CHAPTER XIII

VARIETIES OF GOOSEBERRIES

Alderman. 1. Mclntosh Bk. Card. 2:579. 1855. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:21. 1897.
On the Station grounds the plants are moderate growers, slightly susceptible to mildew; fruit large, green, shaded with pale red, somewhat hairy, sweet; good.

Alice. 1. N. F. Sta. Bul. 114:21. 1897.
In the Station gooseberry collection the plants are vigorous, free from mildew; fruit large, oblong, smooth, clear pale green, sweet; good.

Alma. 1. Can. Cent. Exp. Farm Bul. 56:23. 1907.
A seedling of Downing originated by William Saunders, Ottawa, Canada. In Canada the plants are vigorous, unproductive, susceptible to mildew; fruit of medium size, oval to oblong, with thick skin, slightly downy, green, tinged with coppery red; fair.

Antagonist 1. Mclntosh Bk. Gard. 2:579. 1855. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:21. 1897.
As grown at this Station the plants are moderately vigorous, spreading, dwarfish, productive; fruit medium in size, oblong; skin thin, dull creamy white, hairy and covered with some bloom, mildly subacid; fair.

Apex. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 118:22. 1895.
Originated in Oregon prior to 1890. Plants vigorous, resistant to mildew; berries large, greenish yellow; good.

Apology. 1. Jour. Hort. N. S. 3:124. 1881. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:21. 1897.
As grown at this Station the fruit is large, oblong, smooth, with thin skin, pale green, tinged with red; good.

Auburn. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 67:21. 1890. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:21. 1897.
An English variety introduced to this country by J. Elletson, Auburn, New York, who named it Auburn. Plants vigorous; fruit large, oblong, smooth; good.


Beauty. 1. Jour. Hort. N. S. 7:150. 1864. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:21. 1897.
As grown here the fruit varies from medium to large, oblong, pale red, smooth, pleasantly flavored; good.

Bendelon. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 183. 1894.
In Michigan the plants are weak and subject to attacks of leaf diseases; fruit large, yellowish green; of fair quality.

Bennet Eureka. 1. U. S. D. A. Pom. Rpt. 394. 1891.
An English variety which was distributed by Dr. A. W. Thornton, West Ferndale, Washington. Fruit large, obovate or pear-shaped, dull green with a sharp acid flavor.

Berkeley. 1. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 2:435. 1903- 2+ Cal. Sta. Cir. 164:23. 1917.
In western fruit regions the plants are vigorous, productive, subject to mildew; fruit very large, oval, green, with reddish shades; very good. Placed in the recommended list of fruits in 1909 by the American Pomological Society.

Blucher. 1. Jour, Hort. N. S. 3:124. 1881. 2. N. Y. Sta, Bul. 114:21. 1897.
As grown at this Station the plants are vigorous and productive; fruit very large, roundish oblong, nearly smooth, dark red with thin skin; very good.

British Queen. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:21. 1897.
On the Station grounds the plants are vigorous, productive and free from mildew; fruit small, roundish, dark green; skin thin, nearly smooth; sweet; good.

Briton, 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:21. 1897.
In the Station plats the plants are moderately vigorous and productive; fruit medium to large, oblong, light yellow, with smooth, rather thick skin, sweet; good.

Broom Girl. 1. Gard. Chron. 612. 1843. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:21. 1897.
At this Station the plants are vigorous, nearly free from mildew; fruit medium in size, roundish, smooth, yellowish green, nearly sweet; good.

Bull Dog. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:21. 1897.
On the Station grounds the plants lack vigor, but are free from mildew; fruit medium to large, oblong, red, nearly smooth; poor.

Bury Lane. 1. Jour. Hort. N. S. 29:158. 1875. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:21. 1897.
Plants at this Station are of medium vigor; fruit large to very large, oblong, pale green, smooth or nearly so, sweet; very good to best.


Candidate. 1. Gard. Chron. 868. 1864. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:21. 1897.

As grown here the plants are moderately vigorous and mildew but little; fruit large, roundish oval, dark green, tinged with yellow, smooth: good.

Careless. 1. Jour. Hort. N. S. 7:150. 1864. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:21. 1897.
Plants at this Station are moderately vigorous and slightly inclined to mildew; fruit large, oblong, smooth, pale green, sweet; good.

Carman. 1. Rural N. Y. 51:703. 1892. 2. Storrs et Harrison Cat. 158, fig. 1905.
Carman originated about 1890, with a Mr. Roberts, New York, New York, from seed which had been imported from England. The new seedling attracted the attention of E. S. Carman, editor of the Rural New-Yorker, who named and propagated it, and later, through the columns of his paper, offered to furnish plants to those who desired them. Soon after Storrs et Harrison, Painesville, Ohio procured the entire stock of Carman, and introduced it in 1905. Plants small, weak, upright-spreading, not very healthy, unproductive; fruit variable, medium to very small, roundish, dull yellowish green, moderately juicy, firm, sprightly becoming subacid; good; midseason.

Carrie. 1. U. S. D. A. Yearbook 379, PL 33. 1909. 2. Hedrick Cyc. Hardy Fr. 307. 1922.
In the northern part of the Mississippi Valley where only the hardiest fruits can be grown, Carrie is becoming a popular gooseberry because of its great hardiness. Plant and fruit are very much like those of Houghton but distinct, and Carrie does not deserve a place where the older sort grows well. The berries are too small, the plants are not quite free from mildew, and the thorny bushes bother greatly in harvesting the crop. Carrie originated with Wyman Elliot, Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1893, from seed of Houghton, supposed to have been crossed with Industry. The variety was introduced in 1905 by Elliot et Redpath of Minneapolis. In 1909 the American Pomological Society added Carrie to its recommended list of fruits.

Plants very large, vigorous, spreading, dense, very productive, healthy; young shoots slender, of medium number, green, overlaid with reddish brown, overspread with dull gray scarf-skin; older wood branching but little, very slender, willowy; prickles small, strong, slender, average 3, smaller and almost absent on the older wood, with numerous short bristles between the nodes; leaf-buds narrow, small, long, conical, free; leaves of medium size, cordate, with deeply cut, obovate lobes, dark green, glossy, of medium thickness, variable in smoothness, with crenate or somewhat toothed margins; petiole medium in length, slender, greenish, pubescent. Flowers midseason, of medium size, 1-3, seldom 5, variable; pedicels of medium length and thickness, glabrous, greenish; calyx-tube green, glabrous; calyx-lobes medium in length, width and thickness, nearly glabrous, very light green with a faint tinge of red; ovary shiny, almost glabrous. Fruit midseason; very small but variable, roundish, often with a long meaty shank at the base, dull red mingled with gray, glabrous; skin smooth, glaucous, thin, tough; flesh light green, moderately juicy, tender, mild and rather sweet mingled with a little sprightliness; quality good.

Catherine. 1. Gard. Chron. 758. 1842. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:21. 1897.

Originated in England about 1840. As grown at this Station the plants are moderately vigorous, productive, slightly inclined to mildew; fruit large, oval, with thick skin, lemon-yellow, nearly smooth; good.
Cedar Hill. 1. U.S. D. A. Pom. Rpt. 394. 1891.
Originated with Dr. A. W. Thornton, West Ferndale, Washington, prior to 1890. Plants upright, very productive, and free from mildew; fruit large, oval, with thin skin, richly flavored.

Champion. 1. Ohio Hort. Soc. Rpt. 177. 1886-7. 2; Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 18. 1897.

Originated with O. D. Dickinson, Salem, Oregon, previous to 1880. Plants vigorous, productive; fruit medium in size, roundish oval, greenish yellow; good; early.

Charles. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 286. 1921.

A cross between Houghton and Roaring Lion originated by William Saunders, London, Ontario; fruit larger than that of Downing, roundish oval, green, tinged with red, slightly subacid; good; midseason.

Chautauqua. 1. Am. Gard. 15:119, fig. 1893-94. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:22, PL 8,

fig. 61. 1897.

Of all the European gooseberries grown in North America, Chautauqua is probably the most promising, and as it grows in New York, at least, it is certainly the most deserving. In plant and fruit Chautauqua is far superior to Houghton and Downing which nurserymen ind their agents keep constantly before growers of gooseberries. Chautauqua is less easily propagated than the sorts named, and hence difficult to obtain. At this Station the plants are almost free from the mildew which prevents the culture of the European gooseberries in many parts of the United States. Its culture is of the easiest and anyone who grows the comparatively worthless Houghton and Downing can as easily grow this admirable sort. The origin of Chautauqua is unknown. The original plant, however, was first observed in an old garden in Dunkirk, New York, about 1876 by Lewis Roesch of Fredonia, who propagated it, later naming and introducing it in 1894. Charles Downing once saw the fruit and was of the opinion that it was an English variety renamed. Several varieties resemble it very closely but since the name Chautauqua has now become familiar, it seems wise to consider it a distinct sort. On the Pacific Coast Chautauqua is said to be identical with Whitesmith, where the latter name is always used. Chautauqua was added to the recommended fruit list of the American Pomological Society in 1897.
Plants large, vigorous, upright-spreading, rather dense, productive to very productive, healthy; young and older growth intermediate in stockiness and number of canes, reddish green, the older wood with more scarf-skin mingled with brown and red; prickles thickish, strong, long, numerous, thick at the base, 1-3; leaf-buds of medium size, long, lean, conical, free; leaves cordate, medium in size, thickness and color, glossy, vary from smooth to rugose, with rather obovate lobes and with bluntly crenate, somewhat hairy margins; petiole of medium length, slender, greenish, pubescent near the base. Flowers midseason, medium in size, mostly singly; pedicels medium in length and thickness, pubescent; calyx-tube greenish red, pubescent; calyx-lobes medium in length, width and thickness, pubescent, greenish red; ovary densely pubescent. Fruit midseason; adheres well, large, roundish oval, attractive, silvery green; skin smooth, covered with bloom, thick, tough, translucent; flesh pale green, juicy, firm, sweet or pleasantly sprightly near the skin; quality good.

Cheerful. 1. Jour. Hort. N. S. 29:158. 1875. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:22. 1897.
Station plants of medium vigor; fruit of medium size, green, well flavored.

Cheshire Lass. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Card. 177. 1831.

As grown at this Station the plants are dwarfish, moderately vigorous, productive; fruit small, roundish oval with skin thin and slightly hairy; fair.

Clayton. 1. Jour. Hort. N. S. 7:150. 1864. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:22. 1897.

As grown here the plants are vigorous, spreading, productive, susceptible to mildew; fruit very large, somewhat oblong with thin skin, smooth or slightly downy near calyx, reddish brown with dark red on the exposed side; good.

Columbus. 1. U. S. D. A. Pom. Rpt. 264. 1892. 2. Hedrick Cyc. Hardy Fr. 307, fig. 271. 1922.

An old English sort of unknown origin. It was introduced in America by Ellwanger et Barry, Rochester, New York, some time previous to 1890. It was listed by the American Pomological Society in its fruit catalog in 1897. Plants vigorous, free from mildew; fruit large, roundish oblong, greenish yellow, transparent, sweet; good.

Como. 1. Minn. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 229. 1921. .

A cross between Pearl and Columbus, which originated at the Minnesota Fruit Breeding Farm, Excelsior, Minnesota, and was first designated as Minnesota No. 43. Plants vigorous, productive; berries large, roundish or slightly oblong, green; fair.

Companion. 1. Can. Cent. Exp. Farm Bul. 56:25. 1907.

Introduced into Canada from England about 1890. Fruit large, roundish, green tinged with bronze, nearly smooth, sweet with astringent skin, pleasantly flavored; good.

Copland. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 162. 1920.

Originated and introduced by Peter Copland, Johnstown, Ohio, about 1870. Plants said to be vigorous, stocky, upright, very productive; berries very large, pale1 yellow; very good.

Countess of Amsdale. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:22. 1897.

Station plants moderately vigorous, slightly susceptible to mildew; fruit above medium* in size, dark green shaded with red, smooth; good.

Cremore. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:22. 1897.

At this Station the plants are medium in vigor, and slightly susceptible to mildew; fruit medium to large, green, nearly smooth; good.

Criterion. 1. Jour. Hort. N. S. 9:107. 1865. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:22. 1897.

As grown here the plants are moderately vigorous and susceptible to mildew; fruit very large, oblong, slightly hairy, greenish yellow; very good.

Crosby Seedling. 1. Can. Hort. 11:214. 1888.

Raised and introduced by L. Crosby, Markham, Ontario, about 1880. Fruit large, roundish oval, with thin skin, dark red, smooth; very good.

Crown Bob. 1. Card. Chron. 18, 729. 1842. 2. Horticulturist 1:448, fig. 106. 1846-47. An old English gooseberry of unknown origin, grown in that country for more than 100 years and early introduced in America where it would be extremely valuable were it not for its susceptibility to mildew. Plants dwarfish, spreading, vigorous, very productive; fruit medium to large, nearly round, with thin skin, somewhat hairy, dark red; flesh firm, juicy, rich, sweet; good; ripens early.

Crystal. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:16. 1897.
Received for testing at this Station in 1888 from J. M. Ogle, Puyallup, Washington. It is probably a hybrid between a European gooseberry and some American sort. Plants vigorous, upright, productive; fruit below medium; skin moderately thick, dull green, downy; fair.

Cyprus. 1. AT. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:22. 1897.
On the Station grounds the plants are moderately vigorous, nearly free from mildew; fruit large, oblong; skin rather tough, dark red, nearly smooth; very good.


Dan Mistake. 1. Mclntosh Bk. Card. 2:579. 1855. 2. N. Y.Sta. Bul. 114:23. 1897. As grown at this Station, the plants are vigorous and only slightly subject to mildew; fruit large, roundish oblong, smooth or slightly hairy, red; good.

Deacon. 1. Can. Cent. Exp. Farm Bul. 56:23. 1907.

A seedling of Downing originated by William Saunders, Ottawa, Canada, about 1890. Plants vigorous, moderately productive, slightly affected with mildew; fruit of medium size, oval, smooth, yellowish green, sweet; good; midseason.

Diadem. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:23. 1897.

In the Station gooseberry collection the plants lack vigor, nearly free from mildew; fruit medium in size, smooth, green, tinged with yellow, somewhat acid; fair; late.

Dominion, i. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:23. 1897.

Received at this Station for testing in 1892 from E. C. Pierson, Waterloo, New York. Plants vigorous, productive, free from mildew; fruit large, roundish oblong, pale greenish white, nearly transparent, sweet; very good.

Downing. 1. Can.Hort. 14:161, PI. 1891. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:16, PI. II, fig. 1. 1897. Downing's Seedling. 3. Horticulturist 12:462, fig. 1857.
Of the sorts bred from an American species, Downing is now more grown in North America than any other gooseberry, although it is now agreed by botanists and pomologists that it is a hybrid with the European species. It is one of the easiest of all gooseberries to propagate, and from the time of its introduction it has, therefore, been a favorite with nurserymen. Fruit growers like it, also, because the plants are very vigorous, healthy and productive, and although the fruits are small, they are smooth, thin skinned, rather attractive in appearance and of very good quality. To be at its best the fruit must be picked as soon as full size is attained since decay sets in soon after maturity, and the product is seldom found in the markets sufficiently well ripened to eat out of hand. The plants are rarely attacked by mildew. Downing was originated about 1855 by Charles Downing, Newburgh, New York, as a seedling of Houghton. The variety was added to the fruit catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1862 and its name still appears in the Society's catalogs.
Plants above medium in size, vigorous, upright-spreading, rather dense, very productive, healthy; young shoots medium in thickness, numerous, with a thin layer of dull gray scarf-skin over brownish red; prickles strong, short, numerous, of medium thickness, 1-3, with bristles between the nodes, more numerous towards the base of the canes; leaf-buds medium in size and length, plump, appressed; leaves of medium size, with obovate lobes, medium in thickness and color, glossy, smooth or somewhat rugose, with somewhat hairy, crenate margins; petiole short, of medium thickness, greenish, pubescent. Flowers early, of medium size, 1-4; pedicels medium in length and thickness, glabrous; calyx-tube green, glabrous; calyx-lobes medium in length, width, and thickness, very lightly pubescent beneath, green, tinged with red; ovary quite glabrous, shining, greenish. Fruit mid-season; variable in size averaging medium or below, roundish, silvery green, dull; pedicels short, thick; skin smooth, covered with bloom, thin, tough; flesh juciy, tender, aromatic, sprightly becoming sweet; quality very good to best.

Drill. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 125. 1866. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:23. 1897.
An old English variety, the Station plants of which are not vigorous and are very susceptible to mildew; fruit large, pyriform, smooth, yellowish, sweet; good.

Duck Wing. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 175. 1831. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:23. 1897. On the Station grounds the plants are moderately vigorous, nearly free from mildew; fruit medium in size, somewhat pyriform, with thin skin, smooth, dark green, tinged with yellow and sometimes mottled with red; very good.

Duke of Sutherland. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 126. 1866. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:23. 1897.
In the Station plats, the plants of this old English berry are vigorous, but slow growers, nearly free from mildew; fruit large, oblong, mostly smooth, red, sweet; very good; late.

Duncan. 1. Can. Cent. Exp. Farm Bul. 56:23. 1907.

A hybrid between R. cynosbati and Red Warrington. It was originated by William Saunders, Ottawa, Canada, about 1890. Plants vigorous, upright, moderately productive; fruit large, oval, dull coppery red, quite prickly, with thick skin, sweet with much of the wild flavor; good; midseason.

Duplication. 1. Goldsborough Cat. 4. 1908.

Originated about 1890 by Arthur T. Goldsborough, Washington, D. C. As grown at this Station the plants are upright-spreading; fruit large, roundish oblong, hairy, light green, pleasantly flavored; good.

Duster. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Card. 181. 1831. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:23. 1897.
As grown here, plants of this old English sort are moderately vigorous, somewhat affected by mildew; fruit of medium size, ovate or oblong, pale green, nearly smooth, sweet; good.


Early Green Hairy. 1. Christ Handb. 810. 1817. 2. Pom. Mag. 1:22, PI. 22. 1828. Green Gascoigne. 3. Hogg Fruit Man. 129. 1866. Green Gage. 4. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 54. 1852.
This variety has been much cultivated in the Old World for more than a century. It was introduced in America long ago and from 1852 until 1871 the name appeared in the fruit list recommended by the American Pomological Society. Plants vigorous, productive; fruit small, round; skin thin, hairy, deep green; good; early.

Excellent. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:23. 1897.

In the Station gooseberry collection the plants are vigorous, productive, somewhat subject to mildew; fruit medium to large, round, nearly smooth, light red; very good.

Excelsior. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:17. 1897.

A seedling of Champion which originated with J. H. Haynes, Delphi, Indiana, from whom it was received by this Station for testing in 1893. Plants vigorous, free from mildew; fruit roundish, smooth, light green; good.


Faithful. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 180. 1831. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:23. 1897.

Station plants moderately vigorous, susceptible to mildew; fruit medium to large, somewhat oblong; skin thick, nearly smooth, pale green; poor.

Falstaff. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:23. 1897.
Plants at this Station are subject to mildew; fruit large, pyriform, smooth, dark green tinged with red, sweet; good.

Fascination. 1. Flor et Pom. 57, PI. 512, fig. 4. 1880. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:23. 1897. Raised by Joseph Weston, Sutton, England, and distributed by him in 1877. As grown at this Station the plants are weak and subject to mildew; fruit of medium size, roundish, pale green, mottled with red, nearly smooth, sweet; fair.

Favonius. 1. Jour. Hort. N. S. 11:233. 1885. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:24. 1897.

On the Station grounds the plants are vigorous, somewhat susceptible to mildew; fruit large, roundish, white, nearly smooth, sweet; good.

Flixtonia. i. Mclntosh Bk. Gard. 2:579. 1855. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:23. 1897.

In the Station plats the plants are moderately vigorous and inclined to mildew; fruit large, pale red, slightly hairy, sweet; very good.

Flora. 1. N. Y, Sta. Bul. 114:23. 1897. 2. Can. Cent Exp. Farm Bul., 56:24. 1907. A cross between Houghton and Red Warrington which originated with William Saunders, Ottawa, Canada, about 1890. In the Station plats the plants are vigorous and healthy; fruit large, oblong, smooth green, with tough skin, sweet; good.

Forester. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 178. 1831. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:23. 1897. An old English variety, plants of which at this Station are moderately vigorous, slightly subject to mildew; fruit large, oval-oblong, pale red, somewhat hairy, sweet; good.

Foxhunter. 1. Gard. Chron. 811. 1844. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:24. 1897.

Cultivated in England as early as 1823. As grown here the plants are moderately vigorous, inclined to mildew; fruit large, oblong, dark green tinged with red, smooth, sweet; good.

Freedom. 1. Gard. Chron. 613. 1843. 2. Hogg Fruit Man. 128. 1866. 3, N.Y. Sta. Bul. 114:24. 1897.

An old English sort. Station plants are moderately vigorous, productive, nearly free from mildew; fruit large, oblong; skin smooth, creamy white, sweet; good.

Frontenac. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:24. 1897. Cayuga. 2. Rural N. Y. 52:34, fig. 10. 1893.

This variety was introduced by H. S. Anderson, Union Springs, New York, in 1884. At this Station the plants are very vigorous and productive, subject to mildew; fruit large, oblong, smooth, pale green, sweet; good.

Galopin. i, N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:24. 1897.

As grown here the plants are vigorous, slightly affected by mildew; fruit large, pyriform, smooth, dark green, tough skin; good.

Garibaldi. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 128. 1866. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:24. 1897.

Originated in England about 1860. As grown at this Station the fruit is medium to large, roundish, fine yellow, nearly sweet; good.

General. 1. Gard. Chron. 612. 1843. 2. N. Y. Sta, Bul. 114:24. 1897.
As grown here the plants of this sort are moderately vigorous; fruit medium to large, oblong, smooth, green; good.

George Ridley. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:24. 1897.
In the Station plats the plants are vigorous but susceptible to mildew; fruit medium to large, pyriform, pale green, acid; poor.

Gibb. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 104, 1898.

Originated by William Saunders, Ottawa, Canada, about 1890. Plants vigorous, moderately productive, slightly affected with mildew; fruit large, roundish oval, dull red and green, smooth, sweet; good.

Gill 1. Rural N. Y. 57:322, fig. 138. 1898.

About 1878 John W. Gill, Philipsburg, Pennsylvania, was given plants of a gooseberry by an Englishman. Gill propagated it and distributed it under his name. Plants productive, immune to mildew; fruit large, roundish oblong, light green occasionally tinged with red; good; early.

Gipsy Queen. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 147. 1866. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:24. 1897.

Grown in England in 1860. As grown at this Station the plants are weak and slightly affected by mildew; fruit large, oval; skin thin, smooth, yellow; sweet; fair.

Golborne. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:24. 1897.
Station plants vigorous, susceptible to mildew; fruit medium to large, oblong, light red, smooth; good.

Golden Beauty. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Sp. Rpt. 81. 1904-05.

Mentioned in a report of the American Pomological Society's committee on Small Fruits in 1904 by A. F. Stevens, Wellesley, Massachusetts, as a new seedling, plants of which are vigorous, and free from mildew; fruit very large, golden yellow; very good.

Golden Drop. 1. Christ Handb. 813. 1817. 2. AT". Y. Sta. Bul. 114:24, 1897.

This old variety is widely grown in Europe. Station plants are moderately vigorous, nearly free from mildew; fruit medium in size, roundish oblong; skin very thin, light yellow changing to red, speckled on the exposed side, slightly hairy; good; early.

Golden Prolific. 1. Can. Hort. 11:125. 1889. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:24. 1897. Golden. 3. Mich. Bd. Agr. Rpt. 307. 1907.
An American seedling of the English type, found in 1882 in Rochester, New York. John Charlton, a nurseryman of Rochester, propagated the variety and distributed it eight years later. Station plants moderately vigorous, productive, ,mildew badly; fruit medium in size, oblong; skin thick, golden yellow, hairy and spiny; subacid; fair.

Governor. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 174. 1831. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:24. 1897. In the Station plats the plants are moderately vigorous, subject to mildew; fruit smooth, dark red, nearly sweet; good.

Gracilla. 1. Rural N. Y. 56:646, fig. 270. 1897.

A variety of the European type sent out in 1895 by L. H. Hoysradt, Pine Plains, New York. Plants vigorous; fruit large, oblong, smooth, slightly crimson on the sunny side; good. Great Rack. 1. Ar. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:24. 1897.

In the Station gooseberry collection the plants are moderately vigorous and somewhat subject to mildew; fruit large, oblong, nearly smooth, dark red, sweet; good.

Green Walnut. 1. N. Y. Sta. BuL 114:24. 1897. Smooth Green. 2. Mawe-Abercrombie Univ. Gard. Bot. 1778. Belmont Green. 3. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 193. 1826. Nonpareil. 4. Hort. Reg. (Eng.) 548. 1833.
This is one of the oldest gooseberries in cultivation and is still much grown in some parts of Europe. The variety was included in the fruit list of the American Pomological Society from 1852 to 1871. As grown at this Station the plants are moderately vigorous, nearly free from mildew; fruit medium in size, round, smooth, green, sweet; good.

Green Willow. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 70. 1852. Johnson's Green Willow. 2. Christ Handb. 811. 1817.

In Europe this old variety is much grown for the home and market. Plants vigorous, productive; fruit large to very large, pear-shaped or oblong; skin thin, smooth, dull green; good; midseason.

Greenock. 1. Mclntosh Bk. Gard. 2:579. 1855. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:24. 1897.
Station plants moderately vigorous, susceptible to mildew; fruit medium to large, roundish, smooth, green, rather acid; fair.

Gretna Green. 1. Mclntosh Bk. Gard. 2:579. 1855. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:24. 1897.
As grown at this Station the plants are weak and subject to mildew; fruit medium to large, roundish oblong; skin thin, dark green, sparsely hairy; pleasantly flavored; good.


Harriet. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:24. 1897.
In the Station gooseberry collection the plants of this variety are moderately vigorous and slightly affected by mildew; fruit of medium size, oblong, green tinged with red, hairy, subacid; inferior in quality.

Hedgehog. 1. Maurer Stachelbeerbuch 262, fig. 121. 1913. Improved Early Hedgehog. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:25. 1897.

An old variety still much grown in Europe. At this Station the plants are vigorous, productive, but slightly affected by mildew; fruit below medium in size, nearly round, yellowish green, somewhat hairy, sweet; fair.

Helpmate. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:25. 1897.

Station plants weak, subject to mildew; fruit large, oblong, smooth, light green; good.

Hero of the Nile. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 131. 1866. 2. Ar. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:25. 1897. As grown here the plants are moderately vigorous, subject to mildew; fruit large, roundish oblong, smooth, green, subacid; good.

High Sheriff. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 131. 1866. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:25. 1897.

On the Station grounds the plants are moderately vigorous, nearly free from mildew; fruit large, roundish oval, slightly hairy, yellow, subacid; fair.

Highlander. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 131. 1866. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:25. 1897.

Station plants moderately vigorous, mildew slightly; fruit medium, round, slightly hairy, dark red, nearly sweet; good.

Hit or Miss. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 174. 1831. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:25. 1897.
As grown here the plants are moderately vigorous and affected by mildew; fruit large, roundish pyriform, yellowish, nearly smooth, sweet; good.

Hobbs Seedling. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 504. 1869.

Originated by 0. J. Hobbs, Randolph, Pennsylvania. Fruit medium in size, roundish oval, pale green, smooth.

Hoenings Earliest. 1. Maurer Stachelbeerbuch 246. 1913.

In a plantation of some seventy or eighty varieties of European gooseberries, Hoenings Earliest is one of the earliest and one of the best. The fruits are beautiful golden yellow, the handsomest and best-flavored yellow gooseberry on our grounds. The plants are vigorous, hardy, productive, and fairly free from mildew. At any rate, the variety can be recommended for home use if the sort can be had from American nurserymen. Hoenings Earliest is very similar to a sort described by Hogg in England many years ago as Early Sulphur. This gooseberry was raised about 1900 by Julius Hoenings, Neuss, Germany. It has been disseminated on the continent by Herrn Hoenings, but as yet is little known in America.
Plants large, vigorous, upright, dense, variable in yield; young shoots stocky, dull brown mingled with gray; prickles strong, usually in threes, medium in thickness and length, numerous, with many bristles between the nodes especially towards the base of the shoots; leaf-buds small, short, conical, lean, free or slightly appressed; leaves large, cordate-ovate, medium in thickness and color, glossy, smooth, usually with five deeply cut lobes; petiole long, glabrous. Flowers midseason, medium to large, 1-2; pedicels longish, pubescent; calyx-tube pubescent; calyx-lobes tinged with red; ovary pubescent, glandular. Fruit early; clings well; large, roundish oval, glossy, yellowish, with paler veins; skin hairy, thick, tender, translucent; flesh juicy, melting, sweet, aromatic; quality very good.

Houghton. 1. Bailey Ev. Nat. Fruits 390. 1898. Houghton's Seedling. 2. Mag. Hort. 13:422. 1847. 3. Horticulturist 3:119, fig. 19. 1848-49.
Although it has several faults, Houghton is widely and commonly planted wherever gooseberries are grown in North America. It is without question the most popular sort after Downing. Its most glaring faults are that the fruits are small and uninviting in appearance; the foliage is a little too susceptible to mildew and aphis; and canners, to whom gooseberries are mostly sold in large quantities, do not like the fruit. To offset these faults, the plants are very hardy, vigorous, productive, thrive under a great diversity of conditions, and the berries are rich and sweet, although not of the best quality. Houghton is without question a hybrid between an European and an American gooseberry, and is the oldest American variety of note, having originated from seed planted in 1833 by Abel Houghton, Lynn, Massachusetts. Houghton was added to the recommended fruit list of the American Pomological Society in 1852, a place it still retains.

Plants very large, vigorous, upright becoming very spreading, rather dense, productive to very productive, healthy; young shoots medium to slender, numerous, dark brownish red overlaid with dull gray; prickles medium in thickness and strength, short, usually singly or in twos, with few bristles between the nodes; leaf-buds small, of medium length, conical, lean, free; leaves medium in size and thickness, cordate, with obovate, open, deeply cut lobes, dark green, semi-glossy, variable in smoothness; with hairy, crenate margins; petiole short, of medium thickness, greenish, pubescent. Flowers late, small, 1-3; pedicels medium in length and thickness, glabrous; calyx-tube green, glabrous, green mingled with a slight reddish tinge; ovary glabrous, quite smooth and shining, greenish. Fruit mid-season; very small, roundish, light silvery green changing at maturity to a rather handsome dull dark red; skin smooth, thin, glaucous, medium in firmness; flesh greenish, moderately juicy, tender, pleasing in flavor, very sweet; quality very good.

Hudson, i. Gard. Mon. 22:303. 1880.

Raised by J. H. Ricketts, Newburgh, New York, in the early seventies. It is supposed to be a seedling of an American gooseberry. Plants healthy; fruit large; good.

Hue-and-Cry. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 131. 1866. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:25. 1897.
At this Station the plants are medium growers and subject to mildew; fruit large, oblong, pale green, smooth, sweet; good.

Huntsman. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:25. 1897.
Station plants vigorous, productive, nearly free from mildew; fruit large, oblong, smooth, pale green, sweet; good.


Industry. 1. Rural N. Y. 44:770. 1885. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:25. 1897. Whinham's Industry. 3. Gard. Ckron. 3d Ser. 3:597. 1888.

With Chautauqua, Industry is usually considered the best of the European gooseberries in America. It is one of the most vigorous varieties of its class; rather more productive than any other European; and while by no means free from mildew, it often passes through a season without much mildew, and when infested, the disease is usually readily controlled by spraying. On our grounds the plants are very strong growers, and usually produce as much fruit if not more than those of any other European variety. Many gooseberry growers prefer to have plants from the nursery grown in bush form rather than in tree form. The berries are large, claret-red, rich, sweet, and delicately piquant, and about the best flavored of all the commonly grown gooseberries in American plantations. Very often the berries are picked too soon; to be at their best they should be allowed to remain on the plant until full maturity is reached. The chief defect of the variety for American conditions is that it is difficult to propagate, and therefore scarcely obtainable from nurserymen. Industry was raised by Robert Whinham early in the nineteenth century in northern England. It was disseminated in this country by Ellwanger et Barry, Rochester, New York, about 1885. The American Pomological Society added the variety to its fruit catalog list in 1891.
Plants of medium size and density, vigorous, upright, productive, healthy; young shoots medium in thickness and number, dark brownish red almost entirely overspread with gray scarf-skin; prickles variable in length, of medium thickness and number, strong, thick at the base, singly with scattering bristles between the nodes; leaf-buds large, long, conical, plump, free; leaves medium in size, cordate, with obovate, deeply cut, open lobes, thick, dark green, glossy, smooth, with crenate margins; petiole of medium length and thickness, greenish, pubescent and with reddish hairs. Flowers midseason, large, singly; pedicels medium in length and thickness, pubescent; calyx-tube green, pubescent; calyx-lobes narrow, medium in length and thickness, pubescent, tinged red; ovary pubescent, sometimes with a few reddish hairs. Fruit early; variable in size and shape, averaging large, roundish oval, deep, dull wine-red, with lines and flecks of lighter color becoming dark red at full maturity; skin variable, nearly smooth or slightly hairy, glaucous, of medium thickness, tough, translucent; flesh yellowish green, juicy, tender, pleasantly sprightly to sweet; quality very good.

Ironmonger, 1. Lond. HorL Soc. Cat. 189. 1826. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:25. 1897.

This variety has been known in England for more than a century, and, though similar to Red Champagne, is distinct. It was included in the fruit list of the American Pomological Society from 1852 to 1871. As grown at this Station the plants are vigorous and free from mildew; fruit small, round, dark red, nearly smooth, sweet; good.

Italy. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:25. 1897.
Station plants weak, mildew slightly; fruit of medium size, nearly round, green tinged with red, smooth, sweet; fair.


Jem Mace. 1. N. Y. Sta. But. 114:25. 1897.

In the Station plats, the plants are moderately vigorous, and free from mildew; fruit of medium size, nearly round, smooth, yellow, sweet; good.

Jerry. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 132. 1866. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:25. 1897.
Station plants moderately vigorous, productive; fruit large, nearly round, almost white, slightly hairy, sweet; good.

Jessie. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:26. 1897.

In the Station gooseberry collection the plants are weak and mildew slightly; fruit large, nearly smooth, pale green, sweet; good.

Jewett. 1. U. S. D. A. Pom. Rpt. 27. 1894.

A chance seedling found in a pasture and distributed by George H. Andrews, Clarkson, New York. Fruit large, oblong, silvery green, becoming slightly blotched with red, firm, juicy, subacid, rich; early.

John Anderson. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:26. 1897.
Station plants weak, subject to mildew; fruit large, nearly round, light red, slightly hairy, sweet; good.

John Hall. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:26. 1897.

As grown here the plants are moderately vigorous and subject to mildew, productive; fruit medium to large, oblong, pale green, smooth, sweet; good.

Jolly Angler. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 75. 1842. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:26. 1897.

At this Station the plants of this variety are very vigorous, free from mildew and productive; fruit large, roundish oblong, light green occasionally mottled with red, smooth, sweet; good; late.

Jolly Sailor. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:26. 1897.

Station plants moderately vigorous, affected by mildew; fruit medium in size, nearly round, smooth, yellow, sweet; inferior.

Josselyn. 1. Mich. St. Bd. Agr. Rpt. 307. 1907. 2. U. S. D. A. Farmers' Bul. 1024:33. 1919. Red Jacket. 3, U. S. D. A. Pom. Rpt. 265. 1892. 4. Rural AT. F. 52:34, fig. 13. 1893. 5. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:19. PL H, fig. 5- 1897.
This variety is supposed to be a hybrid between Houghton and Red Warrington. It originated with William Saunders, London, Ontario, about 1876, and was named and introduced by George S. Josselyn, Fredonia, New York, about 1890. The sort was named Red Jacket without knowledge of another Red Jacket of English origin. Latterly most published information concerning the variety appears under the name Josselyn, although the sort is still known as Red Jacket. The American Pomological Society first listed the variety in its fruit catalog in 1897. Plants large, vigorous, spreading, practically free from mildew, productive; fruit medium in size, roundish oval, reddish green, becoming pale red; skin smooth; rich, juicy, fragrant, sweet; very good to best; early.


Keen Seedling. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Card. 179. 1831. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:26. 1897.

Station plants moderately vigorous, slightly drooping, productive; fruit of medium size, roundish oblong; skin thin, red, hairy; aromatic; good.

Keepsake. 1. Gard. Chron. 612. 1843. 2. Hogg Fruit Man. 132. 1866.
Among the good European sorts in the Station plantation is Keepsake. The plants are large, vigorous and productive, fairly free from mildew and other diseases, and comparatively easily propagated, which is a great asset in this country with European gooseberries. A fault is that the fruits are variable in size and not particularly handsome in appearance. But the quality is excellent and the fruit ripens early so that, all in all, the product is well worth having, and the variety is one of the few European gooseberries that can be recommended for American conditions. Keepsake apparently originated in England early in the nineteenth century but no mention of the name of the originator or of the parentage of the berry can be found. The variety is widely grown in England. In 1909 the name was added to the fruit list of the American Pomological Society.
Plants medium in size and vigor, upright-spreading, dense, productive, healthy; young shoots intermediate in stockiness and number, reddish brown almost entirely submerged by dull gray scarf-skin; prickles medium in thickness, strength and length, usually singly, with a few bristles between the nodes toward the base of the canes; leaf-buds medium in size, length and plumpness, conical, free; leaves rather small, open at the base, cordate, with deeply cut lobes, medium in color and thickness, semi-glossy, rugose, with somewhat toothed or crenate, hairy margins; petiole short, of medium thickness, greenish, pubescent, with light colored hairs. Flowers late, usually singly; pedicels short, slender, pubescent; calyx-tube green, pubescent; calyx-lobes medium in length, width and thickness, tinged red; ovary pubescent. Fruit early; variable in size averaging medium, roundish oval to long-oval, light green, with a silvery tinge and with a few flecks of rusty red near the base: skin nearly smooth, glaucous, thin, tough, translucent; flesh greenish, juicy, firm, sprightly to sweet at full maturity; quality good.

King of Trumps. 1. Gard. Chron. 868. 1864. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:26. 1897.

On the Station grounds the plants are moderately vigorous and mildew badly; fruit large, roundish oblong, smooth, pale green, subacid; good.


Lady Houghton. 1. Jour. Hort. N. S. 3:124. 1881. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:26. 1897. As grown here the plants are moderately vigorous and free from mildew; fruit large, oblong, yellowish green, slightly hairy, sweet; good.

Lady Popham. 1. Gard. Chron. 103. 1864. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:26. 1897.

In the Station plats the plants are moderately vigorous, productive and nearly free from mildew; fruit large, roundish oval, nearly smooth, yellow, very sweet; good.

Lady Stanley. 1. Gard. Chron. 583. 1846. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:26. 1897.

At this Station the plants are moderately vigorous and slightly subject to mildew; fruit of medium size, oblong, green tinged with red, slightly hairy, subacid; good.

Lancashire Lad. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 174. 1831. 2. Hogg Fruit Man. 133. 1866. 3. Card Btish-Fr. 325. 1917. Hartshorn's Lancashire Lad. 4. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 216. 1845.
This old English sort has long been grown in America and is possibly among the half dozen best European gooseberries for American conditions. The fruits stand shipment particularly well and are handsome in appearance and very good in flavor when permitted to ripen completely. It is a favorable market sort wherever it succeeds. Perhaps its most valuable characteristic, however, is that the plants are comparatively little troubled with the dreaded mildew. As a green fruit, the product is not desirable, as it is very austere and sometimes astringent. This is an English variety of unknown origin, long grown in English gardens and early introduced to America.

Plants small, weak, spreading, open, unproductive; young shoots stocky, few, reddish brown overlaid with dull gray scarf-skin; prickles strong, short, 1-3 ; leaf-buds small, medium in length, obtuse, plump, free; leaves medium in size, thickness and color, cordate, with 22 deeply cut lobes, with hairy, slightly crenate margins; petiole short, of medium thickness, green, pubescent, with few glands. Flowers very late, medium in size, singly; pedicels short, medium thick, pubescent; calyx-tube green, pubescent; calyx-lobes medium in length and thickness, narrow, pubescent, greenish red; ovary pubescent, glandular, reddish. Fruit midseason; variable in size, medium to large, roundish oval, often inclined to oblong, at first pale silvery green becoming dark wine-red, with lines of lighter markings and flecks; skin with long, rather stiff hairs, glandular, slightly glaucous, thin, tough; flesh pale greenish red, juicy, rather firm, sprightly; quality good.

Largo. i. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:26. 1897.

Station plants moderately vigorous, mildew slightly; fruit medium, nearly round, dark red, almost smooth, subacid; fair.

Late Emerald, 1. Gard. Mon. 19:275. 1877.

Originated by E. P. Roe, Cornwall, New York. Plants vigorous, productive; resistant to mildew; fruit large, bright green.

Lavinia. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:26. 1897.

Plants at this Station are vigorous, and nearly free from mildew; fruit medium to large, oblong, green, smooth, sweet; good.

Leader. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 175. 1831. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:26. 1897.

In England this is a standard variety. As grown at this Station the plants lack vigor and mildew badly; fruit medium to large, oblong, yellowish, smooth, sweet; good.

Leveller. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 133. 1866. 2. N. Y.Sta. Bul. 114:27. 1897.

Originated in England about 1850. On the Station grounds the plants lack vigor but are productive, mildew slightly; fruit medium to large, oblong, nearly smooth, yellowish, slightly acid; good.

Leviathan. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:27. 1897.

Here the plants mildew slightly; fruit below medium, nearly round, smooth; inferior.

Lion Provider. 1. Gard. Chron. 774. 1843. 2* N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:27. 1897.

Station plants moderately vigorous, susceptible to mildew, medium productive; fruit medium in size, long, red, slightly hairy; good.

Lizzard. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:27. 1897.

Here the plants lack vigor, mildew slightly; fruit medium in size, oblong, smooth, light green, sweet; good.

London. 1. Gard. Chron. 118. 1841. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:27. 1897.

This variety has been known since 1840. As grown at this Station the plants are moderately vigorous and mildew slightly; fruit large to very large, oblong, almost smooth, dark red, sweet; good.

Long Barney. 1. N. Y.Sta. Bul. 114:27. 1897.
Station plants vigorous, mildew slightly; fruit large, oblong, smooth, light red, sweet; good.

Lord Beaconsfield. i, N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:27. 1897.

Here the plants are vigorous, productive, but mildew slightly; fruit medium, roundish oval, green, smooth, sweet; good.

Lord Leigh. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:27. 1897.

At this Station the plants are vigorous but mildew slightly; fruit large, oblong, red, slightly hairy, sweet; good.

Lord Rancliffe. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 180. 1831. 2. JV. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:27.

1897.

Originated in England at the beginning of the nineteenth century. As grown here the plants are vigorous but mildew; fruit large, oblong, smooth, yellowish green, subacid; good.

Lord Scarborough. 1. JV. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:27. 1897.
Station plants lack vigor, but are nearly free from mildew; fruit large, pear-shaped, yellowish green, nearly sweet; inferior.

Lowton. 1. JV. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:27. 1897.
In the Station plats the plants are vigorous but mildew slightly; fruit medium in size, roundish oblong, dark red, slightly hairy, subacid; good; early.


Mabel. 1. Can. Cent. Exp. Farm Bul. 56:23. 1907.
Originated by William Saunders, Ottawa, Canada, about 1890. Plants vigorous, very productive, resistant to mildew; fruit above medium in size, roundish oval, pale green, translucent, sweet; fair; midseason.

Major Hibbert. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 135. 1866. 2. JV. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:27. 1897.

Station plants vigorous but mildew slightly; fruit small, nearly round, pale green, slightly hairy, sweet; good.

Marlboro. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 135. 1866. 2. JV. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:27. 1897.

Here the plants are moderately vigorous, slightly subject to mildew; fruit large, oblong, smooth, pale red, sweet; fair.

Mary Ann. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 182. 1866. 2. JV. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:27. 1897.

At this Station the plants are moderately vigorous, somewhat subject to mildew; fruit large, nearly round, light green, nearly smooth, sweet; inferior.

Matchless. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 135. 1866. 2. JV. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:27. 1897.

On the Station grounds the plants are vigorous, productive, but mildew slightly; fruit large, oblong, dull green, slightly hairy, sweet; very good.

May Duke. 1. Maurer Stachelbeerbuch no, fig. 48. 1913. 2. U. S. D. A. Farmers' Bul. 1024:33, fig. 26. 1919.

May Duke was brought to America a few years ago and has been tested in several different parts of the United States. All who have grown it think well of it as an early gooseberry of the European type. Because of its vigorous, productive, healthy plants and large, dark red smooth-skinned fruits and yellow, juicy, firm, aromatic and pleasantly flavored flesh, May Duke is recommended as one of the best early sorts of its parentage. On the grounds of this Station May Baker is the same as May Duke. No information is available as to the origin of this gooseberry, except that the variety came to America from England. It was also taken to Germany in 1892, but German horticulturists were unable to obtain information regarding its history.

Plants medium in size, vigorous, upright-spreading, dense, productive, healthy; young shoots somewhat stocky, intermediate in number of canes, dull reddish brown mingled with gray scarf-skin; prickles slender, strong, short, seldom more than one; leaf-buds medium in size and length, conical, plump, semi-free; leaves medium in size, and thickness, cordate, with obovate lobes, dark green, semi-glossy, rugose, with hairy, crenate margins; petiole medium in length and thickness, greenish, pubescent, with a few glands toward the base. Flowers very early, medium in size, singly and occasionally in twos and threes; pedicels medium in length and thickness, nearly glabrous; calyx-tube greenish, slightly pubescent; calyx-lobes medium in length, width and thickness, pubescent underneath, green with faint tinge of red; ovary pubescent. Fruit early; variable in size averaging above medium, roundish oval or oval, pale silvery green changing to dull dark red; skin smooth, glaucous, medium in thickness and toughness; flesh yellowish, tinged with red, juicy, firm, aromatic, pleasantly flavored, sweet; quality good to very good.

Miss Chester. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:27. 1897.

Station plants weak, mildew slightly; fruit medium to large, nearly round, greenish, smooth, slightly hairy, subacid; inferior.

Mitchell. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:27. 1897.

Here the plants are vigorous, but mildew slightly; fruit medium to large, oblong, pale green, smooth, sweet; good.

Mitre. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 135. 1866. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:27. 1897.

As grown here the plants are vigorous but mildew slightly; fruit large, oval, pale green, hairy, sweet; good.

Monarch. 1. Mclntosh Bk. Gard. 2:579. 1855- 2+ Af. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:27. 1897.

On the Station grounds the plants lack vigor but are free from mildew; fruit medium in size, oblong, red, slightly hairy, nearly sweet; good.

Monument. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:27. 1897.

In the Station plats the plants are moderately vigorous but mildew slightly; fruit medium, oval, pale red, nearly smooth, sweet; good.

Mount Pleasant. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 136. 1866. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:28. 1897. Originated in England about 1850. Here the plants are moderately vigorous, productive, mildew very slightly; fruit large, roundish oval, deep orange-yellow; skin thick, slightly hairy; sweet; fair.

Mountain. 1. Cultivator 287. 1856. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:17, fig. 6, PL 2. 1897.

Discovered by a colony of Shakers about 1846 growing wild at Lebanon, New York. The habit of the plant indicates a hybrid between the G. grossularia and G. cynosbati. From 1860 to 1891 the variety was included in the fruit list of the American Pomological Society. Station plants are tall, with slender sprawling branches, resistant to mildew, unproductive; fruit larger than that of Downing, oblong, dull brownish purple, smooth, thick-skinned, moderately juicy, sweet.

Mrs. Bowcock. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:28. 1897.

Here the plants are moderately vigorous, inclined to mildew; fruit large, slightly oblong, yellow, smooth, sweet; good.

Mrs. Whittaker. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:28. 1897.

Station plants lack vigor and mildew slightly; fruit large, pear-shaped, yellowish green, nearly smooth, sweet; good.


Nailor. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 177. 1831. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:28. 1897.

Grown in England a century ago. Station plants produce fruit of medium size, greenish white, smooth, sweet; good.

Nancy. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:28. 1897.

In the Station gooseberry collection the plants of this variety are not strong growers and are somewhat susceptible to mildew, but they are very productive; fruit large, nearly round, slightly hairy, silvery white, sweet; good.

Napoleon le Grand. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 136. 1866. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:28. 1897.

As grown at this Station the plants are moderately vigorous and quite free from mildew; fruit of medium size, roundish oval, red, slightly hairy, sweet; good.

Nebraska Prolific. 1. Country Gent. 26:238. 1866.

This variety was tested in several states sixty years ago and may have originated with R. O. Thompson, Nursery Hill, Nebraska. The plants are healthy, do not mildew, and produce berries of exceptionally good flavor.

Nebraska Seedling. 1. Country Gent. 26:142. 1865.

A seedling of Nebraska Prolific which was raised about sixty years ago by R. O. Thompson, Nursery Hill, Nebraska. Plants vigorous, free from mildew, productive; fruit large, green with slight pinkish tinge, pleasantly flavored; good.

Newell. 1. Col. O. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 31. 1892.

Sent out for trial by A. H. Gaston, Locon, Illinois, about 1890. It is described as a hardy plant, free from mildew, producing large, attractive berries.

Nottingham. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:28. 1897.

Origin unknown. At this Station the plants are moderately vigorous, quite free from mildew; fruit medium in size, oblong, red, somewhat hairy, subacid; good.


Orange. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 22. 1875. 2. Rural N. Y. 45:493, fig. 304. 1886. EngWs Yellow. 3. Gard. Mon. 17:270. 1875. Early Orange. 4. Ind. Sta. Bul. 48:12. 1894.
Supposed to have originated in New York many years ago; distributed by H. M. Engle, Marietta, Pennsylvania. The American Pomological Society included the variety in its catalog list of fruits from 1875 to 1897- Plants vigorous, productive; fruit small, rich golden yellow, pleasantly flavored; good; early.

Oregon. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 29. 1909.

Oregon Champion. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 127. 1875. 3* U- 5". D. A, Pom. RpL 394. 1891.
Originated about 1860 on the grounds of Dr. P. Prettyman, Multonomah County, Oregon, as a cross between Crown Bob and Houghton. In 1909 the American Pomological Society added this berry to its list of recommended fruits. Plants large, vigorous, upright-spreading, very productive; fruit small, roundish oval, pale whitish green, with thin skin, tough, smooth, juicy, tender, pleasantly sprightly to rather tart; fair; midseason.

Oregon Jumbo. 1. Card Bush-Fr. 403. 1898.

Introduced many years ago by the J. T. Lovett Nursery Company, Little Silver, New Jersey. Plants vigorous, productive, hardy; fruit smooth, pale green; good.

Over All. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Card. 174. 1831. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:28. 1897. Grown in England a century ago; widely disseminated there and upon the continent. In the Station plats the plants are vigorous and nearly free from mildew; fruit large, roundish, pale green, smooth, sweet; good.

Overseer. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 137. 1866. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:28. 1897.

Originated in England many years ago. At this Station the plants are not strong growers but are quite free from mildew; fruit large, pale green, smooth, sweet; very good.


Pale Red. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 504. 1869. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:18. 1897. Ohio Seedling. 3. Ohio Hort. Soc. Rpt. 16. 1859. American Seedling. 4. Rural N.Y. 11:287. 1860. Cluster. 5. Horticulturist 21:275. 1866.
The origin of this variety is unknown except that it is an American variety and that it has been under cultivation for at least a century. It has been known by various names throughout this long period. The American Pomological Society first listed the sort in its fruit catalog under the name American Seedling in 1862, but changed the name to Pale Red in 1871, and it has so appeared since in the Society's catalog. Plants large, vigorous, inclined to be upright-spreading, healthy, very productive; fruit medium to small, roundish, light or pale red, becoming darker when fully mature, smooth, sweet; good to very good; early.

Pearl. 1. U. S. D. A. Pom. Rpt. 395. 1891. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:18, PI. II, fig. 3. 1897. 3. Can. Cent. Exp. Farm Bul. 56:24, PL 3. 1907.
William Saunders originated this variety at London, Ontario, in the early eighties as a cross between Downing and Red Warrington. It was named and introduced in 1888 by A. M. Smith, St. Catharines, Ontario. At this Station the plants are vigorous, upright-spreading, and productive, resembling Downing in growth and fruit characteristics; berries small, roundish, silvery green, smooth, sweet with pleasant sprightliness; good; midseason.

Peru. 1. Card. Chron. 583. 1846. 2. N. Y. Sta. But..114:28. 1897.

Grown in England many years ago. Plants at this Station are large, spreading, unproductive; fruit large, oblong, slightly hairy, yellowish white, sweet; good.

Peto. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 137. 1866. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:28. 1897.

In the Station gooseberry collection, plants of this sort are vigorous but susceptible to mildew; fruit medium in size, smooth, oblong, greenish white, subacid; inferior.

Pilot. 1. Card. Chron. 118. 1841. 2. N, Y. Sta. Bul. 114:28. 1897.

Originated in England long ago. At this Station the plants are moderately vigorous, spreading, subject to mildew; fruit small, roundish oblong, green, smooth, subacid; inferior.
Plowboy. 1. N.Y. Sta. Bul. 114:28. 1897. Plough Boy. 2. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 77. 1842.
Originated in England nearly a century ago. In the Station plats the plants are moderately vigorous, mildew slightly; fruit large, oblong, smooth, light red, subacid; good.

Poorman. 1. Utah Si. Bd. Hoit. Rpt. 64. 1903-04. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 364:193. 1913. 3. Rural N. Y. 79:875. 1920.
This variety has attracted more attention from American gooseberry growers than any other sort in this generation. It has very generally received the approbation of pomologists because of the vigor and productiveness of the plants and the handsome appearance and high quality of the fruits. It passes as an American sort, with few characters to indicate European blood. The berries are much larger than those of any of the other American varieties and are characterized by their oval shape and red color when ripe. The quality is unsurpassed by that of any other gooseberry. The thorns are short and few and less objectionable than in most American varieties. Another splendid character is that it is easily propagated from cuttings, so that nurserymen should find it much more profitable to grow than either the Houghton or Downing which they so commonly sell because of easy propagation. The plants are so vigorous that they should be set farther apart in the field than other varieties. Poorman originated about 1888 with William H. Craighead, Brigham City, Utah, and was introduced in 1896 by D. S. Lohr, Tremonton, Utah. It is supposed to be a cross between Houghton and Downing, and the bush and fruit would indicate such parentage. In 1909 the American Pomological Society added Poorman to its catalog list of fruits.
Plants very large, very vigorous, upright, becoming quite spreading, dense, productive, healthy; young shoots variable but average slender, numerous, reddish brown, covered with a rather loose, gray scarf-skin; prickles quite variable, average medium in size, strong, variable in thickness and length, 1-3, interspersed with few to many bristles between the internodes; leaf-buds medium in size and length, conical, lean, semi-free; leaves medium to very large especially on the branches without fruit, cordate, with deeply cut, obovate lobes, thin, medium green, semi-glossy, rugose, with crenate to nearly serrate, hairy margins; petioles medium in length, rather slender, greenish, pubescent, with very few glands near the base. Flowers midseason, medium in size, usually singly, sometimes two; pedicels medium in length and thickness, glabrous; calyx-tube green or with tinge of red, glabrous; calyx-tubes short, narrow, medium in thickness, glabrous within, with a few small hairs without, dull greenish red; ovary glabrous. Fruit early midseason, ripening period long, picks easily; variable in size, averaging above medium, roundish oval to distinctly oval or somewhat pear-shaped, pale silvery green gradually changing to a beautiful pinkish red deepening to almost wine-red; skin smooth, with thin, lilac bloom, rather tough, translucent; flesh greenish, juicy, tender, pleasantly sprightly becoming very sweet; aromatic; quality very good to best.

Poorman Delight, i. Lovett Cat. 14. 1920.

Introduced by J. T. Lovett, Little Silver, New Jersey. Plants vigorous, upright, with attractive glossy foliage, productive; fruit large, bright red; good.

Portage. 1. U. S. D. A. Pom. Rpt. 395. 1891. 2. Ibid. 27, PI. II. 1894. 3. Card Bush-Fr. 327. 1917.

This variety is so similar to Chautauqua on the grounds of this Station that the two have sometimes been thought identical. The variety, however, is described as distinct by workers in the United States Department of Agriculture and by other pomologists so that it is here held as distinct. A comparison of the descriptions of the two sorts shows some slight differences. As yet the variety is little known among berry growers, but with its good qualities ought to be generally planted. Portage originated as a chance seedling in 1874 with A. H. House, Mantua, Portage County, Ohio. It was propagated in a limited way by George J. Streator, Garrettsville, Ohio, until about 1905 when nursery firms began offering it for sale.
Plants above medium in size, vigorous, upright-spreading, dense, productive, healthy; young shoots stocky, numerous, reddish brown overlaid with dull gray scarf-skin; prickles slender, strong, short, 1-3; leaf-buds medium in size, long, obtuse, moderately plump, semi-free, ragged at the apex; leaves medium in size, cordate, with obovate lobes, thick, medium green, glossy, rugose, with hairy, crenate margins; petiole short, medium in thickness, pubescent, with very few small glands near the base. Flowers early, medium in size, usually singly, occasionally in twos; pedicels medium in length and thickness, pubescent; calyx-tube reddish green, heavily pubescent; calyx-lobes medium in length, width and thickness, pubescent; dull reddish green; ovary pubescent. Fruit late; variable in size, medium to large, roundish oval, dull, pale silvery green; skin smooth, glaucous, thin, tough; flesh very light green, juicy, soft, aromatic, mild and sweet when fully ripe; quality very good.

Postman. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 139. 1866. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:28. 1897.

On the Station grounds, plants of this variety are vigorous, spreading, and nearly free from mildew; fruit medium in size, roundish oval, nearly smooth, pale green, sweet; good.

Premier. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 162. 1920.
Introduced from England about 1897 by Brown Brothers, Ontario, Canada. Plants vigorous, free from mildew, productive; fruit large, round, greenish yellow; very good.

President. 1. Jour. Hort. 29:158. 1875. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:28. 1897.
This may be a seedling raised by William Saunders, Ottawa, Canada. As grown here the plants are vigorous but somewhat susceptible to mildew; fruit large, long, red, slightly hairy, subacid; good.

Pretender. 1. Jour. Hort. 29:158. 1875. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:28. 1897.
A berry of English origin. At this Station, the plants are fair growers and nearly free from mildew; fruit of medium size, yellow, smooth; fair.

Pride of Michigan. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 287. 1921.

This variety was found near South Haven, Michigan, and was introduced by Hurlbut et Cross, Bangor, Michigan, about 1916. Plants vigorous, healthier, hardier, and more productive than Downing which it resembles; fruit large, roundish oval, pale green; good.

Priscilla. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:28. 1897.

In the Station gooseberry collection, the plants are not strong growers but are nearly free from mildew; fruit medium in size, oblong, light green, slightly mottled with red, slightly hairy, nearly sweet; inferior.

Puyallup. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:28, PI. 8, fig. 64. 1897. Puyallup Mammoth. 2. Card. Mon. 28:271. 1886.

Found in 1881 on the bank of the Puyallup river, near Puyallup, Washington, by W. M. Lee of Tacoma. Introduced in 1887 by J. M. Ogle of Puyallup. At this Station the plants are moderately vigorous and productive; fruit large, roundish oval, pale green, smooth, sweet; very good.


Queen Anne. 1. Juindley Guide Orch. Card. 177. 1831. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:29. 1897.

Raised a century ago in England. As grown here the plants are moderately vigorous and nearly free from mildew; fruit of medium size, long-oval, smooth, greenish yellow, subacid; good.

Queen of Trumps. 1. Gard. Chron. 774. 1843. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:29. 1897.

Grown in England a century ago. Plants at this Station are vigorous and quite free from mildew; fruit large, oval, pale green, smooth, sweet; very good.

Queen of Whites. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:29. 1897.

On the Station grounds the plants of this variety are vigorous, with scarcely a trace of mildew; fruit large, roundish oval, smooth, pale yellowish green, sweet; good.

Queen Victoria. 1. Gard. Chron. 489. 1842. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:29. 1897.

Originated in England a century ago. In the Station plats the plants are not strong growers but are quite free from mildew; fruit of medium size, roundish, green, smooth; rather inferior; early.


Ralph. 1. Can. Cent. Exp. Farm Bul. 56:24. 1907.

Originated by William Saunders, Ottawa, Canada, prior to 1890. Plants vigorous,, upright, not as hardy nor productive as many sorts; fruit small, roundish oval, dull yellow, hairy, with thin skin, sweet; fair; early.

Red Champagne. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 55. 1852. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:29. 1897. Champagne. 3. Kenrick Am. Orch. 295. 1832.
A very old English variety once generally grown in eastern America. Plants at this Station are vigorous and quite free from mildew; fruit small, roundish, somewhat hairy, dark red, sweet; good. The American Pomological Society included the variety in its fruit catalog from 1852-1871.

Red Jacket. 1. Jour. Hort. 3d Ser. 3:124. 1881. 2. Card Bush-Fr. 408. 1898.
An English variety of unknown origin, entirely distinct from the Red Jacket of American origin now known as Josselyn. Fruit large to very large, narrowing towards the apex.

Red Robin. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 140. 1866. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:29. 1897.

Originated in England. As grown here the plants lack vigor but are nearly free from mildew; fruit large, oblong, slightly hairy, light red, sweet; inferior.

Red Warrington. i. Gard. Chron. 69. 1841. 2. Ar. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:29. 1897. Aston's Seedling. 3. Christ Handb. 802. 1817. Aston's Red. 4. Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 178. 1831. Warrington. 5. Horticulturist 2:341. 1847-48.
This old English sort is little grown in America but has so many good qualities for a home plantation in which European gooseberries are wanted that it merits a place in this text. The fruits are of but medium size and are rather dull in color and are rendered somewhat less attractive by reason of stiff reddish hairs, but the quality is excellent and the plants are satisfactory in nearly every respect. It merits notice also because of its long and worthy past as an European variety under American conditions. Possibly no other variety from across the seas has been grown longer or more widely in America than Red Warrington. No information is available as to the origin of this variety except that it is an old sort, probably first having been grown in England early in the last century. The variety was probably brought to America nearly 100 years ago. The American Pomological Society added the sort to its recommended list of fruits in 1852 where it appeared until 1871 when it was dropped.
Plants medium in size, vigorous, upright-spreading, dense, productive, healthy; young shoots medium in stockiness and number, dull reddish brown overspread with gray scarf-skin; prickles thick, unusually strong, medium in length, thickened at the base, 1-3, often in triplets; leaf-buds small, short, conical, lean, semi-free; leaves numerous, small, cordate, with obovate lobes, medium in thickness and color, glossy, with hairy, crenate margins; petiole short, medium in thickness, pubescent, with very few glands near the base. Flowers midseason, medium in size, single; pedicels medium in thickness and length, pubescent; calyx-tube green, slightly pubescent; calyx-lobes medium in length, width and thickness, pubescent, green tinged with red; ovary pubescent, with small reddish glands. Fruit late; variable in size, averaging medium to above, roundish oval to long-oval, pale silvery green changing to a delicate pale red, showing faint reddish lines and light-colored flecks; skin with rather long, stiff hairs, slightly glaucous, thin, tough; flesh yellowish green, with tinge of red, juicy, firm, sprightly; quality good.

Ricardo. 1. Mclntosh Bk. Gard. 2:579. 1855. 2. Can. Cent. Exp. Farm Bul. 56:26. 1907.
As grown in Canada this old English gooseberry is relatively free from mildew. Fruit large, oval, dull coppery red, nearly smooth, sweet mingled with pleasant acidity; very good.

Richland. 1. Can. Cent. Exp. Farm Bul. 56:23. 1907.

This sort is the result of a cross between Houghton and Red Warrington, made by William Saunders, Ottawa, Canada, prior to 1890. Plants vigorous, upright, Moderately productive; fruit medium in size, nearly round, dull orange-red, smooth, sweet but with an acid skin; good; midseason.

Rideau. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 104. 1898.
Another of Saunders' seedlings. Plants vigorous, very productive, almost free from mildew; fruit medium to large, roundish, green, with pale distinct ribs, smooth, sweet mingled with pleasant acidity; good; late.

Ringer. 1. Flor. et Pom. 121, PL 520, fig. 2. 1880. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:30. 1897. Raised about 1860 by David Chippindale, Rishton, England, who introduced it a few years later. On the Station grounds the plants are moderately vigorous, nearly free from mildew; fruit medium in size, roundish, yellowish green, smooth, sweet; fair.

Roaring Lion. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Card. 175. 1831. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:30. 1897.

Originated in England a century ago and early brought to America. The American Pomological Society included the variety in its fruit catalog from 1873 to 1897. In the Station plats the plants lack vigor and are affected by mildew; fruit of medium size, oblong, smooth, light red, subacid; good.

Roe. 1. Cult. et Count. Gent. 41:441. 1876.

This is a chance seedling found in an old Newburgh garden about 1860 and introduced fifteen years later by E. P. Roe, Cornwall, New York. Plants healthy, productive; fruit large, attractive, free from mildew; sweet; fair.

Roesch. 1. Penn. Sta. Rpt. Pt. 11:226. 1898-99. Lewis Roesch. 2. Mass. Sta. Bul. 44:11. 1897.

Of American origin. Plants upright, very vigorous, productive; fruit uniform, very large, oval; skin thin, smooth, pale yellow; good.

Rough Red. 1. Gard. Chron. 761. 1842. 2. N, Y. Sta. Bul. 114:30. 1897.

Grown in England many years ago. At this Station the plants are vigorous and free from mildew; fruit large, oblong, slightly hairy, red, acid; good; early.

Rover. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 176. 1831. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:30. 1897.

Raised about 1865 by Joseph Brotherton, Nantwich, England, who introduced it a few years later. In the Station plats the plants lack vigor but are quite free from mildew; fruit large to very large, nearly round, smooth, dull green tinged with dull red.

Rumbullion. 1. Langley Pomona 124. 1729. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:30. 1897.

Of very ancient origin. As grown here the plants are vigorous and free from mildew; fruit small to medium in size, nearly round, slightly hairy, green, sweet; good.

Runge. 1. U. S. D. A. Farmers' Bul. 1024:33. 1919.

A European variety similar to Columbus. It has been tested in the Hudson River Valley where it appears more productive and less susceptible to mildew than Columbus, ripening later.

Ruth. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 104. 1898.

Raised by William Saunders, Ottawa, Canada, about 1890. Plants vigorous, productive, nearly free from mildew; fruit medium in size, oblong-oval, tapering at each end, green with paler veins, smooth, sweet, mild with a pleasant subacid flavor; fair; midseason.


Saunders. 1. Can. Hort. 22:412. 1899.

Originated in the late nineties by William Saunders. Plants vigorous, free from mildew, moderately productive; fruit very large, roundish oval, brownish red, smooth, sweet mingled with a pleasant acidity; good; late.

Shiner. i. Hogg Fruit Man. 141. 1866. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:30. 1897.

Grown in England for more than half a century. At this Station the plants are vigorous, spreading, productive and quite free from mildew; fruit large, slightly pear-shaped, pale green, smooth, sweet; good.

Silvia. 1. Can. Cent. Exp. Farm Bul. 56:24. 1907.

This variety was raised by William Saunders, Ottawa, Canada, in the late nineties. Plants strong, upright-spreading, rather unproductive, free from mildew; fruit large, roundish, green tinged with dull red, smooth, subacid; good; midseason.

Sir George Brown. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 141. 1866. 2. A7. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:30. 1897.
Of English origin. On the Station grounds the plants are vigorous, large, spreading, but somewhat susceptible to mildew; fruit large, oblong, greenish white, nearly smooth, sweet; good.

Slaughterman. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 142. 1866. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:30. 1897.

Long grown in England. At this Station the plants lack vigor and are susceptible to mildew; fruit large, oblong, smooth, red; good.

Smiling Beauty. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 177. 1831. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:30. 1897.

Originated in England a century ago. In the Station plats the plants are vigorous but affected by mildew; fruit large, roundish oval, greenish yellow, sweet; good.

Smith. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:19, PL II, fig. 4- 1897. Smith's Improved. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 504. 1869.

Originated more than half a century ago by a Dr. Smith, Windsor, Vermont, from seed of Houghton, and thought to be a hybrid between American and European gooseberries. In 1871 the variety was added to the American Pomological Society's fruit catalog list. Plants vigorous, with curving canes and rather slender branches; berries smooth, dull pale green, sometimes spotted with red, with light bloom; flesh juicy, sweet; good.

Smithers, 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 162. 1920.

Mentioned by the State Nursery et Seed Company, Helena, Montana, as "a purple variety of medium size, very prolific and hardy."

Snowball. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 182. 1831. 2. Can. Cent. Exp. Farm BuL 56:26. 1907.

Originated in England a century ago. In Canada the plants are free from mildew; fruit large, oval, dull copperish red, nearly smooth, sweet mingled with pleasant acidity; fair.

Snowdrop. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 182. 1831. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:30. 1897.

Raised by Joseph Bratherton, Nantwich, England, about 1840. At this Station the plants are moderately vigorous and nearly free from mildew; fruit large, pear-shaped, smooth, light green, subacid; fair.

Speedwell. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 176. 1831. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:30. 1897. Originated in England a century ago. On the Station grounds the plants are moderately vigorous and free from mildew; fruit large, roundish, nearly smooth, red, sweet; fair.

Sportsman. 1. Brookshaw Hort. Reposit. 1:95, PI- L, fig. 1. 1823. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:30. 1897. v.

Raised by John Wilmot, Isleworth, England, early in the last century. In the Station gooseberry collection the plants are vigorous and quite free from mildew; fruit medium in size, roundish, nearly smooth, red, subacid; good.

Stein. 1. Rural N. Y. 56:646. 1897.

Introduced by W. B. Fulton, Kirkwood, Ohio, as a cross between Houghton and an old German sort. Plants dwarfish, healthy, free from mildew, very productive; fruit medium in size, round, dark green; good; midseason.

Stella. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 143. 1866. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:30. 1897.

An old English variety, plants of which, in the Station plats, are moderately vigorous, and but slightly affected by mildew; fruit large, oblong, smooth, pale green, subacid; fair.

Stockwell. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 143. 1866. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:30. 1897.

Originated in England many years ago. As grown here the plants are moderately vigorous and but slightly susceptible to mildew; fruit large, oblong, smooth, light green, sweet; good.

Strubler. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 127. 1891. 2. Mich. Sta. Bul. 169:163. 1899.
Grown by Phil Strubler, Naperville, Illinois. Plants vigorous; fruit large, roundish oval, greenish yellow; good.

Succeed. 1. Jour. HorL 9:127. 1865. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:30. 1897.

In the Station plats the plants are moderately vigorous and productive, free from mildew; fruit large, oblong, smooth, yellowish green, sweet; good.

Sulphur. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 79. 1842. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:30. 1897.

Of ancient origin in England. Although resembling Early Sulphur, the variety is distinct. At this Station the plants are vigorous, upright, very free from mildew; fruit medium in size, round, nearly smooth, yellow, sweet; good.

Sunset. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:30. 1897.

In the Station gooseberry collection the plants are vigorous and free from mildew; fruit large, oblong, nearly smooth, yellowish green, sweet; very good.

Sutherland. 1. Can. Hort. 13:273. 1890.

Raised about forty years ago by George Sutherland, Meaford, Ontario, probably as a seedling of Downing. Plants large, vigorous, upright, very productive, free from mildew; fruit large, roundish oval, smooth, pale green; fair.


Tally Ho. 1. Gard. Chron. 118. 1841. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:31. 1897.

This old English variety, on the Station grounds, produces large, vigorous plants, free from mildew; fruit large, pear-shaped, pale green, nearly smooth, sweet; good.

Telegraph. 1. Mclntosh Bk. Gard. 2:579. 1855. 2. N. Y. Sta. BuL 114:31. 1897.

Of English origin, quite generally disseminated on the continent* As grown at this Station, the plants are vigorous and spreading; fruit large, oblong, smooth, pale green, sweet; fair; late.

Thatcher, i. Jour. Hort. N. S. 29:158. 1875. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:31. 1897.

At this Station the plants are moderately vigorous and but little affected by mildew; fruit large, oblong, smooth, greenish yellow, subacid; good; early.

Thomas Williams. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:31. 1897.

As grown at the Station, the plants are moderately vigorous and free from mildew; fruit large, oblong, yellow, smooth, sweet; very good.

Thumper. 1. Gard. Chron. 118. 1841. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:31. 1897.

Originated in England nearly a century ago. As tested in the Station gooseberry collection, the plants are moderately vigorous, very productive, and but little affected by mildew; fruit large, oblong, smooth, light green, sweet; good.

Tichborne. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:31. 1897.

On the Station grounds the plants are vigorous, slightly affected by mildew; fruit large, oblong, smooth, light red, subacid; poor. [Could you come up with a worse name? Maybe just replace the "h" with a "k". -ASC]

Transparent. 1. Flor et Pom. 121, PL 520, fig. 1. 1880. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:31. 1897.

This variety was raised more than fifty years ago by Joseph Bratherton, Nantwich, England. On the grounds of this Station, the plants are moderately vigorous and but slightly affected by mildew; fruit large, round, nearly smooth, light green, acid; inferior.

Trebla. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 162. 1920.

Described by Albert F. Etter, Ettersburg, California, as a hybrid gooseberry with Champion as one of the parents. Plants very vigorous and productive, withstanding hot weather well.

Tree. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 184. 1894. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 98:75. 1899.

This is an American wilding which resembles Mountain but is distinct. Plants vigorous but slender, moderately productive; fruit medium in size, green; fair; late.

Triumph. 1. Christ Handb. 812. 1817. 2. Rural N. Y. 45:493. 1886. 3. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:31, PL 8, fig. 66. 1897.

An old -European variety brought to the notice of American growers by George Achelis, West Chester, Pennsylvania, more than forty years ago. The American Pomological Society listed the variety in its catalog fruit list in 1897 but dropped it in 1909. Plants vigorous, productive; fruit large, oblong or roundish, pale greenish yellow, smooth, sweet; very good.

Trumpeter. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 175. 1831. 2. Can. Cent. Exp. Farm Bul. 56:26. 1907.

An old variety from England. Plants vigorous, spreading, productive; fruit large, oval to oblong or slightly pear-shaped; skin thick, yellowish green; moderately sweet; fair.

Try Me Oh. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:31. 1897.

Plants at this Station are moderately vigorous and very slightly subject to mildew; fruit medium in size, oblong, pale green, nearly smooth, subacid; good.


Unity. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:31. 1897.

As grown at this Station the plants are moderately vigorous and but slightly affected by mildew; fruit large, roundish oblong or pear-shaped, smooth, green, sweet; good.

Utah. 1. Rural N. Y. 54:7. 1895.

H. L. Fairchild, Nichols, Connecticut, had the sort in a variety collection on his grounds in 1894. Plants upright, productive; fruit variable, medium to large, dark red; good.


Van Fleet. 1. Hedrick Cyc. Hardy Fr. 310. 1922. Dr. Van Fleet. 2. Lovett Cat. 9, fig. 1916.

Originated in 1902 by Dr. Walter Van Fleet, Washington, D. C, as a hybrid between Houghton and Keepsake and Industry; introduced in 1916 by J. T. Lovett, Little Silver, New Jersey. Plants vigorous, very productive; berries large, nearly round, light red when fully ripe; skin thin; flesh tender, with few seeds, rich; very good.

Veteran. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:31. 1897.

Plants in the Station gooseberry collection are moderately vigorous and nearly free from mildew; fruit medium in size, pear-shaped, nearly smooth, dark red, sweet; poor.

Victoria. 1. Card. Mon. 12:156. 1870.

An English gooseberry once grown sparingly in the Middle West. Plants hardy, vigorous, productive and nearly immune to mildew; fruit large, nearly smooth, red; good.

Village Green. 1. Card. Chron. 1620. 1871. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:31. 1897.

Plants at this Station are vigorous and but slightly susceptible to mildew; fruit of medium size, oblong, smooth, pale green, subacid; good.

Viper. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Card. 176. 1831. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:32. 1897.

The plants of this variety on the Station grounds are moderately vigorous and quite free from mildew; fruit of medium size, roundish oblong, smooth, yellowish green, nearly sweet; fair.

Visit. 1. Jour. Hort. 21:121. 1871. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:32. 1897.

As grown here the plants are moderately vigorous and nearly free from mildew; fruit large, oblong, nearly smooth, pale green, subacid; fair.


Wakeful. 1. Jour. Hort. 11:233. 1885. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:32. 1897.
Of English origin. Station plants are moderately vigorous, slightly affected by.mildew; fruit large, nearly smooth, yellow, sweet; good.

Watson. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:32. 1897. Watson Seedling Tree. 2. Ann. Hort. 131. 1893.
Raised about 1875 by Samuel Wilson, Mechanicsville, Pennsylvania. In 1879 the variety was being grown extensively by William Watson, Provo City, Utah. Station plants are very vigorous, spreading, productive, and quite free from mildew; fruit large, oblong, smooth, dark red, sweet; very good.

Weathercock. 1. Mclntosh Bk. Gard. 2:579. 1855. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:32. 1897. In the Station gooseberry collection the plants are moderately vigorous, productive,. with slight traces of mildew; fruit large, round, smooth, yellowish green, sweet; good.

Wellington Glory, i. Lindley Guide Orch. Card. 177. 1831. 2. Kenrick Am. Orch. 297. 1832. 3. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:32. 1897.

Wellington. 4. Am. Pom, Soc. Cat. 18. 1897.

For many years this has been one of the standard European sorts grown in America. It is very similar to Chautauqua and no doubt the two are often confused. The vigor and productiveness of the plants and the beauty and high quality of the fruits both recommend it. The original plant of this variety was found in England more than a century ago. The sort was early brought to America where it was once grown rather extensively. As distributed at present by most American nurserymen, the variety is identical with or closely resembles Chautauqua. The American Pomological Society added the variety to its fruit list in 1897.
Plants large, vigorous, upright-spreading, dense, very productive, healthy; young shoots medium in stockiness, numerous, dark reddish brown scantily overspread with gray scarf-skin; prickles medium in thickness, strong, short, 1-3, more often single, interspersed with bristles between the nodes toward the base of the canes; leaf-buds large, long, conical, moderately plump, semi-free; leaves medium in size, thickness and color, cordate, with obovate lobes, rugose; with hairy, crenate margins; petiole medium in length, slender, greenish, pubescent, glandular at the base. Flowers early, medium in size, single; pedicels medium in length and thickness, pubescent; calyx-lobes medium in length, width and thickness, pubescent, dull red; ovary heavily pubescent. Fruit midseason, adheres well; variable in size, averaging large, roundish oval to long-oval, light silvery green mingled with a faint tinge of yellow at full maturity; skin smooth, glaucous, medium in thickness, tough, translucent; flesh pale green, juicy, firm, mild and sweet when fully ripe, but with considerable sprightliness next to the skin; quality good to very good.

Westennan Favorite. 1. Card. Mon. .11:271. 1869.

A seedling of an English gooseberry raised more than fifty years ago at Sharon, Pennsylvania. Fruit very large; considered equal to any English variety.

White Eagle. 1. Mag. Hort. 1:207. 1835- 2- N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:32. 1897. Eagle. 3. Hogg Fruit Man. 126. 1866. Cook's White Eagle. 4. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 503. 1869.
Several characters of White Eagle make it desirable in plantations of European gooseberries in this country. Thus, it is about the latest of all the European varieties; the fruits while variable in size are very large and attract attention because of their pear shape and yellow color at maturity. The berries are sweet at full maturity and while not of the best are very good in quality. The bush makes only a moderate growth, but usually mildews but little. There seems to be no trace of the place or time of origin of this gooseberry. Presumably the original plants were introduced to this country from England, and the variety has been growing in American gardens for nearly a century.
Plants above medium in height and vigor, upright-spreading, dense, productive, healthy; young shoots medium in stockiness and number, smooth becoming roughish with age, reddish brown overlaid with dull gray scarf-skin; prickles of medium thickness, length and number, often in twos and threes, interspersed with but few bristles; leaf-buds medium in size and length, plump, semi-free; leaves medium in size, thickness and color, cordate, with deeply cut obovate lobes, glossy, rugose, with hairy, crenate margins; petioles short, of medium thickness, pubescent, sometimes glandular near the base. Flowers late, medium in size, 1-3; pedicels medium in size and thickness, glabrous; calyx-tube greenish red, pubescent; calyx-lobes medium in length, width and thickness, dull red and green; ovary slightly pubescent. Fruit very late; variable in size, sometimes very large, pear-shaped, light silvery green, with faintest yellow tinge at full maturity, dull; skin nearly smooth, glaucous, medium in thickness, tough; flesh pale green, not very juicy, firm, sprightly becoming nearly sweet at full maturity; quality fair.

White Hare. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:32. 1897.

At this Station the plants are but moderately vigorous and considerably affected by mildew; fruit large, round, smooth, greenish white, subacid; good.

Whitesmith. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 79. 1842. 2. Hogg Fruit Man. 364. 1884. 3. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:32. 1897. Woodward's Whitesmith. 4. Forsyth Treat. Fr. Trees 95. 1802. 5. Brookshaw Pomona PL IV. 1817. 6. Gard. Chron. 868. 1864. Lancashire Lass. 7. Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 177. 1831.

In some parts of the United States and Canada Whitesmith is considered the best of the English varieties grown on this side of the Atlantic. The plants are very large and vigorous and are usually productive. The fruit ripens early, and while not of the largest, is above medium in size and is particularly good in quality, the flesh being juicy, tender and very pleasantly flavored. Unfortunately the plants usually mildew rather severely. This is an old English variety, the date and place of origin of which is unknown. It was grown in England, however, in 1802, when William Forsyth spoke of it as one of the newer sorts. The variety has long been known in the United States. In 1852 the American Pomological Society added the sort to its fruit catalog list, a place it still retains, the name having long since been shortened to Whitesmith.
Plants above medium in size, vigorous, upright-spreading, somewhat open, productive; young shoots medium in thickness and number, reddish brown overlaid with gray scarf-skin; prickles slender, strong, medium in length, usually in ones; leaf-buds large, long, obtuse, plump, semi-free; leaves medium in size, thickness and color, cordate, with obovate, shallowly cut lobes, glossy, rugose, with hairy, crenate to nearly serrate margins; petiole short, medium in thickness, green, pubescent, with few glands. Flowers early, medium in size, usually single; pedicels medium in length and thickness, pubescent; calyx-tube green, pubescent; calyx-lobes medium in length, width and thickness, pubescent beneath, tinged dull red; ovary with short, heavy pubescence, eglandular. Fruit early, above medium in size, roundish oval, light silvery green, with faint tinge of yellow at full maturity; skin smooth, glaucous, thin, tender; flesh light green, juicy, firm but tender, pleasantly flavored, sweet; quality good.

William Watson. 1. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:33- 1897-

On the Station grounds the plants are moderately vigorous, with little mildew; fruit medium in size, oblong, nearly smooth, yellow, sweet; very good. 23

Wonderful, i. (Sard. Chron. 84. 1841. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:33. 1897.

This is probably a variety of English origin, although Hogg credits William Saunders, London, Ontario, with having raised it. Plants at this Station are moderately vigorous, nearly free from mildew; fruit of medium size, round, nearly smooth, dark red, quite sweet; good.

Yaxley Hero. 1. Lindley Guide Orch. Card. 175. 1831. 2. N. Y. Sta. Bul. 114:33. 1897.
As grown at this Station the plants are moderately vigorous and productive; fruit large, round, smooth, red, sweet; good.