sweet, mildly subacid; good; late.

Jucunda Improved. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 82. 1891.
A seedling of Jucunda originated in 1882 by A. V. Gerbig, Pennsylvania. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants vigorous, productive; berries large, round-conic, light crimson, firm, subacid; good; midseason.

Judith. 1. Mass. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 176. 1915.
Originated by Dr. F. S. DeLue, Needham, Massachusetts. Semi-perfect to imperfect. As grown here, plants numerous, vigorous, productive, healthy; fruit-stems long, thick, semi-erect; pedicels long, slender; calyx flat, large; fruit large, blunt-wedge to blunt-conic, glossy medium to dark red, juicy, firm, red to the center, highly flavored, sprightly; very good; early. Worthy of trial.

Judsonia. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 130:48. 1896.
Originated with J. C. Bauer, Judsonia, Arkansas; introduced about 1892. Perfect. Berries medium in size, irregular round-conic, light crimson, firm; good; early.

Julia. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 298. 1913.
A seedling of Bubach originated in 1906 at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries large, conical to wedge-shape, bright glossy red; flesh deep pink, tender, juicy, subacid; good; midseason.

Julien. 1. Mag. Hort. 33:167. 1867.
Originated about 1860 by W. F. Cramer, Dubuque, Iowa, as a seedling of Peabody. Berries medium in size, roundish oval, with a long neck, scarlet, moderately firm, sweet; good.

July. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:58. 1911.
This is a cross between Warfield and Ionia which originated with H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan, in 1902. Imperfect. On the Station grounds, plants medium in number and size, healthy, productive; flowers late, large, show distinctly above the foliage; fruit above medium in size, quickly becomes smaller, conic, light red, very juicy, medium firm, tart; fair; midseason. Inferior to the best varieties.

Jumbo. 1. N. E. Homestead 328. 1885.
Introduced in 1883 by A. M. Purdy, Palmyra, New York. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants vigorous, numerous, nearly healthy, medium productive; fruit-stems stiff; calyx very large; fruit usually very large, obtuse- to oblate-conic, glossy light red, soft, slightly acid, pleasantly flavored; fair; early to midseason.

Jumbo (of Farmer). 1. Farmer Cat. 1925.
Originated about 1915 with James Cliff, Oswego, New York. Perfect. Berries large, round, blunt or flat at the apex; good; late.


Kalicene. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 292. 1921.
Originated by Albert F. Etter, Ettersburg, California, as a cross between Ettersburg No. 216 and Trebla. It has little merit at this Station. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems thick, erect; pedicels long, slender; fruit hidden by the foliage, medium to small, conic, glossy medium red, moderately juicy, very firm, tough and whitish at the center, subacid; fair; very early.

Kansas. 1. Rural N. Y. 60:518. 1901. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 276:72. 1906.
A chance seedling which originated with J. J. Whittman, Emporia, Kansas; introduced in 1900. Imperfect. At this Station, plants medium to numerous, moderately vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems thick; fruit above medium to medium in size, decreases rapidly, round-conic to wedge, the tip ending in a depression, with an irregularly furrowed surface, glossy medium red, firm, juicy, mildly acid, well flavored; good to very good; midseason. Not a large berry but. worthy of trial because of good yield, attractive color, good flavor and quality.

Kansas Prolific. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 142:153. 1897.
A seedling of Warfield which originated with James Stayman, Leavenworth, Kansas; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit medium in size, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh medium firm; good; early midseason.

Karl. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 148:57. 1897.
Originated with F. G. Stahelin, Bridgman, Michigan; introduced about 1895. Perfect. Plants numerous, very vigorous, unproductive; fruit small, irregular, dark crimson; flesh soft; poor; late.

Katie. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 100:8. 1893.
Originated with J. H. Haynes, Delphi, Indiana; introduced about 1890. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, unproductive; fruit medium to large, round-conic, dull crimson; flesh dark red, soft; good; midseason.

Keens Seedling. 1. Trans. Lond. Hort. Soc. 5:261, PL 12. 1824. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 531. 1845.
This old English sort was raised from seed by Michael Keens, Isleworth, England, in 1819. It was first exhibited before the Horticultural Society of London in 1821, and was introduced into this country about 1824. From 1830 to 1840 it was a standard variety in the gardens of amateurs. The plants were tender and required high cultivation. The variety is still grown in England. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, tender, productive; fruit large, roundish ovate to coxcombed, dark scarlet; flesh light red, firm, rich; very good; early.

Kellko. 1. Kellogg Cat. 22. 1919.
Introduced in 1919 by the R. M. Kellogg Company, Three Rivers, Michigan; said by them to have been originated by Albert P. Etter, Ettersburg, California. Perfect. Station plants medium in number, vigor, and height, unproductive, healthy; flowers late, very large; fruit-stems short, thick; calyx large, leafy, with very broad sepals; fruit above medium to small, blunt-wedge to chunky-conic, medium to dark glossy red, very juicy, firm, sprightly; very good; midseason.

Kellogg. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:53. 1916. Kellogg's Prize. 2. N. Y. Sta. Rpt. 447:71. 1918.
Kellogg was found as a chance seedling in 1906 by R. M. Sears, La Grange, Illinois; introduced in 1913 by R. M. Kellogg Company, Three Rivers, Michigan. An imperfect-flowering variety of good plant habits, maturing late and shipping well. Imperfect. Plants medium or below in number and vigor, healthy, productive; flowers very large; fruit-stems thick, prostrate; fruit above medium to large, blunt-conic to blunt-wedge, necked, medium to light red; flesh light red, juicy, firm, sprightly; fair to good; late.

Kentucky. 1. Gard. Mon. 11:247, 280, fig. 1869. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:334. 1890.
A seedling of Downer Prolific originated by J. S. Downer, Fairview, Kentucky; introduced in 1869. Until about 1885 Kentucky was a standard sort for home use and local markets. In 1871 the name was added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society, from which it was removed in 1897. Perfect. As grown here, plants very vigorous, numerous, attacked by leaf-spot, moderately productive; fruit of medium size, conic, glossy red, soft, sprightly; good; late.

Kevitt. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 364:81. 1923. Kevitt Wonder. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:58. 1911.
Originated by T. C. Kevitt, Athenia, New Jersey, in 1906 as a cross between Bismarck and Parker Earle. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants few, small, healthy, productive; fruit above medium in size, oblong-conic, necked, glossy medium red, not juicy, medium firm, mild, with inferior flavor; poor; midseason.

Kevitt Best. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 189:116. 1901.
Originated by T. C. Kevitt, Athenia, New Jersey; introduced about 1899. Perfect. Plants few, weak, unproductive; fruit small, irregular, scarlet, soft, acid; poor; midseason.

Keystone. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:226. 1912.
Originated with T. B. Carlisle, Lisbon, Ohio; introduced in 1909. Imperfect. Plants very numerous, vigorous; fruit irregular, scarlet; flesh firm; poor; early midseason.

Killarney. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:184. 1915.
Originated in 1904 by John F. Nickerson, Chatham, Massachusetts, as a cross between Maximus and Jessie. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants very numerous, above medium in vigor, productive, attacked by leaf-spot; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate; fruit very large, strongly furrowed, wedge, dull dark red, juicy, firm, subacid; good; midseason.

Kincks. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:9. 1894.
Originated with Clark Hewitt, Waupun, Wisconsin; introduced about 1892. Perfect. Plants at this Station, few, productive, healthy; fruit medium to large, glossy red, soft;, good; midseason to late.

King Edward. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:530. 1908.
Originated by D. J. Miller, Millersburg, Ohio, in 1903 as a seedling of Miller. Perfect. At this Station, plants medium in number, lack in vigor, healthy, very productive; fruit above medium to medium in size, soon becoming small, round-conic or wedge, dull light red, firm, mild, sweet, well flavored; good; midseason.

King Philip. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 124:183. 1907.
Introduced about 1905. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, unproductive; fruit large, irregular roundish to wedge-shape, bright scarlet; flesh pink, firm, juicy, subacid; good; late.

King Solomon. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:53. 1916. King Sol. 2, Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:226. 1912.
Introduced about 1910. Perfect. Plants numerous, very productive; fruit large, conic, light scarlet; flesh red, firm, juicy, sweet; good; early midseason.

King Wealthy. 1. Potter Cat. 9. 1918.
Originated in 1911 with H. J. King, Jackson, Michigan. Perfect. Station plants few to medium, intermediate in vigor and height, productive, healthy; fruit-stems semi-erect; calyx very large, raised, very leafy; fruit above medium to small, round-conic, glossy dark red, juicy, sprightly; good; very late.

King Worthy. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 163:168. 1898.
Originated with E. W. Cone, Menomonie, Wisconsin; introduced about 1896. Plants few, vigorous, unproductive; fruit large, round-conic, light dull scarlet; flesh light red, soft; fair; midseason.

Kissena. 1. Horticulturist 30:50. 1875. Kissany. 2. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 98. 1877.
Originated in 1850 by G. W. Huntsman, Flushing, New York, as a cross between British Queen and a variety of Fragaria virginiana. Perfect. Plants medium in vigor and productivity; fruit medium in size, long-conic, sometimes coxcombed, light scarlet; flesh white, moderately firm, mildly subacid; good; midseason.

Kittie Rice. 1. Am. Card. 24:332. 1903. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:59. 1911. Downing's Bride. 3. Am. Card. 21:630. 1900.
Originated by John F. Beaver, Dayton, Ohio, about 1890. Sent out as a premium in 1896 by Matthew Crawford, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, under the name of Downing's Bride. In 1903 the name was changed to Kittie Rice. Imperfect. On the Station grounds, plants of medium number, above medium in size, healthy, productive; fruit-stems medium to long, moderately thick, prostrate; calyx large, flat, leafy; seeds raised; fruit above medium in size, conic or wedge, glossy medium red, very juicy, highly flavored, light red at the center, moderately firm, sprightly at first, becoming sweet; very good to best; midseason.

Klickita. 1. Ann. Hort. 134. 1893. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 85:14. 1897.
Originated with E. W. Cone, Menomonie, Wisconsin, as a chance seedling. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, moderately productive; fruit medium to large, conic, regular, scarlet; flesh firm; good; midseason.

Klondike. 1. Am. Gard. 19:534. 1898. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:531. 1908. 3, Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:54. 1916.
This variety is grown almost exclusively in some parts of the South in commercial plantations. It usually fails in all the northern states. Its popularity is due to adaptability to a great diversity of soils, to plants which are fairly free from disease, and to the firm flesh and deep red color of the berries, the last two characters fitting it for shipping and canning. The quality is scarcely above mediocre, and the hulls do not part readily from the berries, serious defects for a home plantation. Klondike originated with R. L. Cloud, Independence, Louisiana, as a cross between Pickerproof and Hoffman; introduced in 1901; placed in the American Pomological Society's fruit catalog in 1909.
Perfect. Plants vigorous, usually healthy, productive; leaves dark green, thin, glossy, rugose. Flowers midseason, large; petals 6-7, large; stamens numerous; receptacle medium in size. Fruit midseason; fruit-stems long, thick, erect; pedicels short, slender; calyx large, flat or sunken, reflexed, often tinged dull red; sepals long, narrow; berries large, retain size well, round-conic to blunt-wedge; apex obtuse; color light to dark rather dull red, variable in glossiness; seeds sunken; flesh well colored to the center, firm, juicy, sprightly to acid; quality fair or below.

Knight. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 163:68. 1898.
Introduced about 1896. Perfect. Plants very vigorous, productive; fruit large, round-conic, dark glossy scarlet; flesh light red, firm; very good; late.

Kossuth. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 142:153. 1897.
Originated by James Stayman, Leavenworth, Kansas; introduced about 1893. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit large, irregular, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm; good; early.

Kramer. 1. Gard. Mon. 9:213. 1867.
Originated in 1863 by F. W. Kramer, Dubuque, Iowa, as a seedling of Wilson. Semi-perfect to perfect. Plants vigorous, productive; fruit medium in size, round-conic, dark red; flesh moderately firm, juicy, acid; good.

Kuropatkin. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 124:183. 1907.
Originated at the Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station, College Park, Maryland, in 1907 as a cross between Belt and an unnamed seedling. Perfect. Plants numerous, medium in vigor and productivity; fruit below medium in size, round-conic, bright scarlet; flesh red, medium firm, juicy, subacid; fair; early.

Kyle. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 62:33. 1909. Kyle No. r. 2. Mich. Sta. Bul. 130:50. 1896.
A chance seedling which originated in 1889 with W. C. Babcock, Bridgman, Michigan. Perfect. Plants numerous, very vigorous; fruit large, roundish, pale red; flesh light red, soft; poor; late midseason.


La Baron. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 676. 1857.
Originated with W. R. Prince, Flushing, New York; introduced about 1855. Perfect. Plants very productive; berries very large, obtuse-conic, dark scarlet, sweet, soft; very good.

La Belle. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 178:50. 1906. LabelL 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:59. 1911.
A chance seedling which originated about 1899 with E. H. Ekey, Steubenville, Ohio. Imperfect. On the Station grounds, plants few, medium in size and vigor, healthy, productive ; fruit large, soon becoming smaller, long-wedge or conic, necked, variable in color, dull, very juicy, firm, tart; fair; late. Of doubtful value.

La Bon. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:72. 1918.
A seedling of unknown parentage raised by H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan, in 1909. Perfect. As grown here, plants numerous, vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit large, irregularly furrowed, roundish oblate, glossy light red, colors unevenly, not juicy, medium firm, with a hollow center, subacid; fair; medium early.

La Constante. 1. Mag. Hort. 25:497. 1859. 2. Hogg Fruit Man. 749. 1884.
Raised in 1854 by M. de Jonghe, Brussels, Belgium; introduced to North America about 1858; included in the fruit catalog of the American Pomological Society from 1862 to 1871. Perfect. Plants dwarf, productive; berries large, round-conic, bright crimson; flesh whitish,,with a rose tint, firm, sweet, highly aromatic; very good to best; late; highly esteemed for home use about 1860 to 1870.

Lacon. 1. Card. Mon. 21:303. 1879.
Originated by E. R. McKinney, LacGn, Illinois; introduced about 1882. Semi-perfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries large, conic, crimson, firm, acid; good; midseason.

Lady Corneille. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:72. 1918.
A seedling of unknown parentage which originated in 1909 with Mrs. T. C. Corneille, Ponchatoula, Louisiana. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants numerous, vigorous, usually healthy, unproductive; fruit-stems short, thick, semi-erect; fruit above medium in size, furrowed, wedge to blunt-conic, necked, dark red, juicy, firm, white towards the center, sprightly; fair; medium early.

Lady Finger. 1. Gard. Mon. 2:262, 334. 1860.
Originated by Benjamin Prosser, Burlington, New Jersey; introduced prior to 1860. Perfect. Berries medium in size, very long-conic, dark scarlet, firm, subacid; very good; early.

Lady Franklin. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 85:14. 1897.
Originated with H. G. Wolfgang, Salem, Ohio; introduced about 1896. Imperfect. Berries large, round-conic, light scarlet, moderately firm; good; midseason.

Lady Jane. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:55. 1916.
Originated with J. A. Bauer, Judsonia, Arkansas, as a cross between Haverland and Hoffman. Perfect. Berries medium in size, long, irregular, scarlet, firm; good; early.

Lady of the Lake. 1. Gard. Mon. 15:133. 1873.
Originated with John C. Scott, Brighton, Massachusetts, in 1862. Imperfect. Berries large, irregular conic, with a long neck, light crimson; flesh light red, firm, sweet, dry; good; midseason.

Lady Rusk. 1. Rural N. Y. 50:527. 1891.
Originated as a chance seedling in 1884 with William Stahl, Quincy, Illinois. Perfect to semi-perfect. Plants at this Station, medium in number and yield; fruit-stems short; fruit small, decidedly variable in shape, very dark red, firm; fair; midseason.

LaFollette. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:55. 1916.
Originated with W. J. Moyle, Union Grove, Wisconsin, as a seedling of McKinley; introduced in 1915. Perfect. Berries large, oblong-conic, light crimson, acid; midseason.

Lanah. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 85:17. 1897. Lanahan. 2. Mich. Sta. Bul. 169:147. 1899.
Originated in Mississippi; introduced in 1894. Perfect. Berries medium to below in size, conic, bright scarlet, very firm; good; midseason to late.

Large Clima1. 1. Gard. Mon. 8:302. 1866.
Originated with W. R. Prince, Flushing, New York; introduced about 1855. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries large, obtuse-conic, dark scarlet; flesh whitish, sweet; good.

Large Early Scarlet. 1. Prince Pom. Man. 2:177. 1832. 2. Mag. Hort. 16:70. 1850. 3. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 993. 1869.
One of the oldest varieties of American origin and together with Hovey was for many years a leading commercial sort. Its name appeared in the first fruit catalog of the American Pomological Society and remained in the Society's catalog until 1879, when it passed from general cultivation. Perfect. Plants slender, upright, productive; berries medium or below, roundish oval, light scarlet; flesh whitish, moderately firm, subacid; good; very early.

Late Bittner. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:56. 1916.
Originated with George Bittner, Milan, Ohio; introduced about 1907. Imperfect. Berries large, round-conic to wedge, scarlet, firm, subacid; good; midseason.

Late Champion. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:56. 1916. Townsend's Late Champion. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:191. 1915.
Originated as a chance seedling near a bed of Aroma in 1906 with E. W. Townsend, Salisbury, Maryland. Perfect. At this Station, plants medium vigorous, numerous, productive, healthy; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate, much branched; fruit large, round-conic to blunt-wedge, dull light red, juicy, subacid, whitish toward the center; fair; midseason.

Late Globe. 1. Gard. Mon. 8:280. 1866. Late Globose. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:56. 1916.
Originated with W. R. Prince, Flushing, New York; introduced about 1855. Imperfect. Plants hardy, vigorous, productive; berries large, roundish, light scarlet, firm; fair; late.

Late Jersey. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 211:69. 1918. Late Jersey Giant. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:184. 1915.
A seedling of unknown parentage originated in 1907 by Dr. Walter Van Fleet, Little Silver, New Jersey. Perfect. As grown here, plants vigorous, very productive, healthy, medium in number; fruit-stems thick, erect; fruit large, round-conic to blunt-wedge, dull light red, sweet, pleasantly flavored, whitish at the center; good; late.

Late Prolific. 1. Mag. Hort. 13:368. 1847.
Originated with John Burr, Columbus, Ohio; introduced in 1847. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, hardy, productive; berries large, irregular, light crimson, firm, acid; good; late.

Late Prolific (of Durand). 1. Horticulturist 25:226. 1870.
Originated with E. W. Durand, Irvington, New Jersey; introduced in 1870. Berries large, roundish coxcomb, dark scarlet; flesh light red, soft, acid; good; late.

Late Prolific (of Rapp). 1. Ohio Sta. Bttl. 178:51. 1906.
Originated in Ohio; introduced in 1905. Perfect. Plants moderately large, and vigorous, productive; berries medium in size, round-conic, ribbed, dark crimson, firm, acid; fair; midseason.

Late Stevens. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:56. 1916. 2. U. S. D. A. Farmers' Bul. 1043:32. 1919. Stevens' Late Champion. 3. Rural N. Y. 66:574. 1907. 4. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309: 548. 1908. Stevens. 5. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 51. 1909.
Late Stevens is not so desirable as several other late varieties in New York, but in parts of New Jersey and Delaware it is highly esteemed for both commercial and home plantations. In New York the plants are not always productive, the foliage is susceptible to mildew and leaf-spot and the fruits lack uniformity in shape and size. Neither plants nor fruits stand drouth well, under which condition the berries show the seeds too plainly. This variety was originated by Arthur Stevens, Bridgeton, New Jersey, in 1897; introduced in 1903. The American Pomological Society added the variety to its list of recommended fruits in 1909.
Semi-perfect to perfect. Plants variable in number and health, tall, not always productive, vigorous; leaves large, dark green, dull, slightly rugose. Flowers midseason or late, large; petals 6-8; stamens few to numerous; receptacle large. Fruit late to very late; fruit-stems semi-erect; pedicels long, slender; calyx medium to above in size, often leafy, attractive green, slightly sunken; sepals long, broad; berries large, retain size well, irregular in shape, varying from coxcomb to wedge or round-conic; apex obtuse; color attractive light red; seeds depressed; flesh well colored to the center, firm, agreeably acid, pleasantly flavored; quality good.

Late Thompson. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:56. 1916. Thompson's Late. 2. Can. Cent. Exp. Farm Bul. 27:20. 1897.
Originated with Mark T. Thompson, Rio Vista, Virginia; introduced about 1896. Imperfect. Plants vigorous; berries medium in size, conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm, acid; good; late.

Latest. 1. Ant. Gard. 24:333. 1903. 2. N. Y, Sta. Bul. 309:531. 1908.
Originated in 1895 by S. H. Warren, Weston, Massachusetts, as a cross between Jewell and Belmont. Imperfect. Station plants very few, medium in vigor; healthy, unproductive; fruit poorly protected from the sun, large to medium, very irregular in shape, dull light and dark red, medium firm, mildly acid, with whitish flesh; fair; late.

Latest of All. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:184. 1915.
Received at this Station in 1910 from Vilmorin-Andrieux Nursery Company, Paris, France. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants small, low growing, medium in number, weak, unproductive; fruit-stems short, thick; fruit of medium size, conic to wedge, dull light red, often green tipped, sweet, mild, whitish toward the center; fair; late.

Laurel Leaf. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:56. 1916.
Originated with A. N. Jones, Leroy, New York; introduced about 1879. Perfect. Berries medium in size, round-conic, light scarlet, soft; good.

Laurella. 1. Horticulturist 25:227. 1870.
Introduced about 1868. Imperfect. Plants very productive; berries large, round-conic, scarlet; flesh light red, soft, acid; fair.

Lawrencia. 1. Gard. Mon. 8:280. 1866.
Originated with W. R. Prince, Flushing, New York; introduced about 1855. Imperfect. Plants hardy, vigorous, very productive; berries large, round-conic, light scarlet, sweet, juicy; good.

Laxton Latest. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:184. 1915.
Received at this Station from Vilmorin-Andrieux Nursery Company, Paris, France. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants few, medium in vigor, unproductive, attacked by leaf-spot; fruit-stems slender, prostrate; fruit of medium size, wedge to long-conic, glossy light to dark red, juicy, subacid, inferior in flavor; poor; late.

Lea. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:184. 1915.
Originated by Thomas J. Custis, Craddockville, Virginia, in 1907. Perfect. Plants at this Station, few, medium in vigor, health and yield; fruit-stems slender, prostrate; fruit small, conic, glossy red, juicy, tart, inferior in flavor; fair; early.

Leader. 1. Gard. et For. 6:336. 1893. 2. Colo. Sta. Bul. 53:18. 1900.
Originated with J. B. Campbell, North Reading, Massachusetts; introduced in 1892. Perfect. At this Station, plants vigorous, numerous, moderately productive; fruit-stems good; fruit medium or below in size, dark red, conic, soft, with dark red flesh; fair; early.

Leavell Beauty. 1. Am. Gard. 21:631. 1900.
Originated with B. S. Leavell, Trenton, Kentucky; introduced about 1900. Berries roundish, dark crimson, very firm; good.

Leavell Favorite. 1. Am. Gard. 21:631. 1900.
Another seedling which originated with B. S. Leavell; introduced about 1900. Berries large, scarlet; very good.

Legal Tender. 1. Rural N. Y. 42:456. 1883. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:334. 1890.
Originated with Oscar Felton, Merchantsville, New Jersey, as a cross between Lady Finger and Cinderella ; introduced about 1881. Imperfect. Station plants very vigorous, numerous, productive; fruit-stems erect, stiff, holding the fruit well above the foliage;, fruit large, bright red, oblong-conic, soft, very sweet, well flavored; early to late.

Lehigh. 1. U. S. D. A. Pom. Rpt. 393. 1891.
A seedling of Crescent originated with W. B. K. Johnson, Allentown, Pennsylvania; introduced in 1891. Imperfect. Berries medium in size, round-conic, dark scarlet; flesh light red, firm, acid; fair; midseason.

Lehman. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 218:198. 1902.
Raised by S. J. Lehman, Enon, Ohio, about 1894. Perfect. Berries medium in size, conic, dark crimson, firm; fair; midseason.

Lennig. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 994. 1869. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:334. 1890. White Pineapple. 3. Rural N. Y. 12:335. 1861. Lennig's White Pine. 4. Mag. Hort. 28:400. 1862. White Albany. 5. Gard. Mon. 4:210. 1862. Albion White. 6. Thomas Am. Fruit Cult. 582. 1885.
Originated about 1858 by a Mr. Lennig, Germantown, Pennsylvania, as a seedling of Wilson; included in the American Pomological Society's recommended fruit list from 1871 to 1883. Perfect. As grown here, plants vigorous, numerous, unproductive; fruit-stems-erect, stiff; fruit small, roundish, glossy light red, soft, well flavored, whitish; very good; late. An excellent pollinizer for pistillate kinds as its blooming season is long and the pollen very abundant.

Leon. 1. Rural N. Y. 58:514. 1899. 2. A^. Y. Sta. Bul. 218:198. 1902.
Originated with J. H. Black, Son et Company, Hightstown, New Jersey; introduced in 1899. Imperfect. On the Station grounds, plants few, medium in vigor,, unproductive; fruit above medium to large, oval to wedge, light red, medium firm,, inferior in flavor; poor; midseason.

Leonard. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:335. 1890.
Introduced by a Mr. Leonard about 1887. Perfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries large, conic, dark crimson, firm; good; early.

Leroy. 1. Gard. et For. 6:335. 1893.
Originated with J. H. Haynes, Delphi, Indiana; introduced about 1891. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries large, round-conic, ridged, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm; good; early to midseason.

Lester Lovett. 1. Am. Gard. 22:473. 1901.
Originated with Matthew Mullen, Lincroft, New Jersey; introduced in 1901. Perfect. Plants vigorous; berries large, round-conic, light crimson, firm, acid; good; late.

Leviathan. 1. Card, et For. 6:336. 1893.
Originated with H. G. Wolfgang, Salem, Ohio, as a seedling of Sharpless; introduced in 1892. Perfect. Berries large, flattened wedge-shape, light scarlet; flesh whitish, soft; fair; midseason.

Lexington. 1. Va. Sta. Bul. 91:89. 1898.
Originated with W. H. Earhart, Lexington, Ohio; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Berries large, irregular, scarlet; midseason.

Liberty Bell. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 167. 1920.
A seedling of Gandy introduced by J. T. Garrison et Sons, Woodstown, New Jersey. Plants thrifty, very productive; fruit firm, resembling Gandy but larger.

Lida. 1. Rural N. Y. 45:461. 1886. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:534. 1890.
Originated in 1880 by William Parry, Parry, New Jersey; introduced in 1886. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants vigorous, few, very productive; fruit-stems stiff, upright; fruit uniformly large, roundish, attractive dark red, very soft, rots quickly, inferior in flavor; poor; midseason.

Lillie Monroe. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 100:8. 1893.
Perfect. Plants moderately vigorous and productive; berries large, conic, flattened, etdull dark scarlet; flesh light red, soft; fair; early.

Lincoln. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:58. 1916.
Originated in Michigan; introduced about 1905. Berries medium in size, long-conic to wedge-shape, bright crimson, soft; midseason.

Linnet. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 154:48. 1904.
Introduced about 1904 by M. Crawford Company, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. Perfect. Berries medium in size, long-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm; good; early.

Little Jap. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 160:203, 213. 1911.
Originated with A. T. Goldsborough, Washington, D. C.; introduced prior to 1911. Perfect. Plants large, vigorous; berries large, roundish to coxcomb, bright crimson, firm, mildly subacid; fair; early.

Little Monitor. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 994. 1869.
Originated with W. A. Burgess, Glen Cove, New York; introduced about 1862. Berries small to medium, round-conic, obtuse, light scarlet; flesh whitish, soft, sweet; good.

Little Seedlings. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:58. 1916.
Seedlings numbering from 1 to 42 were raised by James Little, Granton, Ontario, about 1900. One of these is Woolverton .

Livingston. 1. Md. Sta. Bid. 160:203, 213. 1911.
Originated by C. M. Middleton as a supposed cross between Warfield and Jessie; introduced in 1900. Plants large, vigorous; berries medium to below, irregular long-conic, necked, crimson, firm, mildly subacid; fair; midseason.

Lizzie Randolph. 1. Horticulturist 7:352. 1852.
Originated with W. R. Prince, Flushing, New York; introduced in 1847. Imperfect. Plants productive; berries medium to large, roundish, long-conic; poor.

Lnge. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 293. 1921.
Originated by Albert F. Etter, Ettersburg, California. Perfect. Plants at this Station medium in number, vigor, and height, productive; fruit-stems short, thick, semi-erect; fruit above medium to small, wedge to conic, glossy medium red, green tipped, very juicy, firm, sprightly; good; late.

Logan. 1. Am. Gard. 10:342. 1889. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:334. 1890.
Supposed to be a seedling of Crescent originated in 1886 by J. H. Haynes, Delphi, Indiana. Perfect. At this Station, plants vigorous, productive; fruit-stems short, weak, prostrate; fruit large, roundish, glossy red, well flavored, soft; good; midseason.

Long John. 1. Rural N. Y. 42:146. 1883. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:335. 1890.
Originated with John Burdette, La Salle, New York; introduced in 1871. Perfect. As grown here, plants vigorous, productive; fruit-stems very short, prostrate; fruit small, long-conic, unusually dark red, firm, sour; fair; midseason.

Long John (of Wilde). 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 118:5, 8. 1895.
Originated with Thomas Wilde, Herrington, Michigan; introduced about 1892. Perfect. Berries small, long-conic, bright crimson, moderately firm; good; early to midseason.

Longfellow. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:58. 1916.
Propagated by R. M. Kellogg Company, Three Rivers, Michigan; introduced in 1909. Perfect. Berries large, long-conic, dark crimson, firm, mildly subacid; fair; midseason.

Longfellow (of Webb). 1. W. N. Y. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 119. 1880.
Originated in 1876 by A. D. Webb, Bowling Green, Kentucky. Perfect. Station plants weak, numerous, productive; fruit-stems short; fruit large, oblong-conic, glossy dark red, firm, sweet, with a pleasant flavor; fair; midseason. Of no special value.

Longfield. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 130:48. 1896.
Originated with James Stayman, Leavenworth, Kansas, as a seedling of Warfield; introduced about 1893. Imperfect. Berries medium to large, long-conic, dark crimson, firm; good; early to midseason.

Longworth. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:58, fig. 11. 1916. Schneike's Pistillate. 2. Cultivator 3d Ser. 1:280. 1853. Longworth's Prolific. 3. Horticulturist 8:388. 1853.
Originated in 1848 by a Mr. Schneike, a tenant of Nicholas Longworth, Cincinnati, Ohio, as one of thousands of seedlings, but never widely grown. Perfect. Plants large; berries large, roundish oval, crimson, firm, briskly subacid; good; early.

Lord Salisbury. 1. Townsend Cat. 1925.
Originated in 1920 by James H. Parsons, Salisbury, Maryland. Imperfect. Plants strong, healthy, productive; berries round, uniform in size and shape, firm, bright red; good; early to midseason.

Louella. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 167. 1882. Luella. 2. III. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 359. 1886.
Introduced about 1880. Perfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries large, irregular round-conic, often necked, dark crimson; flesh dark red, acid; good; midseason. 31

Louis Ella. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 167. 1920.
Originated in 1916 by Louis Graton, Whiteman, Massachusetts, as a seedling of Brandywine. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants variable in number, height, and yield, medium in vigor, healthy; flowers midseason, very large; fruit-stems thick, semi-erect; calyx very large, leafy; petals very large; seeds raised; fruit large to medium, blunt-conic to round-conic, dull medium to dark red, juicy, sweet, highly flavored, with a hollow center; very good. Worthy of test on account of high quality.

Louis Gauthier. 1. Gard. Chron. 3d Ser. 19:199. 1896. 2. Am. Card. 18:536. 1897. 3. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:59. 1916.
Originated by Louis Gauthier, Calvados, France; introduced to America in 1S97; of interest solely as one of the parents of Americus, one of the best of the autumn-fruiting sorts. Perfect. Plants lacking in vigor, moderately productive; berries medium to large, round-conic to wedge, very light scarlet to whitish; flesh whitish, firm, mildly subacid; good; midseason to late.

Louis Hubach. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 154:48. 1904.
Originated by Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas, as a cross between Warfield and Thompson; introduced in 1902. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries medium in size, round-conic, dark crimson, firm, acid; fair; moderately early.

Louise. 1. Rural N. Y. 47:460. 1888. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 36:632. 1891. Burpee's Louise. 3. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 216. 1889.
Originated by Nicholas Hallock, Creedmore, New York; introduced by W. Atlee Burpee, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1886. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants very vigorous, very productive, few; fruit-stems long, stiff, erect; fruit large, conic, glossy red, variable in firmness, well flavored; good to very good; midseason. Rots quickly in wet weather.

Lovett. 1. U. S. D. A. Pom. Rpt. 393. 1891. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 109:247. 1896. Lovett's Early. 3. Rural N. Y. 50:527. 1891.
Originated in 1885 by J. H. Morris, Fairview, Kentucky; supposed to be a cross between Crescent and Wilson. Perfect. Plants at this Station, vigorous, bearing a moderate crop of very fine appearing berries of fairly good quality but soft; not extra early here.

Lower. 1. Mich. St. Bd. Agr. Rpt. 132. 1885.
Originated about 1878 with Byron Lower, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan. Perfect, Berries large, round-conic, dark crimson, moderately firm; good; midseason.

Loyal. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 167. 1920.
A seedling of Superb, originated by William Pfaender, New Ulm, Minnesota; introduced by the Pioneer Nursery Company of that place. Autumn-bearing; berries large; good.

Lucas. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 154:48. 1904.
Originated in 1898 with W. S. Todd, Greenwood, Delaware, as a chance seedling. Perfect, Plants large, vigorous, productive; berries medium in size, round-conic to wedge, dark crimson, moderately firm, acid; fair; midseason.

Luckhurst. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 98. 1877.
Originated in New York; introduced about 1874. Perfect. Plants medium in vigor and productiveness; berries large, round-conic, dark crimson, firm; good; midseason.

Lucky Boy. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 293. 1921.
Originated by Samuel Cooper, Delevan, New York. Plants medium in size, deep rooted; berries very large, round, firm, sweet; good.

Lucky Cross. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 293. 1921.
A seedling of Productive which originated with W. M. Freeman, New Meadows, Idaho. Autumn-bearer; berries large, brilliant red, with white centers, very firm; good.

Lucky Strike. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 167. 1920.
Found growing in 1915 in a bed of Progressive everbearing plants by E. W. Townsend, Salisbury, Maryland. Perfect. At this Station, plants variable in number, medium in vigor, dwarfish, productive, with slight leaf-spot; autumn-bearing; leaves small, thin, dark green; flowers small; fruit small, conic, dull medium red; seeds raised; flesh juicy, firm, sprightly; poor; very late.

Lucretta. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 298. 1913.
Originated in 1906 at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada, as a seedling of Bubach. Perfect. Berries large, roundish to wedge, dark scarlet, firm, subacid; fair; early.

Lupton. 1. TV. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 40. 1916. 2. Hedrick Cyc. Hardy Fr. 341. 1922.
Originated in 1905 as a cross between Joe and Gandy by M. D. Lupton, Newport, New Jersey. It is about the handsomest of commercial strawberries but one of the poorest in quality, the Ben Davis in the strawberry family. Perfect. Plants tall, numerous, vigorous, healthy, productive; leaves large, somewhat roundish, dark green; fruit-stems long, thick, semi-erect; pedicels long, often very thick; fruit large to very large, often double, irregular, with a furrowed surface, usually a broad wedge but variable, glossy light red, seldom turning dark after picking; flesh well colored to the center, rather dry, very firm, mildly subacid; poor; late midseason.

Luscious Scarlet. 1. Horticulturist 8:500. 1853.
Originated by W. R. Prince, Flushing, New York; introduced about 1853. Imperfect. Plants productive; berries large, roundish, dark scarlet; good.

Luther. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 76:436. 1894. August Luther. 2. Am. Gard. 21:629, 630. 1900.
Originated in 1875 by August Luther, Sedalia, Missouri. Perfect. Station plants vigorous, very numerous, moderately productive; fruit-stems good; fruit medium or above in size, medium red, moderately firm; fair to good; early.

Luxuriant. 1. Ann. Hort. 97. 1871.
Originated by E. W. Durand, Irvington, New Jersey; introduced about 1868. Berries large, roundish, light scarlet, sweet; poor.

Luxury. 1. Ohio Sta. Bid. 154:48. 1904.
Originated by E. H. Riehl, Alton, Illinois, as a cross between Brandywine and Williams . Perfect. Berries medium in size, irregularly wedge-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm, subacid; very good to best; midseason.

Lyons. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 154:48. 1904.
Originated in 1896 with L. W. Hardy, Grand Rapids, Michigan, as a seedling of Bubach. Imperfect. Plants slender but vigorous, healthy, productive; berries medium in size, long-conic, dark crimson, firm, subacid; good; medium early.


McAlpin. 1. Peninsula Hort. Soc. RpL 84. 1916. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:72. 1918. Hausmann. 3. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 166. 1920.
A cross between Glen Mary and Bubach made by Hausmann Brothers, Hilton, New Jersey, in 1909. Perfect. As grown here, plants numerous, vigorous, injured by leaf-spot, productive; fruit-stems long, slender, erect; fruit large, furrowed, blunt-wedge to blunt-conic, necked, dull light red, green tipped, very juicy, rather soft, subacid, with whitish center; fair; late.

McAvoy Extra Red. 1. Horticulturist 8:388. 1853. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 676.
Originated in 1848 with D. McAvoy, Cincinnati, Ohio, a tenant of Nicholas Longworth, as a seedling of Iowa. Plants vigorous, very productive; fruit large, irregularly oblate, usually necked, dark scarlet; flesh light red, soft, juicy, acid; fair; late.

McAvoy Superior. 1. Mag. Hort. 17:361. 1851. 2. Fuller Sm. Fr. Cult. 96. 1867. Buffalo. 3. Mag. Hort. 30:142. 1864.
Originated in 1848 by D. McAvoy, Cincinnati, Ohio, from mixed seed of Hovey and Keens Seedling ; introduced in 1851, in which year it received the prize of one hundred dollars offered by the Cincinnati Horticultural Society for the "best new American strawberry." It was widely grown until about 1865. Buffalo, introduced by Abner Bryant, Buffalo, New York, in 1864, proved identical with McAvoy Superior. The variety was placed in the list of fruits promising well by the American Pomological Society in 1856, in the society's catalog in 1862, from which it was removed in 1871. Plants medium in number, vigorous, very productive; fruit large, irregular, roundish oblate, necked, variable in color from light to dark crimson; flesh dark red, soft, sweet; very good.

McKinley. 1. Rural N. Y. 55:515. 1896. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:186. 1898.
Originated with W. J. Moyle, Union Grove, Wisconsin; introduced in 1896 by Ellwanger et Barry, Rochester, New York. Plants medium in number, vigor, and productivity; fruit large, irregular round-conic to long-conic, dark crimson; flesh medium red, medium firm, acid; fair; midseason.

McNeil. 1. Miss. Sta. Bul. 26:10. 1893.
Originated in Crystal Springs, Mississippi, as a seedling of Hoffman; introduced about 1893. Imperfect. Plants medium in number, healthy; fruit large, roundish to oblong, crimson; flesh medium red, firm; good; late.

Maggie. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 93. 1883. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 62:34. 1909.
Originated with Charles Arnold, Paris, Ontario, in 1878, as a cross between Wilson and Doctor Nicaise; introduced in 1881. Perfect. Plants few, vigorous, productive; fruit medium in size, round-conic to wedge-conic, light scarlet; flesh medium red, medium firm, juicy, subacid; good; early.

Magic Gem. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:73. 1918.
Originated by Edward Vance, Twin Falls, Idaho, in 1912. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants medium in number and vigor, healthy, productive; fruit-stems medium in length, thick, semi-erect; calyx large, leafy, raised; fruit very large, drops in size, broad-conic, with a few coxcombs, necked, glossy medium red, juicy, very firm, the larger berries with a hollow center, sprightly, well flavored, with red flesh; very good.

Magnate. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:9. 1894.
Originated by James Stayman, Leavenworth, Kansas, as a seedling of Warfield. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants vigorous, few, unproductive, healthy; fruit medium to large, long-conic, dark red, soft; good; midseason.

Magnus. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 298:53. 1908. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:532. 1908.
Originated at this Station in 1899 as a cross between Hunn and Marshall. Owing to its variable color it has not proved popular for market, although its high quality makes it desirable in the home garden. Imperfect. At this Station, plants numerous, vigorous, productive, usually healthy; leaves large, dark green; fruit-stems medium in length, thick, prostrate; calyx large, leafy, sunken; seeds raised; fruit above medium to very large, retains size well, round-conic to long-conic, very dark red, colors unevenly, firm, juicy, with whitish center, mildly acid; good to very good; midseason.

Magoon. 1. Rural N. Y. 56:471. 1897. 2. Ore. Bien. Crop Pest et Hort. Rpt. 76. 1915.
A chance seedling which originated in the garden of W. J. Magoon, Portland, Oregon, who introduced it in 1894. Magoon is the leading variety for home use and local markets in western Oregon and Washington, its popularity being due to its productivity. The fruit is too soft for shipping long distances or for canning. The American Pomological Society added Magoon to its catalog in 1899, where it remained in the last catalog in 1909. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous and productive; fruit medium to large, irregular round-conic, attractive dark crimson; flesh medium to dark red, rather soft, mildly subacid; good; midseason.

Maida. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 72:12. 1899.
Sent out in 1896 by the United States Department of Agriculture who secured it from W. M. Carlins of Virginia. Perfect. Plants few, medium in vigor, unproductive; fruit-stems very long; fruit medium to large, oblong-conic, bright scarlet, with green tips; flesh light red, soft, subacid; good; late.

Malinda. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 178:51. 1906.

Linda. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 51. 1909.
Originated with James Waters, Watsonville, California; introduced about 1894. In the Watsonville and Florin districts of California it is the leading sort, usually being sold as "Longworth." The variety was placed in the last catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1909 as Linda. Perfect. Plants medium in number and vigor, moderately productive; fruit of medium size, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh red, moderately firm, mildly subacid; good; midseason.

Mammoth. 1. Mich. Sta. BuL 55:14. 1889. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:335. 1890.
Originated with William Davis, Mount Ephraim, New Jersey; introduced in 1885 by William Parry, Parry, New Jersey. Perfect. Station plants very vigorous and numerous, severely attacked by leaf-spot, very productive; fruit-stems erect, holding the fruit above the foliage; fruit oblate-conic to round-conic, glossy red, large, soft, well flavored; good; late.

Mammoth Beauty. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:226. 1912.
Originated in Massachusetts; introduced about 1908. This sort is very similar to Haverland. Imperfect. Plants few, vigorous; fruit medium to very large, irregular long-conic, often coxcombed and necked, bright scarlet, with occasional white tips; flesh medium red, medium firm, mildly subacid; good; midseason.

Mammoth Bush. 1. W. N. Y. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 120. 1880.
Originated by A. J. Caywood et Son, Marlboro, New York; introduced about 1879. Perfect. Plants few, vigorous, productive; fruit very large, round-conic, often coxcombed, bright scarlet; flesh moderately firm, juicy, subacid; inferior in quality.

Manchester. 1. Gard. Mon. 23:240. 1881. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:335. 1890.
Originated about 1871 with Jesse Battey, Manchester, New Jersey, as a chance seedling. Grown extensively from 1885 to 1890. The American Pomological Society added Manchester to its catalog in 1883, where it remained in the last catalog in 1909. Imperfect. As grown here, plants vigorous, very numerous, productive, severely injured by leaf-spot; fruit-stems short, much branched; fruit round-conic to oblong-conic, medium to small, light red, firm, subacid; good; late.

Manhattan. 1. N. Y. Sta. BuL 336:59. 1911.
A chance seedling discovered on his farm in 1907 by J. E. Kuhns, Cliffwood, New Jersey. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants very few, small, healthy, medium productive; fruit above medium to below in size, conic or wedge, dull light red; seeds much raised; flesh juicy, firm, tart, inferior in flavor; poor; late.

Manokln. 1. N. Y. Sta. BuL 218:198. 1902.
Originated in 1895 by O. A. Johnson, Manokin, Maryland, as a cross between Crescent and Sharpless. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants vigorous, very numerous, healthy, very productive; fruit-stems long, slender, prostrate; fruit medium to large, drops quickly in size, wedge, light red, glossy, soft, juicy; fair; midseason.

Manwell. 1. Am. Gard. 17:515, 647, fig. 224. 1896.
A supposed cross between Crescent and Sharpless which originated with A. D. Manwell, Vinton, Iowa; introduced about 1895. Perfect. Plants few, moderately vigorous, productive; fruit large, irregular, round-conic, crimson; flesh medium red, firm, acid; fair; midseason.

Maple Bank. 1. Can. Hort. 18:241. 1895. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 109:235. 1896.
A supposed cross between Crescent and Wilson which originated with E. B. Stevenson, Lowville, Ontario; introduced about 1895. Imperfect. Plants at this Station, vigorous, numerous, moderately productive; fruit medium to very large, round-wedge, glossy dark red, firm; fair; midseason to late.

Marconi. 1. Ohio Sta. Bid. 166:76. 1905.
Originated in 1900 by K. Smith, Bridgman, Michigan, as a cross between Warfield and Enhance. Imperfect. Plants vigorous; fruit medium in size, round-conic, dark red; flesh red, acid; good; midseason.

Margaret. 1. Gard. Mon. 15:218. 1873.
Raised by Matthew Crawford, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, who introduced it in 1873. Imperfect. Fruit large, round-conic, very dark crimson: flesh dark red, subacid; good; midseason.

Margaret (of Beavers). 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 109:235. 1896. 2. Meekans* Mon. 7:115.1897.
Originated in 1891 by J. F. Beaver, Dayton, Ohio, as a seedling of Crawford. Perfect. Plants numerous, medium in number and vigor, unproductive; fruit of medium size, conic, dark red; flesh medium red, firm, mildly subacid; good; midseason.

Marguerite. 1. Am. Gard. 19:111, 196. 1898.
A chance seedling supposed to be a cross between Jewell and Jessie which originated with J. C. Grossman, Wolcottville, Indiana, in 1893. This sort has been confused with Margaret, from the similarity in names. A French sort of the same name originating in 1858 has been on trial in this country. Imperfect. Plants numerous, medium in vigor and productivity; fruit medium to large, irregular round-conic, bright scarlet; flesh whitish, soft; good; midseason.

Mariana. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 298. 1913.
A seedling of Bubach which originated in 1906 at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada. Perfect. Plants medium in number; fruit large, roundish to wedge-shape, dark scarlet; flesh medium red, medium firm, subacid; good; late midseason.

Marie. 1. Rural N. Y. 60:108. 1901. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 62:34. 1909.
Originated in 1892 by W. N. Scarf!, New Carlisle, Ohio, as a cross between Crescent and Cumberland. Imperfect. Plants few, vigorous, productive; foliage subject to rust; fruit large, roundish, pale glossy red; flesh pale red, rather soft, juicy; good; late midseason.

Mark. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 81:8. 1892.
Originated with Mark T. Thompson, Rio Vista, Virginia, as a seedling of Sharpless; introduced about 1889. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigor, and productivity; fruit medium in size, round-conic, light crimson; flesh light red, medium firm; fair; midseason.

Mark Hanna. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 146:35. 1903. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 276:72. 1906.
A seedling of Bubach originated by Mark T. Thompson, Rio Vista, Virginia; introduced about 1906. Imperfect. At this Station, plants numerous, healthy, very productive, vigorous; fruit-stems long, thick; fruit large to very large, retains size well, irregularly shaped and furrowed, glossy light red, medium firm, juicy, pleasantly tart; fair to good; medium early.

Marsden Perry. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 186:7. 1907.
Originated by William Perry, Cool Spring, Delaware; introduced in 1904. Perfect. Plants few, unproductive; fruit of medium size, conic, crimson; flesh medium red, subacid; fair; midseason.

Marshall. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 91:192. 1895. 2.16^.309:533. 1908. Henry. 3. Rural N. Y. 56:470. 1897.
Were it not for its very exacting soil and climatic requirements, Marshall would be considered the standard of excellence among strawberries in both fruit and plant in northern regions. The plants require a heavy, rich soil and intensive culture to force the foliage sufficiently to withstand the leaf-spot. Under good conditions, however, very large crops of exceedingly handsome and splendid-flavored berries, are produced. Under unfavorable conditions, which occur all too often, the berries are small, seedy, irregular and unattractive. This variety originated in 1890 as a chance seedling, with Marshall F. Ewell, Marshfield Hills, Massachusetts, who introduced it in 1893.
Perfect. Plants medium in number, tall, large, usually vigorous, susceptible to leaf-spot, variable in yield; leaves large, light to dark green, roundish, thick, rugose, glossy. Flowers midseason, large; petals 5-6, small; stamens numerous; receptacle intermediate in size. Fruit midseason; fruit-stems thick, prostrate; pedicels long, thick; calyx sometimes discolored, depressed; sepals medium in length and width; berries large to very large, irregularly round-conic to wedge, the surface often irregularly furrowed and misshapen; apex obtuse; color glossy dark, deep red; seeds raised to slightly sunken; flesh dark red to the center, juicy, variable in firmness, pleasantly sprightly, aromatic; quality very good to best.

Marshall Improved. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:73. 1918.
The origin of this variety is obscure. E. W. Townsend et Sons, Salisbury, Maryland, introduced the sort about 1913, having purchased the original plant three years earlier from a nursery canvasser. It is inferior to Marshall at this Station. Perfect. Plants healthy, medium in number, yield, and vigor; fruit-stems short, thick, erect; fruit large to medium, irregularly furrowed, round-conic, dull light red, medium in juiciness and firmness, subacid, whitish at the center, fair; early.

Marston. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 91:192. 1895.
Introduced about 1894 by C. S. Pratt, Reading, Massachusetts. Imperfect. As grown here, plants vigorous, numerous, very productive; fruit-stems good; fruit medium or below in size, light red, irregular round-conic, moderately firm, acid; fair; early.

Martha. 1. Rural N. Y. 47:710. 1888. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 44:143. 1892.
Raised by William Lyons, Minneapolis, Minnesota, from mixed seed of Pride of Cumberland, Wilson, and Downer Prolific; introduced in 1891 in which year it was placed in the catalog of the American Pomological Society, from which it was removed in 1897. Imperfect. On the Station grounds, plants stocky, with very dark green foliage; fruit dark red, of moderate size and of fine quality; midseason.

Marvel. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:338. 1890.
Originated in Ohio; introduced about 1890. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit large, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh soft, subacid; fair; midseason.

Marvel (of Kellogg). 1. Kellogg Cat. 23. 1922.
Originated by Percy Schuckhardt, North Lake, Wisconsin, and is supposed to be a cross between Dunlap and Warfield; introduced by the R. M. Kellogg Company, Three Rivers, Michigan, in 1922. The fruit is of the type of Dunlap and worthy of trial. Perfect to semi-perfect. In the Station beds, plants very numerous, vigorous, tall, very productive, healthy; leaves large, dark green; flowers midseason to late, small; fruit-stems short, thick, semi-erect; calyx and seeds raised; fruit large to medium, soon becomes smaller, conic, necked, unusually dark red, glossy, somewhat seedy at the apex, with very dark red flesh, juicy, very firm, subacid to sprightly; good; late midseason.

Marvin. 1. W. N. Y. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 119. 1880.
Originated by Harry Marvin, Ovid, Michigan, in 1874, as a supposed cross between Wilson and Jucunda. Perfect. Plants medium in number, productive; fruit large, round-conic, bright crimson; flesh firm; very good; very late.

Mary. 1. Rural N. Y. 48:523. 1889. 2+ N. Y. Sta. Bul. 109:236. 1896.
Originated in 1886 by H. H. Alley, Hilton, New Jersey, as a cross between Champion and Great American. Imperfect. Plants at this Station, very few, vigorous, healthy; fruit-stems medium; fruit large to very large, irregular in shape, with many coxcombs, dark red, firm, acid, with dark red flesh; fair; midseason to late.

Mary Stewart. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 38. 1873.
Originated in Louisiana; introduced in 1873 by Samuel Miller, Bluffton, Missouri. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1873 from which it was removed in 1879. Imperfect. Fruit soft; good; late.

Maryland. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 160:214. 1911.
Found in Anne Arundel County, Maryland, in 1902. Perfect. Plants vigorous; fruits large, irregular round-conic, bright scarlet; flesh whitish, medium firm, juicy, mildly subacid; early midseason.

Maryland Prize. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:185. 1915.
Said to have originated with a Mr. Bell, Tawson, Maryland, in 1908. Imperfect. At this Station, plants numerous, vigorous, healthy, very productive; fruit-stems long, thick, prostrate, much branched; fruit large, with a furrowed surface, conic to wedge, dull medium red, very juicy, subacid, highly flavored; good to very good; midseason.

Marylandica. 1. Mag. Hort. 18:407. 1852. 2. Ibid. 23:123. 1857.
Originated in 1850 by Thomas Edmondson, Baltimore, Maryland; introduced in 1857. Perfect. Plants numerous, unproductive; fruit large, roundish, dark crimson; flesh whitish, firm; good.

Mascot. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:60. 1915. 2, U.S. D. A. Farmers' Bul. 1043:33. 1919.
Introduced by T. M. Hanback, Warrenton, Virginia, in 1908. Mascot described in Bulletin 336 of this Station was not true to name. It is being grown extensively in Maryland, Delaware, and New Jersey, where it ripens later than Gandy, is of better quality and lacks the white tips which detract from the appearance of that sort. Perfect. Station plants numerous, productive, healthy; flowers unusually large and with crinkly petals, late; fruit-stems long, thick, semi-erect; calyx large, raised; seeds raised; fruit large, blunt-wedge to roundish, dull medium red, with apex often green tipped and seedy, juicy, firm, sweet, highly flavored, with well-colored flesh; very good; late.

Mastodon. 1. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 2:421. 1903. 2. Ont. Dept. Agr. Fr. Out. 309. 1914.
Introduced by James Lippincott, Jr., Mount Holly, New Jersey, in 1895. Very similar to Bubach. Imperfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit very large, round-conic, bright crimson; flesh pink, medium firm; good; midseason.

Matilda. 1. Am. Hort. Ann. 107. 1870.
A supposed seedling of Triomphe which originated with A. J. Tillson, Highland, New York; introduced in 1870. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous; fruit large, roundish conic, light scarlet; flesh light red, medium firm, very juicy, sprightly; very good; early midseason,

Matthew Crawford. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:60. 1911.
Originated by J. R. Peck, Breckenridge, Missouri. Perfect. As grown here, plants numerous, healthy, extremely dwarfish, medium productive; fruit large, drops quickly in size, conic, glossy light red, juicy, medium firm, subacid, whitish at the center; fair to good; very late.

Matthews. 1. N. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 19. 1917.
Originated in 1910 as a chance seedling with F. E. Matthews, Pocomoke City, Maryland. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants numerous, medium in vigor and height, productive, healthy; fruit-stems medium in length and thickness, prostrate; fruit medium to small, wedge to irregular conic, furrowed, glossy medium red, very juicy, firm, with a hard center, tart; fair; very early.

Maud Muller. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:185. 1915.
A seedling of Excelsior; introduced in 1912 by E. W. Townsend et Sons, Salisbury, Maryland. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants very numerous and vigorous, productive, healthy; fruit-stems short, slender, prostrate; fruit above medium to small, irregular conic to wedge, furrowed, glossy medium to dark red, very juicy, firm, subacid, red to the center; fair; early.

Maximus. 1. Rural N. Y. 58:530. 1899. 2* N. Y. Sta. Bul. 218:198. 1902. Armstrong. 3. Mich. Sta. Bul. 176:4. 1899. Big Berry. 4. Am. Gard. 21:533. 1900. Corsican. 5. Rural N. Y. 64:544, 568. 1905. German Seedling. 6. Ibid. 68:626. 1909.
This variety is supposed to have originated in Germany and was grown for several years near Rochester, New York, before being introduced as Maximus in 1897. Later a Mr. Armstrong, Charlotte, New York, disseminated it under his own name. It was subsequently distributed as Big Berry and Corsican. The berries are large, handsome and ship well. Perfect. Plants tall, numerous, vigorous, usually healthy, productive; flowers often very large; fruit-stems long, rather slender; fruit medium to very large, holding up well in size, irregularly round-conic to wedge, the surface often furrowed, light to dark red, not very glossy; flesh light red, medium in firmness and juiciness, mildly subacid; good; midseason.

Maxwell. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 130:50. 1896.
Introduced in 1893. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous; fruit small, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, medium firm; good.

May King. 1. Rural N. Y. 45:333. 1895. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:335. 1890.
Originated with Thomas G. Zane, Chews, New Jersey, as a seedling of Crescent; introduced about 1885. Perfect. Plants at this Station, vigorous, numerous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems stiff, erect; fruit medium to large, almost round, light red, firm, well flavored, subacid; very good to best; early.

Mayflower. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 163:69. 1898.
Originated with Charles Waldron, Manchester, Ohio; introduced about 1884. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous; fruit of medium size, long-conic, bright scarlet; flesh pale red, medium firm, juicy; fair; early.

Maytrott. 1. Rural N. Y. 55:515. 1896.
Introduced about 1894. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit medium in size, round-conic, crimson; flesh bright scarlet, medium firm, acid; fair; midseason.

Maywood.
A cross between Sample and Glen Mary raised by T. C. Kevitt, Athenia, New Jersey, in 1912. As grown here Maywood is worthy of trial because of the productivity of the plants and the attractive, high-quality fruit. Perfect. Plants above medium in number, vigorous, tall, very productive, healthy; leaves large; flowers midseason, medium to large; fruit-stems long, thick, erect; pedicels long, slender; calyx large, raised, often clasping; fruit above medium in size, soon becoming smaller, blunt-wedge, glossy dark red, juicy, very firm, sweet, red to the center; very good; early midseason.

Mead. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 276:73. 1906.
Originated with O. E. Mead, Lunenburg, Massachusetts, about 1894. Perfect. Station plants medium to below in number, vigorous, healthy, very productive; fruit-stems variable in length and thickness, prostrate; calyx leafy; fruit very large to medium, round-conic, variable in shape, glossy light and dark red, mildly acid, firm, well flavored; very good; midseason to late.

Mead (of New Jersey). 1. Gard. Mon. 6:309. 1864. 2. Fuller Sm. Fr. Cult. 96. 1867.
Originated about 1857 by Peter B. Mead, Tenafly, New Jersey, as " a cross between the pine and scarlet." Imperfect. Plants vigorous, moderately productive; fruit of medium size, long-conic, necked, light scarlet; flesh pink, very firm, acid; fair; midseason.

Meek.
Meek Early. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:9. 1894.
Originated with James Meek, Anne Arundel County, Maryland; introduced about 1891. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1899, from which it was removed in 1909. Perfect. Plants few, vigorous, unproductive; fruit small, round-conic, very dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm, subacid; good; very early.

Mele. 1. Rural N. Y. 55:515. 1896.
A seedling of Crescent which originated with A. H. Griesa, Lawrence, Kansas, who introduced it in 1894. Imperfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, very productive; fruit medium to large, round-conic, scarlet; flesh whitish, soft, acid; good; early midseason.

Mellie Hubach. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 166:77. 1905-
Originated by Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas, as a cross between Warfield and Thompson; introduced in 1903. Imperfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit of medium size, long-conic, slightly necked, regular, light crimson; flesh red, firm; fair; early midseason.

Meridian. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 142:153. 1897.
Originated with James Stayman, Leavenworth, Kansas; introduced about 1893. Imperfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit large, round-conic, dull dark crimson; flesh dark red, medium firm, lacking juice; fair; late.

Metcalf.
Metcalfs Early. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 996. 1869,
Originated at Niles, Michigan; introduced about 1866. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit small, roundish to oval, light scarlet; flesh soft, mildly subacid; good; early.

Meteor. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 160:214. 1911.
Originated with Charles Lunt, of Massachusetts; introduced about 1907. Imperfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit medium to large, round-conic; color variable, scarlet to crimson, glossy; flesh light red, medium firm, acid; good; late.

Methven Scarlet. 1. Trans. Loud. Hort. Soc. 6:172. 1826. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 527- 1845.
An old English sort grown extensively in this country from 1825 to 1835. Raised in 1816 by Thomas Bishop, Methven Castle, Perthshire, England; introduced into this country about 1825. Plants numerous; fruit large, roundish to coxcomb, dull scarlet; flesh light red, soft; poor; midseason.

Mexican Everbearing. 1. Gard. Mon. 11:240, 301. 1869. 2. Am. Hort. Ann. 107. 1870. 3. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:65. 1916.
Introduced about 1867 with the statement that it had been discovered by a Mr. Mack, near Jalapa, Mexico. Henry Gilman, Detroit, Michigan, took it to Buffalo, New York, where the Society of Natural Sciences of that place decided it was a new species and named it Fragaria Gilmani. It was highly advertised and sold at $3.00 per dozen as an "ever-bearer " but it proved not to differ materially from the old Monthly Alpine and was worthless in most places.

Miami. 1. Col. 0. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 219. 1887. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:335. 1890.
Originated in 1880 with J. D. Kruschke, Piqua, Ohio, as a seeding of Big Bob. Imperfect. On the Station grounds, plants medium in vigor, very numerous, productive; fruit medium to large, oblong-conic, glossy dark red, soft, well flavored; very good; late.

Michel. 1. Ani.Gard. 11:562. 1890. Michel's Early. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:338. 1890. 3. Rural N. Y. 50:527. 1891. Ella. 4. Kan. Sta. Bul. 26:130. 1891. Osceola. 5. Del. Sta. Bul. 18:9. 1892. Sunrise. 6. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:189. 1898. Young's Early Sunrise. 7. Ohio Sta. Bul. 146:38. 1903.
Never of much account in the North, Michel was for many years the standard shipping sort for the South. It is still grown in several southern states as an early market variety, but is being discarded. The plants develop far too many runners, so that a patch of Michel becomes a wilderness. The fruits are small, poor in color and not of high quality. Extreme earliness and ability to cover a large area, sometimes an asset, are its chief characteristics. Excelsior which ripens at the same time is under most conditions a better variety. This sort originated in 1886 with George Michel, Judsonia, Arkansas; introduced in 1889; added to the American Pomological Society's list of recommended fruits in 1897. The variety is a chance seedling with Crescent as a probable parent.
Perfect. Plants very numerous, vigorous but slender, tall, healthy, variable in yield; leaves small, light green, rugose. Flowers early, intermediate in size; petals 6-8. large; stamens numerous; receptacle of medium size. Fruit very early; fruit-stems short, slender, prostrate; pedicels long, slender; calyx large, adherent, slightly raised; sepals long, narrow; berries small, round-conic, sometimes necked; apex blunt-pointed; color dull light red; seeds even with the surface; flesh pale red or whitish towards the center, variable in firmness, quite acid; quality no more than fair.

Michigan. 1. Horticulturist 24:248. 1869. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:65. 1916.
Originated by B. Hathaway, Little Prairie Rond, Michigan, as a cross between a seedling of Old Scarlet and Burr. Grown extensively for a few years. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, and productive; fruit of medium size, round-conic to coxcomb, light scarlet; flesh whitish, soft, acid; good; midseason to late.

Michigan (of Engle). 1. U. S. D. A. Pom. Rpt. 393. 1891. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:186. 1898.
Originated by C. Engle, Paw Paw, Michigan, in 1889. Perfect. Plants medium in number and vigor, productive; fruit large, irregular, round-conic, bright crimson; flesh medium red, firm; good; very late.

Middlefield. 1. Rural N. Y. 48:522. 1889. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 109:248. 1896. Augur No. 70. 3. Rural N. Y. 47:640. 1888.
Originated by P. M. Augur et Sons, Middlefield, Connecticut; introduced in 1890. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants very vigorous, numerous, healthy, productive; fruit large, retains size well, conical, the larger berries flattened, very glossy red, firm, well flavored, sprightly; very good; midseason.

Midnight. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 154:50. 1904. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 276:74. 1906. Hole's 11:59 P. M. 3. Ont. Dept. Agr. Fr. Ont. 307. 1914-
A cross between Haverland and Parker Earle; introduced in 1901 by J. H. Hale, South Glastonbury, Connecticut. Perfect. Plants at this Station, few, lack vigor, unproductive; fruit-stems short, medium thick; fruit variable in size, round-conic to wedge, dull light and dark red, firm, medium juicy; fair to good; medium late. Not equal to standard varieties.

Miller. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 218:198. 1902.
Originated in 1893 by D. J. Miller, Millersburg, Ohio. Perfect. At this Station, plants vigorous, numerous, productive, attacked by leaf-spot; fruit medium to large, conic, glossy light red, soft, with whitish flesh, sweet; fair to good; midseason to late.

Millionaire. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:534. 1908.
Originated in 1902 by Henry Jerolaman, Hilton, New Jersey, as a cross between Hilton and Mary. It is not equal to standard sorts at this Station. Imperfect to semi-perfect. Plants vigorous, healthy, productive, medium in number; fruit-stems thick, prostrate; fruit large to above medium, variable in shape, light red, firm, pleasantly acid; fair; late midseason.

Mineola. 1. Rural N. Y. 48:523. 1889. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:186. 1898.
Originated about 1885 by N. Hallock, Creedmore, New York; introduced in 1888. As grown here, plants very vigorous, low and stocky, medium productive; fruit-stems short, stout; calyx clings to the berry very firmly and when removed brings a hard core from the fruit; berries heart-shaped, large, light red, soft, well flavored; good.

Miner. 1. III. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 199. 1879. Miner's Great Prolific. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 42. 1879. Miner's Prolific. 3. Ibid. 48. 1883
Originated by T. B. Miner, Linden, New Jersey; introduced in 1877. Grown considerably for local markets from 1880 to 1895. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1879, from which it was removed in 1909. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit medium to large, round-conic, dark crimson, colors unevenly; flesh medium red, medium firm, acid; good; midseason.

Minnehaha. 1. Minn. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 227. 1921.
A cross between Minnesota and Abington, originated at the Minnesota Fruit Breeding Farm, Excelsior, Minnesota; introduced in 1916. Although lacking in quality, it is worthy of trial because of the vigor and productivity of the plants. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants medium to very numerous, vigorous, very productive, healthy; leaves large, thick, dark green; flowers late midseason, with large, crinkly petals; fruit-stems long, semi-erect; calyx large, raised, leafy; fruit large to medium, drops in size, round-conic to irregular blunt-wedge, glossy light to medium red, juicy, firm, distinctly whitish toward the center, subacid; fair; early midseason.

Minnesota. 1. Minn. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 227. 1921. Minnesota No. j. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:73. 1918.
Originated in 1909 at the Minnesota Fruit Breeding Farm, Excelsior, Minnesota.
The fruit is of the type of that of Dunlap. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants numerous, vigorous, healthy, very productive; fruit-stems medium in length and thickness, prostrate, branching into long, slender pedicels; calyx large, much raised, with long, reflexed sepals; seeds sunken; fruit large to medium, drops quickly in size, conic, the base irregular, strongly necked, glossy medium to dark red, apex distinctly pointed, often green tipped, very juicy, firm, pleasantly sprightly; good; medium early.

Minnetonka. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:227. 1912. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:75. 1918.
A cross between a seedling of Splendid and Beder Wood, originated in Minnesota in 1904. Perfect. Plants at this Station, medium in number, vigor, and productiveness, healthy; fruit-stems very short, thick, prostrate; fruit of inferior size, blunt-wedge to blunt-conic, dull medium red, juicy, very firm, sprightly; fair; midseason.

Minnie. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 176:77. 1905. Minnie's Early. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:227. 1912.
Originated by Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas; introduced in 1903. Perfect. Plants numerous, medium in vigor and productivity; fruit small, round-conic, scarlet; flesh whitish, firm, juicy, mildly subacid; good; early.

Minute Man. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 218:199. 1902. 2. U. S. D. A. Farmers' Bul. 1043:33. 1919.
Originated as a chance seedling in an old strawberry bed about 1895 with George F. Wheeler, Concord, Massachusetts. Grown extensively near Fall River, Massachusetts, but has not succeeded in other localities. Imperfect. At this Station, plants medium in number and vigor, healthy; fruit above medium to large, retains size well, wedge to conic, glossy light red, soft, subacid; good; medium early.

Miranda. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 298. 1913.
A seedling of Bubach originated in 1906 at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada. Plants medium in number; fruit large, irregular wedge-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm, briskly subacid; early midseason.

Miss Boston. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:534. 1908.
Introduced about 1905. Imperfect. Station plants few, medium to below in vigor, healthy, productive; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate; fruit large to medium, drops rapidly in size, round-conic to wedge, glossy light to dark red, medium to firm, pleasantly acid, moderately juicy, with well-colored flesh; fair to good; medium early.

Missionary. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:185. 1915. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:66. 1916.
This variety originated about 1900 as a chance seedling with Nathaniel Gohn, Deep Creek, Virginia. The Florida shipment of strawberries is mostly made up of Missionary and Klondike. The former is the better yielder, the latter the better shipper. Perfect. Plants very numerous, tall, vigorous, healthy, medium to productive; leaves light green, thin; flowers early, large; fruit-stems long, prostrate; calyx small, raised, reflexed; fruit above medium to large, blunt-conic, often necked, medium to very dark dull red; flesh well colored to the center, juicy, very firm, quite tart, not of highest flavor; fair; early.

Missouri. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 166:77. 1905-
Originated about 1900 with James Sons, Jr., Seligman, Missouri. Perfect. Plants numerous, unproductive; fruit medium to large, irregular round-conic, dull dark crimson; flesh red, rather soft, mildly subacid; fair; midseason.

Model. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:227. 1912. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:186. 1915.
A supposed seedling of Belt, originated by M. S. Hubbell, East Toledo, Ohio; introduced in 1913 by M. Crawford, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. Perfect. As grown here, plants numerous, medium to large, vigorous, productive, healthy; fruit-stems thick, semi-erect; fruit large to medium, irregular in shape, often coxcomb, necked, dull light red, juicy, firm, sweet, well flavored, red to the center; good; midseason.

Mollie. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:228. 1912.
Originated with W. J. Alt, Lancaster, Ohio; introduced in 1908. Imperfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous and productive; fruit large, wedge-conic, light crimson; flesh whitish, firm, juicy, sweet; good; midseason.

Monarch. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 48. 1883. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:67. 1916. Monarch of the West. 3. Am. Hort. Ann. 99. 1871.
A cross between Green Prolific and an unknown English sort, raised by Jesse Brady, Piano, Illinois, in 1867. It has been a favorite for local markets because of the large, attractively-shaped fruits, which, however, are soft and light in color. The blossoms are very sensitive to frost. The variety was placed in the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1875, where it remained in the last catalog in 1909. Plants medium in number, vigorous, productive; fruit large to very large, round-conic, light scarlet; flesh whitish, soft, mildly subacid; very good; late midseason.

Monitor. 1. Horticulturist 17:331, 418, PL 1862. 2. Fuller Sm. Fr. Cult. 97. 1867. Originated in 1859 by A. S. Fuller, Ridgewood, New Jersey, as a seedling of Peabody. Perfect. Plants vigorous and productive; fruit large, round-conic, necked, bright scarlet; flesh white, firm, moderately juicy, subacid; good.

Monitor (of Russell). 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 218:199. 1902.
A supposed cross between Captain Jack and Cumberland, originated by Z. T. Russell, Carthage, Missouri, in 1893. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants very numerous, medium in vigor, healthy, very productive; blossoms show conspicuously above the foliage; fruit above medium to large, retains size well, wedge, pale red, firm, juicy, whitish at the center; fair to good.

Monmouth. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:335. 1890.
Originated in New Jersey in 1885, and is supposed to be a cross between Jersey Queen and Glendale. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants of dwarfish growth, rather weak, unproductive; fruit-stems very short; fruit large, round-conic, glossy medium red, firm, pleasantly tart; good; early.

Monroe. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:60. 1911.
Raised in 1905 by J. A. Morgan, Scottsville, New York, as a seedling of Sample growing adjacent to plants of Rough Rider and Parker Earle. Perfect. Plants at this Station, numerous, of medium size, vigor, and yield, attacked by leaf-spot; leaves thick, dark green; flowers early; fruit-stems medium in length and thickness; calyx large, flattened, leafy; seeds sunken; fruit large, retains size well, round-conic, variable in color, juicy, medium firm, sweet; good; early.

Monroe Scarlet. 1. Mag. Hort. 17:400. 1851. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 996. 1869. Originated about 1847 by Ellwanger et Barry, Rochester, New York, as a seedling of Hovey. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries large, roundish, with a short neck, light scarlet, tender, juicy; very good; early.

Montevideo Pine. 1. Cultivator 3:348. 1846.
Originated by William Prince, Flushing, New York, about 1845. Plants vigorous; fruit large, regular, conic, scarlet, pineapple flavored; late.

Montmorency. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 293. 1921.
Introduced about 1919 by Augustine et Company, Normal, Illinois. Perfect. At this Station, plants very numerous, medium in vigor and height, very productive, healthy; fruit-stems short, thick, erect; fruit small to above medium, oval to conic, strongly necked, very glossy dark red, juicy, medium firm, tart, inferior in flavor; poor.

Moore Prolific. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 55:14. 1889.
Originated in Plymouth, Michigan, in 1884. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit medium to large, long-conic to oblong-conic, scarlet; flesh moderately firm, subacid; good; early midseason.

More Favorite. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:186. 1898.
Originated by C. J. More, Jamestown, New York; introduced about 1897. Imperfect. Plants numerous, very vigorous, productive; fruit small, roundish, scarlet; flesh moderately firm; good; early.

Morgan. 1. Am. Gard. 21:630. 1900. Morgan Favorite. 2. Mich. Sta. Bul. 163:69. 1898. Morgan No. 1. 3. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:187. 1898.
Originated with Joseph A. Morgan, Scottsville, New York, as a supposed cross between Sharpless and Triomphe. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, unproductive;-fruit large, irregular conic, dark crimson; flesh medium red, medium firm, mildly subacid; good; midseason. It is very similar to New York.

Morning Star. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309.'534. 1908.
Originated about 1908 by Mark T. Thompson, Rio Vista, Virginia. Perfect. Station plants few, rather weak, healthy, very unproductive; fruit-stems short, prostrate; fruit small to above medium, round-conic, dark red, firm, mild, well flavored, with red flesh; good; midseason.

Mount. 1. N. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 55, 57. 1907.
A chance seedling found in a fence corner by Samuel Mount, Hightstown, New Jersey; introduced about 1907. Perfect. Plants medium in number, moderately productive; fruit of medium size, crimson; flesh medium firm; good; early. 32

Mount Holyoke. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 44:143. 1892. Holyoke. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 73. 1895.
Originated in Massachusetts; introduced about 1890. Perfect. As grown here, plants very vigorous, with light green foliage; blossoms very profusely but fails to develop over one-half of its crop; fruit of medium size, irregular conic, dark scarlet; flesh medium firm; good; midseason.

Mount Vernon. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 169. 1882. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:335. 1890. Kirkwood. 3. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 166. 1882. Shuckless. 4. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 76:438. 1894.
A seedling of Jucunda originated about 1875 by T. Bishop of New Jersey. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1883, from which it was removed in 1909. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants vigorous, few, productive slightly injured by leaf-spot; fruit-stems erect, stiff, long; fruit of medium size, obtuse-conic, bright red, soft, well flavored, subacid; very good; late.

Moyamensing. 1. Mag. Hort. 18:210, 407. 1852. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 676. 1857. A seedling of Hudson Bay, raised by Gerard Schmitz, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; introduced about 1848. It was a popular sort in New Jersey and Pennsylvania about 1855. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1862, from which it was removed in 1869. Imperfect. Plants moderately vigorous, productive; fruit medium to large, broad-conic, dark crimson; flesh red, firm, acid; very good; midseason.

Mrs. Fisher. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 218:199. ^02. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 154:38. 1904.
Originated with J. H. Black, Son et Company, Hightstown, New Jersey; introduced in 1899. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants vigorous, numerous, attacked by leaf-spot, moderately productive; fruit large to very large, decided wedge, glossy light red, medium firm; fair; late. Size unusually good for a late berry.

Mrs. Garfield. 1. Ohio Hort. Soc. Rpt. 108. 1880-81. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:335. 1890. A seedling of Sharpless which originated in 1868 with Matthew Crawford, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. Perfect. Plants at this Station, numerous, weak, attacked by leaf-spot, unproductive; fruit-stems short; fruit medium to small, conic, glossy red, subacid, soft; poor to fair; early.

Mrs. McDowell. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 195:81. 1902.
Introduced about 1902. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit medium to large, irregular round-conic, light scarlet; flesh soft, sweet; good; late.

Mrs. Mark Hanna. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 146:35. 1903.
Originated in 1898 by Mark T. Thompson, Rio Vista, Virginia. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, moderately productive; fruit large, broad-conic, crimson; flesh pink, soft, subacid; fair; midseason.

Mrs. Miller. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:535. 1908.
Originated in 1893 by D. J. Miller, Millersburg, Ohio. Imperfect. At this Station, plants medium in number and vigor, unproductive, slightly injured by leaf-spot; fruit-stems medium in length, thick, prostrate; fruit large to medium, drops rapidly in size, variable in shape, with uneven surface, glossy dark red, firm, pleasantly acid, well flavored; good; midseason.

Mulberry. 1. Trans. Lond. Hort. Soc. 6:203. 1826. 2. Mag. Hort. 1:302. 1835.
Thought to have originated in England prior to 1800, although another account mentions it as a native of New York. It was grown extensively near Boston from 1810 to 1835. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit of medium size, ovate-conic, with a short neck, dull dark red; flesh dark red, juicy, subacid; good; midseason.

Multnomah. 1. Ore. Bien. Crop Pest et Hort. Rpt. 79. 1915.
Originated by L. S. Otis, Newberg, Oregon, as a cross between Clark and Gold Dollar; introduced about 1921. Perfect. Plants numerous, weak, unproductive; fruit of medium size, roundish conic, dark red; flesh medium red, moderately firm, sweet; good; midseason-

Murray. 1. U. S. D. A. Pom. Rpt. 265. 1892. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 109:236. 1896.
Originated with J. S. Westbrook, Faison, North Carolina; introduced in 1892. Imperfect. Station plants vigorous, numerous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems medium in length; fruit medium to large, dark red, roundish, firm; fair; early.

Murray (of Smith). 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 62:35. 1909.
Originated by A. M. Smith, St. Catherines, Ontario; introduced about 1895. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit large, irregular wedge to conic, scarlet; flesh bright red, firm, juicy, subacid; good; late midseason.

Muskingum. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. HI:No. 7, 217. 1890. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:9 1894. Kearns. 3. Rural N. Y. 47:195. 1888.
Originated with Grant Kearns, Zanesville, Ohio, in 1884; introduced in 1892 by S. R. Moore, Zanesville. It has had considerable value as a late sort. Perfect. Station plants few, lacking in vigor, unproductive; fruit-stems good; fruit of medium size, variable in shape, bright red, moderately firm, acid; fair; midseason to late.

Myer. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:61. 1911. 2. U. S. D. A. Farmers' Bul. 1043:33. 1919. A chance seedling found in 1906 in a bed of many varieties by Myer et Son, Bridgeville, Delaware. Grown extensively in southern Delaware, where it is liked because of its productivity, good size, and attractive color. Imperfect. As grown here, plants medium in number and size, healthy, very productive; fruit-stems short, thick, semi-erect; fruit above medium in size, conic, glossy medium red, colors unevenly, medium firm, rather dry, mild, sweet; good; midseason.

Myriad. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 166:77. 1905.
Originated by Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas; introduced in 1903. Perfect. Plants very numerous, moderately productive; fruit small, conic, crimson; flesh red, soft; poor; midseason.

Myrtle Murrell. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:74. 1918.
A cross between Hoffman and Heflin, raised in 1905 by S. S. Murrell, Marion Station, Maryland. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants very numerous, medium in vigor, unproductive, attacked by leaf-spot; fruit-stems short, slender, erect; fruit inferior in size, long-conic, necked, dull light red, variable in firmness, mild, sweet, whitish at the center; good; midseason.

Mystic. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 100:9. 1893.
Originated in Indiana; introduced about 1892. Plants numerous, vigorous, moderately productive; fruit medium to large, round-conic, bright dark crimson; flesh light red, firm; very good; late midseason.


Nan. 1. Rural N. Y. 53:437, fig. 112. 1894. 2. N. V. Sta. Bul. 91:193. 1895.
Introduced by T. J. Dwyer, Cornwall, New York, in 1893. Perfect. As grown here, plants vigorous, medium in number, healthy, moderately productive; fruit-stems good; fruit medium to large, glossy red, round-conic, firm, subacid; good; midseason.

Nanticoke. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:186. 1915.
A seedling of unknown parentage originated in 1907 by S. Barkley, Nanticoke, Maryland. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants numerous, vigorous, productive, with slight leaf-spot; fruit-stems slender, prostrate; calyx large, flat, strongly reflexed, very leafy; seeds much sunken; fruit large to below medium, roundish to blunt-wedge? irregular, furrowed, dull light red, firm, subacid, whitish at the center, inferior in flavor; poor; early. Easily surpassed by better varieties.

Naomi. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 996. 1869.
Originated with Samuel Miller, Bluflton, Missouri; introduced about 1866. Perfect. Berries medium in size, roundish oval, dark scarlet; flesh whitish, soft, sweet; fair.

Naomi (of Stayman). 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:69. 1916.
Originated with James Stayman, Leavenworth, Kansas; introduced about 1894. Imperfect. Berries large, roundish, light crimson, firm, acid; good; midseason.

Napoleon III. 1. Gard. Mon. 3:285. 1861.
Originated by Ferdinande Gloede, England; introduced to America about 1860 and considerably grown here about 1870; listed in the American Pomological Society's fruit catalog in 1875. Perfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries large, irregularly round-conic to coxcomb, light scarlet; flesh whitish, firm, sweet; good; late.

Nash. 1. la. Sta. Bul. 64:193, 205. 1902.
Perfect. Plants small, not hardy; berries small, irregular conic, crimson, moderately firm; poor; midseason.

Nathalie. 1. U. S. Pat. Off. Rpt. 199. 1861.
Originated with W. R. Prince, Flushing, New York; introduced about 1855. Imperfect. Berries large, conic, light scarlet; good.

Necked Pine. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 676. 1857. Unique Prairie. 2. Horticulturist 3:71. 1848-49.
A native of Ohio; introduced prior to 1829; a variety of Fragaria virginiana; much cultivated in the Mississippi Valley near Cincinnati from 1830 to 1850. Imperfect. Berries medium in size, ovate to conic, with a distinct neck, light scarlet; flesh whitish, soft, acid; good; moderately early.

Nehring. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:70. 1916. Nehring's Gem. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Sp. Rpt. 81. 1904-05. 3. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309; 535- 1908.
Originated by W. F. Nehring about 1891 at Strasburg, Illinois, probably as a seedling of Glendale. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants few, vigorous, healthy, unproductive; fruit-stems thick, prostrate; calyx decidedly sunken; fruit above medium to large, drops in size, round-conic to irregular wedge, glossy dark red, firm, pleasantly acid, well flavored; good to very good; midseason.

Nellie Gray. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:70. 1916.
Introduced in 1913. Perfect. Berries medium to large, acid, completely covered with seeds, producing a yellow appearance; foliage resembling orange leaves; early to midseason; a curiosity only.

Nellis Triumph. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:74. 1918.
A seedling of unknown parentage discovered in 1912 by J. H. Nellis, Paterson, New Jersey. Semi-perfect to perfect. Plants at this Station, medium in number and vigor, healthy, very productive; fruit-stems thick, prostrate, branching freely into long, slender pedicels; fruit large, retains size well, blunt-conic, broad at the base, dull light red, very juicy, soft, subacid; good; midseason.

Neptune. 1. Ind. Sta. Bul. 38:9, 11. 1892.
Originated in Ohio; introduced in 1890. Perfect. Berries medium to large, round-conic, necked, crimson; flesh light red, moderately firm; good; midseason.

Nettie. 1. Rural N. Y. 57:498. 1898. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:536. 1908.
Originated in 1893 by J. H. Black, Son et Company, Hightstown, New Jersey. Imperfect. At this Station, plants medium to numerous, vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems long, thick, erect; calyx leafy, raised; seeds sunken; fruit very large to above medium, holds its size well, variable in shape, dull light to medium red, medium to firm, acid; good; late. A showy variety not of highest flavor or quality.

Neunan. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:70. 1916. Neunan's Prolific. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 42. 1879. Charleston. 3. Am. Gard. 12:657. 1891.
Originated by a Mr. Neunan, Charleston, South Carolina. This was the first of the southern varieties to be grown in quantity for northern markets. Between 1870 and 1890 it was a standard commercial sort in the southern states; now it has almost disappeared from cultivation. It was listed in the fruit catalog of the American Pomological Society from 1879 to 1909. Perfect. Plants tall, vigorous, productive; berries medium in size, roundish conic, with a short neck, light crimson, very firm, acid; fair; early to midseason.

Neverfail. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 168. 1920.
A cross between Bubach and Superb, originated by D. J. Miller, Millersburg, Ohio, in 1913. Semi-perfect. Station plants dwarfish, unproductive; autumn-bearing; berries, medium in size, conic, medium dark glossy red, firm, juicy, subacid; fair.

New Dominion. 1. Can. Cent. Exp. Farm Bid. 5:19. 1889. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:536. 1890.
A seedling of Jucunda originated by C. N. Biggar, Lundy Lane, Ontario, in 1873. Perfect. Station plants vigorous, very numerous, attacked slightly by leaf-spot, productive; fruit-stems erect; fruit large, retains size well, obtuse-conic, glossy light red, soft, subacid; fair; late.

New Early. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:228. 1912.
Grown by C. S. Tuttle in Ohio in 1909. Perfect. Plants moderately vigorous; berries small to medium, roundish, very light scarlet, soft; good; very early.

New Home. 1. Rural N. Y. 65:570. 1906. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:537. 1908.
Origin unknown; introduced by W. F. Allen, Salisbury, Maryland, in 1905. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants few, medium in vigor, healthy, unproductive; fruit-stems thick, erect; seeds raised, with short, dark, characteristic styles; fruit above medium in size, drops as the season advances, round-conic, glossy light to dark red, very firm, mildly acid; fair; late.

New Jersey Scarlet. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 997. 1869.
Originated by E. W. Durand, Irvington, New Jersey; introduced in 1868. Perfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries medium in size, conic, with a long neck, light scarlet; flesh whitish, moderately firm, mildly subacid; good; early.

New Shuckless Wonder. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 168. 1920.
Introduced by H. W. Buckbee, Rockford, Illinois. Plants vigorous, productive; calyx detaches easily; berries long-conic, bright red, very firm, sweet, with few seeds.

New York. 1. Am. Card. 20:69, fig. 24. 1899. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 218:199. 1902.
This variety was originated in 1890 by Martha Y. Tanner, Slaterville Springs, New York, as a seedling of Bubach. New York very closely resembles several other varieties each of which, however, seems to be of authentic independent origin. Perfect. Plants medium in number, tall, vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems of medium length, thick, semi-erect; calyx often very large, pale green, detaches very easily; fruit large, wedge to conic, irregular, light to dark red; flesh light red, variable in firmness, not very juicy, mildly subacid; good; midseason.

Nicanor. 1. Horticulturist 22:273, fig. 155. 1867.
Originated about 1860 with Ellwanger et Barry, Rochester, New York, as a cross between Triomphe and Wilson; included in the American Pomological Society's fruit catalog from 1869 to 1883. Perfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries medium in size, round-conic to oval-conic, bright scarlet, firm, sweet; good; early.

Nicaragua. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:71. 1916.
Originated in 1906 by D. C. Tibbs, East Nashville, Tennessee, as a seedling of Haverland; introduced in 1912. Perfect. Berries large, long-conic, dark crimson, firm; good; midseason.

Nich Ohmer. 1. Rural N. Y. 58:514. 1899. 2. U. S. D. A. Farmers' Bul. 1043:33. 1919.
Nich Ohmer was originated in the early nineties by J. P. Beaver, Dayton, Ohio, as a seedling of Middlefield; introduced in 1898. The variety is exceedingly variable in plant and fruit and needs special culture. Perfect. Plants medium in number and height, vigorous, variable in health and yield; fruit-stems medium in length, thick, prostrate; pedicels long; fruit large, round-conic to blunt-wedge, glossy dark red; flesh variable in color, firmness, and juiciness, mildly subacid; good; midseason.

Nichols. 1. Am. Hort. Ann. 108. 1870.
Raised by G. W. Nichols, Summit, New Jersey; introduced in 1870, Berries large, conic, firm; good.

Nigger. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 100:9. 1893.
Introduced about 1891. Perfect. Plants small, productive; berries small to medium, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm; good; medium early.

Nigh. 1. Mich. St. Bd. Agr. Rpt. 99. 1887. Nigh's Superb. 2. Cult. et Count. Gent. 48:660. 1883.
Originated t]y J. W. Nigh, Piqua, Ohio; introduced about 1881. Imperfect. Berries large, long-conic, light scarlet, soft, sweet; good.

Nim. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 122:5. 1895.
Introduced about 1890. Imperfect. Berries medium in size, irregular round-conic, light crimson, moderately firm; poor; late.

Nimrod. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:537* i908-
Originated about 1898 by John F. Beaver, Dayton, Ohio. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants few, weak, low growing, attacked by leaf-spot, very unproductive; fruit-stems very short, slender; fruit above medium to small, round-conic, glossy light and dark red, very firm, pleasantly acid; good; early midseason.

Nina. 1. Rural N. Y.. 56:471. 1897. 2. JV. Y. Sta. Bul. 218:199. 1902.
Originated in 1892 with J. H. Black et Company, Hightstown, New Jersey, as a cross between Jersey Queen and Charles Downing. Perfect. Plants at this Station, medium in vigor, few, attacked severely by leaf-spot, unproductive; fruit medium to large, irregular in shape, glossy red; calyx detaches very easily; flesh medium in firmness and juiciness, sweet, well colored, fair; midseason.

Ninety-Si1. 1. Am. Card. 20:510. 1899. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 166:77. 1905.
Originated in 1895 by G. W. Howard, Stevensville, Michigan, as a cross between Barton and Gandy. Perfect. Berries large, round-conic, scarlet; flesh light red, moderately firm, mildly subacid; good; midseason to late.

No. 999 Giant. 1. Gardner Cat. 1921.
Raised by C. P. Gardner, Osage, Iowa, as a cross between a seedling of Progressive and a big type berry. Of little value. Perfect. Plants at this Station, few, vigorous, healthy, very productive; autumn-bearing; leaves small, dark green; flowers small; fruit-stems thick, erect; fruit variable in size, round-conic, unattractive light red, medium juicy, firm, subacid to sprightly; fair; late midseason.

Noble. 1. Gard. Chron. 6:79. 1889. Laxton's Noble. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 44:143. 1892.
Originated in 1887 by Laxton Brothers, Bedford, England; introduced to America about 1890. Perfect. Station plants, moderately vigorous and productive; berries large, round, dark red; flesh dark red, soft, sweet; very good; early.

Nokomis. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 293. 1921. Minnesota No. 48Q. 2. Minn. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 226. 1921.
A seedling of Dunlap by Abington; originated at the Minnesota Fruit Breeding Farm, Excelsior, Minnesota. Perfect. At this Station, plants numerous, vigorous, very tall, very productive, healthy; leaves large, thick, glossy dark green; flowers midseason, medium to large, with crinkly petals; fruit-stems very long, thick, prostrate; pedicels short, slender; calyx raised; seeds sunken; fruit large to medium, retains size well, blunt-conic, necked, glossy light to medium red, juicy, medium firm, with well-colored flesh, subacid to sprightly; fair; late midseason. Worthy of test.

Noland. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 187:187. 1898.
Originated by J. P. Noland, Peninsula, Ohio; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Station plants vigorous, moderately productive; berries large, irregularly long-conic, scarlet, moderately firm; fair; midseason.

Nonesuch. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:61. 1911.
Found growing wild in a fence corner by Peter A. Berry, Logansport, Indiana, in 1895 \ supposed to be a seedling of Sharpless which grew near by. Perfect. Station plants very numerous, very vigorous, with some mildew and leaf-spot, very productive; blossoms appear in masses above the foliage; fruit-stems long, slender, erect; fruit variable in size and shape, dull light red, colors unevenly, green-tipped, juicy, firm, subacid. aromatic: good; very late.

Nor-J. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 168. 1920.
Introduced in 1918 by Albert F. Etter, Ettersburg, California. "A berry of the Beach type of flavor, exceedingly large, pink in color with white flesh like Rose Ettersburg; exceedingly productive/'

Norma. 1. Am. Gard. 24:380. 1903.
Originated with M. H. Ridgeway, Wabash, Indiana. Perfect. Plants productive; berries medium to large, round-conic, light crimson, firm; good; late.

Norman. 1. Gard. Mon. 18:145. 1876. 2. Col. O. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 120. 1887.
Originated in 1871 by Matthew Crawford, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, who named it after his son. Perfect. Berries medium to large, irregular, crimson, firm, acid; very good; early.

North Jersey. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 168. 1920.
Introduced by the North Jersey Nurseries, Milburn, New Jersey. Plants very productive; berries medium large, round, pointed, dark glossy red; very good.

North Shore. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:537. 1908.
Raised in 1898 by William H. Monroe, Beverly, Massachusetts, as a seedling of Brandy-wine. Perfect. As grown here, plants few, medium in vigor, attacked by leaf-spot, unproductive; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate; fruit large to medium, irregular in shape, dull dark red, firm, mildly acid, well flavored, with good flesh color; good to very good; late.

Northfield. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 168. 1920.
Introduced by C. W. Atwater et Son, Agawam, Massachusetts. Plants vigorous, productive; berries large, bright red, firm, spicy; late.

Norwood. 1. III. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 223. 1910. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:186. 1915.
A cross between Maximus and Marshall originated in 1905 by N. B. White, Norwood, Massachusetts. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants above medium in size, vigorous, healthy, moderately productive; fruit above medium to small, variable in shape, necked, dull light red, rather dry, whitish at the center, subacid, inferior in flavor; poor; midseason.

Notre Dame. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:72. 1916.
Introduced in 1914. Berries large, round-conic to coxcomb, light crimson; flesh light red, mildly subacid; fair; midseason.


Oak.
Oaks Early. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:538. 1908.
A chance seedling found in the wild on the farm of William Tull, Somerset County, Maryland; introduced in 1906. Perfect. As grown here, plants medium in number, vigorous, healthy, unproductive; fruit-stems thick, semi-erect; fruit above medium in size, soon becoming smaller, long-conic, light to dark red, firm, pleasantly acid, well flavored, with red flesh; fair to good; early.

Ocean City. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:187. 1898.
A supposed cross between Wilson and Sharpless originated in 1887 in Berlin, Maryland. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, moderately productive; fruit large, irregular, dark scarlet; flesh light red, moderately firm, mildly subacid; good; midseason.

Odessa. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 100:12. 1893.
Originated with J. Y. Cameron, East Rochester, Ohio; introduced about 1892. Imperfect. Plants medium in number and vigor, unproductive; fruit large, irregular, bright scarlet; flesh light red, medium firm; fair; late midseason.

Ohio. 1. Rural N. Y. 46:511. 1887. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:336. 1890.
A seedling of Kentucky originating in 1886 with George L. Miller, Butler County, Ohio. Imperfect. On the Station grounds, plants vigorous, few, with slight leaf-spot, unproductive; fruit-stems erect, stiff; fruit large to small, conic or wedge, glossy red, firm but scalds badly, very tart; fair; late.

Ohio Boy. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:187. 1915.
Originated by A. A. Eppert, Amelia, Ohio; introduced in 1910. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants numerous, vigorous, very productive, healthy; flowers large, with crinkly petals; fruit-stems long, thick, semi-erect, much branched; calyx very large; fruit variable in size, wedge, dull medium red, colors unevenly, juicy, firm, subacid, with an inferior flavor; poor; midseason.

Ohio Centennial. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:339. 1890. 2. Ibid. 36:633. 1891.
Originated by George Townsend, Gordon, Ohio; introduced about 1889. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants low growing, stocky, with very dark green foliage; fruit-stems short, stiff; fruit large, heart-shaped, with numerous coxcombs, glossy red, firm, well flavored; very good; medium late.

Ohio Mammoth. 1. Mag, Hort. 13:368. 1847.
A cross between Hovey and Burr, raised by John Burr, Columbus, Ohio; introduced in 1847. Perfect. Plants vigorous and productive; fruit large, long-conic, light red; flesh sweet; good.

Old John Brown. 1. Horticulturist 18:263. 1863.
Originated in 1856 by H. Schroeder, Bloomington, Illinois, as a cross between Wilson and "Chilian." Perfect. Plants productive; fruit large, round-conic, light crimson; flesh soft, sweet; good; early.

Old Pine. 1. Trans, Lond. Hort. Soc. 6:195. 1826. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 532. 1845. Pineapple. 3. McMahon Am. Gard. Cat. 477. 1806. Carolina. 4. Miller Gard. Diet. 2: 1807.
An old English sort grown extensively in this country prior to 1835, especially in the gardens of amateurs. Its origin is unknown; Downing states that it is believed to have been taken to England from Carolina. It was widely distributed in England as early as 1759. Perfect. Plants few, productive under high culture; fruit large, conic, necked, bright scarlet; flesh pale scarlet, firm, juicy, rich; very good; late.

Old Scarlet. 1. Trans. Lond. Hort. Soc. 6:1.52. 1826. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 528 1845. Early Scarlet. 3. Prince Pom. Man. 2:186. 1832. Early Virginia. 4. Mag. Hort. 2:91. 1836.
A slightly improved form of Fragaria virginiana grown extensively in this country until about 1845. ^n I^2^ ^ was said to have been cultivated in English gardens for two hundred years and was doubtless introduced from North America. It is still grown in England and Scotland for preserving. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit small, roundish conic, light scarlet; flesh whitish, medium firm, subacid; good; early.

Olga Petrovka.
Received at this Station in 1923 from Louis Graton, Whitman, Massachusetts, with the statement that it was a seedling of Howard, originated by a Mr. Stevenson, Guelph, Ontario. As grown here it is well worthy of trial as an early sort. Perfect. At this Station, plants medium in number and vigor, healthy, productive; leaves small, dark green; flowers early midseason, often large, with crinkly petals; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate; pedicels long, slender; calyx large, raised, leafy, detaches readily; seeds sunken; fruit large, retains size well, long-conic, necked, glossy dark red, juicy, firm, sweet, with red flesh; good; very early.

Olive. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:73. Olive's Pride. 2. Ohio Sta, Bul. 154:52. 1904.
A seedling of Crescent originated by J. W. Hall, Marion, Indiana; introduced about 1903. Perfect. Plants medium in number; fruit medium in size, wedge-conic, light crimson; flesh medium red, firm, mildly subacid; good; midseason.

Oliver. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:337. 1890. 2.16^.36:633. 1891.
Originated with Phil Strubler, Napierville, Illinois. Perfect. As grown here, plants very vigorous, numerous, healthy, unproductive; fruit-stems long, stiff; fruit large, conic, of Sharpless type, with the characteristic green tips of that variety, firm, subacid; fair; midseason to late.

Oliver Goldsmith. 1. W. N. Y. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 27. 1881.
A cross between Charles Downing and Monarch raised by William Bennison, Delaware, Ohio, in 1874. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, very productive; fruit large, round-conic, with a long neck, bright crimson; flesh firm, mildly subacid; good; midseason.

Olympia. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:538. 1908.
Originated with W. M. Gray of California; introduced about 1903I Perfect. Station plants few, medium in vigor, attacked by leaf-spot, very productive; fruit-stems erect; calyx detaches readily; fruit large to small, round-conic, broad at the base, light red, juicy, firm, acid, inferior in flavor; poor; midseason.

Omega. 1. Ann. Hort. 202. 1892. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 109:236. 1896.
Originated by Oakley Apgar, Califon, New Jersey; introduced in 1892. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants numerous, medium in vigor, productive; fruit-stems short; fruit large, irregular wedge, glossy light red, firm; fair; medium late.

Omega (of Indiana). 1. Farmer Cat. 14. 1910.
A cross between Captain Jack and Cumberland raided by L. H. Girton, Bristol, Indiana, in 1886. Semi-perfect. Plants at this Station, mpdjum in number, size, and vigor, productive, healthy; fruit-stems long, thick, above medium in size, round-conic, furrowed, dull medium red, moderately juicy, finn, with a hollow center, sweet; good; early to late.

Omega (of Maine). 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 209:539. 1908.
A chance seedling found in an asparagus bed by A. V. Metcalf, Brunswick, Maine, in 1904. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants medium in number and vigor, attacked by leaf-spot, productive; fruit-stems erect, short; fruit large to medium, drops in size, wedge to long-conic, glossy medium to dark red, firm, acid, well flavored, with red flesh; fair to good; midseason.

Ona. 1. Ann. Hort. 134. 1893; 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 91:193- l895-
A cross between Crescent and Sharpless originated by F. M. Kilbourne, Lakeville, Minnesota. Imperfect. At this Station, plants few, medium in vigor and yield; fruit-stems good; fruit medium or above in size, round-conic, glossy dark red, moderately firm; fair; medium early.

Oneida. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:539. 1908.
A seedling of Sharpless originated in 1903 by Mrs. Isaac Hildreth, Rome, New York. Perfect. Station plants very numerous, vigorous, healthy, very productive; fruit-stems long, medium thick; fruit variable in size and shape, irregularly furrowed, light and dark red, firm, aromatic, not very juicy, mild; fair to good; midseason.

Onward. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:75. 1918.
Raised by Samuel Cooper, Delevan, New York, as a cross between Autumn and Cooper; introduced in 1914. Perfect. As grown at this Station, Onward cannot be distinguished from Advance and the reader is referred to that variety for description.

Oom Paul. 1. Rural N. Y. 60:493. 1901. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 154:52. 1904.
Originated by T. S. Palmer, Columbia, New York, as a cross between Jessie and Bubach; introduced in 1903. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, productive; fruit large, irregular, round-conic to wedge-shape, dark red; flesh red, firm, mildly subacid; good; early midseason.

Ophelia. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 298. 1913.
Originated in 1906 at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada, as a seedling of Belt. Perfect. Plants medium in number; fruit large, long wedge-shape, necked, bright scarlet; flesh light red, firm, briskly subacid; good; late midseason.

Orange County. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 91:193. 1895.
Originated by H. S. Timbrell, Unionville, New York. Imperfect. As grown here, plants vigorous, numerous, moderately productive; fruit-stems good; fruit medium to large, round-oblate, light red, soft, subacid; good; midseason.

Orange Prolific. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 677. 1857.
Originated about 1847 by Ellwanger et Barry, Rochester, New York. Imperfect; Plants vigorous, very productive; fruit large, roundish oblate, necked, dark crimson; flesh firm, acid; late.

Oregon. 1. Ore. Bien. Bd. Hort. Rpt. 103. 1909-10. 2. Ore. Bien. Crop Pest et Hort. Rpt. 81. 1915. 3. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:75. 1918.
Originated about 1898 near Salem, Oregon, with A. F. Hofstadtler, as a cross between Marshall and Jessie; introduced in 1902 as Admiral Dewey, but was soon changed to Oregon. Oregon is grown considerably in Washington, Oregon, and near San Francisco, California, where it is liked because of its productiveness and the large, attractive fruit. The name was added to the last catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1909. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants numerous, of medium vigor, healthy, very productive; leaves small; flowers early, large; fruit-stems long, slender, erect; fruit large, retains size well, irregular in shape, averaging round conic, glossy medium to dark red, colors unevenly, juicy, firm, pleasantly sprightly, with red flesh; good; early.

Oregon Everbearing. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:9. 1894. 2. Ore. Bien. Crop Pest et Hort. Rpt. 81. 1915. Everbearing. 3. Wash. St. Bd. Hort. Rpt. 147. 1893.
A chance seedling supposed to be of Triomphe originated in 1882 with Seth Winquist, Russellville, Oregon; introduced in 1890 as Everbearing. It is considered one of the best of the fall-fruiting sorts in Oregon. Semi-perfect to perfect. In the Station beds, plants lack vigor, few, healthy, variable in yield; autumn-fruiting; fruit-stems short; fruit of medium size, symmetrical, conic, glossy medium red, soft, subacid, well flavored; good to very good.

Oregon Ironclad. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 160:215. 1911. 2. Ore. Bien. Crop Pest et Hort. Rpt. 82. 1915.
Of unknown origin; introduced about 1911. Perfect. Plants few, medium in vigor and productivity; fruit of medium size, roundish, medium red; flesh light red, soft, mildly sweet; good; midseason.

Orem. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:61. 1911.
Introduced in 1908 by J. H. Arndt, Arlington, Maryland; supposed to be a cross between Bubach and Gandy. Perfect. Plants at this Station, numerous, medium in size and vigor, healthy, productive; leaves thick, dark green; flowers midseason, large; calyx large, flattened, leafy; fruit very large, retains size well, round-conic or wedge, glossy medium red, with a tendency to green tips and poorly developed apex, moderately juicy, firm, tart, with red flesh, often with a hard core; good; late.

Orewiler. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 85:18. 1897. 2. Mich. Sta. Bul. 176:9. 1899.
Originated with Henry Orewiler, Shelby, Ohio; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Plants vigorous, moderately productive; fruit medium to large, irregular conic, sometimes necked, light crimson; flesh medium firm; good; midseason.

Oriole. 1. Am. Card. 17:67, 226. 1896.
Originated in 1889 by J. W. Kerr, Denton, Maryland, as a a cross between Bubach and Hoffman. Imperfect. Plants medium in number; fruit of medium size, irregular round conic, dark crimson; flesh medium red, firm; good; early midseason.

Orphan. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:62. 1911.
A chance seedling found in 1904 by J. A. Morgan, Scottsville, New York. Imperfect. At this Station, plants medium in number and size, healthy, productive; fruit large, holds its size well, wedge or conic, dull medium to light red, colors unevenly, juicy, moderately firm, subacid, with well-colored flesh, inferior in flavor; poor; late.

Oscar. 1. Ann. Hort. 134. 1893. 2. Mich. Sta. Bul. 142:154. 1897.
Originated with F. M. Kilbourne, Lakeville, Minnesota; introduced in 1893. An English sort of the same name was on trial in this country about 1860. Perfect. Plants vigorous, unproductive; fruit medium to large, irregular round-conic, crimson; flesh dark red, firm; good; late.

Oscar (of Hubach). 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:74. i9l6.
Originated by Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas; introduced in 1903. Perfect. Plants numerous; fruit below medium in size, conic, crimson; flesh dark red, medium firm; good; early.

Ossie. 1. Etter Cat. 23. 1920.
Originated in 1912 by Albert F. Etter, Ettersburg, California, as a seedling of Etters-burg No. 84. Perfect. Station plants very numerous, low growing, very dwarfish, healthy, productive; leaves small, dark green; flowers overtop the foliage; fruit above medium to small, drops in size, roundish, very light red; seeds much raised; flesh very juicy, firm, whitish toward the center, sweet; good; very late.

Oswego. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:539. 1908.
Introduced in 1906 by L. J. Farmer, Pulaski, New York. Said to be a cross between Bubach and Sharpless. It is inferior to other sorts. Perfect. As grown here, plants few, vigorous, healthy, very productive; fruit-stems very thick, prostrate; fruit large, drops quickly to small, round-conic to wedge, with furrowed surface, dark red, variable in firmness, mildly acid, with light red flesh; good; early midseason.

Oswego Queen. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:187. 1898.
Originated by M. Stevens, Pennellville, New York; introduced about 1898. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous/ productive; fruit large, irregular conic, bright scarlet; flesh firm; good; late.

Otsego. 1. Ann. Hort. 134. 1893. 2* Mich. Sta. Bul. 142:154. 1897.
Originated by J. M. Robinson, Otsego County, New York; introduced in 1893. Imperfect. Plants medium in number, vigor, and productivity; fruit of medium size, roundish, scarlet; flesh light red, medium firm; fair; midseason.

Outlander. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:62. 1911.
This is a seedling originated by A. T. Goldsborough, Washington, D. C, who introduced it in 1906. Perfect. On the Station grounds, a late-blooming and very late-ripening variety of good size, wedge to round-conic, glossy medium red, firm, sweet; very good.

Ozark. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:74. 1916. Early Ozark. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:54. 1911.
Earliness makes Ozark a popular commercial variety in Missouri and neighboring states. et It is sometimes but not often grown in New York. The berries are very good in quality and the crop is especially valued for canning. The plants are fairly satisfactory in most respects and they are particularly productive as plant makers. Ozark is a seedling of Aroma and Excelsior, originated in 1902 by Charles Shull, Sarcoxie, Missouri, who introduced it in 1908.
Perfect. Plants numerous, medium in vigor and height, healthy, very productive; leaves small, intermediate in thickness, color and glossiness, rugose, with reddish stems. Flowers early, large; petals 6-8; stamens numerous; receptacle large. Fruit very early; fruit-stems semi-erect; pedicels thick; calyx small, reflexed, depressed, well colored; sepals short; berries above medium to medium in size, round-conic; apex obtuse, indented; color glossy, attractive dark red; seeds sunken; flesh well colored to the center, very juicy, firm, subacid or pleasantly tart, highly flavored; very good in quality.


Pacific. 1. Minn. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 18. 1894. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:75. 19*6."
Of southern origin, introduced about 1900. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, moderately productive; berries medium to large, irregular round-conic, crimson; flesh light red, firm, acid; good; early.

Page Seedling. 1. Gen. Farmer 20:118. 1859.
Originated in Massachusetts; introduced about 1858. Berries medium in size, conic, dark crimson, soft; good; early.

Palmer. 1. Am. Card. 24:332. 1903. Palmer's Earliest. 2. Rural N. Y. 61:498. 1902.
Originated in 1897 with I. S. Palmer, Columbia, New York. Perfect. Plants moderately vigorous and productive; berries medium or below in size, conic, dull dark crimson, moderately firm, subacid; fair; early.

Pan American. 1. Rural N. Y. 62:597. 1903. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 276:74. 1906.
This variety originated in 1898 with Samuel Cooper, Delevan, New York, as a sport of Bismarck. The variety is now of interest chiefly as the parent of the new race of double-bearing strawberries, nearly all of which are direct offspring of this one and all indirectly so. The variety fails in comparison with later sorts of its kind in being unproductive and difficult to propagate. Perfect. Plants very few, medium to vigorous, healthy, variable in yield; autumn-bearing; runners none or very few, the young plants usually blossoming as soon as rooted or sometimes before striking root; fruit-stems short, stout, erect; calyx small, deeply set; berries closely clustered and hidden by the foliage, medium in size, round-conic, dull red; flesh pale red, firm, aromatic, subacid; good; early.

Panic. 1. W. N. Y. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 26. 1881.
Originated with H. J. Peck, Brighton, New York; introduced about 1880. Perfect. Berries irregular long-conic, firm; fair; late.

Parcell. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:75. 1916. Parcell's Early. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:62. 1911.
Supposed to be a cross between Haverland and Excelsior originated in 1903 by G. A. Parcell, Pine City, New York. Perfect. As grown here, plants medium in number, and vigor, healthy, productive; fruit above medium in size, conic, necked, glossy light red, juicy, firm, sprightly or tart; good; very early. Does better on a light rather than heavy soil.

Parcell Late. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 236:230. 1912.
Originated by G. A. Parcell, Pine City, New York, who introduced it about 1912. Imperfect. Plants thrifty, productive; berries large, long wedge-shape, crimson to scarlet, tinged with greenish yellow; flesh scarlet, soft; fair; late.

Paris King. 1. Mass. Sta. Bul. 44:23. 1897.
Originated by B. O. Curtis, Paris, Illinois, as a seedling of Captain Jack; introduced in 1891. Perfect. Plants fairly vigorous; berries large, conic, light crimson; flesh light red; good; midseason.

Paris Queen. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:18?. 1898.
Originated by B. O. Curtis, Paris, Illinois; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Plants moderately vigorous and productive; berries medium to large, conical to wedge-shape, scarlet, soft; good; midseason.

Parker. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 209. 1922.
Originated about 1910 by Lucius Parker, as a cross between Bubach and Jessie. Imperfect. On the Station grounds, plants numerous, vigorous, tall, productive, healthy; leaves dark green; flowers midseason, small; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate; pedicels short, thick; calyx large, sunken, detaches readily; fruit large, retains size well, irregular wedge, furrowed, glossy light red, juicy, very firm, subacid, with pale red flesh with hard center; inferior in quality; early to midseason.

Parker Earle. 1. Rural N. Y. 45:461. 1886. 2. U. 5. D. A. Rpt. 420. 1890. 3. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 36:633. 1891. Parker Earle Improved. 4. Mich. Sta. Bul. 189:114, 116. 1901.
This variety now has little but historic value. It represents a somewhat distinct type in plant and fruit and was in its day one of the old standards so that it is here included among the major sorts. The variety was never a general favorite in New York, but was largely grown in several states of the Middle West. Its half-developed fruits are green; just before ripening they become dead white which rapidly turns to glossy red. The berries usually have the appearance of having been cut squarely off at the tip end. Parker Earle originated in 1886 with James Nimon, Denison, Texas, as a seedling of Crescent; introduced in 1889 by T. V. Munson of Denison; added to the recommended fruit list of the American Pomological Society in 1891.
Perfect. Plants medium to few, tall, vigorous, healthy, productive; leaves rather large, dull, rugose. Flowers midseason, medium to small; petals 5-7, smallish; stamens numerous; receptacle small. Fruit late midseason to late; fruit-stems short, prostrate; pedicels long, thick; calyx raised, reflexed, easily detached, well colored; sepals long, narrow; berries medium to large, conic, often truncate at the apex, although usually somewhat pointed; color glossy bright red; seeds raised; flesh light red, medium in firmness, juicy, mildly subacid; good to very good.

Parker Earle, Jr. 1. Rural N. Y. 56:471. 1897.
Originated by James Nimon, Denison, Texas, as a seedling of Parker Earle; introduced about 1894. Identical with its parent except that the plants develop runners more freely and the berries ripen ten days earlier.

Parry, 1. Rural N. Y. 43:400, 445, fig, 211. 1884. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:336. 1890. Originated in 1880 by William Parry, Parry, New Jersey, as a seedling of Jersey Queen. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants numerous, medium in vigor, unproductive, severely injured by leaf-spot; fruit-stems medium in length, stiff; fruit large, obtuse-conic, glossy light red, soft, well flavored, whitish at the center; very good; midseason.

Parsons. 1. U. S. D. A. Farmers' Bul. 1043:34. 1919. Parsons7 Beauty. 2. Am. Card. 21:630. 1900. Reynolds. 3. Ohio Sta. Bul. 178:59. 1906.
This variety originated as a chance seedling about 1890 with R. G. Parsons, Parsonsburg, Maryland; included in the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1909. Parsons has been generally successful in New York and New England but does not now seem to hold its own with standard sorts. Perfect. Plants very numerous, vigorous, variable in height and health, very productive; fruit-stems of medium length, thick, semi-erect; fruit medium to large, uniform, blunt-conic to blunt-wedge, usually slightly necked, glossy medium red; flesh well colored to the center, juicy, firm, pleasantly sprightly; good; midseason.

Patagonia. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:187. 1915.
Originated by Luther Burbank, Santa Rosa, California, in 1907; obtained by crossing Fragaria chiloensis from South America with some of the best North American strains. Perfect. Plants at this Station, vigorous, productive, medium in number, injured by leaf-spot ; fruit-stems long, thick, semi-erect; fruit large to medium, blunt-conic to blunt-wedge, dull dark red, colors unevenly, with green tips, very whitish at the center, firm, very sweet; good; late. Surpassed by other varieties.

Patrick. 1. Rural N. Y. 58:530. 1899.
Originated by E. W. Cone, Menomonie, Wisconsin; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Plants moderately vigorous, productive; berries small, round to long-conic, light scarlet, medium firm; fair; early .

Patuxent. 1. Mo. Sta. Bul. 18:7. 1892.
Originated by William Saunders, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C; introduced in 1876. Perfect. Berries medium in size, conic, dark crimson, firm, subacid; very good; midseason.

Paul Jones. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:63. 1911.
A cross between Haverland and Brandywine, originated by William H. Johnson, Northboro, Massachusetts, about 1898. Imperfect. At this Station, plants numerous, above medium in size and vigor, healthy, very productive; fruit-stems medium in length and thickness, prostrate; fruit above medium in size, which is held up well, characteristically long-conic to wedge, dull light red, medium in juiciness and firmness, subacid, inferior in flavor; poor; midseason.

Pauline. 1. Mag.Hort. 28:400. 1862.
Originated with W. R. Prince, Flushing, New York; introduced about 1855. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, hardy, productive; berries large, obovate, bright scarlet, acid; good; late.

Paulinus. 1. U. 5. Pat. Off. Rpt. 198. 1861.
Originated by W. R. Prince, Flushing, New York; introduced about 1855. Imperfect. Berries medium in size, conic, light scarlet; good.

Pawnee. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:9. 1894.
Originated by James Stayman, Leavenworth, Kansas; introduced in 1892. Perfect. Station plants vigorous, slightly tender to the sun, numerous, productive; fruit-stems good; fruit medium in size, round-conic, necked, dark red, soft, well flavored; very good; early to late.

Peabody. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 163:64, 70. 1898.
Grown by J. Little in Michigan about 1895. Perfect. Plants lacking vigor; berries small to medium, round-conic, light scarlet; flesh light red, soft; poor; midseason.

Peabody Seedling. 1. Mag. Hort. 22:416. 1856. Peabodys New Hautbois. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 684. 1857.
Originated with Charles xA.. Peabody, Columbus, Georgia; introduced in 1856. Perfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries medium in size, irregularly conic, necked, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm, sweet; good; early.

Peach. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:187. 1915.
A chance seedling found in an abandoned peach orchard in 1888 by L. H. Girton, Bristol, Indiana. Perfect. As grown here, plants medium in number, large, vigorous, unproductive, attacked by mildew; fruit-stems long; fruit above medium to below in size; wedge to round-conic, glossy medium red, green tipped, juicy, firm, sprightly, well flavored, with red flesh, aromatic; very good; midseason.

Peak Emperor. 1. Horticulturist 24:276. 1869.
Originated with Ellwood Peak, South Bend, Indiana, as a cross between Hovey and Wilson; introduced in 1867. Imperfect. Plants strong, vigorous; berries large, conic, often necked, dark crimson, firm, mildly subacid; good; late.

Pearl. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul.447:75. 1918.
Originated by J. W. Loomis, Hobart, Indiana, as a seedling of Gandy; introduced in 1912. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants numerous, large, healthy, productive; leaves large, thick; flowers very late, large: fruit-stems medium in length, very thick, erect; calyx large; seeds raised; berries very large, retain size well, necked, medium to light red, juicy, very firm, sprightly,with red flesh; good; very late. Worthy of trial for a sprightly, late variety of high quality.

Pearl (of New Jersey). 1. Rural N. Y. 47:710. 1888. 2. Fa. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:77. 1916.
Originated in New Jersey; introduced in 1889. Perfect to semi-perfect. Berries medium to large, round-conic to long-conic, crimson, firm, acid; very good; early.

Peckham. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:77. 1916. Peckham Wonder. 2. Ar. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:187. 1915.
Found in a meadow in 1907 by W..U. Peckham, Silver Springs, New York. Perfect. Plants at this Station, medium in number, vigor, and height, attacked by mildew, productive; fruit-stems thick, erect; fruit of medium size, long-conic to wedge, necked, dull dark red, colors unevenly, with green tips, firm, subacid, with red flesh, inferior in flavor; poor; midseason.

Peerless. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:77. 1916. 2. Hedrick Cyc. Hardy Fr. 343. 1922.
Originated in 1910 as a cross between Cooper and Autumn by Samuel Cooper, who, with the R. M. Kellogg Company, Three Rivers, Michigan, introduced it in 1915. This is one of the best of the autumn-bearing sorts; the plants are productive and the fruits are of handsome appearance and hold up well. Semi-perfect to perfect. Plants develop very few runners, medium in vigor and height, healthy, very productive; autumn-bearing; flowers cup-shaped, small, with leafy calyx; fruit-stems short, prostrate, much branched; berries large to medium, conic, glossy medium to dark red; seeds distinctly raised; flesh dark red throughout, medium juicy, very firm, mildly subacid; good; early.

Peerless (of Hubach). 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 166:78. 1905. 2. Rural N. Y. 66:800. 1907,
Originated by Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas; introduced in 1904. Perfect. Plants vigorous, with numerous runners; berries large, round-conic, slightly necked, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm; good; midseason.

Pennell. 1. Am. Gard. 20:435, 590. 1899.
Originated as a chance seedling by John W. Pennell, West Norwalk, Connecticut; introduced in 1898. Perfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries large, round-conic to oblong, sometimes necked, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm, subacid; good; late.

Pennsylvania. 1. Horticulturist 8:388. 1853.
Originated by Gerald Schmitz, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, as a seedling of Moyamensing; introduced in 1853. Imperfect. Berries large, broadly conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm, acid; good; midseason.

Pennsylvania Dutchman. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 160:204, 216. 1911.
Originated in York County, Pennsylvania; introduced by W. F. Allen, Salisbury, Maryland, in 1911. Perfect. Plants large, vigorous; berries medium to large, irregular round-conic, light crimson, firm, mildly subacid; fair; midseason.

Perfection. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 169:148, 150. 1899. Speece's Perfection. 2. Ibid. 80:8. 1892.
Originated by B. W. Speece, Carthage, Missouri; introduced about 1886. Perfect. Plants productive; berries medium to large, round-conic, scarlet, moderately firm; good; midseason.

Perfection (of Kellogg). 1. Kellogg Cat. 19. 1920.
Originated in 1914 by E. H. Riehl, Alton, Illinois. Perfect to semi-perfect. Station plants very few, below medium in vigor and height, healthy, moderately productive; autumn-fruiting; fruit-stems short, medium thick, prostrate; calyx small; seeds sunken; fruit above medium to small, blunt-conic to blunt-wedge, dull medium red, juicy, medium firm, sprightly; poor; early.

Perfection (of Salzer). 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 206:54. 1903.
Introduced in 1892 by John A. Salzer, La Crosse, Wisconsin. Perfect. Plants hardy, vigorous, lacking in productiveness; berries small, conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, acid; good; midseason.

Perfection (of Smith). 1. Rural N. Y. 50:527. 1891.
Originated with Fred E. Smith, Hudson Center, New Hampshire; introduced about 1890. Perfect. Plants healthy, moderately productive; berries large, round-conic, light scarlet; flesh light red, soft; very good; midseason.

Perfection (of Sons). 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:77. 1916.
Originated about 1900 with James Sons, Jr., Seligman, Missouri; introduced about 1904. Perfect. Berries medium in size, conic, light crimson, moderately firm; fair; midseason to late.

Perfumed Pine. 1. Mag. Hort. 25:328. 1859.
A seedling of Burr originated by W. R. Prince, Flushing, New York; introduced about 1855. Perfect. Plants vigorous, very productive; berries large, obtuse-conic, bright scarlet, firm, sweet; good.

Perfumed Scarlet. 1. Horticulturist 8:501. 1853.
Originated by W. R. Prince, Flushing, New York; introduced about 1855. Imperfect. Plants productive; berries medium in size, roundish, light scarlet; very good.

Perpetual. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:78. 1916.
Originated in 1909 by Charles F. Gardner, Osage, Iowa. Perfect. Autumn-fruiting. Berries medium in size, crimson, firm; good.

Perpetual (of Burbank). 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 293. 1921.
Originated by Luther Burbank, Santa Rosa, California. Autumn-fruiting. Berries medium in size, oval, light crimson; good.

Perry Seedling. 1. Fuller Sm. Fr. Cult. 97, fig. 37. 1867.
Raised by George Perry et Sons, Georgetown, Connecticut; introduced about 1865. Perfect. Berries large, roundish, with slight neck, bright crimson, sweet; good.

Pet. I. Mich. Sta. Bul. 163:64, 70. 1898.
Originated as a chance seedling by Samuel Miller, Bluffton, Missouri; introduced about 1891. Perfect. Berries medium to large, round-conic, dark crimson, firm; very good; midseason.

Pewamo. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 169. 1920.
Originated by H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan. Perfect. . Plants very productive; autumn-fruiting; berries large.

Phelps. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 28. 1884. Old Iron Clad. 2. Card. Mon. 26:46. 1884. Ironclad. 3. Colo. Sta. Bul. $3:17. 1900.
Originated in southern Illinois; introduced in 1883; included in the American Pomological Society's fruit catalog from 1883 to 1897. Perfect. Plants at this Station, very vigorous, numerous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems short, slender; fruit medium to small, conic, glossy red, firm, with dark red flesh; good; midseason.

Phenomenal. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:78. 1916.
Originated at Orlando, Florida, as a seedling of Hoffman; introduced about 1895. Perfect. Berries medium to large, conic, dark crimson, firm; good; early.

Phil Krates. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:78. 1916.
Originated by A. T. Goldsborough, Washington, D. C, from English sorts; introduced in 1908. Perfect. Berries medium in size, round-conic, light scarlet, moderately firm, sweet; midseason.

Phil Sheridan. 1. Mag. Hort. 32:273. 1866. General Sheridan. 2. Horticulturist 22:254. 1867.
Originated with J. Keech, Waterloo, New York, as a cross between Russell and Triomphe; introduced in 1866. Imperfect. Berries medium to large, irregular, dark crimson, firm; good; midseason.

Philadelphia Beauty. 1. Moore Seed Cat. 68. 1923.
Introduced about 1922 by the Moore Seed Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Perfect. Plants strong, healthy; berries very large, conic, bright red, firm, good; midseason.

Phillips. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 142:151, 156. 1897. Phillips' Seedling. 2. N. Y. Sta. BuL 36:634. 1891.
A cross between Sharpless and Crescent, originated by W. H, Phillips, Staunton, Indiana; introduced in 1892. Perfect. As grown here, plants very vigorous, medium in number, very productive; fruit-stems stout but unable to hold up the large fruits; fruit very large, Sharpless in shape, glossy red, firm, subacid, well flavored; good; midseason.

Phipen. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 169:148. 1899.
Introduced about 1896. Perfect. Berries small to medium, long-conic, bright scarlet; flesh light red, firm, acid; fair; midseason.

Phoeni1. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:187. 1915.
A seedling of unknown parentage originated in 1906 by Charles L. Granby, Naples, New York, who introduced it in 1910. Semi-perfect. On the Station grounds, plants large, vigorous, productive, healthy; leaves large, dark green; flowers late; fruit-stems long, medium thick, semi-erect; calyx attractive green; seeds raised; fruit very large, irregular in shape, with furrowed surface, often coxcomb, glossy medium red, green tipped, not very juicy, sweet, whitish at the center, well flavored; very good; midseason. Worthy of test on account of high quality.

Phoenix (of Arizona). 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 189:114. 1901.
Originated in Arizona; introduced about 1898. Perfect. Berries medium in size, round-conic, dark scarlet, moderately firm; fair; a double-cropper in Arizona; midseason elsewhere.

Photo. 1. Rural N. Y. 42:146. 1883. 2. Col. 0. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 119. 1887.
Originated in 1871 by Matthew Crawford, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio; introduced in 1876. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, unproductive; berries large to very large, roundish to long-conic, bright crimson; flesh light red, very soft, mildly subacid; good; late.

Pickerproof. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:78. 1916.
Originated by R. L. Cloud, Independence, Iowa, as a seedling of Hoffman; introduced about 1898.

Pierson Seedling. 1. N. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 100. 1899.
Originated with A. W. Pierson, Vineland, New Jersey; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Berries large, round-conic, scarlet, firm; late.

Pilgrim. 1. Rural N. Y. 58:514. 1899.
Sent out by A. Diamond, Rochester, New York, in 1899. Perfect. Plants moderately vigorous and productive; berries large, broad-ovate, dark crimson, mild; good; early.

Pine Hill. 1. Rural N. F. 53:437. 1894.
Originated by C. G. Bushnell, Centerbrook, Connecticut; introduced in 1892. Imperfect. Berries medium in size, round-conic, scarlet; flesh whitish, moderately firm; good; midseason.

Pineapple. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 160:204, 2I6. 1911. Pineapple Flavored. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:540. 1908.
A chance seedling originated by a Mr. Talmage, Mt. Morris, New York, about 1896; introduced by Green's Nursery Company, Rochester, New York. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants very numerous, vigorous, above medium in yield; fruit-stems long, medium thick, prostrate; fruit above medium to small, round-conic, glossy medium to dark red, very firm, with medium acidity, well flavored; fair to good; early to midseason.

Pioneer. 1. N. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 7. 1878. King of the North. 2. Can. Cent. Exp. Farm Bul. 5:16. 1889.
Originated about 1868 by E. W. Durand, Irvington, New Jersey. Perfect. Plants vigorous, very productive; berries large, round-conic to oval, with a slight neck, bright scarlet; flesh light red, moderately firm, sweet; good; early.

Piper. 1. Gard. Mon. 26:46. 1884. Piper's Seedling. 2. Rural N. Y. 42:456. 1883. 3* N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:336. 1890.
Originated as a chance seedling in 1873 with D. J. Piper, Forreston, Illinois. Perfect. At this Station, plants very vigorous, numerous, healthy, productive, fruit-stems short; fruit medium to large, conic, deep dark red, firm, well flavored; very good; midseason.

Pitchers Overland. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 169. 1920.
Introduced by the Arctic Nursery and Fruit Farm, Buchanan, Michigan. Perfect. Plants vigorous; berries large, round, dark red, firm; good.

Pittsville. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 169. 1920.
Originated by L. G. Tingle, Pittsville, Maryland, as a seedling of Parsons; introduced by Tingle's Small Fruit Company, of that place, in 1916. Plants vigorous; fruit resembles Dunlap but lighter in color; midseason.

Plow City. 1. Am. Gard. 17:517. 1896. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:187. 1898.
Originated in 1884 by C. C. Stone, Moline, Illinois, possibly as a seedling of Atlantic; introduced in 1894. Perfect. Station plants vigorous, moderately productive; berries large, irregular round-conic, dark scarlet, firm; good; midseason.

Plumb Bob. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:79. 1916.
Originated in 1902 by H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan, as a cross between Haverland and Ionia. Imperfect. Berries large, conic, light crimson; flesh whitish, firm, acid; midseason to late.

Plymouth Rock. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:79. 1916.
Originated in Massachusetts; included in a list of varieties growing at the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station in 1900. Berries medium in size, roundish, crimson; flesh light red, firm, sweet; good; midseason.

Pocahontas. 1. Md. Sta. BuL 160:204, 216. 1911.
A chance seedling originated with S. K. Garrison, of Virginia; introduced in 1908, Perfect. Plants moderately vigorous and productive; berries medium, round-conic, slightly necked, dark scarlet; flesh light red, moderately firm, mildly subacid; fair; midseason.

Pocomoke. 1. Ohio Sta. BuL 154:54. 1904. 2. U. S. D. A. Farmers' Bul. 1043:34. 1919. Gibson. 3. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:70. 1918.
This variety is occasionally found in strawberry plantations in western New York, but is more generally grown in Michigan and in the Middle West. Its outstanding characters are hardy and productive plants and large, handsome berries which are firm enough to keep well and reach markets in good condition. Many growers believe that there are two if not three varieties under this name. Gibson and Parsons are very similar if not identical. Almost without question Gibson is Pocomoke, and we have listed it as a synonym, a procedure which many growers will dispute. The variety originated with E. H. Hamblin, Pittsville, Maryland, as a chance seedling; introduced about 1902. A variety introduced from Michigan in 1911 under the name Gibson, has proved identical with Pocomoke.
Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, healthy, productive; leaves dark green, dull, somewhat rugose. Flowers early, large; petals 7-9, large, crinkly; stamens numerous; receptacle large. Fruit midseason; fruit-stems thick, semi-erect; pedicels long; calyx large, raised, leafy; sepals broad; berries above medium in size, round-conic to long-conic, necked; apex usually pointed but variable; color attractive, glossy red; seeds raised; flesh red throughout, juicy, very firm, tart or sprightly; fair in quality.

Pokagon. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 169. 1920.
Originated in 1914 as a seedling of Goldsborough by A. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan; introduced in 1916. Perfect. Station plants numerous, vigorous, healthy, productive; leaves large; fruit-stems long, thick, erect, much branched; calyx large, leafy, flat or depressed; seeds raised; fruit very large to medium, retains size well, irregular wedge, often coxcomb, much furrowed, glossy medium red, very juicy, very firm, with a hard center, subacid, inferior in flavor; poor. The large size is the greatest asset of this variety.

Polly Warfield. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 177:20, 22. 1899.
Originated with W. W. Sewall, Carthage, Missouri; introduced about 1897. Imperfect. Plants thrifty; berries round-conic, light scarlet, firm; good; midseason.

Pomona. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:79. 1916.
Originated with B. Hathaway, Little Prairie Ronde, Michigan; introduced about 1884. Perfect. Berries medium in size, round-conic, scarlet; flesh light red, firm, mildly subacid; fair; early.

Ponderosa. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 176:6, 10. 1899.
Introduced in 1895 by John A. Salzer, La Crosse, Wisconsin. Perfect. Plants vigorous; berries large, irregular round-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm, mildly subacid; good; midseason.

Pontiac. 1. Am. Pom. Soc, Rpt. 169. 1920,
Originated by H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan, as an "Indian strain of everbearing strawberry." Imperfect. Plants very productive; berries large.

Portage. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 85:18. 1897.
Originated with M. C. Hall, Freedom, Ohio; introduced about 1894. Perfect. Berries large, long-conic to coxcomb, bright scarlet, firm; fair; late.

Porter. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 311. 1891. Porter's Seedling. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:79. 1916.
Originated with a Mr. Porter, Rocky Point, North Carolina; introduced in 1890. Perfect. Berries medium in size, round-conic, light crimson, soft; fair; very early.

Portia. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 299. 1913.
Originated in 1906 at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada, as a seedling of Belt. Imperfect. As grown here, plants medium to numerous, vigorous, moderately productive, healthy; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate, bearing the fruit close to the ground; seeds raised; fruit above medium to small, drops in size, round-conic, with very obtuse apex, glossy medium red, juicy, firm, subacid, with red flesh; good; midseason.

Porto Rico. 1. Am. Card. 19:608, 684. 1898.
A cross between Haverland and Parker Earle originated in 1895 by E. W. Wooster, Hancock Point, Maine. Imperfect to semi-perfect. Plants vigorous; berries medium to large, round-conic, bright crimson; flesh light red, moderately firm, mildly subacid; fair; late.

Posey. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:188. 1915.
Originated as a chance seedling in 1910 by Oral Herron, Brazil, Indiana. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants very numerous and vigorous, productive; attacked by leaf-spot; leaves large, light green; flowers late, large; fruit-stems long, semi-erect; calyx very large, raised, leafy; seeds large, raised; fruit large, long-wedge, necked, glossy medium to dark red, often green tipped, juicy, firm, subacid, with red flesh; fair; midseason. Not of highest quality but exceedingly attractive in appearance. May have value where appearance is of more value than quality.

Prairie Farmer. 1. Horticulturist 24:273. 1869.
Originated with William D. Neff, Ottawa, Illinois; introduced in 1869. Perfect. Plants vigorous; berries large, irregular obovate, dark scarlet, firm, subacid; good; midseason.

Prairie Queen. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 168. 1882.
Listed in Michigan in 1882. Perfect. Plants vigorous, unproductive; berries medium in size, round-conic, dull crimson, soft, subacid; fair.

Premium. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:188. 1898.
Originated about 1886 as a seedling of Jersey Queen. Imperfect. Station plants unproductive; berries medium to large, roundish, dark crimson, firm; good.

President. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:540. 1908.
Originated about 1900 by M. R. Hunt, Lambertville, New Jersey. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants medium to numerous, vigorous, sometimes attacked by leaf-spot, productive; leaves large, dark green; fruit-stems long, stout, prostrate; calyx large, leafy'; seeds sunken; fruit of largest size, which is well retained, round-conic, slightly furrowed, glossy bright red, firm, moderately juicy, subacid; fair to good; midseason. One of the most promising varieties where good size and color are prime requisites.

President Harding. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 293. 1921.
Originated in 1915 as a chance seedling with George Williams, Wicomico County, Maryland. Perfect. Plants at this Station, medium to numerous, intermediate in vigor and height, usually healthy, very productive; fruit-stems short, medium thick, prostrate; seeds raised; fruit medium to small, chunky conic, dull dark red, seedy in appearance, juicy, very firm, sprightly; good; midseason to late.

President Harrison. 1. Rural N. Y. 50:527. 1891.
Introduced about 1890. Perfect. Plants unproductive; berries small, irregular, scarlet, firm; good; midseason.

President Lincoln. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:80. 1916.
Raised in 1875 by a Mr. Smith, gardener to Charles Dickens, New York City. Perfect. Berries large, irregularly round-conic, often necked, light crimson; flesh light red, moderately firm, sweet; good; midseason. [not to be confused with 'Jucunda', which also goes by this name-ASC]

President Roosevelt. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:541. 1908. Roosevelt. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:85. 1916.
A seedling of Warfield by Clyde, originated by A. Y. Cathcoit, Bristol, Indiana. Imperfect. At this Station, plants few, vigorous, slightly injured by leaf-spot, below medium in yield; fruit-stems slender, prostrate, much branched; calyx often raised on a long neck, detaches easily; fruit above medium to small, irregular in shape, strongly necked, with furrowed surface, glossy medium to dark red, moderately firm, pleasantly acid, well flavored; good; early.

President Wilder. 1. Gard. Mon. 10:310. 1868. 2. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 181. 1875.
A cross between Hovey and La Constante, raised by Marshall P. Wilder, Dorchester, Massachusetts, in 1861; included in the list of fruits recommended by the American Pomological Society from 1869 to 1897. For many years the variety was valued by amateurs for its high quality. Perfect. Plants hardy, vigorous, very productive; berries large, round-conic to oval-conic, obtuse, light scarlet; flesh rosy white, firm, sweet; very good to best; midseason.

Price. 1. Del. Sta. Bul. 24:9. 1894. Price's Seedling. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:80. 1916.
Originated with Caleb Price, Mt. Olive, North Carolina; introduced in 1892. Perfect.
Plants unproductive; berries medium in size, long-conic, necked, light crimson, moderately firm; very good; early.

Pride. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 169. 1920.
Introduced by the Capital City Nurseries, Des Moines, Iowa. Perfect. Plants vigorous, healthy; berries large, oblong, dark red; good.

Pride of Albany. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 311. 1891.
Originated by D. W. H. Taylor, Brodhead, Wisconsin; introduced about 1890. Perfect. Plants moderately vigorous; berries medium in size, round-conic, dark crimson, soft; good; late.

Pride of Cumberland. 1. N. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 157. 1896. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:188. 1898.
A seedling of Gandy, originated about 1890 by W. S. Gandy, Newport, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Perfect. Plants numerous, moderately vigorous, unproductive; fruit medium to large, round-conic, bright scarlet; flesh light red, firm, sweet; good; late midseason.

Pride of Michigan. 1. Ind. Sta. Bul. 164:782. 1913.
Originated as a chance seedling with Peter Weinheimer, Bridgman, Michigan, about 1900. Perfect. Plants moderately vigorous, and productive; berries large oblong to roundish conic, dark red, firm, mildly subacid; good; medium early.

Pride of Ohio. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 98:71. 1899.
Originated with W. H. Earheart, Lexington, Ohio; introduced about 1898. Perfect. Plants moderately vigorous and productive; berries medium in size, round-conic, dark scarlet, firm; good; midseason.

Primate (I). 1. Horticulturist 3:70. 1848-49.
A seedling of Prince Albert, an English variety, raised about 1845 by W. R. Prince, Flushing, New York. Perfect. Plants vigorous, very productive; berries large, conic, dark scarlet firm; good.

Primate (II). 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:10. 1894.
Introduced by James Stayman, Leavenworth, Kansas, about 1892. Perfect. Station plants vigorous, healthy, medium in number, productive; fruit-stems good; fruit medium to large, long-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, soft; good; midseason.

Primo. 1. Card. Mon. 23:50, 240. 1881. 2. Ar. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:336. 1890.
Originated about 1878 by Daniel Smith, Newburgh, New York. Perfect. As grown here, plants vigorous, very numerous, with slight leaf-spot, productive; fruit-stems short; fruit of medium size, obtuse-conic, glossy light red, firm, subacid, variable in flavor; good; late.

Primoridan. 1. Cultivator 3:348. 1846.
Raised about 1845 by W. R. Prince, Flushing, New York, as a seedling of Crimson Cone. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries large, long-conic, dark scarlet, sweet; good; early.

Prince. 1. Townsend Cir. 1925.
Originated about 1918 with George Lawson, Somerset County, Maryland. Perfect. Berries large, dark red throughout, firm; good; early.

Prince Albert. 1. Bridgeman Gard. Ass*t Pt. 111:139. 1857. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 999. 1869.
Of English origin early in the nineteenth century. Perfect. Berries large, oblong-conic, deep scarlet, firm, sweet; good; late.

Prince of Berries. 1. Rural N. Y. 43:495. 1884. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:336. 1890. Prince. 3. Rural N. Y. 48:521. 1889.
A seedling of Jersey Queen, originated by E. W. Durand, Irvington, New Jersey; introduced about 1881. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants vigorous, few, healthy, unproductive; fruit-stems short, stiff; fruit of medium size, roundish truncate, rich dark red, firm, sweet, very well flavored; very good to best; late.

Princeps. 1. Mag. Hort. 28:400. 1862.
Originated by W. R. Prince, Flushing, New York; introduced about 1855. Plants vigorous, productive; berries very large, long-conic, dark crimson, soft; good.

Princess Ena. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:81. 1916.
Originated about 1905 with A. T. Goldsborough, Washington, D. C, as a cross between English and American varieties. Imperfect. Berries round-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, sweet; very good; midseason.

Princeton Chief. 1. Ann. Hort. 202. 1892. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:9. 1894.
Originated in 1884 with F. W. Poscharsky et Son, Princeton, Illinois, as a cross between Crescent and Kentucky. Imperfect. Plants at this Station, numerous, vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems long; fruit of medium size, irregular conic, glossy medium to dark red, moderately firm, acid; good; midseason to late.

Productive. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:188. 1915.
A cross between Pan American and Autumn raised by Samuel Cooper, Delevan, New York, in 1908. Imperfect. At this Station, plants very few, vigorous, productive, healthy; leaves unusually dark green; fruit-stems long, slender, prostrate, the fruit being densely clustered about the plant; fruit above medium to small, blunt-wedge to blunt-conic, broad at the base, glossy medium red, with green tips, juicy, firm, subacid, inferior in flavor; poor; midseason.

Professor. 1. Am. Gard. 21:469. 1900.
Originated about 1898 with a Mr. Warner, Port Jervis, New Jersey. Berries round-conic, crimson; very good.

Profit. 1. Rural N. Y. 53:437- 1894.
Originated about 1890 with Finney Brothers, West Hanover, Massachusetts. Perfect. Berries medium in size, round-conic, scarlet, firm, acid.

Profuse Scarlet. 1. Horticulturist 3:69. 1848-59.
Originated by W. R. Prince, Flushing, New York, as a seedling of Large Early Scarlet; introduced about 1849. Imperfect. Berries small to medium, roundish oval, light scarlet, soft; very early.

Profusion. 1. Mag. Hort. 13:368. 1847.
Originated about 1845 by John Burr, Columbus, Ohio. Imperfect. Berries small to medium, sweet; very good.

Progressive. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 187. 1912. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:188. 1915. 3. U. S. D. A. Farmers' Bul. 901:18. 1922. Rockhill No. 16. 4. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 120. 1911.
Of the score or more everbearing strawberries introduced in recent years, Progressive is now probably the best known. It is a favorite because of the hardiness, healthiness and productiveness of the plants and the handsome, well-flavored fruits. The plants produce a crop in the spring as well as in the fall. Progressive seems to do well only in northern climates and, as with all the double-cropping varieties, is often very capricious in bearing habits. This is a cross between Dunlap and Pan American, which originated with Harlow Rockhill, Conrad, Iowa, in 1908; placed on the market in 1912.
Perfect. Plants medium to numerous, vigorous, healthy, productive; autumn-bearing; leaves dark green, thick, smooth, glossy. Flowers early, medium in size; petals 5-6; receptacle small. Fruit early; fruit-stems thick, much branched; pedicels long, slender; calyx flat, reflexed, of ton with a pinkish tinge; sepals narrow; berries vary considerably in size from large to small, blunt-wedge to blunt-conic; apex obtuse; color glossy dark red; seeds raised; flesh well colored throughout, firm, subacid, mild; quality good.

Prolific. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:542. 1908. 2. Ibid. 364:194, PL 1913.
This variety was originated on the grounds of the New York Agricultural Experiment Station and so has been under the eyes of the authors of this text for several years. It would rank among the very best strawberries were it not for susceptibility to leaf-spot which takes too great toll in most localities. The plants .are very vigorous and productive, and the fruits are large, handsome and well flavored. For those who can control leaf-spot by spraying, and for home gardens, Prolific is a most valuable strawberry. It originated on the grounds of this Station in 1899 as a cross between Sample and Marshall; introduced in 1908.
Perfect. Plants numerous, tall, vigorous, susceptible to leaf-spot, very productive; leaves large, dark green, thick. Flowers midseason, medium to large; petals 6-8, large; stamens numerous. Fruit midseason, ripening period long, picks easily; fruit-stems stout, semi-erect; pedicels intermediate in length and thickness; calyx depressed, variable in color; sepals short, broad; berries large, retain size well throughout the season, round-conic to wedge-conic; apex obtuse; color handsome, glossy bright red; seeds raised; flesh well colored throughout, firm, juicy, pleasantly acid, aromatic; quality good.

Prolific (of Miller). 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:81. 1916.
A seedling of Bubach originated by J. B. Miller, Anna, Illinois; introduced about 1893. Perfect. Berries large, roundish, firm, sweet; good: medium early.

Prolific Hudson. 1. Horticulturist 3:70. 1848-49.
Originated about 1845 with W. R. Prince, Flushing, New York. Imperfect. Berries medium in size, round-conic, crimson; good.

Prosperity. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:82. 1916.
Listed in 1902. Berries large, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh light red, soft, subacid; very good; early to midseason.

Prosser. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:82. 1916.
Originated about .1900 by C. A. Warner, Prosser, Washington, as a cross between Brandywine and Clark. Berries medium in size, firm.

Prouty. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 358. 1880. Prouty's Seedling. 2. Mass. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 171. 1878.
Originated in 1870 by K. Prouty, as a cross between Wilson and Russell. Perfect. Berries medium in size, irregular long-conic, light crimson; flesh light red, firm, acid; fair; early.

Providence. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:82. 1916.
Originated in 1909 as a chance seedling with William Carroll, Somerset County, Maryland. Perfect. Berries large, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm; early.

Purdue. 1. Ind. Sta. Bul. 55:14. 1895.
Originated at the Indiana Agricultural Experiment Station in 1890 as a cross between Bubach and Jessie. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries large, round-conic, dull scarlet; flesh dark red, moderately firm, acid; good; midseason.

Puritan. 1. Colo. Sta. Bul. 53:22. 1900.
Of Ohio origin, introduced about 1890. Imperfect to semi-perfect. Berries medium in size, irregular conic, dark crimson, moderately firm, acid; good; midseason.

Pyramidal Chilian. 1. Thomas Am. Fruit Cull. 419. 1867.
Originated with a Mr. Newland of New Jersey, prior to 1840; probably a seedling of Fragaria chiloensis. Perfect. Berries large, conic, dark scarlet, moderately firm, subacid; good; late.


Quality. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 298:54. 1908. 2. Ibid. 309:542. 1908.
Originated at this Station in 1899 as a cross between Hunn and Atlantic. The variety varies greatly in sex, plant, and fruit characters, and has not held up to its earlier promises. Semi-perfect. Plants at this Station, numerous, medium to productive, attacked by leaf-spot, moderately vigorous; leaves dark green; fruit-stems variable in length, semi-erect; calyx medium to large, leafy, variable in position; fruit above medium to very large, not uniform in shape, necked, glossy light to dark red, firm, mildly acid, with red flesh, well flavored; good to very good; late.

Quality (of Ohio). 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 163:70. 1898.
Originated in Ohio; introduced in 1896. Plants few; fruit large, round-conic, bright crimson; flesh medium firm, mildly subacid; very good; midseason.


Random. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 76:436. 1894.
Received at this Station in 1893 from G. W. Cline, Winona, Ontario. Perfect. As grown here, plants vigorous, healthy, very numerous, unproductive; fruit-stems good; fruit of medium size, light red, moderately firm; good.

Rear Guard. 1. N. H. Sta. Bul. 137:184. 1908.
Of southern origin; introduced about 1906. Imperfect. Plants dwarfish, productive; fruit medium to large, conic, light red; flesh medium firm, juicy, acid; fair; late midseason.

Reba. 1. Rural N. Y. 55:514. 1896. 2. N. Y, Sta. Bul. 218:200. 1902.
Raised by J. H. Black et Son, Hightstown, New Jersey, in 1893, as a cross between a seedling of Bubach and Charles Downing, and Gandy. Imperfect. On the Station grounds, plants vigorous, medium in number, healthy, unproductive; fruit above medium to large, blunt-wedge, glossy red, soft, juicy; fair; medium late.

Red Bird. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:63. 1911.
Originated in 1902 by Samuel Wherry et Son, Durant, Mississippi, as a cross between Murray and Hoffman. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants medium in number and size, healthy, unproductive; fruit large to above medium, round-conic or wedge, necked, glossy light red, not very juicy, tender, sprightly, well flavored; good to very good; early.

Red Cross. 1. Etter Cat. 33. 1920.
Originated by Albert F. Etter, Ettersburg, California, as a cross between Ettersburg No. 216 and Trebla. Plants medium in vigor, very productive; fruit round, bright red; flesh firm, mild, sweet; early.

Red Jacket. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 203. 1876.
Originated in 1869 by C. P. Hunt, Waterloo, Iowa, as a supposed cross between Wilson and Russell. Perfect. Plants numerous; fruit large, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh soft, acid; poor; very early.

Red Prolific. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:188. 1915.
A cross between Ionia and Crescent raised by H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan, in 1899. Imperfect. Plants at this Station, numerous, below medium in vigor and height, productive, healthy; fruit-stems medium thick, rather short, very brittle; fruit large to above medium, conic, glossy light red, tart, with red flesh; fair; early.

Regina. 1. Ann. Hort. 134. 1893. 2. Mich. Sta. Bul. 104:68. 1894.
Originated by Julius Schnadelbach, Grand Bay, Alabama; introduced about 1890. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, unproductive; fruit medium in size, round-conic, crimson; flesh medium firm; fair; late.

Reliance. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 124:189. 1907.
Originated by Charles W. Momm, Irvington, New Jersey, as a cross between Mary and Marshall; introduced about 1905. Perfect. Plants few, weak, unproductive; fruit of medium size, round-conic, bright scarlet; flesh bright red, soft, not juicy, acid; fair; early.

Remington. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:83. 1916.
Originated in Colorado. Grown extensively near Steamboat Springs, Colorado. Perfect. Fruit of medium size, irregular, crimson, very firm, mildly subacid; very good; late midseason.

Rena. 1. Etter Cat. 28. 1920.
Raised by Albert F. Etter, Ettersburg, California, as a supposed cross between the wild beach strawberry of California and Ettersburg No. 84; introduced in 1920. Imperfect. At this Station, plants intermediate in number and vigor, somewhat low growing, unproductive, with slight leaf-spot; calyx cup-shaped; fruit-stems very short, slender, erect; fruit small, roundish, glossy pinkish white, moderately firm, juicy, with distinctly whitish flesh, sweet; fair; very late.

Repeater. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 189:116. 1901. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:189. 1915.
Origin not known; introduced about 1900. Perfect. Station plants numerous, small, low growing, productive, healthy; fruit-stems medium in length, variable in thickness; fruit above medium in size, blunt-wedge, glossy red, juicy, firm, sweet, well flavored, whitish at the center; fair; early.

Rewastico. 1. Peninsula Hort. Soc. Rpt. 54. 1914. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:76. 1918. A chance seedling which originated with Thomas B. Howard, Wicomico County, Maryland, about 1908. Perfect. As grown here, plants unusually numerous, vigorous, healthy, very productive; flowers large, showy, scattered thickly among the dark green leaves; fruit-stems long, very thick, erect; calyx leafy, with very broad sepals; fruit large, blunt-wedge to round-conic, necked, glossy medium red, very juicy, firm, tart, inferior in flavor, with red flesh; poor; late.

Richardson Early. 1. Mag. Hort. 17:59. 1851. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 682. 1857. Originated by J. Richardson, Cambridge, Massachusetts; introduced in 1848. Imperfect. Plants unproductive; fruit of medium size, conic, dark crimson^,good; early.

Richardson Late. 1. Mag. Hort. 17:59. 1851. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 682. 1857. Originated by a Mr. Richardson, Cambridge, Massachusetts; introduced in 1848. Perfect. Plants moderately productive; fruit large, roundish, light scarlet; flesh sprightly; good; midseason.

Richmond. 1. Rural N. Y. 47:710. 1888.
A chance seedling found in the woods in 1883 by a Mr. Collins, New Richmond, Michigan. Perfect. Plants numerous, unproductive; fruit of medium size, irregular round-conic, crimson; flesh medium firm; good; midseason.

Richmond (of Thompson). 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:76. 1918.
Originated in 1901 as a seedling of Thompson by Mark T. Thompson, Richmond, Virginia. Semi-perfect to perfect. In the Station beds, plants few, medium in vigor, healthy, very productive; fruit-stems medium in length and thickness, semi-erect; fruit above medium to small, very oblong-conic, necked, dull light red, juicy, firm, with red flesh, variable in flavor; fair; midseason.

Ridgeway. 1. Rural N. Y. 55:498. 1896. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:188. 1898.
A cross between Jersey Queen and Parker Earle originated by M. H. Ridgeway, Wabash, Indiana, in 1892. It is valued in some sections for local markets. Added to the last catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1909. Perfect. Plants at this Station, numerous, vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems short, stout; calyx large, leafy, detaches very easily; fruit above medium in size which is well retained, round-conic to wedge, glossy light red, medium firm, juicy, well flavored; good; midseason to late.

Riehl Seedlings. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 76:436. 1894. 2. Ibid. 218:200. 1902.
E. A. Riehl, Alton, Illinois, sent a number of seedlings to this Station for trial at various times between 1893 and 1918. Nos. 5 and 6 are described in Bulletin 76 of this Station, and Nos. 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 are described in Bulletin 218. No. 6 was introduced by Mr. Riehl as Ruby.

Rio. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:10. 1894. Thompson A?o. p. 2. Mich. Sta. Bul. 80:10. 1892.
A seedling of Sharpless originated by Mark T. Thompson, Lakewood, Ohio, in 1887. Perfect. At this Station, plants vigorous, healthy, numerous, unproductive; fruit-stems good; fruit of medium size, round-conic, scarlet, firm, briskly subacid; good; midseason.

Rip Snorter. 1. Mich. Sta. BuL 206:54. 1903.
Originated with W. Rapp, Terre Haute, Indiana; introduced about 1902. Plants medium in number, vigorous, unproductive; fruit large, round-conic, light crimson; flesh soft; good; midseason.

Rippowam. 1. Mag. Hort. 32:273. 1866. 2. Ibid. 34:74. 1868.
Originated with J. W. Faulkner, Stamford, Connecticut, as a cross between Bicton Pine, an English variety, and Triomphe; introduced in 1865. Very similar to Eliza (of Rivers), an English sort. Perfect. Plants vigorous, moderately productive; fruit large, irregular round-conic to coxcomb, scarlet; flesh whitish, medium firm, subacid; fair.

Rival Hudson. 1.'Mag. Hort. 13:368. 1847.
Originated by John Burr, Columbus, Ohio, as a cross between Early Hudson and Burr. Imperfect. Plants hardy and very productive; fruit of medium size, conic, dark crimson; flesh firm, briskly subacid; good.

Roadside. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:84. 1916,
Said to be a cross between Klondike and a wild berry originated in Delaware. Perfect. Plants very numerous; fruit of medium size, round-conic, bright scarlet; flesh light red, subacid; early.

Rob Rusk. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 177:22. 1899.
Originated with W. W. Sewall, Carthage, Missouri; introduced about 1897. . Perfect. Plants numerous, weak, unproductive; fruit round-conic, crimson; flesh scarlet, firm; fair; early.

Robbie. 1. Rural N. Y. 55:514. 1896. 2. Ar. Y. Sta. Bul. 218:201. 1902.
A cross between Shuster and Kentucky raised by J. H. Black, Son et Company, Hightstown, New Jersey, in 1893. Perfect. Station plants few, medium in vigor, attacked by leaf-spot, unproductive; fruit above medium to large, conic or wedge, light red, with tendenc}'- to green tips, firm, subacid, with pale red flesh; fair to good; late.

Robinson. 1. Ann. Hort. 202. 1892. 2. AT. Y. Sta. Bul. 109:236. 1896.
Originated by J. G. Robinson, Franklin County, Kansas, as a cross between Crescent and Charles Downing; introduced in 1891. Perfect. Station plants numerous, vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems moderately long and thick; fruit medium to large, round-conic, scarlet, intermediate in firmness; fair; late.

Robusta. 1. Burbank Cat. 4. 1920.
Originated by Luther Burbank, Santa Rosa, California, in 1916 as a cross between Progressive and one of his seedlings; an everbearing sort. Fruit large, oval, scarlet; very good.

Rochester. 1. Green Cat. 82. 1902. 2. N. H. Sta. Bul. 137:184. 1908.
Introduced in 1902 by Green's Nursery Company, Rochester, New York. Perfect. Plants numerous, medium in vigor, unproductive; fruit of medium size, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh light red, medium firm, sweet; fair; midseason.

Rockhill. 1. Kellogg Cir. 1923.
Originated in 1918 by Harlow Rockhill, Conrad, Iowa, as a cross between Early Jersey Giant and Progressive. Introduced in 1923 as an everbearing sort by the R. M. Kellogg Company, Three Rivers, Michigan, with the statement that it had been purchased by them from Mr. Rockhill for $50,000. It lost its fall-fruiting habit after being introduced and in a letter of September 25, 1923, from the Kellogg Company, Mr. Rockhill is quoted as assuming that it had reverted to one of its spring-bearing ancestors.

Rockhill Seedlings. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:63. 1911.
Since 1904 Harlow Rockhill, Conrad, Iowa, has sent out seedling strawberries under number. The following numbers have fruited at this Station and are described in Bulletin 336: Nos. 6, later named Standpat, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12.

Romeyn.
Romeyn Seedling. 1. Mag. Hort. 34:270. 1868.
Originated by M. Romeyn, Kingston, New York, as a supposed seedling of Triomphe, with which variety it was practically identical; introduced in 1866. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous and productive; fruit large, irregular round-conic, light crimson; flesh light red, medium firm, mildly subacid; very good; late midseason.

Roosevelt. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:85. 191^ 2* Ohio Sta. Bul. 364:84. 1923.
Originated with T. B. West, Perry, Ohio; introduced in 1911. Perfect. Plants vigorous and productive; fruit medium to large, conic to wedge-shape, regular, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm, juicy, subacid; good; late.

Rose Ettersburg. 1. Cal. Sta. Rpt. 105. 1898-01. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:189. 1915.
Raised in 1896 by Albert F. Etter, Ettersburg, California, who gives its parentage as "a third generation Sharpless-Parry by Peruvian Beach cross." It is of little value at this Station. Perfect. As grown here, plants medium to numerous, healthy, dwarfish, moderately productive; leaves small, dark green; flowers large, showy, above the foliage; fruit-stems thick, erect; calyx large, pale green; fruit large to medium, decidedly variable in shape, very pale light red, colors unevenly, juicy, tender, mild, whitish at the center; fair; late.

Roseberry. 1. Trans. Lond. HorL Soc. 2:380, PL 27. 1817. 2. Ibid. 6:156. 1826. 3. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 528. 1845.
An old Scotch variety grown considerably in this country from 1825 to 1840. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit large, conic, necked, dark red; flesh firm, pale scarlet, mild; good; midseason.

Roser. 1. Ind. Sta. Bul. 48:7. 1894.
Originated by E. L. Roser, Brittain, Ohio; introduced about 1895. Mr. Roser also sent out several other seedlings under number for trial. Imperfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, productive; fruit medium to large, roundish, scarlet; flesh soft; good; midseason.

Ross Phoenix. 1. Mag, Hort. 8:270, 351. 1842. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 533, fig. 1845.
Raised from seed of Keens Seedling in 1837 by Alexander Ross, Hudson, New York. It was a popular sort about 1845 to 1855. Perfect. Plants vigorous and productive; fruit large, coxcomb-shape, very dark crimson; flesh firm; very good; midseason.

Rough Rider. 1. Am. Gard. 20:882, fig. 229. 1899. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 276:75. 1906. This variety originated in 1893 with Charles Learned, Pulaski, New York, as a cross between Bubach and Gandy. It has received many favorable reports from New York but seems not to have succeeded greatly elsewhere; not now a leading variety in New York. Perfect. Plants medium in height and number, vigorous, usually healthy, variable in yield; fruit-stems of medium length, variable in thickness, semi-erect; berries large, retain good size, round-conic or wedge, attractive dark red; flesh well colored throughout, firm, juicy, agreeably acid, pleasantly flavored; good; late.

Royal Sovereign. 1. Gard. Chron. 3d Ser. 15:594. 1894. 2. Am. Gard. 21:255. 1900. Raised by Thomas Laxton, Bedford, England, as a cross between Noble and King of the Earlies, English varieties; introduced by Laxton Brothers in 1891. It is a standard sort in England and is grown considerably in British Columbia and Nova Scotia. Perfect. Plants medium in number, productive; fruit large, round-conic to wedge-shape, bright crimson; flesh medium red, firm, briskly subacid; good; very early.

Ruby. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 85:19. 1897. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:544. 1908. Riekl No. 6. 3. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 76:436. 1894.
A supposed cross between Crescent and Sharpless raised by E. A. Riehl, Alton, Illinois, in 1890. It is valued for canning. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants medium in number and vigor, healthy, productive; fruit-stems variable in length, slender, prostrate; fruit large to medium, irregular wedge to round-conic, dull dark red, firm, pleasantly acid, with red flesh, well flavored; good.

Ruby (of Henderson). 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:86. 1916. Great Ruby. 2. Henderson Cat 143. 1902.
Introduced in 1902 by Peter Henderson, New York City. Imperfect. Plants numerous; fruit of medium size, round-conic to wedge-shape, dark crimson; flesh dark red, very firm, mildly subacid; fair; early midseason.

Rumark. 1. Kellogg Cat 21. 1919.
Introduced in 1919 by the R. M. Kellogg Company, Three Rivers, Michigan. Semi-perfect to imperfect. In the Station beds, plants few, medium in vigor and height, productive, healthy; leaves small, dark green; flowers early, with a very large receptacle; fruit-stems long, thick, prostrate; pedicels long, slender; seeds much raised; fruit above medium in size, quickly becomes smaller, irregular wedge to blunt-conic, necked, light to medium red, colors unevenly, juicy, firm, hard at the center, sprightly; poor to fair; early to midseason.

Rural Gem. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:188. 1898.
A seedling o Crescent which originated with J. L. Fairman, Thompsonville, Connecticut; introduced about 1898 by J. H. Pease et Son of Thompsonville. Perfect. Plants numerous, moderately vigorous, productive; fruit of medium size, roundish conic, light scarlet; flesh medium firm; fair; late.

Rush. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 76:437. 1894.
A cross between Miner and Crescent introduced about 1893 by Jackson et Perkins, Newark, New York. Imperfect. Plants at this Station, vigorous, healthy, numerous, medium productive; fruit-stems good; fruit of medium size, dark red, moderately firm; fair.

Russell. 1. Horticulturist 18:244. 1862. Russell Prolific. 2. Fuller Sm. Fr. Cult 98. 1867.
Originated in 1856 by Harvey Russell, Seneca Falls, New York, as a cross between McAvoy Superior and Longworth. The variety was placed in the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1873 from, which it was removed in 1883. Imperfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit very large, irregular round-conic, necked, dark crimson; flesh light red, moderately firm, sweet; good.

Russell Advance. 1. Cult et Count Gent 41:408. 1876.
Originated by Harvey Russell, Seneca Falls. New York; introduced about 1868. The variety was added to the American Pomological Society's catalog in 1879, from which it was removed in 1897. Perfect. Plants few; fruit large, conic, crimson, soft; very good; early midseason.

Ruth. Morgan No. 21. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:74. *9*%-
A chance seedling found in a fence corner in 1911 by J. A. Morgan, Scottsville, New York. As grown at this Station this variety is worthy of trial because of the vigor and productivity of the plants and the large, firm, attractive fruit. Imperfect. Plants of medium number, unusually vigorous and tall, healthy, very productive; leaves of largest size, thick, dark green; flowers cup-shaped; fruit-stems very long, thick, erect; calyx very large, leafy; fruit very large, drops rapidly in size, round-conic to blunt-wedge or inclined to oblate, glossy dark red, very firm, juicy, sprightly; very good; early to midseason.

Ryckman. 1. W. N. Y. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 27. 1904. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:545. 1908. A chance seedling discovered by George F. Ryckman, Brocton, New York, who introduced it in 1901. It is practically identical with New York. Perfect. Station plants medium in number, vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems long, variable in thickness; fruit very large to medium, round-conic to slight wedge, or elongated, furrowed, dull light to dark red, firm, mild, not juicy; fair to good; midseason.


Sadie. 1. Ann. Hort. 211. 1891. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 44:143. 1892.
Originated by M. T. Thompson, Lakewood, Ohio; introduced in 1891. Imperfect As grown here, plants vigorous, numerous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems short, weak; fruit small, obtuse-conic, bright red, moderately firm, tart; good; early.

Saint Joseph. 1. Am. Card. 20:539. 1899. 2. Soc. Nat. Hort. France Pom. 164, fig. 1907. 3. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:189. 1915.
Originated in 1893 by Abbe Thivolet, Chenoves, Saone-et-Loire, France, as a cross between White Alpine and an unknown sort; introduced in America in 1899 by the United States Department of Agriculture. In Europe it was considered the first good large-fruited everbearing sort, but it shows only a slight tendency to fall-fruiting in this country. The plants are tender and the fruit is small, although of the highest quality. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants medium in vigor, yield and number, low growing, healthy; sometimes autumn-fruiting; flowers small, early; fruit does not pick easily, small, blunt-conic to wedge, dull medium red, firm, sweet, well flavored, aromatic, whitish at the center; very good to best; early.

St. Louis. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:86. 1916.
Raised in 1903 by A. T. Goldsborough, Washington, D. C, as a cross between Commander and one of his own seedlings the parentage of which was British Queen by Louis Gauthier. This variety is said to have produced a berry measuring three and one-half inches by three and one-sixteenth inches, weighing three and three-fourths ounces. Imperfect to semi-perfect. Plants medium in number; fruit large, irregular round-conic, light crimson; flesh light red, medium firm, sweet; very good; late midseason.

St. Louis (of Bauer). 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:545. 1908.
Raised in 1904 by J. A. Bauer, Judsonia, Arkansas, as a cross between Haverland and Thompson. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants medium in number, vigorous, healthy, very productive; fruit-stems slender, prostrate; fruit large to medium, drops in size, variable in shape, very light dull red, soft, medium in acidity, inferior in flavor; poor; early

St. Martin. 1. Mass. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 229. 1914. 2. Graton Circ. 1920.
Originated in 1908 by Louis Graton, Trumansburg, New York. It received a silver medal from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. Perfect. Plants at this Station, of medium vigor, number, and height, healthy, moderately productive; flowers medium early, very large; fruit-stems medium in length, thick, semi-erect; pedicels long, thick; calyx very large, detaches readily, leafy; seeds much raised; fruit large chunky wedge, glossy dark red, often with poorly developed apex, juicy, firm, with red flesh, well flavored; very good; midseason.

Salem. 1. Rural N. Y. 58:514. 1899. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 218:201. 1902.
Originated by B. M. Smith, Beverly, Massachusetts; introduced in 1900. Perfect. At this Station, plants weak, low growing, exposing the fruit to the sun, productive, healthy; fruit below medium to large, irregular and roughish, glossy deep red, soft, subacid, with red flesh; fair; midseason.

Salisbury. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:65. 1911.
A chance seedling found in Salisbury, North Carolina; introduced by E. W. Townsend et Sons, Salisbury, Maryland, in 1906. Imperfect. Station plants few, medium in size, vigor, and yield, healthy; fruit large to medium, wedge or conic, dull very light red, very juicy, tender, subacid, inferior in flavor; poor; late.

Salter. 1. U. S. D. A. Pom. Rpt. 393. 1891.
Cultivated in Mississippi about 1891. Perfect. Fruit medium in size, conic, dark crimson; flesh firm, acid; early.

Sam Sperry. 1. Mich. S a. Bul. 177:22. 1899.
Originated with W. W. Sewall, Carthage, Missouri; introduced in 1907. Perfect. Plants low; fruit conic, bright scarlet; flesh light red, very firm; mid:eason.

Sam Wherry. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:87. 1916.
Originated in 1905 by Sam E. Wherry, Durant, Mississippi, as a cross between Klondike and Red Bird. Perfect. Plants numerous; fruit large, oval, with a long neck, dark scarlet; flesh medium red, firm, acid; fair; early midseason.

Sample. 1. Am. Gard. 19:236, 288, fig. 57. 1898. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 218:201. 1902.
Once a standard sort, Sample is now rapidly passing from cultivation although it is still more or less grown in New York, New England, and the states of the Middle West. The variety came into prominence because of the productiveness of the plants and its large, handsome, well-flavored fruits. The berries are too soft to ship long distances, but it was, and still is, in some localities a very good sort for local markets and home gardens. Dunlap makes a good pollinator. Sample originated as a chance seedling in a bed of Leader in 1894 with J. D. Gowing, North Reading, Massachusetts; introduced by Charles S. Pratt of that place in 1898; added to the fruit list of the American Pomological Society in 1909.
Imperfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, healthy, productive; leaves dark green, dull, rugose. Flowers late midseason, small; petals 6-8. Fruit late; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate; pedicels short, slender; calyx of medium size, flat, well colored; sepals broad; berries large to medium, conic or wedge; apex slightly pointed; color glossy bright, dark red; seeds sunken; flesh dark red, firm, juicy, subacid to somewhat sprightly; quality good.

Sampson. 1. Am. Gard. 21:631. 1900. 2. N. F. Sta. Bul. 218:201. 1902.
Originated in 1893 by D. J. Miller, Millersburg, Ohio. Perfect. As grown here, plants numerous, vigorous, healthy, with large, dark green leaves; fruit medium to very large, variable in shape, necked, dull light red, firm, juicy, with light colored flesh; fair; late.

Sandoval. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 358. 1891. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:11. 1894.
Originated by C. B. Warfield, Sandoval, Illinois; introduced in 1891. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1897, where it remained in the last catalog in 1909. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants vigorous, medium healthy, few, unproductive; fruit-stems good; fruit of medium size, symmetrical, round-conic, dark red, firm, with dark red flesh; good; midseason to late.

Saratoga. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:546. 1908.
Originated in 1903 as a cross between Glen Mary and Sample by William Palmer, Rexford Flats, New York. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants medium in number and vigor, attacked by leaf-spot, very productive; fruit-stems short, very thick, prostrate; fruit large to medium, blunt-wedge, glossy dark red, very firm, sprightly to acid; well flavored; good to very good; early midseason.

Satin Gloss. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 169. 1882.
A seedling of Lady Finger, originated by Oscar Felton, Mechanicsburg, New Jersey; introduced about 1880. Plants weak and unproductive; fruit small, round-conic, glossy scarlet; flesh soft, juicy, mildly subacid; good.

Satisfaction. 1. Rural N. Y. 55:515. 1896. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bui. 62:38. 1909.
A seedling of Wilson originated by G. W. Howard, Stevensville, Michigan; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous; fruit medium in size, roundish, bright crimson; flesh bright red, medium firm, juicy, briskly subacid; good; midseason.

Saunders. 1. Can. Hort. 14:263. 1891. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 62:38. 1909.
Originated by John Little, Granton, Ontario, as a supposed cross between Crescent and Sharpless; introduced in 1890; has been grown extensively in Canada. It was added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1897, where it remained in 1909. Plants numerous, medium in vigor and productivity; fruit of medium size, round-conic to wedge-conic, dark red, sometimes with green tips; flesh light red, medium firm, juicy, subacid; good; late.

Saunders Success. 1. N. Y. Sta. BuL 76:437. 1894.
Originated with A. Saunders, Sac City, Iowa; introduced about 1893. Perfect. Plants at this Station, vigorous, healthy, numerous, unproductive; fruit-stems good; fruit of medium size, scarlet, soft; fair; midseason. Scarlet Ball. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 104:68. 1894. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 62:38. 1909.
Originated by E. W. Cone, Menomonie, Wisconsin; introduced about 1892. Imperfect. Plants few, vigorous; fruit medium to large, roundish, scarlet; flesh pale red, firm, juicy, subacid; very good; late.

Scarlet Cone. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 1002. 1869.
Raised by Ellwanger et Barry, Rochester, New York; introduced in 1850. Imperfect. Plants vigorous and very productive; fruit large, conic, bright scarlet.

Scarlet Melting, 1. Mag. Hort. 13:368. 1847.
A cross between Hovey and Burr, raised about 1845 by John Burr, Columbus, Ohio. Imperfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, very productive; fruit medium in size, long-conic, necked, bright red; flesh very soft; good; early.

Schauber Seedlings. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:189. 1915.
George R. Schauber, Ballston Lake, New York, sent out various seedlings raised by him from 1905 to 1920. Nos. 106, 108, 150, 701, and 705 have been tested at this Station, and the last two are described in Bulletin 401. No. 150 was the most promising of the lot but was inferior in quality, although large and very productive.

Schild Seedlings. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:190. 1915.
H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan, has sent out various seedlings under number; the following numbers have been tested at this Station and described in Bulletin 401: Nos. 2, 8, 10, and 12.

Scott. 1. Mag.Hort. 19:543. 1853. 2. Hovey Fr. Am. 2:67, PI. 1856.
Raised by J. Scott, Brighton, Massachusetts, in 1847, as a cross between Prince Albert and Boston Pine. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1862 from which it was removed in 1871. Perfect. Plants numerous, moderately vigorous, productive; fruit large, long-conic, dark crimson; flesh pale red, firm, rather dry, rich; good; midseason to late.

Scriver. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 176:10. 1899.
Originated with J. D. McCrimmon, St. Louis, Michigan; introduced about 1899. Perfect. Plants vigorous, unproductive; fruit medium in size, long-conic, necked, dull dark crimson; flesh bright red, firm; good; midseason.

Seaford. 1. Am. Card. 18:536. 1897. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:188. 1898. Lloyd. 3. Col. 0. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 88. 1901.
A chance seedling which originated in 1892 with Charles Wright, Seaford, Delaware. It was added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1899, where it remained in the last catalog in 1909. Imperfect. As grown here, plants medium in number; fruit medium to large, glossy light and dark red, conic to wedge, firm, juicy, acid; good; midseason.

See Seedlings. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 76:437. 1894. 2. Rural N. Y. 55:514. 1896.
H. S. et A. J. See, Geneva, Pennsylvania, sent out several seedling strawberries under numbers in 1893 for trial. Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 were sent out, of which Nos. 1 and 2 are described in Bulletin 76 of this Station.

Seek-No-Further. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 176:10. 1899.
Originated with J. M. Wickizer, Marshall County, Indiana; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, unproductive; fruit large, round-conic, light scarlet; flesh light red, moderately firm, juicy; fair; midseason.

Senator Wilson. 1. Gottwold Circ. 1921.
A chance seedling found in a strawberry bed by O. R. Gottwold, Sayville, New York, in 1913. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants numerous, vigorous, tall, unproductive, healthy; fruit-stems long, thick, prostrate; calyx very large, leafy; seeds sunken; fruit large, drops in size, wedge to blunt-conic, dull medium red, colors unevenly, firm, rather dry, sweet; fair; early.

Seneca. 1. iV. 7. Sfo. SwZ. 309:547. 1908.
Originated in 1902 by L. J. Brundage, Dundee, New York. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants numerous, very vigorous, healthy, unproductive; fruit-stems medium in length, thick, semi-erect; fruit large to medium, drops in size, roundish, necked, very light red, soft, mild, with light colored flesh; fair; midseason.

Seneca Chief. 1. Am. Hort. Ann. 99. 1871. 2. Mich. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 99. 1877.
Originated by Hunt et Foote, Waterloo, New York, as a seedling of Miner. Added to the American Pomological Society's catalog in 1879, from which it was removed in 1883. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, very productive; fruit of medium size, round-conic, bright scarlet; flesh light red, firm, subacid; good; midseason.

Seneca Queen. 1. Gard. Mon. 23:240. 1881. 2. Mich. Sta. Bul. 55:15. 1889.
Originated with Hunt et Foote, Waterloo, New York, as a seedling of Miner; introduced about 1879. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1879, from which it was removed in 1897. Perfect. Plants numerous, productive; fruit of medium size, roundish, attractive dark crimson; flesh dark red, soft; good; midseason.

Seth Boyden. 1. Am. Hort. Ann. 96. 1871. Boyden No. 30. 2. Rec. Hort. 2:62. 1868. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 980. 1869.
Originated in 1865 by Seth Boyden, Newark, New Jersey, as a cross between Green Prolific and Georgia Mammoth. From about 1870 to 1885 it was widely grown for market and home use. It required high culture. The American Pomological Society added the variety to its catalog in 1873, and removed it in 1897. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, very productive; fruit large, roundish conic, regular, with a short neck, bright crimson; flesh medium red, firm, juicy, subacid; good; early.

Sharpless. 1. Gard. Mon. 20:239, 306. 1878. Ontario. 2. Rural N. Y. 46:511. 1887. Dawley. 3. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:332. 1890. Shaw. 4. Am. Gard. 12:633. 1891.
This variety originated in 1872 with J. K. Sharpless, Catawissa, Pennsylvania; introduced in 1877; added to the American Pomological Society's recommended fruit list in 1879. For many years Sharpless was the dominant strawberry in America and was especially well adapted for hill culture. It is, however, capricious as to soils and there were always many berries with green tips. Perfect. Plants medium to numerous, vigorous, healthy, variable in yield; fruit-stems long, thick, variable in position; calyx easily detached; berries large to very large, variable in shape, bright glossy red, inclined to green tips; flesh light red, medium firm, juicy, the larger berries hollow at the center, juicy, mildly subacid, good; late midseason.

Shawnee. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 129:7. 1896.
Originated with James Stayman, Leavenworth, Kansas, as a seedling of Cyclone; introduced about 1892. Semi-perfect to perfect. Plants medium in number and vigor; fruit medium to large, long-conic, dark crimson; flesh medium red, medium firm, acid; good; midseason.

Shenandoah. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 154:56. 1904. 2, N. Y. Sta. Bul. 276:76. 1906.
Originated with W. A. Shook, McGaheysville, Virginia, as a chance seedling, supposed to be a cross between Bubach and Lovett; introduced about 1906. Perfect. At this Station, plants numerous, vigorous, productive, healthy; fruit-stems long, slender; fruit above medium to large, drops in size, round-conic to blunt-wedge, light red, medium soft, acid, well flavored; good; medium late.

Sheppard. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 193:82. 1902. 2, Ohio Sta. Bul. 154:57. 1904.
Originated by E. S. Sheppard of Tennessee, as a seedling of Monarch; introduced about 1896. Imperfect to semi-perfect. Plants numerous, moderately vigorous, productive; fruit of medium size, conic, often coxcombed, bright crimson; flesh pink, soft, sweet; fair; late.

Sherman. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 142:154. 1897.
Originated with E. W. Cone, Menomonie, Wisconsin; introduced about 1896. Imperfect to semi-perfect. Plants numerous, moderately vigorous, very productive; fruit large, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh light red, firm; fair; midseason.

Sherman (of Cooper). 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:65. 1911.
Originated in 1903 by Samuel Cooper, Delevan, New York, as a seedling of Pan American. Imperfect. Station plants numerous, above medium in size and vigor, healthy, productive; leaves very dark green; fruit large, retains size well, round-conic, glossy medium red, colors unevenly, very juicy, firm, tart; good; midseason. Worthy of trial.

Shipping King. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 160:217. 1911.
Originated with C. W. Scantling, Albemarle County, Virginia; introduced in 1908. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous; fruit of medium size, round-conic, dark glossy scarlet; flesh light red, firm, juicy, mildly subacid; good; midseason.

Shirtz. 1. Ohio Hort. Soc. Rpt. 108. 1880-81.
Originated in 1873 with E. J. Shirtz, Shelby, Michigan, as a chance seedling. Very similar to Bidwell. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1883 and removed in 1897. Perfect. Plants medium in number, weak, moderately productive; fruit large, long-conic, necked, dark red; flesh medium red, medium firm, sweet; good; midseason.

Shropshire. 1. U. S. D. A. Farmers' Bul. 1043:35. 1919.
Originated in New Jersey about 1911. It is grown extensively in southern New Jersey, where it is liked because of its productivity, attractive fruit with raised seeds, and large stems which hold it erect. Plants numerous, productive; fruit medium to large, irregular, conic wedge-shape, dark crimson; flesh red firm, subacid; fair; midseason.

Shuster. 1. Rural N. Y. 47:460. 1888. Shuster's Gem. 2. Rural N. Y. 50:527. 1891. 3. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 36:634. 1891.
Originated in 1871 by S. S. Shuster, Frenchtown, New Jersey, as a cross between Crescent and Cumberland. Imperfect. On the Station grounds, plants medium in vigor, few, unproductive; fruit-stems stiff; fruit of medium size, obtuse-conic, dark red, moderately firm, with dark red flesh; good; medium early.

Shyster 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 163:70. 1898.
Originated with Mark T. Thompson, Rio Vista, Virginia; introduced about 1897. Plants numerous, vigorous and productive; fruit large, round-conic, light scarlet; flesh bright red, medium firm, juicy, acid; fair; early midseason.

Silver Coin. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:65. 1911.
A chance seedling which originated in 1902 with W. W. Kennedy, Red Bank, New Jersey. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants medium in number, size, and vigor, moderately productive; fruit-stems long, thick, prostrate, much branched; fruit above medium in size, round-conic, dull light red, very juicy, tender, subacid, inferior in flavor; fair; late.

Silvia. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 299. 1913.
A seedling of Belt raised in 1906 at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada. Plants medium in number; fruit large, roundish to wedge-shape, dark crimson; flesh medium red, medium firm, briskly subacid; good; late midseason.

Sionilli. 1. Kellogg Cat. 22. 1919.
Originated in 1915 with R. M. Sears, La Grange, Illinois. Semi-perfect to perfect. Plants at this Station, very few, medium in vigor and height, healthy, unproductive; leaves thick, dark green; flowers early; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate; calyx large, raised; seeds sunken; fruit above medium to medium in size, conic to wedge, glossy medium red, moderately juicy, very firm, subacid; fair; early to midseason.

Smeltzer. 1. Del. Sta. Bul. 24:10. 1894.

Smeltzer Early. 2. Mich. Sta. Bul. 100:12. 1893.
Originated with F. H. Smeltzer, Van Buren, Arkansas; introduced about 1892. Plants numerous, vigorous and productive; fruit small to medium in size, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm; fair; early midseason.

Smith. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:10. 1894. Smith Seedling. 2. Mich. Sta. Bul. 130:51. 1896.
A seedling of Wilson which originated with L. Smith, Rock County, Wisconsin; introduced in 1893. Perfect. At this Station, plants vigorous, healthy, numerous, productive; fruit-stems good; fruit of medium size, roundish, light red, firm; fair; early.

Snowball. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 130:51. 1896.
Originated in 1890 with E. W. Cone, Menomonie, Wisconsin. Perfect. Plants few, vigorous; fruit medium to large, long-conic, necked, bright scarlet; flesh light red, firm, acid; good; late midseason.

Somerset Maid. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:548. 1908.
Originated in Massachusetts; introduced about 1906. Perfect. Station plants medium in number and vigor, healthy, productive; fruit-stems variable in length, thickness and position; fruit above medium to small, variable in shape, furrowed, medium dark red, firm, pleasantly acid, with dark red flesh, well flavored; good to very good; midseason.

Sons Prolific. 1. Mo. Bd. Hort. Rpt. 297. 1909. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:191. 1915.
Originated in 1902 with James Sons, Jr., Seiigman, Missouri, as a cross between Bubach and Aroma. Imperfect to semi-perfect. As grown here, plants few, below medium in vigor, productive, healthy; fruit-stems long, thick, prostrate, much branched; calyx deeply sunken; fruit large to medium, irregular in shape, glossy medium red, firm, moderately juicy, with red flesh; fair to good; early.

Southard. 1. Ann. Hort. 202. 1892. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:10. 1894.
A chance seedling which originated with M. Southard, Lakeview, Ohio; introduced in 1892. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants medium in vigor, few, moderately productive; fruit-stems good; fruit medium to large, round-conic, bright red, soft: good; midseason.

Southern Beauty. 1. W. Va. Sta. Bul. 52:108. 1898.
Origin unknown. Plants very numerous, healthy, moderately vigorous; fruit of medium size, round-conic, light crimson; flesh medium red, medium firm, mildly subacid; good; midseason.

Sparta. 1. Rural N. Y. 55:498. 1896.
Originated by J. L. Herbst, Sparta, Wisconsin, as a cross between Warfield and Jessie; introduced in 1895. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, of medium productivity; fruit medium to large, long-conic, necked, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm, sweet; very good; midseason.

Splendid. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 76:438. 1894.
Originated with C. H. Sumner, Sterling, Illinois; introduced about 1892. The variety was added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1899, and remained in the last catalog in 1909. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants vigorous, healthy, very numerous, moderately productive; fruit-stems good; fruit medium to large, round-conic, bright red, medium firm to soft, sprightly; good; medium early.

Springdale. 1. Gard. Mon. 16:279. 1874.
Originated by Amos Miller, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, as a supposed cross between Green Prolific and Jucunda; introduced in 1874. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1879, and removed in 1883. Imperfect. Plants numerous, medium in vigor and productivity; fruit medium to large, round-conic, bright crimson; flesh light red, medium firm; good; late midseason.

Springdale (of Stayman). 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 130:51. 1896. Springdale Beauty. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 154:57. 1904.
Originated by James Stayman, Leavenworth, Kansas, as a supposed cross between Crescent and Wilson; introduced about 1901. Perfect. Plants medium in number, moderately vigorous, productive; fruit of medium size, round-conic, bright scarlet; flesh light red, firm, subacid; good; early midseason.

Staderman. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 166:79. 1905.
Introduced about 1904. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, moderately productive; fruit large, conic, dark crimson; flesh red, moderately firm; good; late midseason.

Stahelin. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:189. 1898. 2. Ibid. 276:76. 1906. Stakeley. 3. Md. Sta. Bul. 124:191. 1907. A chance seedling which originated with P. C. Stahelin, Bridgman, Michigan; introduced about 1897. Imperfect. Plants at this Station, numerous, vigorous, very productive; fruit-stems long, stocky; fruit medium to nearly large, drops quickly in size, oblate-conic to round-conic or wedge, glossy light red, firm, acid; fair to good; early.

Standard. 1. Rural N. 7.48:523. 1889. 2. Mich. Sta. Bul. 100:12. 1897.
Originated with J. D. Gowing, North Reading, Massachusetts; introduced in 1891. Imperfect to semi-perfect. Plants few, moderately vigorous, productive; fruit medium to large, irregular round-conic, dark glossy crimson; flesh medium red, medium firm; good; midseason.

Standpat. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 187. 1912. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:76. 1918. Rockhill No. 6. 3. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:63. 1911.
Originated with Harlow Rockhill, Conrad, Iowa, in 1906, as a cross between Dunlap and Pan American. Perfect. At this Station, plants very few, inferior in vigor, health, and yield; autumn-bearing; flowers early, very small; fruit-stems very short, slender, prostrate; calyx small, sunken; seeds prominent; fruit medium to small, blunt-conic, dull dark red, juicy, medium firm, subacid, inferior in flavor; poor; very early.

Stanley. 1. Ga. Sta. Bul. 32:487. 1896.
Originated by Luther L. Stanley, Griffin, Georgia; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Plants very numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit large, conic, colors unevenly; flesh firm, acid; good; midseason.

Staples. 1. Crawford Cat. 1895. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 109:237. 1896.
Originated by Isaac Staples, Dayton, Ohio, as a seedling of Warfield. Perfect. Station plants moderately vigorous, numerous; fruit-stems short; fruit of medium size, roundish, dark red, firm, sweet, with red flesh; fair; early.

Star. 1. Rural N. Y. 57:499. 1898. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:548. 1908.
Originated with E. W. Reid, Bridgeport, Ohio; introduced in 1897. Perfect. Station plants few, medium in vigor, healthy, unproductive; fruit-stems medium in length, variable in thickness and position; fruit large to medium, retains size well, round-conic to wedge, furrowed, dull dark red, seedy at the apex, firm, sweet, mild, with red flesh; good; midseason.

Stayman. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 216. 1889. Stayman No. 1. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:336. 1890.
Originated by James Stayman, Leavenworth, Kansas; introduced about 1885. Imperfect. Plants numerous, very vigorous, productive; fruit of medium size, round-conic, attractive scarlet; flesh light red, medium firm, acid; good; early midseason.

Stella. 1. Rural N. Y. 56:471. 1897. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 218:201. 1902.
Originated in 1893 by J. H. Black, Son et Company, Hightstown, New Jersey, as a cross between Bubach and Sharpless. Imperfect. As grown here, plants medium in vigor and number, attacked slightly by leaf-spot; fruit above medium to very large, retains size well, mostly wedge, glossy red, soft, medium juicy, mild; fair; medium late

Sterling. I, Am. Hort. Ann. 99. 1871. 2. Ohio Hort. Soc. Rpt. 97. 1875-76.
Raised in 1867 from a lot of mixed seed by Matthew Crawford, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. Imperfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit large, oval-conic, necked, bright crimson; flesh light red, medium firm, acid; very good; midseason.

Stevens. 1. U. S. D. A. Pom. Rpt. 393. 1891. Stevens Early. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 62:39. 1909.
Originated in 1888 with Julius Schnadelbach, Grand Bay, Alabama, as a supposed cross between Crescent and Neunan; introduced in 1890. Imperfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit of medium size, roundish to wedge-conic, bright crimson; flesh medium red, medium firm, acid; fair; early.

Stevens (of New York). Stevens Great American. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:66. 1911.
Originated with S. D. Stevens et Sons, Bridgeton, New York; introduced in 1911. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants medium in number, size and vigor, healthy, moderately productive; fruit large, conic, necked, glossy medium red, very juicy, firm, tart, with red flesh; good; midseason.

Stevenson. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 163:71. 1898.
Originated with Edward Stevenson, Stevensville, Michigan; introduced in 1898. Imperfect. Plants weak, unproductive; fruit small, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh medium red, medium firm; very good; midseason.

Stewart. 1. Am. Jour. Hort. 9:274. 1871.
A seedling of Crimson Cone which originated prior to 1860. Widely grown in Maryland and Virginia about 1860 to 1870 as an early sort. Plants numerous; fruit of medium size, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh firm, sweet; good; early.

Stinger. 1. Gard. Mon. 8:248. 1866.
A seedling of Triomphe raised in 1861 by W. H. Stinger, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit large, roundish oval to coxcombed, bright scarlet; flesh medium firm, good; early midseason.

Stone. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 163:71. 1898. Stone's Early. 2. Can. Hort. 18:395. 1895.
Originated by C. C. Stone, Moline, Illinois, as a cross between Crescent and Piper; introduced about 1895. Imperfect. Plants numerous, very vigorous and productive; fruit medium to large, long-conic, bright scarlet; flesh light red, medium firm; fair; early.

Stouffer. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 189:116. 1901.
On trial at the Michigan Station in 1901. Perfect. Plants few, very vigorous, moderately productive; fruit large, irregular round-conic, dark crimson; flesh medium firm, sweet; fair; midseason.

Strickland. 1. U. S. D. A. Pom. Rpt. 393. 1891.
Originated with Edmund Gookin, Ponchatoula, Louisiana. Imperfect. Fruit large, oblong-conic, dark scarlet, acid; late.

Strouse Champion, 1. Rural N. Y. 53:514. 1896.
Originated with David Strouse, Royersford, Pennsylvania; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous; fruit medium to large, long-conic, necked, scarlet; flesh medium red; good; midseason.

Success. 1. Mich.Sta.BuL 176:11. 1899. 2. U.S. D. A.Farmers1 Bui. 1043:35. 1919. Originated by A. J. Hannah, Whigville, Connecticut, as a cross between Bubach and Michel; introduced in 1897. This variety is popular in parts of New Jersey and New England for home use because of its attractive, excellent quality fruit. Plants numerous, very vigorous, moderately productive; fruit medium to large, irregular round-conic, bright scarlet; flesh light red, soft, mildly subacid; good; early midseason.

Sucker State. 1. III.. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 105. 1879. 2. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 169. 1882. Originated about 1876 by J. B. Miller, Anna, Illinois, as a cross between Green Prolific and Wilson; introduced in 1885, and for a few years was a popular sort in Illinois. It was added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1889, from which it was removed in 1897. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, moderately productive; fruit of medium size, round-conic, sometimes irregular, bright crimson; flesh light red, very firm, subacid; good; late midseason.

Summit. 1. Ohio Hort. Soc. Rpt 64. 1886-87. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:337. 1890.
Originated in 1880 by Matthew Crawford, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants medium in vigor, numerous, unproductive; fruit-stems short; fruit large, round-conic, dark red, well flavored, medium firm; very good; late.

Sunapee. 1. Mich. Bd. Ag. Rpt. 101 1887.
Originated in New Jersey; introduced in 1886. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous; fruit of medium size, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh soft, acid; good; midseason.

Sunny South. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 166:80. 1905.
Originated by Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas; introduced in 1903. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, moderately productive; fruit of medium size, round-conic to oblate, often with a short neck, light crimson; flesh light red, medium firm, acid; fair; early.

Sunnyside. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:11. 1894.
Originated with C. S. Pratt, Reading, Massachusetts, by whom it was introduced in 1895. Imperfect. Plants at this Station, very vigorous, numerous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems long; fruit medium to large, round or wedge, glossy light red, moderately firm, acid; good; midseason to late, ripening period long.

Sunshine. 1. Am. Card. 22:618. 1901. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 154:57. 1904.
Originated in Delaware; introduced in 1900. Imperfect. Plants numerous, moderately vigorous, productive; fruit of medium size, irregular roundish, bright scarlet; flesh pink, firm, subacid; fair; late.

Superb. I. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 141. 1913. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:191. 1915.
After Progressive without question Superb is the best of the double-cropping strawberries The variety has to recommend it hardy, healthy, vigorous, and for this type of strawberry, productive plants. The fruits are large, satisfactory in color, shape, and size and so richly flavored that it is about the best of the double-cropping strawberries. The quality runs a little lower in late, cool weather. The variety needs an abundant supply of moisture, hence is well adapted to the irrigated regions of the Northwest, although it is very generally grown in New York and New England as well. This is a seedling of Autumn crossed with Cooper, which originated in 1908 with Samuel Cooper, Delevan, New York, who introduced it in 1911.
Perfect. Plants rather few, vigorous, healthy, very productive; autumn-bearing; leaves small, dark green, very glossy, thick, smooth. Flowers early, very small; petals 5-6, small; stamens numerous; receptacle small. Fruit early; fruit-stems short, thick, erect; pedicels short, thick; calyx sunken, well colored; sepals short, narrow; berries large, blunt-conic, plump; apex obtuse; color attractive, glossy dark red; seeds raised; flesh well colored throughout, firm, juicy, mildly subacid; quality good.

Superb (of Albaugh). 1. Rural N. Y. 56:470. 1897.
Originated by B. F. Albaugh et Son, Covington, Ohio; introduced in 1896. Plants moderately vigorous, productive; berries medium in size, round-conic, scarlet, soft; very good; early.

Superior. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 124:191. 1907. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:66. 1911.
Originated in Delaware; introduced about 1890. In parts of Delaware and New Jersey it has been popular because of its attractive fruit and good shipping quality. Perfect to semi-perfect. At this Station, plants numerous, large, vigorous, healthy, productive; flowers very early, small; fruit-stems long, erect; calyx flat, leafy; seeds raised; fruit large to medium, drops in size, conic or wedge, glossy bright red, juicy, firm, aromatic, well flavored, sweet, with red flesh; very good; midseason. Worthy of test.

Surprise. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 55:10. 1889. Truitt's Surprise. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 48. 1883. Truitt. 3. Rural N. Y. 46:589. 1887.
Originated by James Truitt, Chanute, Kansas; introduced prior to 1883. It was added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1883 as Truitt's Surprise, and was. removed from the catalog in 1897. Perfect. Plants numerous, medium in vigor and productivity; fruit medium to large, round-conic to wedge-conic, pale red; flesh bright red, juicy, subacid; good; midseason.

Sutherland. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 146:37. 1903. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 62:39. 1909. Originated by Eugene Sutherland, West Coxsackie, New York, as a seedling of Bubach; introduced in 1899. Imperfect. Plants few, vigorous, productive; fruit small to medium in size, round-conic, light crimson; flesh pale red, moderately firm, juicy, subacid; good; midseason.

Swedenberg. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:67. 1911.
A chance seedling, supposed to be of Beder Wood found near Sawyer, Michigan, by Charles Schwichtenberg. Perfect. Station plants medium in number, size, and vigor, attacked by leaf-spot, very productive; fruit large, round-conic, broad at the base, very light red, medium juicy, tender, with light colored flesh, subacid, inferior in flavor; poor to fair; early.

Sweetheart. i N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:191. 1915.
Raised from seed of Maximus in 1905 by E. H. Bulson, Clifton, New York. Perfect. As grown here, plants numerous, vigorous, very productive, healthy; fruit-stems medium in length, thick, erect; fruit above medium in size, uniform, conic, glossy light to medium red, colors unevenly, juicy, firm, sprightly; fair to good; midseason.

Swindle. 1. Ann. Hort. 202. 1892. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:11. 1894.
Originated by B. Smalley, Bradford, Vermont, as a cross between Jersey Queen and Glendale; introduced in 1892 by G. H. et J. H. Hale, Glastonbury, Connecticut Imperfect. On the Station grounds, plants few, tender to the sun, unproductive; fruit-stems good; fruit medium to large, irregular in shape, light red, firm, acid; good; midseason to late.

Taft. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 16. 1907. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:67. 1911.
A seedling of Goldsborough raised by A. T. Goldsborough, Washington, D.C; introduced by him in 1906. Imperfect. As grown here, plants medium in number, vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems medium in length and thickness, erect; calyx detaches Teadily; fruit large, retains size well, blunt-wedge to round-conic, with roughish surface, glossy dark red, juicy, sweet, moderately firm, aromatic, well flavored, with red flesh; good to very good; midseason.

Tama Jim. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 213:8. 1904.
Originated in Iowa; introduced about 1901. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit large, oblong-conic, bright red; flesh light red, medium firm; good; late.

Tardy. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:94. 1916.
Originated with J. L. Herbst, Sparta, Wisconsin; introduced about 1904. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants few, medium in size and vigor, healthy, productive; fruit above medium in size, conic, dull medium red, moderately juicy and firm, with hollow center, subacid, aromatic; good; early midseason.

Teddy Roosevelt. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:94. 1916. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 364:90. 1923. Introduced about 1911 by E. W. Townsend et Sons, Salisbury, Maryland, as a cross between Autumn and Pan American; very similar to Autumn. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants numerous, vigorous, tall, very productive; fruit-stems long, thick, very erect; calyx very large, fiat, leafy; seeds sunken; fruit above medium to medium in size, dropping quickly, dull medium red, colors unevenly, juicy, firm, very sprightly, whitish at the center; fair; midseason

Tennessee Prolific. 1.. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 91:194. 1895. 2. U. S. D. A. Farmers* Bul. 1043:194. 1895. Tennessee. 3. Am. Gard. 15:434. 1894.
Originated by J. C. Hodges of eastern Tennessee as a cross between Crescent and Sharpless; introduced about 1892. It has been grown extensively but is now discarded in most sections except near Washington, D. C, where it is popular because of productive plants and attractive fruits. Added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1899, where it remained in the last catalog in 1909. Perfect. Plants at this Station, vigorous, numerous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems long, prostrate; fruit medium to large, glossy bright red, round-conic to wedge, moderately firm, subacid; fair; midseason.

Tennyson. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:189. 1898. 2. Mich. Sta. Bul. 169:151. 1899.
Originated with T. R. Tennyson of northern Arkansas; introduced about 1895. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, moderately productive; fruit medium to large, round-conic, dark scarlet; flesh light red, soft; good; midseason.

Third Class. 1. Ore. Bien. Crop Pest et Hort. Rpt. 89. 1915.
Grown at the Oregon Station in 1915. Imperfect. Plants medium in number, vigor, and productivity; fruit of medium size, round-conic, dark red; flesh light red, soft, mildly subacid; fair; late.

Thompson. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 109:237. 1896. 2. U. S. D. A. Farmers' Bul. 1043:35. 1919. Lady Thompson. 3. Meehans* Mon. 5:115. 1895.
A chance seedling which originated before 1891 with D. A. Thompson, Mt. Olive, North Carolina. Until about 1910 Thompson was grown extensively in the southeastern states, but it has now been supplanted by Klondike. The plants are very productive, but the fruit is too soft and too light in color for a general market variety. The American Pomological Society placed Thompson in its catalog in 1897, where it remained in the last catalog in 1909. Perfect. Plants medium in number and vigor, very productive; fruit of medium size, round-conic, bright light scarlet; flesh light red, medium firm, subacid; good; early.

Tilghman. 1. Am. Card. 24:332. 1903. Tilghman Favorite. 2. Md. Sta. Bul. 124:193. 1907.
Originated with W. B. Tilghman, Salisbury, Maryland; introduced about 1902. Imperfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, moderately productive; fruit large, long-conic, light-scarlet; flesh light red, firm, acid; good; late midseason.

Timbrell. 1. Rural N. Y. 50:528. 1891. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 76:38. 1894.
A chance seedling found in his garden about 1887 by H. S. Timbrell, Unionville, New York. The fruit is valued for home use, but is too unattractive in color for market. Imperfect. At this Station, plants vigorous, healthy, medium in number, unproductive; fruit-stems good; fruit medium to large, dark red, roundish, irregular, mild, soft, subacid; fair to good; late.

Tippecanoe. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:339. 1890. Badger. 2. Am. Gard. 17:627. .1896.
Raised by J. H. Haynes, Delphi, Indiana, from mixed seed brought from France; introduced in 1890. Perfect. Station plants very vigorous, healthy, very productive; fruit-stems stout, prostrate; fruit grows in large clusters, large, Sharpless in shape, bright red, moderately firm, with pleasing acidity; good; medium early. 35

Todd. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:76. 1918. Todd's Late Champion. 2. Todd Cat. 1. 1914.
A chance seedling found on his farm near a bed of Sample and Belt by W. S. Todd, Greenwood, Delaware, in 1909. Imperfect. As grown here, plants few, vigorous, attacked by leaf-spot, productive; fruit-stems short, very thick, erect; fruit large to medium, wedge or blunt-conic, irregularly furrowed, dull light red, colors unevenly, medium juicy, soft, sprightly, with whitish center; fair; very late.

Tom Walker. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 100:13. 1893.
Originated by Thomas C. Walker, Barnesville, Ohio, as a cross between Sharpless and Manchester; introduced about 1892. Imperfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit large, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm; good; midseason.

Tonga. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 130:52. 1896.
Originated by James Stayman, Leavenworth, Kansas; introduced about 1895. Imperfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, unproductive; fruit of medium size, irregular, round-conic, dull scarlet; flesh firm; fair; late midseason.

Topeka. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 122:6. 1895.
Originated by James Stayman, Leavenworth, Kansas; introduced about 1892. Perfect. Plants medium in vigor and productivity; fruit medium to large, long-conic, dark crimson, medium firm; good; midseason.

Townsend. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:95. 1916. Lady Townsend. 2. Md. Sta. Bul. 160:213. 1911.
Originated with E. W. Townsend, Salisbury, Maryland, who introduced it in 1908. Perfect. Plants medium in number and vigor; fruit of medium size, long-conic, dark crimson; flesh red, firm, moderately juicy, acid; fair; early.

Townsend Seedlings. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:11. 1894.
Various seedlings of George Townsend, Gordon, Ohio, were sent out under numbers about 1890. In Bulletin 64 of this Station descriptions are given of the following: Nos. 2, 3, 9, and 20.

Trebla. 1. Etter Cat. 29. 1920.
Originated by Albert F. Etter, Ettersburg, California, in 1912, as a cross between two of his seedlings, Nos. 114 and 84, and is said to be a composite of Fragaria chiloensis, F. vesca, and F. californica. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants unusually numerous, medium in vigor, dwarfish, unproductive, severely injured by leaf-spot, with small scanty foliage; fruit-stems short, medium thick, prostrate; calyx small, very dull; fruit medium to small, blunt-conic, dark red, very juicy, firm, with a hard, hollow center, subacid, inferior in flavor; poor; late midseason.

Triomphe. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:95. 1916. Triomphe de Gand. 2. Mag. Hort. 24:370. 1858. 3. Downing Ft. Trees Am. 1003. 1869.
Originated by M. de Jonghe, Brussels, Belgium; introduced into the United States about 1855 by Ellwanger et Barry, Rochester, New York. This is one of the few foreign sorts that has been cultivated successfully in this country. Between 1860 and 1870 it was widely grown in the East and it is still esteemed for intensive culture on the Pacific Coast. It requires hill training and high cultivation. Triomphe was added to the American Pomological Society's list of promising new sorts in 1860, and to the fruit catalog in 1862 from which it was removed in 1897. Perfect. Plants medium in number, large, vigorous, hardy, and moderately productive; fruit large, roundish to coxcombed, light glossy crimson; flesh white, firm, juicy, mildly subacid; very good; late.

Triple Crown. 1. Gard. Mon. 23:240. 1881. 2. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 167. 1882.
Originated by William Hunt, Waterloo, New York; introduced about 1880. It was added to the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1879 from which it was removed in 1897. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, very productive; fruit of medium size, roundish conic, dull dark crimson; flesh firm, very juicy, mildly subacid; very good; midseason.

Tubbs. 1. N. Y.Sta.Bul. 109:237. 1896.
Originated by John Tubbs, Glen Burnie, Maryland; introduced in 1894. Perfect. Plants numerous, productive; fruit medium to large, round-conic, dark scarlet; flesh medium red, firm, mildly subacid; good; early midseason.

Twentieth Century. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 166:80. 1905. 2. Ibid. 178:66. 1906.
As grown at the Ohio Station, it was so similar to Bubach as to be indistinguishable from that variety.

Twilight. 1. Rural N. Y. 61:480. 1902. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 62:40. 1909.
Originated in Missouri; introduced about 1900. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, unproductive; fruit of medium size, round-conic to wedge-conic, bright red; flesh medium red, firm, subacid; good; midseason.

Twilley. 1. Allen Cat. 2. 1910. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:192. 1915.
A chance seedling which originated with W. J. Twilley, Cambridge, Maryland, about 1906. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants medium in number, vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems long, thick, semi-erect; fruit large to above medium, distinctly wedge, necked, dull light red, firm, very mild, with well-colored flesh, inferior in flavor; poor; midseason.


Uitlander. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 16. 1907.
Originated in 1906 by A. T. Goldsborough, Washington, D. C, as a seedling of Flush. Fruit large, roundish, glossy crimson; flesh pink, moderately firm, moderately juicy, subacid; good; early.

Uncle Jim. 1. Flansburgh et Pierson Cat. 5. 1902. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:549. 1908. Dornan. 3. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Ann. 2:416. 1903.
A chance seedling found on his farm near an old strawberry bed by J. F. Dornan, Glenn, Michigan, in 1898. It was later renamed Dornan by the Michigan Horticultural Society, but is more generally known by its original name. It is very similar to New York. Perfect. As grown here, plants medium in number, vigorous, healthy, productive; leaves very large; fruit-stems thick, prostrate; fruit large to medium, retains size well, wedge to round-conic, with furrowed surface, dull light and dark red, firm, mild; fair to good; midseason.

Uncle Joe. 1. Vick Cat. 82. 1906. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:550. 1908.
Received as a seedling in a number of varieties sent to him from Cornell University in 1903 by John Howard, Irondequoit, New York. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants medium to numerous, vigorous, with a slight amount of leaf-spot, above medium in yield; fruit-stems long, thick, medium erect; fruit variable in size and shape, furrowed, dull red, medium juicy, subacid; inferior in flavor; poor; midseason.

Uncle Sam. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 206:55. 1903- 2* N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:550. 1908.
Originated in 1894 by F. E. Snow, Ada, Ohio, as a seedling of Herald. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants few, medium in vigor, injured by leaf-spot, productive; fruit-stems short to medium, very thick, semi-erect; fruit large to medium, retains size well, round-conic, glossy bright red, juicy, medium to firm, well flavored; good; midseason to late.

Uncle Sam (of Townsend). 1. Townsend Cat. 2. 1913. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:192.
Introduced in 1913 by E. W. Townsend et Sons, Salisbury, Maryland, with the statement that it had been received in 1909 from an unknown person in St. Louis, Missouri, as a new variety found in a garden. Perfect. Plants at this Station, few, vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems short, thick, variable in position; fruit above medium to small, round-conic to wedge, dull dark red, juicy, firm, sprightly, with red flesh; fair; early.

Unique Scarlet. 1. Horticulturist 3:70. 1848-49.
Originated by William R. Prince, Flushing, New York; introduced about 1849. Perfect. Fruit of medium size, obovate, light scarlet, sweet; very good.

Up-to-Date. 1. Rural N. Y. 58:514. 1899.
Originated in 1893 with J. E. Bever, Keithsburg, Illinois, as a supposed cross between Haverland and Jessie. Perfect. Plants few, weak, unproductive; fruit small, round-conic, light crimson; flesh medium red, soft; poor; early midseason.


Valley Pride. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bttl. 11:97. 1916. Pride of the Valley. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 186:7. 1907-
A chance seedling in a bed of Gandy, originating about 1900 with H. M. Martin, Stark County, Ohio. Fruit large, conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm; good; midseason.

Van Deman. 1. Ar. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:339. 1890. 2.16^.36:634. 1891.
Originated about 1885 by J. C. Bauer, Judsonia, Arkansas, as a cross between Crescent and Captain Jack. At one time grown in the South to pollinate Warfield and as an extra early sort. Perfect. At this Station, plants vigorous, stocky, productive, the fruit hidden beneath the dark green foliage; fruit-stems short; fruit above medium in size, round-conic, glossy red, firm, tart; good; very early.

Van Fleet. 1. Rural N. Y. 63:542. 1904. Dr. Van Fleet. 2. Rural N. Y. 62:518. 1903.
Originated by J. H. Black, Son et Company, Hightstown, New Jersey; introduced in 1903. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, productive; fruit large, round-conic, very dark crimson; flesh dark red, medium firm, sweet;- very good; early.

Van Sant. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:97. 1916. Governor Van Sant. 2. Salzer Cat. 94. 1906. General Van Sant. 3. N. H. Sta. Bul. 137:178. 1908.
Originated in Wisconsin; introduced in 1906 by John A. Salzer, La Crosse, Wisconsin. Plants numerous, moderately vigorous; fruit large, conic, necked, dark crimson; flesh medium firm; good; midseason.

Vanguard.
Originated in 1913 at the Horticultural Experiment Station, Vineland, Ontario, as a cross between Pocomoke and Ozark. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, fairly productive; fruit of medium size, holding up well through the season, round-conic, medium red; seeds raised; flesh firm; good; early.

Velvet. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 166:80. 1905. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:550. 1908.
A cross between Jessie and Bubach raised by R. C. Cronk, Oregon, Wisconsin, in 1891. Imperfect. Station plants very few, weak, healthy, productive; fruit-stems short, slender to medium, prostrate; fruit large to medium, round-conic, dull dark red, medium firm, juicy; fair; midseason.

Venia. 1. Mass. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 143. 1917.
Originated by F. S. De Lue, Needham, Massachusetts. Awarded a silver medal by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society in 1917 for the best new strawberry of merit not yet introduced. Plants very productive; fruit early, season long.

Vera. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 127:332. 1897.
A chance seedling which originated with E. B. Stevenson, Freeman, Ontario; introduced in 1895. Imperfect. Plants medium in number, vigor, and productivity; fruit of medium size, conic, bright scarlet; flesh medium firm; good; early midseason.

Vicomtesse Hericart de Thury. 1. Horticulturist 11:331. 1856, 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 1004. 1869. Marquise de Latour Moubourg. 3. Goeschke Erdbeeren 212. 1874. Duchesse de Trevise. 4. Elliott Fr. Book 458. 1854.
Raised about 1845 by M. J. Jamin, Bourg-la-Reine, France, as a seedling of Elton; introduced into this country about 1852. It was much grown in this country about 1860. Many plants sold for this variety, especially in Minnesota, have been Downer. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, moderately productive; fruit medium to large, irregular conic, scarlet; flesh light red, firm, subacid; good; early.

Victor. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Sp. Rpt. 81. 1904-05. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:551. 1908.
Originated in 1893 by D. J. Miller, Millersburg, Ohio. Perfect. As grown here, plants very few, moderately vigorous, injured by leaf-spot, unproductive; fruit-stems short, thick, prostrate; fruit large to medium, drops quickly in size, round-conic, dull dark red, firm, juicy, pleasantly acid; good; midseason to late.

Victor Hugo. 1. Ann. Hort. 203. 1892. Hugo. 2. Mich. Sta. Bul. 104:69. 1894.
Introduced in 1892 by Oakley Apgar, Calif on, New Jersey Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants medium in number; fruit above medium to large, round-conic, dull light red, with poorly colored calyx, firm, subacid, well flavored; good; medium early.

Victoria. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 6j8. 1857. Trollope's Victoria. 2. Mag. Hort. 17:400. 1851. Boy den's Mammoth. 3. Horticulturist 16:444. 1861. Golden Queen. 4. Mag. Hort. 32:298. 1866
Originated in 1849 by L. Trollope, Bath, England; introduced into this country soon afterwards, and until 1875 was a popular sort. It was added to the American Pomological Society's list of promising new sorts in 1856; to the catalog in 1862, from which it was removed in 1883. Perfect. Plants medium in number, vigorous, unproductive; fruit large, round-conic, light crimson; flesh light red, medium firm, sweet; good; midseason.

Vineland. 1. Rural N. Y. 42:456. 1883. 2. Mich. Bd. Agr. Rpt. 101. 1887.
Originated with a Mr. Lord, Vineland, New Jersey; introduced about 1885. Perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, moderately productive; fruit medium to large, round-conic, light red; flesh medium firm, acid; fair; late.

Viola. 1. Ohio Hort. Soc. Rpt. 58, 63. 1889-90. 2. Ar. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:337. 1890.
Originated in 1884 with a Mr. Kershaw, Delaware County, Ohio, as a cross between Green Prolific and Sharpless. Believed by some to be identical with Monarch. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants very vigorous, unproductive, with large leaves; fruit-stems medium long, stiff; fruit very large, obtuse-conic, flattened at the apex, glossy dark red, firm, well flavored; good; midseason.

Viola (of Canada). 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 299. 1913.
A seedling of Belt raised in 1906 at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada. Imperfect. Plants medium in number; fruit large, conic to wedge-shape, crimson; flesh dark red, firm, briskly subacid; good; late midseason.

Virgilia. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 299. 1913.
Raised from seed of Belt in 1906 at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada, Plants medium in number, vigorous, productive; fruit large, roundish to wedge-shape, dark crimson; flesh dark red, medium firm, subacid; good; midseason.

Virginia. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:551. 1908.
Originated by T. J. Custis, Accomac County, Virginia, as a cross between Hoffman and Sharpless; introduced in 1906. Added to the last catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1909. Imperfect. Plants at this Station, few, medium in vigor, healthy, productive; fruit-stems intermediate in length, thick, prostrate; seeds deeply sunken; fruit large to medium, drops in size, round-conic to wedge, glossy light and dark red, moderately firm, mild, inferior in flavor; poor to fair; early to midseason.

Vories. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 72:16. 1899.

A chance seedling originating in 1892 with T. H. Vories, Wathena, Kansas. Perfect. Plants numerous, very vigorous, productive; fruit of medium size, round-conic, dark scarlet; flesh light red, soft, sweet; good; midseason.


Wabash. 1. Rural N. Y. 46:677. 1887.
Originated by J. A. Foote, Crawfordsville, Indiana; introduced in 1887. Perfect. Berries large, irregular round-conic to ovate, dark crimson; flesh dark red, moderately firm; very good; midseason.

Wabesis. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 170. 1920.
Originated by H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan. Perfect. Plants productive. An " Indian strain " of autumn-fruiting strawberries.

Wabi. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 170. 1920.
Another " Indian strain " of autumn-fruiting strawberries which originated with H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan. Perfect. Productive.

Waits Perfection. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 210. 1922.
Originated by A. B. Katkamier, Macedon, New York. Autumn-fruiting; type of Superb but firmer and more productive. Walden. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 44:14.4.. 1892.
Originated with John B. Moore, Concord, Massachusetts; introduced about 1880. Imperfect. As grown here, plants very vigorous, medium in number, with light green foliage; fruit round-conic, large to very large, glossy red, moderately firm, well flavored; very good; late.

Waldorf. 1. Rural N. Y. 68:674. 1909.
Originated with Dr. Walter Van Fleet, Little Silver, New Jersey, as a cross between President and Belt; introduced in 1909. Perfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries large, roundish to round-conic, slightly necked, scarlet; flesh light red, moderately firm, sweet; good; moderately early.

Waldron. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 22:218. 1890.
Originated about 1882 with Charles Waldron, Manchester, Ohio. Imperfect. Berries medium in size, round-conic, bright scarlet, moderately firm; good; midseason.

Walker. 1. Fuller Sm. Fr. Cult. 103. 1867. Walker's Seedling. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 672. 1857.
Supposed to be a seedling of Black Prince, originated in 1842 by Samuel Walker, Roxbury, Massachusetts. Perfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries medium in size, conic, very dark crimson; flesh dark red, soft, acid; very good; midseason.

Wallace. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:98. 1916. Three Ws. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:549. 1908.
A chance seedling originated in 1901 by W. W. Wallace, Harriman, Tennessee. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants medium to few, weak, healthy, very productive; fruit-stems short, very thick, prostrate; fruit large to medium, drops quickly in size, variable in shape, very dark red, medium firm, mildly acid, with a pleasant flavor; good; midseason.

Walnut Stump. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:192. 1915.
A cross between Bubach and Miner originated about 1900 by Sylvanus Gordon, Sergeantsville, New Jersey. Perfect. Plants at this Station, numerous, large, vigorous, productive, healthy; leaves very dark green; fruit-stems long, thick, erect; fruit medium in size, round-conic, glossy light red, with red flesh, tart, moderately firm; fair; late.

Walton. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 44:144. 1892.
Originated in 1886 with Silas Walton, Moorestown, New Jersey. Imperfect. In the Station beds, plants medium in vigor and number, with light green foliage; fruit small to medium conic, bright red, soft; good; medium early.

War-Dyke.
Originated in 1920 with E. W. Townsend et Sons, Salisbury, Maryland, as a cross between Warfield and Klondike. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, very productive; berries medium in size, very firm, resembling Klondike; midseason.

Ward Favorite. 1. Fuller Sm. Fr. Cult. 103. 1867.
Originated with I. M. Ward, Newark, New Jersey; introduced about 1858. Imperfect. Plants unproductive; berries medium in size, round-conic, dark crimson, firm; good.

Wardlow. 1. U. S. Pat. Off. Rpt. 200. 1861.
Originated with W. R. Prince, Flushing, New York; introduced about 1855. Perfect. Berries large, roundish, scarlet; early.

Warfield. 1. Am. Gard. 11:522. 1890. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:98, fig. 17. 1916. Warfield No. 2. 3. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 359. 1891.
For a quarter of a century Warfield was a standard market variety in all of the northern commercial strawberry centers, from which it has been discarded except in parts of the Middle West. The variety came into prominence because of its hardy, healthy, productive plants. The fruits were liked by shippers, consumers, and canners; they retain their color, shape, and flavor very well under the most trying conditions for this crop. The berries often run small, unless the plants are grown on rich soils and given high culture. Dunlap is the best variety for cross pollination. The greatest defect of Warfield is the small size of its berries in light or poor soils and in dry weather. This variety, for many years a standard, originated as a chance seedling about 1882 with C. B. Warfield, Sandoval, Illinois. It may be a cross between Crescent and Wilson; introduced in 1885; added to the fruit catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1891.

Imperfect. Plants very numerous, of medium vigor, usually healthy, very productive; leaves small, thin, medium green. Flowers early, small; petals 6 to 8, small; receptacle small; fruit-stems short, thick, erect, single; calyx large for the size of the berry, raised, reflexed; pedicels short, stout; sepals long, narrow. Fruit early; medium to small, chunky round-conic to blunt-wedge, slightly necked, glossy attractive dark red; apex obtuse; seeds raised; flesh dark red to the center, juicy, firm, pleasantly sprightly; quality variable.

Warren. 1. Thomas Am. Fruit Cult. 452. 1875-85.
Originated with A. D. Webb, Bowling Green, Kentucky; introduced in 1876. Perfect. Berries large, round-conic, dark crimson, moderately firm; good; early.

Warren (of Thompson). 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:99. 1916.
Originated in 1898 with Mark T. Thompson, Rio Vista, Virginia, as a seedling of Carrie. Imperfect. Berries large, round-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, firm; good; late.

Warren (of Warren). 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:76. 1918.
A chance seedling found by S. H. Warren, Auburndale, Massachusetts, many years ago; introduced by W. F. Allen, Salisbury, Maryland, in 1914. Perfect. At this Station, plants numerous, medium in vigor, productive, injured by leaf-spot; leaves small, thick, very dark green; flowers very large; fruit-stems short, thick, semi-erect to prostrate; seeds raised; fruit large, holds up well in size, blunt-conic, glossy medium red, juicy, firm, sprightly, with red flesh; good; very late. Wathena. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:98. 1916.
Originated

at Wathena, Kansas; introduced about 1909. Perfect. Berries large, firm; good. Waverly. 1. U. S. Pat. Off. Rpt. 200. 1861.
Originated with W. R. Prince, Flushing, New York; introduced about 1855. Imperfect. Berries large, oblong-conic, dark scarlet, firm; good.

Waymego. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 170. 1920.
Originated with H. J. Schild, Ionia, Michigan. Perfect. Berries large, dark glossy red, very firm, good; very late.

Wehrley Seedling. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:100. 1916.
Supposed to have originated in Massachusetts; introduced about 1869. Berries medium to large, round-conic, scarlet, firm; midseason.

Welcome. 1. Mag. Hort. 28:400. 1862.
Originated with W. R. Prince, Flushing, New York; introduced about 1855. Perfect. Plants vigorous, hardy, productive; berries medium in size, conic, scarlet; flesh white, firm, sweet; good; early.

Wellington Marvel. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 170. 1920.
Originated by Wellington S. Butler, Merlin, Oregon; introduced in 1920. The variety is unsurpassed "in color, shape, flavor and good qualities. It is unequalled for table and excellent for canning."

Welton. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:100. 1916.
Listed in Michigan in 1899.
Perfect. Berries round-conic, crimson, medium firm; poor; midseason.

Wentzell. 1. Del. Sta. Bul. 24:10. 1894.
Originated with F. R. Wentzell, Monroeville, New Jersey; introduced about 1892. Perfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries medium to large, round-conic to ovate, light scarlet, soft, sweet; good; midseason.

Westbrook. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 126. 1891. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 44:144 1894.
Originated about 1882 with C. W. Westbrook, Mt. Olive, North Carolina. Imperfect. Station plants moderately vigorous, with large, light green foliage; fruit small, conic, with many imperfect berries, tart, firm, inferior in flavor; poor.

Western Queen. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Ant. 679. 1857.
Originated in 1849 by Professor J. P. Kirtland, Cleveland, Ohio. Imperfect. Plants hardy, productive; berries medium to large, round-conic, dark crimson, firm, subacid; good; midseason.

Westlawn. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:12. 1894.
Originated as a seedling of Longfellow (of Webb) by J. C. Bauer, Judsonia, Arkansas; introduced about 1892. Imperfect. As grown here, plants vigorous, very numerous, moderately productive, healthy; fruit-stems long; fruit of medium size, round-conic, dark red, firm, acid; good; midseason.

Weston. 1. Gard. et For. 6:335. 1893. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 147:189. 1898.
Originated with E. A. Weston, Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania; introduced about 1891. Imperfect. Plants moderately vigorous and productive; berries medium to large, irregular round-conic, bright crimson, moderately firm, sweet; good; midseason.

White Alpine. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 482. 1831. 2. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:100. 1916.
A European sort which originated more than a century ago; introduced to America about 1820. Perfect. Plants very hardy; berries small, long-conic, white; flesh pure white, soft, very sweet; very good; season long with a marked autumn-fruiting tendency here.

White Novelty. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 91:194. 1895.
Originated in New Jersey as a seedling of White Alpine: introduced about 1892. Perfect. On the Station grounds, plants indicate a variety of Fragaria vesca; fruit small, white.

White Sugar. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 294. 1921.
Originated by Albert F. Etter, Ettersburg, California. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants medium to few, vigorous, tall, very productive, healthy; leaves thick, with long and coarsely toothed leaflets, dark bluish green; fruit stems long, thick, erect; calyx very small; seeds markedly raised; fruit of medium size, roundish wedge, often oblate, very unattractive dull white mingled with pink, juicy, moderately firm, with whitish flesh, very sweet to subacid; very good but variable; very late. The quality is much better than the appearance would indicate.

Whitney. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 163:71. 1898.
Originated in Washington; introduced about 1895. Perfect. Berries small to medium, irregular, bright scarlet, moderately firm; good; late.

Wicomico. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:100. 1916.
Originated with A. J. Allen, Salisbury, Maryland; introduced about 1894. Imperfect. Berries medium in size, light crimson, soft; medium early.

Wide-Awake. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:77- *9l8[
A seedling of Aroma originated in 1910 by Louis Hubach, Judsonia, Arkansas. Perfect, Plants at this Station, intermediate in number and vigor, healthy, productive; flowers very early, large; fruit-stems variable in length, slender; calyx small; seeds raised; fruit large, furrowed, wedge to blunt-conic, unusually glossy, very dark red, juicy, very firm, tart, with dark red flesh, inferior in flavor; poor; midseason.

Wieland. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:100. 1916.
Introduced about 1886. Perfect. Berries small, round-conic, bright scarlet; flesh light red, soft; good; midseason.

Wilding. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:100. 1916.
Originated with A. N. Jones, Le Roy, New York; introduced in 1878. Perfect. Berries large, round-conic, light crimson, moderately firm; good; midseason.

Wildwood. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 447:77. 1918.
Found in a bed of Jersey Queen in 1904 by E. R. Foss, Salem, Iowa. Perfect. At this Station, plants very numerous and vigorous, attacked by mildew, very productive; fruit-stems long, slender, erect; fruit medium to small, blunt-conic, strongly necked, dull medium red, moderately juicy, soft, mild, aromatic; good; very late. This description is from stock of the introducer, yet the plants may not be true as the variety is said to be early and the berries roundish, varying greatly from the fruit just described.

Wilkins. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:101. 1916.
Introduced in 1913. Imperfect. Berries medium in size, conic, crimson, firm; good; very early.

Will Warfield. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:101. 1916.
Originated with W. W. Sewall, Carthage, Missouri; introduced about 1897. Perfect. Berries conic, bright scarlet, very firm; fair; midseason.

Willey. 1. Horticulturist 3:51, 146. 1848-49.
Of American origin. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, hardy, very productive; berries medium in size, roundish, deep crimson, firm, acid; fair.

Williams. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:552. 1908.
A cross between Crescent and Sharpless originated by a Mr. Williams, Burford, Ontario; introduced in 1890. Perfect. Station plants few, medium in vigor, healthy, productive; fruit-stems variable in length and thickness, prostiate; fruit large to medium, drops quickly in size, round-conic, dull moderately dark red, firm, pleasantly acid, well flavored, with dark red flesh; good to very good; late.

Williams (of Virginia). 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:101. 1916.
Originated in Virginia; introduced in 1915. Berries large, mildly subacid; very late.

Wilson. 1. Ohio Hort. Soc. Rpt. 12. 1867. 2. Va. Sta, Tech. Bul. 11:101. 1916. Wilson's Albany. 3. Mag. Hort. 23:399. 1857. 4. Gen. Farmer 21:279. 1860.
No other strawberry has been so long under cultivation as Wilson, and no other one was so commonly grown in the prime of its popularity. For many years it was the leading sort in all parts of the United States, but is now to be found only about Rochester, New York, and occasionally in Oregon and Washington. In these regions it is liked for its productive plants and its dark red glossy fruits for which canners are willing to pay a high price. This old variety originated in 1851 with James Wilson, Albany, New York; introduced in 1854; included in the American Pomological Society's fruit catalog from 1860 to date.
Perfect. Plants numerous, tall, vigorous, healthy, very productive; leaves variable in size, color, and rugoseness, glossy. Flowers early or early midseason, of medium size; petals 5-9, large; stamens numerous. Fruit early midseason; fruit-stems semi-erect; pedicels slender; calyx large, flat or slightly depressed, well colored; sepals broad; berries medium to small, round-conic; apex obtuse or slightly pointed; color dark red, glossy; seeds even with the surface or depressed; flesh red throughout, very firm, juicy, sprightly or acid; quality variable.

Wilson, Jr. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 76:439. 1894.
Introduced by F. L. Ray, East Claridon, Ohio. Perfect. Station plants vigorous, productive; berries medium in size, dark crimson; flesh dark red, acid, moderately firm; fair.

Wilton. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 64:12. 1894.
Originated with B. L. Carr, Saratoga Springs, New York; introduced about 1894. Perfect. As grown here, plants rather weak, moderately numerous, unproductive; fruit-stems short; fruit small to medium, round-conic, firm; good; midseason.

Winchell. 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:102. 1916. Winchell Beauty. 2. Md. Sta. Bul. 160:218. 1911.
Introduced about 1902. Imperfect. Plants vigorous; berries medium to large, round-conic, light crimson; flesh light red, medium firm, mildly subacid; fair; midseason.

Windsor. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 104:68. 1894. Windsor Chief. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 42. 1879. 3. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 24:337. 1890.
Originated in 1875 with C. A. Gardner, Dimondale, Michigan, as cross between Champion and Charles Downing; included in the American Pomological Society's fruit catalog from 1879 to 1883. Imperfect. On the Station grounds, plants very vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit-stems long, erect, stiff; fruit large, roundish, glossy dark red, firm, pleasantly acid, well flavored; good; early; so similar to Champion that it has largely displaced that variety.

Wine. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 160:218. 1911.
Introduced by E. W. Townsend et Sons, Salisbury, Maryland; resembles Dunlap. Perfect. Plants vigorous; berries medium in size, roundish cordate, dark scarlet; flesh light red, moderately firm, juicy, subacid; fair.

Winner. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 401:192. 1915.
A chance seedling which originated with W. E. Shoemaker, Laceyville, Pennsylvania, about 1909. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants numerous, vigorous, very productive, healthy; leaves large, with very deep margin serrations; fruit-stems unusually long, variable in thickness, very prostrate; fruit large, holds up well in size, distinctly wedge, but variable, dull medium to dark red, not juicy, firm, very mildly subacid, with red flesh, inferior in flavor; poor; early.

Winnie Warfield. 1. Can. Cent. Exp. Farm Bul. 62:41. 1909.
Originated with W. W. Sewall, Carthage, Missouri; introduced about 1897. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries large, round-conic to wedge-shape, scarlet, firm, acid; fair; late.

Wisconsin.' 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:102. 1916.
Introduced about 1895 by J. A. Salzer, La Crosse, Wisconsin. Perfect. Berries large, round-conic, bright crimson; flesh light red, moderately firm, acid; good.

Wisconsin Seedling. 1. Mag. Hort. 29:335. 1863.
Raised by Emil Rothe, Watertown, Wisconsin, as a seedling of Triomphe; introduced about 1861 Perfect. Plants hardy, very productive; berries large, round-conic, light scarlet; flesh white, pleasantly subacid; good.

Wonder. 1. Am. Card. 25:573. 1904. Sampsel. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 154:55. 1904.
Originated in 1899 with S. A. Sampsel, Sandusky, Ohio. Perfect. Plants large, vigorous, productive; berries large, conic, slightly necked, light crimson; flesh light red, firm, mildly subacid; good; midseason.

Wonder (of Shank). 1. Va. Sta. Tech. Bul. 11:102. 1916. Wild Wonder. 2. Rural N. Y. 64:554. 1905.
A seedling of Fragaria virginiana, found by John Shank, Sterling, Illinois; introduced in 1904. Perfect. Plants small but vigorous; berries small to medium, round-conic, bright crimson; flesh light red, moderately firm, mildly subacid; poor; early.

Wonderful. 1. Card. Mon. 27:178. 1885. 2* Mich. Sta. Bul. 189:115. 1901.
Originated in Ohio; introduced in 1884. Imperfect. Plants productive; berries large, irregular roundish, light crimson, moderately firm, acid; good; midseason.

Woodhouse. 1. Can. Cent. Exp. Farm BuL 5:23. 1889.
Introduced about 1886. Imperfect. Plants vigorous, productive; berries medium in size, conic, bright scarlet, firm; fair; late.

Woodrow. 1. N. Y. Sta. BuL 447:78. 1918. Early Woodrow. 2. Md. Sta. BuL 211:64. 1918.
Introduced by Wilkins et Company, Salisbury, Maryland, in 1915. Perfect. At this Station, plants intermediate in number and size, healthy, productive; fruit-stems long, prostrate; fruit variable in size, long-wedge to long-conic, furrowed, necked, dull medium to dark red, juicy, very firm, with red flesh, mild; fair; midseason.

Woodruff. 1. Cult. et Count. Gent. 50:820. 1885. 2. Can. Cent. Exp. Farm BuL 5:22. 1889.
Originated in 1872 by Charles H. Woodruff, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Perfect. Station plants very vigorous, numerous, very productive, with slight leaf-spot; leaf-stems short, upright; fruit small, irregular in shape, very dark red, firm, acid, tough at the center; fair; midseason.

Woolverton. 1. Rural N. Y. 50:527. 1891. 2, Ar. Y. Sta. Bul. 44:144 1892.
Originated by John Little, Granton, Ontario; introduced in 1891. Perfect, Plants at this Station, vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit medium in size, wedge-conic, crimson, moderately firm, mildly subacid; good; midseason.

Wooster. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 336:67. 1911.
A supposed cross between Sample and Clyde originated in 1904 with E. W. Wooster, South Hancock, Maine. Imperfect. As grown here, plants medium in number, above medium in size and vigor, healthy, unproductive; fruit large, retains size well, round-conic, glossy medium to light red, moderately juicy, mild, subacid to sweet; fair; early.

World Champion. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 163:71. 1898. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 62:41. 1909.
Introduced about 1896. Semi-perfect to perfect. Plants numerous, vigorous, productive; fruit of medium size, roundish, dull dark red with green tips; flesh bright red, medium firm, juicy, subacid; good; late midseason.

World Wonder. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 309:552. 1908.
Originated with R, G. Parsons, Parsonsburg, Maryland; introduced in 1906. Imperfect. On the Station grounds, plants moderately numerous, vigorous, injured by leaf-spot, very productive; fruit-stems short, medium thick, prostrate; fruit above medium in size but drops quickly to small, blunt-wedge, irregularly furrowed, glossy red, firm, decidedly acid, well flavored; good; midseason.

Wyatt. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 142:155. 1897.
Originated with Ezra G. Smith, Manchester, New York; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Plants medium in vigor and productivity; fruit of medium size, round-conic, dull crimson; flesh firm; very good; midseason.

Wyoga. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 178:61. 1906.
Introduced about 1905; resembles Haverland in plant and fruit. Imperfect. Plants productive; fruit of medium size, regular long-conic, dark crimson; flesh light red, firm, sweet; fair; late.

Wyona
A chance seedling, supposed to be of Gandy, originated prior to 1922 with A. S. Johnson, Washington, D. C. Perfect. In the Station beds, plants very numerous, very vigorous, tall, very productive, healthy; leaves large, dark green; flowers large, late; fruit-stems very long, thick, erect; pedicels unusually long, thick; calyx very large, raised, leafy; seeds raised; fruit large to very large, retains size well, chunky round-conic to wedge, necked, furrowed, glossy medium red, at times green tipped, moderately juicy, firm, subacid, with a hollow center; good to very good; very late.


Yale. 1. Rural N. Y, 48:522. 1889. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 44:144. 1892.
A chance seedling found near the Yale College campus in New Haven in 1883. Perfect. As grown here, plants vigorous, healthy, medium in number; fruit-stems short; fruit of medium size, obtuse-conic, very dark red, very firm, with dark red flesh; fair; late.

Yalu. 1. Md. Sta. Bul. 124:195. 1907.
Originated in 1904 by the Maryland Station as a cross between Johnson and Star. Perfect. Plants medium in number, weak, unproductive; fruit of medium size, round-conic, dull dark crimson; flesh light red, soft, moderately juicy, mildly subacid; fair; early.

Yant. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 146:38. 1903.
A chance seedling originated in 1896 with John Yant, Ohio. Perfect. P ants few, vigorous, moderately productive; fruit large, irregular conic, light to dark red; flesh medium red, soft, mild; fair; early.

Yates. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 142:153. 1897.
Introduced about 1894. Perfect. Plants vigorous; fruit large, round-conic, light scarlet; flesh light red, soft, mild; good; early midseason.

Zula. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 142:155. 1897.
Originated by James Stayman, Leavenworth, Kansas, as a seedling of Cyclone; introduced about 1896. Perfect. Plants numerous, productive; fruit of medium size, long-conic, dark crimson; flesh dark red, moderately firm; good; midseason.