THE PLUMS OF NEW YORK

CHAPTER IV

THE MINOR VARIETIES OP PLUMS

Abbaye d'Arton. Domestica. 1. Cat. Cong. Pom. France 445. 1906.
This variety came from a chance seedling found in the ruins of the Abbaye d'Arton at Valreas, France; it was propagated in 1897 by M. Valdy of Valreas. Tree very productive; fruit large, obovate; suture obscure; stem short; pale red, darker on the sunny side; bloom thick; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet; good; freestone; mid-season.

Abricotee de Braunau. Domestica. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 349. 1866. 2. Oberdieck Dent. Obst. Sort. 429. 1881. 3. Hogg Fruit Man. 683. 1884. 4. Mathieu Norn. Pom. 423. 1889.  AbricoUe de Braunau 4. Braunauer Aprikosenartige 2. Braunauer Aprikosen-artige Pnaume 4. Braunauer Aprikosenartige Damascene 4. Braunauer Neue Kern-frucht 2. Reine-Claude Braunau 3, 4.
Dr. Liegel of Braunau, Germany, originated this variety about 1810. Fruit large, roundish; suture distinct; greenish; bloom rather heavy; dots distinct, reddish; flesh yellow, firm, juicy, sweet; good; stone free; mid-season.

Abricotee de Lange. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:103, fig. 52. 1873.  Langes Aprikosenpflaume 1.
Dr. Liegel of Braunau, Germany, grew this variety and named it after Lange of Altenburg. Fruit of medium size, roundish; suture slight; yellow, blushed in the sun; flesh yellow, tender, sweet, aromatic; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Abricotee de Trauttenberg. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:35, fig. 18. 1873. 2. Mathieu, Nom. Pom. 453. 1889.  Abricotee de Trauttenberg 2. Abricotee Rouge de Trauttenberg 2. Trauttenbergs Aprikosenpflaume 1. Von Trauttenberg's Aprikosenpflaume 2.
Liegel raised the Abricotee de Trauttenberg from a stone of the Red Apricot and named it after Baron Emmanuel of Trauttenberg, Prague. Fruit medium in size, oval, red; flesh yellow, firm, aromatic; good; freestone; mid-season.

Abricot Princesse. Domestica. Mentioned in Knoop Fructologie 2:54. 1771.

Admirable. Domestica. Mentioned in Forsyth Treat. Fr. Trees 21. 1803.  

Admiral, Domestica. 1. Kenrick Am. Orch. 257. 1832. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 293. 1845. . 3. Thomas Am. Fruit Cult. 345. 1849.  Corse's Admiral 1, 2, 3.
Originated by Henry Corse, Montreal, Canada. Inferior in quality but hardy, productive and showy; rarely grown. Fruit of medium size, oval, sides unequal, light purple; dots yellow; bloom thin; stem long, pubescent; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy; clingstone; mid-season.

Admiral Schley. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:260. 1890. 2. Terry Cat. 1900.
Originated by H. A. Terry of Crescent, Iowa. Fruit roundish, yellow, washed with deep bronze-red; dots small, numerous, yellow, distinct; bloom thin; skin tough; flesh deep yellow, juicy, rich, sweet; very good; stone large, oval, flattened, clinging.  Apparently an improvement over Hawkeye.

Advance. Americana, i. Waugh Plum Cult. 142. 1901. 2. Kerr Cat. 1902-3.
Grown by Theodore Williams, Benson, Nebraska, and introduced by J. W. Kerr, Denton, Maryland, in 1902. Fruit large, oval; cavity very shallow; suture a line; apex slightly depressed; dark red; dots many, conspicuous, yellow; good; clingstone; tree vigorous and productive; said to be resistant to rot.

African. Angustifolia varians. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 160. 1881. 2. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:60, 86. 1892. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 192, 193 fig. 1901.
Originated with G. Onderdonk of Texas and introduced by him in 1870; said to be one of the best varieties of this species. Tree small, spreading; fruit medium to large, roundish to oblong, dull, dark red; dots large and small, white; skin thin, tough; flesh yellow, soft, juicy, subacid; good; stone clinging; mid-season.

Alabama. Triflora X ?. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 175:154. 1899. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 201. 1901. Normand No. 5 2
Sent out by J. L. Normand, Marksville, Louisiana. Fruit of medium size, heart-shaped, light yellow with pink cheek; bloom thin; mid-season; fruits drop before ripe but mature after falling; good; tree spreading, twiggy; branches smooth, glossy, zigzag.

Albany Beauty. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 146. 1831. 2. Thomas Am. Fruit Cult. 327. 1849. 3. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 420. 1889.  Belle dy Albany 3. Denniston's Albany Beauty 2, 3. Denniston's Albany 1.
Produced in the garden of Isaac Denniston, Albany, New York, about 1835. Fruit below medium in size, oval with a slight neck, greenish-yellow with reddish spots on the sunny side; flesh yellow, juicy, rich, sweet; good; stone free, small, pointed; mid-season; tree hardy; productive.

Alberta. Nigra ? 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 426. 1900.
A seedling raised at Indian Head Experimental Farm, Northwest Territory, Canada. Fruit large; fairly productive; early.

Alexander. Species ? 1. ///. Hort. Soc. Rpt, 135. 1903. 2. Ibid, 424. 1905.  Alexander's Late 2.
Mentioned as a late native plum; productive; resistant to rot; clingstone.

Alibuchari. Domestica. 1. Mag, Hort. 9:163. 1843. 2- Mclntosh Bk. Card. 2:534. 1855.
An old European prune. Size medium, oval, purple; fair in quality; freestone; shrivels on the tree; hardy; productive.

Alice. Americana mollis. 1. Terry Cat. 1900.
Originated by H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa, from seed of Van Buren. "Tree a fine upright grower, with large, light red fruit of best quality/'

Allen. Species ? 1. Cornell Sta, Bui, 38:78. 1892. Allen's Yellow 1.
An obsolete variety from Kansas of medium size, round, yellow and red; skin thick; clingstone.

Allfruit. Simonii X Triflora. 1. Vt, Sta. Bul. 67:5. 1898. 2. Waugh Plum Cult, 202. 1901.
Grown by Luther Burbank: named in 1898. Described by Waugh as follows: "Fruit oblate, medium size; cavity deep, rounded; stem short; suture rather shallow; color pale red with many large and small yellowish dots and a thin white bloom; skin medium thick; flesh-medium firm, bright yellow; flavor sweet and rich, fragrant; good to best; stone medium to large, slightly flattened, semi-cling; leaf large, oval, pointed, rather finely double crenulate and minutely glandular, rather thick, glistens as if varnished; petiole short, glandular."

Allie. Nigra ? 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 426. 1900.
A seedling raised at Indian Head Experimental Farm, Northwest Territory, Canada. Tree productive; fruit of medium size; skin red; flavor good; early.

Aloe. Domestica. 1. Montreal Hort, Soc. Rpt. 55. 1878.
Mentioned as an old Scottish variety; is not hardy at Montreal, Canada.

Alois Reine Claude. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 420. 1889.  Alois' Reine-Claude. Reine-Claude d* Alois. Reine-Claude Aloise. Aloo Bokhara. Domestica? 1. Horticulturist 3:144. 1848.
A variety noted by Sir Alexander Burnes, while traveling in Bokhara, as having a sweet kernel. He states that the stone, when ripe, can be seen through the skin.

Alpha. Maritima. 1. Kerr Cat. 1899. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 162:254, 255. 1905.
A variety selected from wild trees by E. W. Winsor of New Jersey and sent to J. W. Kerr, Denton, Maryland, who introduced it in 1899. Very small, roundish, purple; no cavity nor suture; flesh greenish-yellow; poor; freestone; early; tree small, compact, very productive.

Alpha-Americana. Americana, i. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 86. 1900.
A seedling of De Soto pollinated by Weaver; grown by N. K. Fluke, Davenport, Iowa, in 1890. Fruit large, oval with a truncate base, clear yellow, mottled with light red, lilac blush; suture distinct; flesh yellow, firm and meaty; fair in quality; stone of medium size, flattened, free; mid-season.

Amaryllis. Insititia. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:33. 1903.
Originated by August Dupuis, Village des Aulnaies, Province of Quebec, in 1890 from seed of Mirabelle. Fruit large, roundish; cavity medium, abrupt; suture distinct; apex rounded; greenish-yellow; dots indistinct; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet, rich; good; clingstone.

Amber. Domestica ? 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 577, 578. 1629. 2, Quintinye Com. Gard. 68. 1699.
Described by Parkinson in 1629 as a small, round, yellow freestone plum of mediocre quality; classified by him as "Prunum Ambarinum."

Amber Primordian. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 575. 1629. 2. Rea Flora 206. 1676.
Mentioned by Parkinson in 1629 as an early, small, round, yellow, watery, worthless plum. [distinct from 'Early Yellow'- ASC]

Ambre Tardif. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 421. 1889.  Ambree Tardive. Amelie Blanche. Domestica. 1. Knoop Fructologie 2:54. 1771.
Tree productive; fruit of medium size, roundish, yellow; obsolete.

Amelie Noire. Domestica. 1. Knoop Fructologie 2:54. 1771.
Of ancient and unknown origin. Tree productive; fruit of medium size, roundish, purplish-black; flesh dry; flavor fair; early.

Amelioree. Domestica. 1. U.S.D.A. Pom. Bul. 10:20. 1901.  D'Agen Amelioree 1.
Ameliore'e originated in eastern France and differs from only in being more vigorous; foliage and fruit larger and the season earlier.

American Golden. Hortulana. 1. Mo. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 182. 1895. 2. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 11:283. 1898.
James B. Wild of Sarcoxie, Missouri, introduced this variety as a seedling found in his neighborhood. Tree vigorous; fruit of medium size, round; suture a line; cavity very shallow; stem medium; bright golden-yellow; dots numerous, large, white; bloom thin; skin thick, tough; flesh yellow, firm, sweet but sprightly; good; stone of medium size, turgid, clinging; late.

American Magnum Bonum. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 896. 1869.
Probably a seedling of Red Magnum Bonum from which it differs in that the young shoots are pubescent, the stone clinging and the fruit better in quality.

American Prune. Domestica. i. Wood Bros. Cat. 1898. Probably a synonym.

American Violet. Domestica. 1. Le Bon Jard. 1:342. 1882. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 26. Ser., 3:49. 1900. P. violette americaine 1.
Tree weak in growth, productive; fruit large, roundish-oval, light purple; bloom thick; flesh yellow, sweet, juicy; quality good; mid-season.

American Wheat. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 289. 1845. 2. Thomas Am. Fruit Cult, 346. 1849. 3. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:129. 1873.  American Wheat 3, Froment American 3.
A very small, round, pale blue plum with thin bloom; flesh greenish, melting, juicy, sweet; poor; clingstone; mid-season; tree productive; leaves small, light colored.

Ancient City. Domestica. 1. Cultivator 6:270 fig. 1858. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 941. 1869. 3. Hogg Fruit Man. 684. 1884.  Reagles' Ancient City 1, 2.
Raised by C. Reagles, Schenectady, New York, supposedly from seed of Washington. Fruit large, roundish; suture deep; sides unequal; yellow, tinged with green, mottled with crimson specks next to the sun; bloom thin; stem of medium length, thick; flesh yellow veined with white, firm, coarse; good; freestone.

Anderson. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:27. 1897. 2. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 488. 1904.  Anderson's Early Red 1.
Found growing on the Turkey River near Sioux Rapids, Iowa, by Mrs. Vincent Anderson, about 1865. Trees productive; fruit of medium size; good; mid-season.

Angelina Burdett. Domestica. 1. Gard. Chron. 13:600. 1853. 2. Mas Le Verger 6:37. 1866-73. 3. Gaucher Pom. Prak. Obst. 91. 1894.
Raised from seed by Henry Dowling of Woolston, England, about 1845. Tree vigorous, hardy and productive; fruit of medium size, roundish; suture deep, one side enlarged; skin thick; dark purple with brown dots and heavy bloom; flesh greenish-yellow, rich, juicy, sprightly; stone small, obovate, free; mid-season.

Angouleme. Domestica. 1. Waugh Plum Cult. 95. 1901. Reine-Claude d'Angouleme 1.
Similar to Reine Claude.

Anna. Americana. 1. Montreal Hort. Soc. Rpt. 90. 1885.
A variety grown from a wild plum root secured in Wisconsin by Mr. Charles Gibb of Montreal, Canada.

Anna Maria. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am 896. 1869.
Originated by S. D. Pardee, New Haven, Connecticut. Fruit below medium in size, roundish-oval; suture lacking; pale greenish-yellow splashed with darker green; stem short; cavity small; flesh pale green, juicy, melting, rich, sugary; good; stone nearly free; tree moderately vigorous, spreading, productive.

Anna Spath. Domestica. 1. Lange Allgem. Garten. 2:421. 1879. 2. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 401. 1881. 3. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 421. 1889. 4. Can. Exp. Farm Bul., 2d Ser. 3:49. 1900. Anna Spaeth 3.
Originated with M. Spath at Baumschulenweg, Germany, about 1870. Tree vigorous; fruit of medium size, roundish-oval, flattened at both ends; skin tough, free; brownish-black; dots brownish; bloom thick; flesh greenish-yellow, very juicy, mild; good; freestone; season late.

Annual Bearer. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 87:11. 1901.
A seedling grown by Edson Gaylord, Nora Springs, Iowa. Fruit large, oblong; suture distinct; purplish-red on a yellow ground; dots numerous, small; bloom heavy; skin thick, tough; stone strongly flattened, oval, pointed, sharp on both sides; flesh rich; flavor good; mid-season. Apple. Americana. Patten No. 40.
A seedling of Hawkeye; fruit large, roundish, dark red; dots conspicuous; suture aline; skin tender; flesh juicy, soft, fibrous, sweet; fair; clingstone; mid-season.

Apple. Domestica. 1. Cole Am. Fr. Book 210. 1849. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 373. 1857. Apple Plum i, 2.
Originated in the garden of D. U. Pratt, Chelsea, Massachusetts. Fruit, large, flattened like an apple; sides unequal; suture distinct; stem short; cavity broad, deep; reddish-purple; bloom heavy; dots yellow; flesh greenish-yellow, tender, slightly coarse, sweet, sprightly; skin astringent; semi-clinging; mid-season.

Apricot. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Colo. Sta. Bul. 50:32. 1898.
Tree bushy; fruit medium in size, roundish; suture slight; skin thick; red over yellow; bloom thin; flesh reddish-yellow, juicy, sweet; quality fair; stone large, flattened, clinging; mid-season.

Aprikosenartige Mirabelle. Insititia. 1. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 426. 1881. 2. Mathieu Noin. Pom. 421. 1889. Mirabelle Abricoiee 2.
Said to be a synonym of Mirabelle; Oberdieck claims that this variety has firmer and sweeter flesh, and that its shoots are glabrous.

Arab. Domestica. 1. Ind. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 29. 1885. 2. Mich. Sta. Rpt. in. 1887.  Noted in the preceding references as imported from eastern Europe.

Arctic. Nigra? 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 426. 1900.
A variety selected from wild plants by Thomas Frankland, Stonewall, Manitoba, and tested at the Experimental Farm, Indian Head, Northwest Territory, Canada. Fruit large, red; late. [distinct from the P. domestica 'Arctic'- ASC]

Ashes Seedling. Species? Mentioned in N. Y. Sta. Rpt. 9:347. 1890.

Ashridge Black. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 143. 1831. 2. Mclntosh Bk. Card. 2:529. 1855.
An English variety not cultivated in this country. Medium in size, roundish, purple, firm; quality fair; a good kitchen variety; tree hardy and productive.

Assiniboia. Nigra? 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 426. 1900.
A seedling raised at the Experimental Farm, Indian Head, Northwest Territory, Canada; now discarded. Fruit of medium size; early.

Aston. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 143. 1831.
A small, round, purple, clingstone plum of mediocre quality; obsolete.

Aston Green Gage. Domestica. Mentioned in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 147. 1831. Atkins. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:262. 1900. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 143. 1901.  Beatty 1, 2.
Originated with James Beatty at Atkins, Benton County, Iowa, and introduced by R. Royce of the same place in 1894 under the name Beatty. It became confused with the Beaty of Texas and Waugh renamed it, giving it the name of the place of its origin. Fruit large, oval, slightly compressed; cavity small; suture a line; red on a yellow ground; dots small, numerous; bloom thin; flesh yellow; good; clingstone; mid-season.

A-248. Munsoniana X Trinora. 1. Burbank Cat. 22. 1893. 2. Vt. Sta. Bul. 5:67. 1898.
An early, dark crimson, heart-shaped plum of medium size, yellow flesh and inferior quality.

Aubert Domestica. 1. Am, Pom. Soc. Rpt. 61. 1887. 2. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 86. 1890. 3. U.S.D.A. Rpt. 292, PI. V c and d. 1893. 4- Am- P0- Soc. Cat. 25. 1897. 5. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 328. 1903.  Dame Aubert Jaune 1, 2. Dame Aubert Jaune 3. Riga 115 2. Yellow Aubert ?i, 3, 5. Yellow Aubert 4.
Introduced from Russia by J. L. Budd of the Iowa Experiment Station in 1882. According to the introducer this variety was found in southwest Russia and Poland; said to have come from central Asia. Evidently related to the Yellow Egg, differing in being earlier and of better quality.

Auburn. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 897. 1869.
A variety said by Downing to be a native of western New York. Fruit medium in size, oval; suture shallow; skin light reddish-purple with a thin bloom; stem short; flesh coarse, orange-yellow, not juicy, sweet, pleasant; good; freestone; early.

Auchtertyre. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 143. 1831.
A small, oval, purple, early plum; quality medium; freestone; obsolete.

August* Nigra. 1. Bailey Ann. Hort. 20. 1889. 2* Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:27. 1897.  August Red 1.
A large purplish-red variety introduced by J. W. Kerr, Maryland. Fruit oblong; clingstone; tree upright, vigorous, unproductive; foliage resembling that of an apricot.

August Zwetsche. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 421. 1889.  LiegeVs August Zwetsche.

Aunt Ann. Domestica. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 351. 1866. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 918. 1869. 3. Mas Pom. Gen. 275. 1873.  Guthrie's Aunt Ann 1. Guthrie's Aunt Ann 2. Aunt Ann 2, 3. Tante Anne 3.
This variety was grown in Scotland by a Mr. Guthrie. A large, round, greenish-yellow plum; flesh rich, juicy; freestone; tree hardy, productive.

Aurora. Hortulana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1900-03. Moreman's Cherry 1.
Originated by Theodore Williams of Nebraska and introduced in 1898 by J. W. Kerr of Maryland under the name " Moreman's Cherry;" in 1900, Mr. Kerr changed the name to Aurora. Fruit large, round, cherry-red deepening to dark red; clingstone; season late; tree vigorous, productive.

Austrian Quetsche. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 152. 1831. 2. Prince Pom. Man. 2:78. 1832. 3. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 311. 1845.  Bremen Prune 2,3. Quetsche de Breme 3.
A strain of the German Prune from which it differs in being a little later and of somewhat better flavor.

Autumn Gage. Domestica. 1. Cultivator 10:167. 1843. 2* Ann. Pom. Beige 7:43, PI. 1859. 3. Hogg Fruit Man. 380. 1866. 4. Mas Le Verger 6:33, fig. 1866-73. 5. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 435. 1889.

Autumn Gage 3, 5. Herbst Reine Claude 5. Prune Autumn Gage 2. Reine-Claude d'Automne 2, 5. Reine-Claude d'Automne 4. Roe's Autumn 3. Roe's Autumn Gage 3; 5-
Raised by Wm. Roe, Newburgh, New York. Tree spreading, hardy, productive; fruit of medium size, oval; suture shallow; stem of medium length; pale yellow with a thin bloom; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy and sweet with a rich and excellent flavor; stone long, compressed, pointed at both ends, free; season late.

Azure. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:67, fig. 34. 1873. Reine-Claude Azurde 1.
Mas states that this variety grew in his garden from a sucker. Tree vigorous, medium in productiveness; fruit medium in size, roundish-oblate; suture a line; skin tender; purplish-black; stem long, slender to medium; cavity deep; flesh green, fine, tender, soft, juicy, sweet, aromatic; freestone; mid-season.

Bailey. Americana. 1. Kerr Gat. 1901-1902.
A variety sent J. W. Kerr, Denton, Maryland, by the Division of Pomology, United States Department of Agriculture, for testing. Tree vigorous, upright, productive; fruit above medium in size, oblong, very dark red; good; clingstone; said to be free from rot.

Bailey. Domestica. 1. Cornell Sta. Bui 62:20. 1894.
Known only from a plate in the possession of the Rochester Lithographing Company, made some time prior to 1886, representing this plurn and stating that it " has not failed to bear for twenty-five successive years."

Baker. Insititia. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 177:41, 43. 1899. 2. Ibid. 187:77, 78. 1901.  Baker Damson 1.
Tree upright, vigorous, unproductive; fruit small, roundish-ovate; stem slender, inserted in a slight cavity; dark blue or black; flesh greenish-amber, juicy; good; stone small, roundish, clinging.

Baker, Domestica. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 101. 1891. 2. Cornell Sta. Bul. 131: 182. 1897- 3. Brown Bros. Cat. 1900. Bakers German Prune 1, 3.
A seedling of the German Prune which had its origin at Collingwood, Canada, with a Mr. Baker. Tree hardy, an annual bearer, productive; fruit resembles the Italian Prune in color and quality but is a trifle smaller and two weeks later.

Baldwin. Americana. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 333. 1888. 2. S. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:9, 51 fig. 1905.
A wild variety found by D. L. Royer of Iowa. Tree vigorous ; fruit large, round; apex flat; cavity deep, narrow; dark red, mottled with dull yellow; bloom heavy; dots whitish, minute, numerous; skin thick, astringent; flesh dark yellow, flavor pleasant, acid; good; stone semi-free, rounded, thick, of medium size.

Ballonartige Gelbe Zwetsche. Domestica? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 421. 1889.  Damas-Ballon Jaune. Damas-Ballon Panachee Variete.

Ballonartige Rote Damascene. Domestica? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 421. 1889. Damas-Ballon Rouge.

Bankalari Früh Damascene. Domestica? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 421. 1889.

Bankalari's Rote Früh Damascene 1. Banker's Gage. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 147. 1831. 2. Kenrick Am. Orch. 202. 1835.
Originated in New York. Fruit large; flavor good; adapted to drying.

Bant Spate Reine Claude. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Norn. Pom. 422. 1889.  Banfs Late Green Gage.

Baraboo. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:28. 1897. 2. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:262. 1900.
Found wild near Baraboo, Wisconsin, about 1860 and introduced by William Toole of the same place in 1897. Tree vigorous, spreading, symmetrical; fruit of medium size, round, dull yellow, overlaid with red; flesh firm, mild, sweet; quality fair; mid-season ; drops badly and is a poor keeper.

Barbary. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576. 1629. 2. Rea Flora 207. 1676.  Barberry 2.
A large, egg-shaped, early, productive, black plum.

Barkhausen Violette Reine Claude. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Norn. Pom. 422. 1889.

Barkley. Americana? 1. Letter from Kerr. Teeter 1.
From Pennsylvania; fruit medium in size, green, blushed with red; good.

Barnsback. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 87:11. 1901. 2. S. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:9. 1905.  Barnsbeck 2.
Originated at Vermilion, South Dakota. Fruit large, roundish; suture a line; yellowish overspread with light red; sparsely dotted; heavy bloom; skin medium thick, astringent until fully ripe; flesh pale yellow or reddish, juicy, sweet; good; stone nearly free; mid-season.

Baronne Helen Trauttenberg. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 422. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 163, 352. 1895.
A variety said to resemble Italian Prune.

Basaricatta. Domestica. 1. Gallesio Pom. Ital. 2:P1. 1839. Collo-Torto 1.
An Italian variety described by Gallesio in his Pomona Italiana. Fruit long, prune-shaped, necked; skin golden-yellow; flesh yellow, firm, sweet and agreeable; a good shipper.

Bastle. Species? 1. Tex. Sta. Bul. 32:490. 1899.
Reported as very weak in growth and as having failed to produce fruit.

Batchelor Damson. Insititia. 1. N. Y. Sta. Rpt. 12:611. 1893.
Received for testing at the New York Experiment Station.

Bazalicza. Domestica. 1. Mas Le Verger 6:139. 1866-73. 2. Oberdieck Deut. Obst Sort. 441. 1881. 3. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 422. 1889. 4. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 402. 1898. 5. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 26. Ser., 3:51. 1900.  Quetsche de Bazalicza 1. Bazalicza Zwetsche 1. Bazalicza Zwetsche 2, ^. Bazal-licza's Grosse Blaue Zwetsche 3. Quetsche de Bazalicza 3. Bazalicza's Prune 4. Bazalicza Damson 5.
Raised by Liegel of Braunau, Germany, from seed of Red Magnum Bonum. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit above medium size, oblong-oval; suture shallow, halves usually unequal; skin free; dark purple; bloom thin; flesh yellow, sweet; excellent; clingstone; early.

Beach Plum. Maritima.
"Beach Plum" is the common name for Prunus maritima.

Beals. Domestica.
A seedling raised by George F. Beals, of Viscalia, California, and sent to Nelson Smith of Geneva, New York, for testing. Fruit large, egg-shaped, lop-sided; suture shallow; skin thick; blue, often purplish; dots yellow; flesh firm, yellow, juicy, sweet; stone large, oval, rough; mid-season.

Bean. Americana, i. Minn. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 128. 1890. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:28. 1897.
Found wild by H. Knudson, Springfield, Minnesota. Fruit below medium in size, oblong; apex flattened; suture depressed; pale yellow tinged with crimson; dots faint; skin astringent unless fully ripe; flesh pale yellow or reddish, juicy, sweet, rich; stone large, oblong, rough, pointed, grooved on the back; mid-season.

Beaty. Angustifolia varians. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:36, 60. 1902. 2. Thomas Am. Fruit Cult. 489. 1897. 3. Tex. Sta. Bul. 32:478. 1899. 4. Waugh Plum Cult. 192. 1901.  Beauty's Choice 1. Beaty Choice 2. Beauty 3. Beaty's Choice 4. El Paso 4. El Paso 1.
Originated under cultivation with Lee Beaty, Luling County, Texas, and introduced by him in 1877. Tree irregular, spreading; fruit of medium size, roundish; cavity shallow; light red; bloom thin; dots numerous; flesh yellow; good; stone oval, turgid, clinging.

Bechstein Spitzpflaume. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 422. 1889.  Blaue Zipper. Prunus Oxycarpa. Rosinen Pflaume. Spitz Pflaume. Spitzige Rote Pflaume. Rote Zwetsche incor. Rote Zipper. Bedford. Nigra? 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 426. 1900.
A seedling raised at Indian Head Experimental Farm, Northwest Territory, Canada. Fruit of medium size.

Beer Plum. Domestica. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 86. 1890.
One of the many Domesticas imported from Europe by Professor J. L. Budd. This one is small and fit only for culinary purposes.

Bell. Species? 1. Tex. Dept. Agr. Bul. 12:102. 1910. Bell's October 1.
A variety said to be of value near Plain view, Texas.

Belle de Hardy. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 422. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 163, 352. 1895.
Said to resemble Agen.

Belle de Louvain. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 392. 1857. 2. Ibid. 898. 1869. 3. Lucas Vollst. Hand. Obst. 471. 1894. 4. Guide Prat. 157, 352. 1895.  Large Black Imperial! 4. Plum of Louvain 1. Prune de Louvain 2. Schone von Lowen 3. Schone von Lowen 4.
A seedling found in the nursery of Van Mons at Louvain, Belgium, about 1840. Tree vigorous, a biennial bearer; fruit large, long-oval; suture distinct; deep purple with delicate bloom; flesh firm, yellowish, juicy, rich; mid-season; valuable for culinary purposes.

Belle de Paris. Domestica. Mentioned in Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 26. Ser. 3:49. 1900. Belle de Riom. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 144. 1831. 2. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:83. 1873.
This variety is thought to have originated in the vicinity of the French village of Riom, in the early part of the Nineteenth Century. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit medium, oval; suture indistinct; skin intense purple; dots white; flesh greenish-yellow, melting, rich, sweet, aromatic; very good; stone oval, free; late.

Belle de Schoeneberg. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom Pom. 449. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 158. 352. 1895.  Belle de Schoneberg 1. Gloire de Schoneberg 1, 2. Rotgefieckte Gold Pflaume 1. Rothgefleckte Goldpflaume 2. Schone von Schoneberg 1. Schone von Schoneberg 2.
Tree neither vigorous nor productive; fruit large, roundish, reddish-violet; flesh yellow, sweet, agreeable; good; early.

Belsiana. Cerasifera. 1. Cat. Cong. Pom. France 471. 1887.
A wild plum resembling Myrobalan, selected by the Arabs and introduced into France in 1878 by G. Luizet, to whom it was sent by Ferdinand Lombard, horticulturist at Mustopha, Algieria. Fruit of medium size, round; suture indistinct; cavity shallow; skin papery; amber-yellow, with a rose tint on the sunny side; flesh amber-yellow, melting, sweet; stone slightly clinging; early.

Belvoir. Domestica. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 680, 686. 1884.
Fruit above medium in size, round; suture faint; skin thin; black with russet markings and dots; flesh yellow, tender, rich; freestone; late.

Bender, Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1896-7. 2. Waugh Plum Cult 143. 1901. 3. Wis.Hort.Soc.Rpt. 121. 1902. 4.S. Dak.Sta.BuLgy.10. 1905. Paul Wolf 4.
Reported to have been grown near Chaska, Minnesota, by Paul Wolf. Tree very vigorous, productive; fruit large, oblong, conical, irregular; suture indistinct; dark red with thick bloom; dots numerous, small; skin thick, tough; flesh light yellow, very firm, meaty; fair to good; stone long, pointed, early.

Benedetto, Domestica? Listed in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 422. 1889. Beni-Detto. Benedict. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 899. 1869.
Originated in Pennsylvania. Tree vigorous; fruit small, oval; suture distinct; pale yellow, dotted and splashed with red on the sunny side; bloom thin; flesh pale yellow, juicy, pleasant; good; clingstone.

Beni Botan. Triflora. 1. Va. Sta. Bul. 129:111. 1901.
A variety imported by the Department of Agriculture

Benschoten. Domestica.
Pits were left in the cellar of a Mr. Benschoten of Woodstock, Ulster County, New York, by a German emigrant, and from them the above variety was grown. Fruit above medium in size, oval, cream color, mottled with crimson; flesh golden-yellow, sugary, aroma like that of an apricot; season late.

Benson. Hortulana. 1. Kerr Cat. 14. 1898. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 40. 1899. 3-Waugh Plum Cult. 177. 1901. 4. III. Hort. Soc. RpL 422. 1905.  Moreman Prune 1. Benson Market 4.
Benson originated with Theodore Williams of Benson, Nebraska; was first called Moreman Prune but was renamed and introduced by J. W. Kerr in 1898. Tree vigorous; fruit medium in size, roundish; cavity shallow; stem slender; suture distinct; deep cherry-red, with numerous, yellowish dots; bloom thin; flesh yellow; quality fair; stone medium in size, oval, clinging; season late.

Berlepsch. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:175. 1873. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 422. 1889.  Berlepsch's Grosse Grime Reine-Claude 2. Berlepchs Renclode Grosse Grüne 1. Grosse Reine-Claude de Berlepsch 2. Grosse Reine-Claude Verte De Berlepsch 1.
A seedling raised by Liegel of Braunau, Germany. Tree vigorous, medium in productiveness; fruit of the same flavor and quality as the Reine Claude, of which it is probably a strain to be distinguished by earlier maturity, slightly more depressed form and a paler-colored skin.

Berlet Früh Damascene. Domestica? Listed in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 422. 1889.

Bernsteinzwetsche. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 422. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 163, 351. 1895.  Ambre de Provence 2. Ambre de Provence 1. Bernsteinzwetsche 2.  Mentioned in the references cited without description.

Berryhill. Americana. 1. Meneray Cat.
Originated with H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa; introduced by F. W. Meneray, Council Blufe, Iowa. Tree productive; fruit large, red over a yellow ground; skin thin, tender; flesh firm; good; clingstone.

Berry Plum. Species? 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:78. 1892.  Mentioned as a variety growing on the grounds of the New York State College of "Agriculture.

Best Black Blood. Triflora. 1. Rural N. Y. 59:655 fig. 245. 1900.
Originated by Burbank and described by him as being productive and vigorous; leaves resembling Simon; fruit large; flesh juicy and firm.

Best of All. Hortulana mineri X Triflora. 1. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:7. 1898. 2. Rural N. Y. 65:730. 1906. Bestovall 1.
This is a seedling of Miner pollinated by Abundance originating with T. V. Munson, Denison, Texas. Tree vigorous, prolific; fruit of medium size, round, dark red; flesh firm, meaty; good; late.

Beta. Maritima. 1. Kerr Cat. 1899-1900.
Selected from wild plants by E. W. Winsor of New York. Fruit yellow, small and round; very prolific; early.

Betterave. Domestica. 1. Noisette Man. Comp. Jard. 2:496. 1860.
Tree large and vigorous; fruit large, round, pale yellow, juicy, not pleasant.

Beztercser Grosse Zwetsche. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 422. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 163, 352. 1895.
Mentioned in the preceding references; said to resemble Washington.

Biconical. Triflora X ? 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 14:270. 1901.
A cross between Abundance and "a Chicasaw," originating with A. L. Bruce

Texas. Leaves Triflora-like with peculiar double, crenulate, glandular margins. Fruit conical, of medium size; cavity shallow; suture faint; skin thin; bright red; bloom moderate; flesh soft, yellow, subacid; quality fair; stone medium in size, round-oval, clinging.

Biery. Triflora. 1. U.S.D.A. Pom. Rpt. 45. 1895.
Received from California by J. J. Biery, Covington, Louisiana, wrongly labeled Long Fruit. Fruit spherical, medium in size; cavity deep; suture indistinct; color yellow, blushed with red, patched with russet and with minute, russet dots, skin thin* separating easily from the tender, juicy, yellow flesh; good; stone medium in size, oval, clinging; early.

Big Rose. Domestica. 1. U.S.D.A. Div. Pom. Bul. 10:21. 1901.
A variety of English origin introduced into Oregon about 1900.

Bilona. Triflora X ?
Bilona, as yet unintroduced, originated with H. A. Biles, Roanoke, Texas, and is thought by F. T. Ramsey of Austin, Texas, to be a seedling of Chabot probably crossed with some native variety. Tree resembles Chabot; fruit red, coloring long before ripe; quality said to be very good.

Bingham, Domestica. 1. Prince Treat. Hort. 27. 1828. 2. Prince Pom. Man. 2:101. 1832. 3. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 272. 1845. 4. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 87. 1854. 5. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 422. 1889. Bingham's Pflaume 5.
Originated in Pennsylvania. Fruit large, oval, yellow, occasionally with carmine dots on the sunny exposure; suture distinct; cavity narrow and deep; flesh yellowish, juicy, pleasant; good; clingstone; early; at one time highly esteemed.

Biondeck. Domestica. 1. Koch Dent. Obst. 572. 1876. 2. Lauche Dent. Pom. 10, PI. IV. 1882. 3, Mathieu Norn. Pom. 422. 1889.  Biondeck's Frühzwetsche 1, 2, 3. Biondeck's rothe Frühzwetsche 2. Biondeck9s Rote Früh Zwetsche 3. PrScoce Biondeck 3. Quetsche Pricoce de Biondeck 3.
Liegel produced this variety from a seed of Early Yellow and named it after his friend Biondeck, of Baden, near Vienna. Tree large, productive; fruit oval, medium, light red; flesh yellowish, sweet, highly flavored; freestone; early; considered valuable for drying.

Birchland. Americana. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 26. Ser. 3:49. 1900.
A variety from Minnesota reported as unsatisfactory in British Columbia.

Bittern. Domestica. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 289. 1889. 2. U.S.D.A. Pom. Rpt. 25. 1894. 3. Cornell Sta. Bul. 131:182. 1897.  Biltern 3.
A seedling grown by Francis Rivers, Sawbridgeworth, England. Tree productive; fruit above medium or large, oval, purple, with a heavy bloom; dots few, inconspicuous; skin thick, acid; flesh greenish-yellow, firm, juicy, brisk subacid; good; stone long, of medium size, oval, clinging; early.

Bixby. Americana. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 436. 1888. 2. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:262. 1892. 3. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:29. 1897.
Found on the homestead of Rev. N. W. Bixby, Clayton County, Iowa, in 1847; introduced by C, H. True, Edgewood, Iowa, in 1880. Tree spreading, vigorous; fruit large, roundish-oval; cavity narrow, shallow; suture a line; apex rounded; yellow more or less covered with bright red; dots numerous, small, yellow; skin thick, tender; flesh yellow, sweet but not rich in flavor; good; stone large, flattened, clinging; mid-season.

Black Arabka. Domestica. i. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 61. 1887. 2. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 86. 1890.  Tchernaya Arabskaya 1. Mixed Arab 2. Black Arab 2. Black Prune 2.
One of the foreign varieties tested by the Iowa Agricultural College.

Black Ball. Domestica. Mentioned in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 144. 1831.

Black Damask. Domestica. 1. Miller Gard. Diet. 1754. 2. Am. Gard. Cal. 587. 1806. 3. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 374. 1857.  Small Damas 1. Little Black Damask 1. Small Black Damask 2.
Black Damask has been confused by the old writers with the common Damson. This plum is a Domestica with a sweet, pleasantly flavored flesh suitable for dessert purposes and ripens much earlier than the Damson.

Black Damask Hasting. Insititia. 1. Quintinye Com. Gard. 68. 1699.
Mentioned by Quintinye as having a "sharp and sourish taste."

Black Hawk. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 4:95. 1889. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:29. 1897. 3. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 37. 1899. 4. Waugh Plum Cult. 143. 1901.
A wild variety found in Black Hawk County, Iowa. Tree hardy, vigorous, and productive; fruit large, flattened, more convex on the ventral side; suture distinct; deep red; skin thick, tough; flesh yellow, tender, rich; good; stone free, mid-season; listed in the fruit catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1899.

Black Hill. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 144. 1831.
Cultivated in the Gardens of the London Horticultural Society.

Black Pear. Domestica. 1. Rea Flora 208. 1676. 2. Langley Pomona 96. 1729.
A variety of early European origin now obsolete. Fruit pear-shaped; skin dark red or black; juicy when fully ripe.

Black Perdrigon. Domestica. 1. Abercrombie Gard. Ass't 13. 1786. 2. Willich Dom. Enc. 4:194. 1803.
Probably a strain of Blue Perdrigon.

Black Prune. Domestica. 1. Ia. Agr. Col. Bul. 51. 1886. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 61. 1887. 3. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 86. 1890. 4. Ia. Sta. Bul. 31:34.9. 1895.
Arab No. 1 (Budd unpublished). Black Prune No. 1 3. Black Prune No. 1 4. Black Vengerka 2, Tchernaya vengerskaya 1, 2.
Black Prune was imported by J. L. Budd of the Iowa Experiment Station from Dr. Regel, St. Petersburg, Russia, in 1881-2, under the name "Tchernaya vengerskaya." It. was received at this Station for trial under the name "Arab No. 1." It is a small prune of fair quality when eaten out of hand, but becomes sour in cooking.

Black Prunella. Domestica. 1. Rea Flora 207. 1676. 2. Ray Hist. Plant. 1529. 1688.
An old European plum. Fruit small, black and very sour; once valued in England for preserves.

Blaisdon. Domestica. 1. Watkins Cat. 1892? Blaisdon's Red 1.
Fruit medium in size, red; mid-season.

Blaue Reine Claude. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 423. 1889.  LiegeVs Blaue Reine Claude. Reine-Claude Bleue. Reine-Claude Violette. Schwarze Reine-Claude.

Blaugh. Americana. 1. Ont. Fr. Exp. Sta. Rpt. 6:46. 1899.
A vigorous variety which originated in the Allegheny Mountains, Fruit above medium in size, light purple; bloom heavy; flesh yellow, juicy; good; stone clinging; late; promising.

Bleeker Large Red. Domestica. 1. Cultivator 1:306. 1844.  Mrs. Bleeker's Large Red 1.
Grown by a Mrs. Bleeker of New York from stones received from Germany. Fruit large, bluish-red, melting and rich; mid-season. Downing gave Bleecker's Scarlet as a synonym of the Lombard, but he could not have had this plum in mind.

Bleue de Perse, Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pont. 423. 1889.

Blood Plum, Triflora. 1. Ga. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 54. 1892. 2. Ibid. 96. 1895.  Beni-Smono No. 3 ?i. Blood Plum No. 3 2.
Tree open, straggling, early blooming; fruit small; flesh deep red, juicy, sweet; middle of July.

Blubenthal. Insititia ? 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 401. 1898.  Blubenthal Damson 1.
According to the preceding reference the largest of the Damsons. Fruit heart-shaped, deep purple; bloom heavy; flesh green, juicy, sprightly; mid-season.

Blue Apricot. Domestica. i. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 26. Ser. 3:49. 1900.
Fruit above medium in size, roundish, flattened at the ends; suture well defined; skin bluish-purple; dots few; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, sweet; stone small, roundish, free; early.

Blue Egg. Domestica. 1. Lange Allgem. Garten. 2:421. 1879. 2* Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 406. 1881. 3. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 422. 1889.  Bamberger Eier Pflaume 3. Blaue Eierpflaume 2, 3. Blaue Kaiser Pflaume 3. Dame-Aubert Rouge 3. Eier Pflaume 3. Grosse Blaue Eier Pflaume 3. Violette Kaiser Pflaume 3 incor.
A European variety similar to the German Prune. Tree large; fruit large, obovate to oval; skin reddish-blue; flesh yellow, aromatically sweet; freestone; mid-season.

Blue Eye. Domestica. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894.
Mentioned as of German origin by J. W. Kerr, who obtained the variety from Charles Luedloff, Carver, Minnesota.

Blue Matchless. Domestica. Mentioned in Forsyth Treat. Fr. Trees 21. 1803.

Bluemont. Angustifolia watsoni. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 126. 1889. 2, Bailey Ev. Nat. Fruits 222. 1898.
Introduced by E. Gale of Manhattan, Kansas, about i860. Fruit of medium size, round, flattened, dull red with heavy bloom; flesh yellow, coarse; flavor fair; clingstone; early.

Blue Moldavka. Domestica. 1. Ont. Fr. Gr. Assoc. 1:17, 74. 1894. 2. Ia. Sta. Bul. 31:347. 1895. 3. Kan Sta. Bul. 101:119, I20 % 1901- 4* Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 2:306. 1903. 5. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:38. 1903.  Moldavka 1, 3. Voronesh Blue 5.

Blue Moldavka was received from Russia by J. L. Budd of the Iowa Experiment Station about 1882 in a lot of sprouts labeled Moldavka. Tree hardy and productive; fruit large, oblong; suture a line; cavity of medium size; stem short; dark purple; bloom thick; dots numerous, russet; flesh greenish-yellow, firm, dry; flavor not high; quality fair; stone semi-clinging; mid-season.

Blue Plum. Domestica. 1. Horticulturist 7:404. 1852. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 900. 1869.
Fruit of medium size, roundish-oval; suture obscure; skin dark blue with light bloom; flesh yellowish-green, juicy, sweet and refreshing; clingstone; early.

Blue Primordian. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 575. 1629. 2. Rea Flora 206, 1676.
An old variety of the same shape as the Red Primordian but smaller and of a violet-blue color; of good taste; ripens early, productive.

Blue Prolific. Domestica. 1. Flor. and Pom. 89. 1876. 2. Hogg Fruit Man. 722. 1884. 3. Guide Prat. 156, 356. 1895.  Blue Prolific 3. Fertile Bleue 3. Rivers' Blue Prolific 2. Rivers' No. 4 1.
Tree hardy, productive; fruit below medium in size, oval, slightly narrowed at the stem end; cavity and suture shallow; dark purple, with thin bloom; flesh dull greenish-yellow, juicy; flavor brisk and agreeable; a cooking plum; stone clinging; ripens early.

Blue Prune. Domestica. 1. HoiTy Orch. Comp. 2. 1842.
Hoffy published a colored engraving of this variety, but did not describe it. Fruit long-oval; suture deep; dark blue.

Blue Rock. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 423. 1903.
A seedling from Thomas Rivers, England. Tree upright, productive; fruit of medium size, round; cavity small; suture distinct; dark purple; dots small, gray; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet, rich; clingstone; early.

Blue Tweens. Domestica. 1. Horticulturist 25:204. 1870. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 52. 1871.
A seedling, raised by G. P. Peffer of Pewaukee, Wisconsin, about 1855. Tree hardy, slow in growth; fruit in pairs, giving rise to the name; flesh yellowish-green, adhering to the stone on one side; flavor sprightly subacid; late.

Blue Violet. Domestica. Mentioned in Ray Hist. Plant. 2:1528. 1688.

Blum. Domestica. 1. Cultivator 3d Ser. 8:280 fig. 1860. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 900. 1869.
A seedling from North Carolina resembling Nelson's Victory in color and shape. Size above medium, oval, dull orange with numerous small brown dots; flesh yellowish-brown, juicy; good; early.

Bohemian Prune. Domestica. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894.
Introduced by J. W. Kerr, who secured plants from Charles LuedlofT, Carver, Minnesota. Tree upright, vigorous, productive; fruit large, roundish-oval, dark purple; good.

Bomberger. Americana. 1. Terry Cat. 1900. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 87:12. 1901.
A variety grown by H. A. Terry of Crescent, Iowa, from seed of Harrison; first fruited in 1897. Tree upright, vigorous, productive; fruit large, roundish; suture faint; yellow overlaid with red; flesh tender, sweet, rich; good; stone round, smooth, abruptly pointed; mid-season.

Bongoume. Triflora. 1. Normand Cat. 1891.
Sold by J. L. Normand, Marksville, Louisiana, as a Japanese plum resembling an apricot.

Bonne Bouche. Domestica. 1. Thompson Gard. Ass't 4:156. 1901.
Of French origin. Fruit medium, greenish-yellow; flesh golden-yellow, tender, juicy; flavor delicious; mid-season; valuable for dessert.

Bonne deBry. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 26. Ser. 3:50. 1900. 2. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 480. 1904. 3. Soc. Nat. Hort. France Pom. 526 fig. 1904.
Originated in the valley of the Marne near Bry-sur-Marne, France. Tree vigorous; fruit below medium, globular; suture shallow; skin dark purple; heavy bloom; flesh greenish, juicy, sweet, tender; good for canning; stone very small; very early.

Bonnemain de la Digue. Domestica? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 423. 1889.
Found in the reference given above and in Journal de la Sodete Nationale et Centrale d1 Horticulture de France 562. 1875.

Bonne Rouge. Domestica. Listed in Lond. Hort Soc. Cat. 144. 1831. Bonnet d'Eveque. Domestica. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 353. 1866. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 900. 1869. 3. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 422. 1889. 4, Guide Prat. 163, 352. 1895.  Bischofsmiitze 3. Bonnet d'Eveque 3. Die Bischojsmutze 4.
Tree vigorous, upright; fruit medium, obovate, dark purple; flesh rich; freestone; good; late.

Bossland. Hortulana mineri X (Domestica? X Hortulana). 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:263. 1900.
A cross between Miner and a seedling of Quackenboss and Wayland, originating with Theodore Williams, Benson, Nebraska, in 1893. Tree vigorous, spreading; fruit medium, dark red; flesh coarse, dry; stone semi-clinging; mid-season.

Boulouf. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 901. 1869. 2. Hogg Fruit Man. 688. 1884. 3. N. Y. Sta. An. Rpt. 15:291. 1896. Bouloff 3.
Large, roundish-oval; suture a line; stem short and thick; red covered with thick bloom; dots brownish; flesh yellow, juicy and sweet; good.

Bouncer. Americana. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:29. 1903.
A seedling of Yosemite Purple grown at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, about 1900. Fruit large, roundish; suture a line; uniform deep purplish-red; dots numerous, yellow, distinct; moderate bloom; flesh deep yellow, juicy, sweet and rich; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Bower. Domestica. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 122. 1860. 2. Gard. Mon. 3:314. 1861.  Bower's Gage 1,2.
A seedling raised by a Mr. Bower of Philadelphia about 1850. Tree lacking in vigor; fruit oblong, yellow, like Lawrence; probably of Reine Claude parentage; good.

Bowie. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576. 1629. 2. Rea Flora 207. 1676.  Bole 2.
Described by Rea as of "middle size, black, flat on one side and well tasted."

Brackett. Americana, i. Terry Cat. 1900.
One of H. A. Terry's varieties coming from a seed of Harrison. Tree strong, upright and productive; fruit large, pale yellow overspread with dark red; flesh yellow, firm; good; stone semi-clinging.

Brahy. Domestica. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 353. 1866. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 901. 1869. 3. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 445. 1889.  Brahy's Green Gage 1, 2. Brahy's Green Gage 3. Reine-Claude de Brahy 1, 2, 3. Reine-Claude von Brahy 3.
Supposed to have been raised by M. Brahay Eckenholm, at Herstal, near Liege, Belgium. Fruit very large, round; suture distinct; skin yellowish-green, with fine bloom; flesh rich yellow, tender, juicy, very rich flavor; mid-season; a trifle later than Reine Claude, which it otherwise resembles.

Brainerd. Americana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:36. 1892. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 144. 1901. Brainerd's Best 2.
A wild variety found in Ramsay County, Minnesota, prior to 1884. Fruit small; poor; worthless.

Brandon Ruby. Nigra. Mentioned in Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:39. 1903. Brandy Gage. Domestica. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 371. 1866. 2. Fell Cat. 1893. 3. Guide Prat. 163, 352. 1895. 4. Garden 62:433. 1902. ImpSriale de Mann 3. Mann's Imperial 1,3. Mann's Brandy Gage 1, 3.
A variety of European origin resembling a small Golden Drop. Fruit small, yellow, with heavy bloom; flesh melting and sweet; good; early.

Brant of Naples. Domestica. 1. Can. Hort. Soc. An. Rpt. 19:253. 1896.
Mentioned as hardy. This variety may be the same as Beauty of Naples.

Bramnan. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 547. 1901.
An unproductive German variety. Fruit medium in size, globular; stem short; suture a line; skin greenish-yellow; flesh green, coarse, dry, sweet, pleasant; stone clinging; early.

Braunauer Damascenenartige Pflaume. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 423. 1889. Breck. Triflora X ? 1. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:7. 1898. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 204. 1-901.
First offered for sale in 1899 by F. T. Ramsey of Austin, Texas. Fruit oblong or slightly conical, medium in size; stem short; suture lacking; bright red, indistinctly striped; dots many, small, white, inconspicuous; bloom light; flesh red, fibrous; clingstone; much like Wild Goose, but somewhat firmer.

Brevoort Purple. Domestica. 1. Kenrick Am. Orch. 203. 1835. 2 Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 222, 244. 1858. 3. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 901. 1869. 4. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 448. 1889.  Brevoorfs Purple 4. Brevoort's Purple Bolmar 1. Brevoort1 s Purple Washington 1, 3, 4. Brevorts 2. Brevort's Purple 3. Brevorfs Purple 4. Brevorts' Purple Bolmar 4. Brevorts Purple Bolmar 3. New York Purple 3, 4. Rote Washington 4. Rouge de Brevoort 4. Washington 4. Washington Purple 3, 4.
A seedling grown by Henry Brevoort of New York from a stone of Washington planted in 1819. Fruit large, oval; suture distinct at the base; skin reddish-purple; flesh yellow, soft, juicy, vinous; clingstone; mid-season; rejected by the American Pomological Society.

Briancon. Domestica? 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 144. 1831. 2. Prince Pom. Man. 2:105. 1832. 3. Poiteau Pom. Franc. 1. 1846.  De Briancon i} 3. Prune de Briancon 3. Prune de Brigantiaca 2, 3.
A variety indigenous to the Alps in southeastern France. Trees grow to the height of eight or ten feet; fruit small, nearly round, smooth, yellow, with reddish tinge; flesh yellow; freestone. The stone contains a bitter kernel, from which is extracted a valuable oil. Prince considered the tree a hybrid between the plum and the apricot.

Brignole. Domestica. 1. Miller Card. Diet. 3. 1754. 2. Knoop Fructologie 2:55. 1771. 3. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 151. 1831. 4. Prince Pom. Man. 2:67. 1832. 5. Floy-Lindley Guide Orch. Card. 295, 383. 1846.  Prune de Brignole 1. Brignole Plum 1. Brignole Jaune 2. Perdrigon de Brignole Gros 3. Perdrigon de Brignole ?4. Brignole Jaune 5. Prune de Brignole 5.
The Brignole plum is named from Brignoles, a town in France where it is used with the White Perdrigon for the famous Brignoles Prunes. Duhamel and several others have confused the two varieties but they seem to be distinct. The Brignole is larger, its skin less tough, flesh more yellow and the season later than White Perdrigon.

Brignole Violette. Domestica. 1. Knoop Fructologie 2:55. 1771. 2, Quintinye Com. Gard. 68, 69. 1699. 3. Cal. State Bd. Hort. Rpt. 107. 1891.  Brugnole 2. Brignole 2. Brignole 3.
This seems to be a purple strain of the Brignole which has found its way into California. Fruit oval, medium in size, violet; dots light yellow, yellow spots on the sunny side; flesh greenish-yellow, tender, juicy, sweet; freestone; best adapted to a warm climate.

Brill. Cerasifera. 1. Gard. Mon. 17:305. 1875. 2. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 13:368. 1900. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 230. 1901. 4. Ga. Sta. Bul. 67:272. 1904.
This plum is thought to have originated in Mississippi and was introduced by J. T. Whitaker, Tyler, Texas. Tree vigorous, with an upright-spreading habit; fruit small, round; cavity broad, shallow; stem long, slender;' suture a line; bright red with yellow * dots; bloom thin; skin thin; flesh yellow, soft, juicy; quality fair; stone small, clinging; early; listed in the American Pomological Society catalog of fruits for 1875 but removed in 1883.

Bristol. Domestica. 1. ///. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 212. 1904.
Bristol, as tested in Illinois, is very similar to, if not identical with the Lombard.

Briton Seedling. Domestica. 1. Montreal Hort. Soc. Rpt. 92. 1885.
An unproductive seedling of Canadian origin. Fruit of medium size, very dark blue; bloom heavy; flesh greenish, firm, juicy, sweet and pleasant; late.

Brittlewood. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:30. 1897. 2. U.S.D.A. Yearbook 477, 478, PI. LXIL 1902. Brittlewood No. 1 2.
Theodore Williams of Benson, Nebraska, grew this variety from seed of Quaker pollinated by Harrison. Tree large, vigorous, spreading; fruit large, nearly round, symmetrical; cavity small, shallow; stem medium; suture shallow; dark red when fully ripe; dots numerous, small; bloom thick; skin thick, tenacious; flesh yellowish, meaty, juicy, mild subacid, rich; good; stone oval, large, clinging; mid-season.

Brittlewood No. 3. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 5. 1898.
From the same source as Brittlewood but from the reciprocal cross. The two varieties are similar in all respects except that Brittlewood No. 3 is about a week earlier.

Britzer Egg. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 548. 1901.
Originated in Germany. Tree productive; fruit below medium size, egg-shaped; stem short; suture wide, shallow; yellow; bloom thin; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet, pleasant; stone large, semi-clinging; mid-season.

Brock. Species? 1. Can. Hort. 18:350. 1895. General Brock 1.
A seedling grown by J. K. Gordon of Whitby, Ontario. Said to be early and attractive.

Brodie. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:33. 1903.
A seedling tree known in the family of R. Brodie, Montreal, Quebec, for three generations. Fruit below medium, almost round, dark purple; dots obscure; suture a line; flesh greenish-yellow, sweet, rich; good; mid-season.

Brompton. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 144. 1831.
An old variety formerly much used as a stock.

Brooklyn. Americana. 1. Terry Cat. 1900.
A seedling of Harrison grown by H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa. Tree vigorous, spreading, productive; fruit large, oblong, dark red over a yellow ground; flesh firm, yellow; good; stone semi-clinging.

Brunner Zwetsche. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 424. 1889.  Undescribed by Mathieu who took the name from Wiener Garten-Zeitung 286. 1884.

Brunswick. Munsoniana. 1. Lovett Cat. 44. 1893. 2. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 294. 1903. 3. Ohio Sta. Bul. 162:245, 254, 255. 1905.
According to the Lovett Nursery Company, this plum originated in Missouri and was introduced by them. Fruit above medium, roundish-oval; stem of medium length, slender; bright red on a yellowish ground; flesh yellow, meaty, sweet; good; early.

Brussels. Domestica. Mentioned in Lond Hort. Soc. Cat. 144. 1831.

Bryan. Americana. 1. Waugh Plum Cult. 144. 1901. W. J. Bryan 1. Colonel Bryan 1.
One of H. A. Terry's numerous seedlings which fruited first in 1896. Fruit large, oblong, rich, dark red; flesh firm; good.

Buchanan. Domestica. Mentioned in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 144. 1831.

Buchner Konigspflaume. Domestica. Listed in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 424. 1889. Braunauer Konigs Pflaume. Braunauer Violetter Perdrigon. Royale de Braunau.

Budd. Americana. 1. Terry Cat. 1900. Prof. Budd 1.
Originated with H. A. Terry of Iowa and first fruited in 1897. Tree upright, productive; fruit large, bright red, with numerous white dots; flesh firm; good; mid-season.


Buel, Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 272. 1845. 2. Ann. Pom. Beige 8:59, PI. 1860. 3. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 424. 1889.  Buel's Favorite 1. Buel's Liebling's Zwetsche 3. BueVs Favorite 3. Favorite de Buel 3. Prune Buel's Favorite 2.
Raised about 1840 by Isaac Denniston of Albany and named after the distinguished agriculturist, Judge Buel. Fruit large, ovate, broadest toward the stem; stalk long and thick; pale green, thickly sprinkled with lighter dots and speckled red near the stalk; flesh greenish-yellow, firm, juicy and rich; good; stone nearly free; mid-season.

Buffalo Bill. Species? 1. Letter from F. T. Ramsey.
Selected from the wild plums of Texas.

Buhl-Eltershofen. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 424. 1889. Buhl-Eltershofen Zwetsche. Buhler. Domestica. 1. Lucas Vollst. Hand. Obst. 473. 1894. Buhler's Early Prune 1.
Fruit of medium size, egg-shaped, beautiful blue; table and market plum; early.

Bulah No. 4. Hortulana mineri. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:263. 1900.
A seedling from a Miner tree pollinated by wild plums, from J. F. Wagner, Bennett, Cedar County, Iowa, in 1894. Fruit medium to large, dark red; late.

Bullman. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 464. 1900.
A vigorous variety from Germany. Fruit above medium, oval; suture deep; sides unequal; yellow with red dots; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, sweet, pleasant; freestone; early.

Bulgaria. Domestica? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 424. 1889.
Mathieu refers this variety to Pomologische Monatshetfe 323. 1887.

Bulgarian. Domestica. i. Cal. Sta. Bd. Hort. 292. 1885-6. 2. Ibid. 107 fig. 1891. 3. Wickson Cal. Fruits 357. 1891. 4. N. Mex. Sta. Bul. 27:126. 1898. Belgarian Prune 1.
A variety grown chiefly in the vicinity of Haywards, Alameda County, California, for drying. Tree vigorous, bears early and regularly, productive; fruit above medium, roundish-obovate, having a short neck; suture shallow; apex slightly compressed; stem slender, one inch long; cavity narrow and shallow; dark purple; flesh greenish-yellow, sweet and rich with a pleasant flavor; good; stone semi-clinging; season early.

Bullock. Domestica. 1. Quintinye Com. Card. 69. 1699. Bullock's Heart 1.
Described as an "extream large plum."

Bull Plum, Domestica. 1. Quintinye Com. Gard. 68. 1699.
Mentioned by Quintinye as a "dry plum"

Bunker Hill. Domestica. 1. Bailey Ann. Hort. 196. 1891. 2. Me. Sta. An. Rpt. 12: 64. 1896. 3. Vt. Sta. Bul. 134:41. 1902.  Plattman's Bunker. Hill 1.
Orignated at the Yates County Nurseries near Seneca Lake, New York, by J. H. Plattman, from a seed of a plum which grew near a Washington and a Reine Claude. Tree upright, vigorous and productive; fruit medium to large, blue; good; mid-season.

Bunte Früh Pflaume. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 424. 1889.

Bunter Perdrigon. Domestica. 1. Lange Allgem. Garten. 2:419. 1879. 2, Lauche Dent. Pom. 18, PI. 4. 1882. 3. Mathieu Norn. Pom. 424. 1889.  Der Bunter Perdrigon 2. Perdrigon Bariole 3.
A European variety called Bunter because of its variegated colored fruit. Tree large; fruit medium, violet-blue on the sunny side, red and green on the shaded side; flesh greenish, juicy, sprightly; quality fair; freestone; recommended for table and drying purposes in Germany.

Burbank First. Triflora. 1. Rural N. Y. 65:730. 1906.  Burbank's First 1.
Tree vigorous, productive; fruit small, red and yellow; early; inferior.

Burbank No. 1. Triflora. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 62:22. 1894.
One of Burbank's seedlings said to resemble Berckmans.

Burbank No. 7. Trifiora X Domestica. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 118:52. 1895. 2. Ibid. 169: 249. 1899.
Tree vigorous, round-topped, branches upright; fruit roundish-ovate; cavity narrow, deep, suture broad, shallow; greenish-yellow; flesh pale yellow, sweet, juicy, sprightly, highly flavored; stone turgid, roundish-oval, semi-clinging; mid-season.

Burbank No. 11. Triflora X Domestica? 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 129:32, 34. 1896.
Both tree and fruit give indications of an admixture of Domestica. Tree not productive; fruit large; flavor good.

Burbank X Redick. Triflora X Americana. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 228. 1909.
A hybrid from Theodore Williams, Benson, Nebraska, published in the preceding reference under the name of its parents. It resembles the Burbank very closely and is said to be somewhat more hardy than that variety but inferior in quality.

Burchardt Gelbe Früh Zwetsche. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 424. 1889.  Listed by Mathieu from Wiener Garten-Zeitung 286. 1884.

Burettes. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 374. 1857. 2. Ann. Pom. Beige 5:47, PL 1857. 3. Mas Le Verger 6:115. 1866-73.  Burrettes 1. Des Burettes 3. Prune Des Burettes 2.
Originated by M. Gregoire of Burrettes, Belgium, and first reported in 1849. Tree vigorous, hardy ; fruit large, irregularly oval; suture faint; dull greenish-yellow with rose-purple on the sunny exposure; flesh green, fine, melting; juice abundant, sweet, agreeably aromatic; good; freestone.

Burford. Triflora X Munsoniana. 1. Munson Cat. 1906-7.
A seedling of Burbank crossed with Clifford from T. V. Munson, Denison, Texas. Tree weeping; branches more slender than those of Burbank; fruit large, round, light, bright red; stone small.

Burgundy Prune. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 374. 1857. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 424. 1889. 3. Wickson Cal. Fruits 357. 1891.  Burgunder Zwetsche 2. Prune de Bourgoyne 1, 2. Burgundy Prune 2. Susina Torla d' Nova di Borgogna 2 incor.
Fruit medium, egg-shaped with a neck; suture indistinct; reddish-black; dots minute, numerous; flesh juicy, sugary, pleasant; freestone; mid-season.

Burlington Gage. Domestica. 1. Goodrich N. Fr. Cult. 83. 1849. 2- Downing Fr. Trees Am. 902. 1869.
Raised from seed of some unknown " Blue Gage," brought from Connecticut about 1800, and planted by Mrs. Ozias Buel of Burlington, Vermont. Tree hardy, vigorous, productive; fruit medium in size, roundish-oval, dark purplish-blue, with abundant bloom; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy,rich; freestone; early; formerly considered valuable.

Burnet. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 144. 1831. 2. Mag. Hori. 9:163. 1843.
Fruit small, roundish, purple; freestone; mid-season; similar to Wine Sour.

Bursoto. Triflora X Americana. 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 10:106. 1897. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 144. 1901.
A hybrid of Burbank with De Soto, grown and named by Theodore Williams of Benson, Nebraska, about 1890. Tree "of the Americana type; fruit large, oblique, oval; cavity lacking; stem short, thick; light red and yellow; dots small, white; skin thick; flesh yellow, juicy; good; stone semi-clinging; early.

Byefield. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 272. 1845.
Fruit small, round; suture a line; light yellow, with red spots around the stem; flesh yellow; clingstone; good; early; rejected by the American Pomological Society in 1888.


Caddo Chief. Angustifolia varians. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 162. 1881. 2. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:60, 86. 1892. 3. Tex. Sta. Bul. 32:479. 1894. 4. N. Mex. Sta. Bul. 27:124. 1898. 5. Waugh Plum Cult. 193. 1901.
Found wild in Caddo Parish, Louisiana, and introduced by G. W. Stones, Shreveport, Louisiana. It is favorably reported from the South but not generally recommended, although the American Pomological Society included it in their catalog of fruits in 1897. Tree low-branching, hardy and productive; fruit of medium size, roundish-oblong; suture shallow; cavity medium deep; skin thick, tough; bright red; flesh reddish-yellow, firm, sweet and juicy; poor; stone large, round, clinging; season early.

Caldwell Golden Drop. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 902. 1869.  Caldwell's Golden Drop 1.
Possibly an American strain of the Golden Drop. Fruit large, oval, sides often unequal; suture distinct; yellow marbled with crimson in the sun, with thin bloom; stem slender; cavity small; flesh yellow, juicy, sugary, rich; good; clingstone; early.

Caldwell White Gage. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 903. 1869.  Caldwell's White Gage 1.
A productive variety of American origin. Fruit of medium size, oval, narrowing slightly at the apex; suture shallow; apex pointed; greenish-yellow, dotted with purple in the sun; bloom thick; stem long; flesh greenish-yellow, coarse, juicy, sugary; good; clingstone; mid-season.

California. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 145. 1901.  California Seedling 2. Cal. Seedling 1.
Fruit of medium size, slightly oblate; cavity medium deep, flaring; stem long; suture a line; bright red; dots many, minute; skin thick, tough; flesh yellow; good; stone roundish, flattened, clinging; mid-season.

Cambell. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 903. 1869. Cambell's Seedling 1. McCauley's Seedling 1.
Fruit large, oval; suture shallow; pale yellow, splashed with green, dotted and marbled with crimson in the sun; bloom light; cavity small; flesh pale yellow, coarse, juicy, sweet; good; semi-clinging; mid-season.

Campbell. Species? 1. Gard. Mon. 25:49, 83. 1883.
A seedling found growing on a Mr. Campbell's farm near Abingdon, Virginia. Very late and a long keeper.

Canada Blue. Domestica. 1. Lutts Cat. 1890?
Mentioned as a " small, round, early, blue plum, very productive and excellent for preserving."

Canada Orleans. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 3rd App. 180. 1S81. 2. Mich. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 466. 1883. 3. Cornell Sta. Bul. 131:183. 1897.  Canada Egg ?1. Canada Egg 2.
Probably originated in the vicinity of Hamilton, Ontario, where it is chiefly grown. Fruit medium to large, reddish-purple, with heavy bloom; flesh yellow, juicy, melting, sweet, rich; early.

Canadian Apricot. Nigra.
The common wild plum of Canada.

Candelaria. Domestica. 1. Clarke Prune Industry 41. 1893. Candelaria Prune 1.
About 1881 W. B. Simpson discovered that a supposed Golden Drop tree on the farm of S. A. Clarke, Salem, Oregon, was not true to name. It seemed of value and was named Candelaria from the name of the farm. Fruit large, yellow; flesh solid, sub-acid; very good; has not been extensively propagated.

Caper. Triflora X Cerasifera? 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 12:221. 1899.
Grown between 1890 and 1895 by J. S. Breece, of North Carolina. Waugh states that the fruit and foliage suggest the species mentioned above. Fruit of medium size, oval; cavity shallow; dark red; dots many, minute; skin thick, tough; flesh firm, red, sprightly, subacid; fair in quality; stone large, turgid, clinging.

Capitaine Kirchhof. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 424, 434. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 161, 353. 1895.  Capitaine Kirckhof 1. Capitaine Kirckkof 2. Hauptmann Kirchhofs Pflaume r, 2. Kirchhof s Pflaume 1, 2. Prune de Kirchhof 1.
Found by M. Oberdieck of Schaferhof on the estate of a Captain Kirchhof near Nienburg (Hanover). Tree productive; fruit of medium size, round, purplish-brown; bloom thick; flesh yellow, fine, juicy; sweet, aromatic; good; late.

Captain. Hortulana? 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 11:283. 1898. Columbia 1. Columbia 2.
Introduced about 1892 by A. M. Ramsey and Son of Austin, Texas, under the name Columbia but changed by Waugh in 1898 to Captain to avoid confusion with an older Columbia. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit medium in size, spherical, bright golden-yellow; dots many, conspicuous, whitish; suture a line; skin thin, tough; flesh firm, yellow; good; stone small, clinging; late.

Capt. Bacon. Americana. 1. Meneray Cat.
A seedling of Weaver grown by H. A. Terry. Tree vigorous; fruit large, red over yellow; flesh yellow, coarse, rich; freestone; a culinary variety.

Capt. Watrous. Americana. 1. Terry Cat. 1900.
A seedling of Harrison grown by H. A. Terry who plucked the first fruit in 1897. Tree vigorous and productive; fruit large, roundish, yellow overspread with bright red; good. *

Caro. Americana mollis. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:29, $8. 1903.
A seedling of Wolf which originated at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada, in 1895. Fruit large, roundish; suture distinct; bright red, showing yellow in patches; dots numerous, yellow, distinct; bloom light; skin thick; flesh deep yellow, juicy, sweet, rich; good; mid-season.

Caroline, Americana? 1. Minn. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 412. 1899. 2. 5. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:11. 1905.
A seedling grown by C. W. H. Heideman, New Ulm, Minnesota. Fruit of medium size, yellowish-red; good; season of Forest Garden; subject to plum-pocket and unproductive.

Carpenter. Species? 1. 5. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:11. 1905.
A seedling from Vermilion, South Dakota.

Carson. Domestica.
According to a letter from G. B. Brackett of the United States Department of Agriculture, Carson is a strain of Lombard.

Carstesen. Nigra. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:29. 1903.
A seedling grown by H. P. Carstesen, Billings Bridge, Ontario. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit of medium size, roundish; cavity narrow; suture obscure; apex rounded; yellow, nearly covered with deep red; dots obscure; bloomless; skin thin, tender; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet; good; stone flat, roundish, nearly free; early.

Carver. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1896-1900. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 145. 1901.
Introduced by Charles Luedloff, Cologne, Minnesota. Fruit small, roundish-oval; cavity shallow; stem slender; suture a line; red, sometimes mottled; dots many, small; skin tough; flesh yellow; quality fair; clingstone; late; unpromising.

Catalano. Domestica. 1. Gallesio Pom Ital. 2: PI. 1839. Susino Catalano 1. Prunus Catalanica 1. Catalana-Susina 1. Catelane 1.
This Italian variety is much larger than the Early Yellow, known also as the Catalonia. They may be related, however, for Gallesio says that there are many varieties from Catalonia which are similar in shape and taste. Fruit large, oblong, slightly necked; skin greenish and greasy; pulp green, soft, tender, juicy and pleasant.

Catalana Propria. Domestica. 1. Gallesio Pom. Ital. 2: PL 1839.  Catalana Toscana 1.
A good strain of Catalano grown in Italy.

Catelano Giallo. Domestica. 1. Gallesio Pom. Ital. 2: PI. 1839.  Buon-Boccone 1. Buon-Bocconi 1.
This variety is figured under the name Buon-Boccone and described under Catelano

Giallo. As early as 1839 it was well known in parts of Italy and was then ranked next to the Reine Claude in quality. Fruit large, oval, dull yellow, tinged with red; pulp yellow, tender, sweet and highly flavored.

Catelano Violaceo. Domestica. 1. Gallesio Pom. Ital. 2: PL 1839. Catelana Morella? 1. Susina Vecchietti 1. Susino Vecchietti 1.
Gallesio described this plum as a strain of the Catelano and adds that it is grown in abundance at Florence. Tree medium in size; fruit large, oval; suture distinct; violet; pulp yellowish, tender, juicy, sweet and highly flavored.

Catherine. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 26. Ser. 3:50. 1900.
Tree strong, moderately productive; fruit above medium size, egg-shaped; suture a line; cavity small; reddish-purple; bloom thin; flesh greenish-yellow, firm, juicy, sweet; pleasant; good; stone large, clinging; mid-season.

Cel. Cerasifera X (Triflora X Simonii). 1. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:8. 1898.
Originated and named by Luther Burbank, who states that it is a cross between Myrobalan and Wickson. Fruit of medium size, egg-shaped; cavity rounded; suture indistinct; apex pointed; bright, transparent yellow; flavor resembling the Americanas; good; stone of medium size, clinging.

Centennial. Species? 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 308. 1884.
Originated in 1877 by George U. Oberholtzer, Sioux City, Iowa. Fruit of medium size; skin firm; good; ten days later than Miner.

Centralia. Domestica. 1. Wild Bros. Cat. 1892? 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 26. Ser. 3:50. 1900.
A vigorous variety from J. B. Webster of Centralia, Illinois.

Cerney Perdrigon. Domestica. 1. Quintinye Com. Card. 69. 1699. 2. Langley Pomona 93, 97. 1729. Cernay Perdrigon 2.
A variety long since obsolete. Fruit roundish, slightly flattened, red; good.

Ceur de Beuf. Domestica. 1. Quintinye Com. Card. 69. 1699.
Mentioned by Quintinye in 1699 as a violet-red plum. Its relationship to Coeur de Boeuf is unknown.

Chabot Blood. Triflora X Simonii. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 106:49. 1896.
Fruit of medium size, dull red or cinnabar; flesh firm, brick red, very juicy, sweet, aromatic; late.

Champion. Americana. 1. U.S.D.A. Rpt. 392. 1891. 2. Terry Cat. 1900. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 145 fig. 1901.
A seedling of Hawkeye grown by H. A. Terry; first fruited in 1891. Fruit large, roundish; suture a line; red over yellow; dots many, conspicuous; skin firm; flesh yellow, firm; flavor not high; quality fair; stone large, oval, flattened, clinging; late.

Chancellor Gage. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 147. 1831.
Fruit of medium size, round, yellow; quality fair; a table plum.

Chapin. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 903. 1869.
Grown by Aaron Chapin, Hartford, Connecticut. Tree vigorous; fruit of medium size, oval; suture shallow; stem long, slender; cavity deep; light reddish-purple; flesh yellow, juicy, vinous; good; semi-clinging; late.


Chariot. Species? 1. Harrison Cat. 1897.
Probably misnamed.

Charity Clark, Munsoniana X Prunus persica. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:77. 1892.  Blackman 1.
For a history of this variety see Blackman.

Charlotte. Domestica. 1. Prince Treat. Hort. 25. 1828. 2. Prince Pom. Man. 2:59. 1832. Tomlinson's Charlotte 1, 2. Charlotte 2.
Prince says this is "a seedling of Yellow Egg raised by Judge Tomlinson." Tree very vigorous; fruit shaped like its parent, yellow; flesh sweet with an agreeable flavor; early.

Charmer. Nigra? 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 426 1900.
A seedling raised at Indian Head Experimental Farm, Northwest Territory, Canada. Fruit large, red, bitter; early.

Chautauqua. Nigra? 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:38. 1903.
A variety grown on the Experimental Farm at Ottawa, Canada.

Chauviere. Domestica. 1. Rev. Hort. 535. 1891.  Reine-Claude Chauviere 1. Belle de Doue 1 incor.
Grown by M. Chauviere, a Frenchman, who had purchased it under the false name of Belle de Doue. Trees variable in productiveness; fruit roundish-oblate; suture shallow; skin changes from marbled greenish-yellow to dark red, dotted and stained with cinnabar-red; flesh yellowish-green, soft, juicy, honey-like, very agreeable; clingstone.

Cheresoto. Prunus besseyi X Americana. Cir. S. Dak. Exp. Sta. 1910.
Cheresoto originated with N. E. Hansen of the South Dakota Experiment Station as a result of a cross of Prunus besseyi with De Soto. After fruiting for one year it was introduced in 1910. Fruit small, oval; apex pointed; black; bloom heavy; flesh yellowish-green, sprightly; clingstone.

Cherokee. Americana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:78. 1892. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 145. 1901.
Said to have been found wild in Kansas. Fruit medium in size, roundish-oblong; skin blotched red, thick; clingstone.

Cherry. Nigra. 1. N. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 186. 1885. 2. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:264. 1900.
Found wild near Chaseburg, Vernon County, Wisconsin, in 1870 by E. Markle of LaCrosse, Wisconsin; introduced by the discoverer. Tree hardy, productive, an early bearer; fruit resembles that of De Soto except that it is larger and about twenty days earlier in ripening.

Chester. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 547. 1901.
An unimportant seedling from the British Columbia Experiment Station not to be confused with the Chester of Forsyth. Tree vigorous, unproductive; fruit medium in size, obovate; cavity narrow, deep; suture shallow; reddish-pink with numerous golden dots; flesh firm, juicy, sprightly, slightly coarse; stone large, clinging; mid-season.

Chester. Domestica. 1, Forsyth Treat. Fr. Trees 20. 1803.
Mentioned by Forsyth as very productive; fruit rich; season late.

Chester County Prune. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 903. 1869.
From Chester County, Pennsylvania. Tree vigorous; branches slender; fruit of medium size, oval; suture faint; cavity small; stem long, slender; black with thick bloom; flesh greenish, sweet; good; freestone; mid-season.

Chestnut. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 144. 1831.
Fruit purple, oblong; size and quality medium; clingstone; a table plum.

Chicrigland. Species? 1. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:9. 1898. 2. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 14:270. 1901.
Grown by T. V. Munson, from seed of a plum grown by F. T. Ramsey, Lampasas County, Texas. Tree vigorous; branches zigzag, drooping; fruit oval, small; cavity of medium depth, rounded; suture faint; dull red over yellow; surface a trifle fuzzy; dots many; bloom heavy; skin thin, tender, not astringent; flesh soft, yellow, mild acid, aromatic; quality fair; stone clinging.

Chinook. Nigra? 1. Can. Ex p. Farms Rpt. 426. 1900.
A seedling raised at the Experimental Farm, Indian Head, Northwest Territory, Canada. Fruit of medium size, red; early.

Chippewa. Americana. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 85. 1890. 2. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:37. 1892. 3. Ia. Sta. Bul. 31:346. 1895. Chippeway 2.
A dwarf variety from Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, often bearing when only two feet in height. Fruit small, deep red; skin medium thick; flesh firm, sweet; stone free, small, pointed, rough; worthless.

Choptank.. Munsoniana. 1. Bailey Ann. Hort. 133. 1893. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 40. 1899. 3. Ohio Sta. Bul. 113:154. 1899. 4. Waugh Plum Cult. 184. 1901.
A seedling of Wild Goose grown by J. W. Kerr, Denton, Maryland; introduced in 1893 ; listed in the American Pomological Society catalog of fruits in 1899. Tree vigorous, prolific and hardy; foliage large, ornamental; fruit above medium to large, variable in shape, roundish-oblong to oval; cavity shallow; stem long; suture distinct; skin thin, tough; bright red; dots numerous, light colored; bloom thin; flesh yellow, firm, rather acid but of good quality; stone medium in size, oval, flattened, clinging; medium early.

Christian. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576. 1629. 2. Rea Flora 209. 1676.  Nutmeg 1, 2.
Shrubby in growth; fruit small, dark red; late; obsolete. Christie. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:264. 1900. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 145. 1901.
Taken from the woods by W. Christie, Villisca, Iowa, in 1887. Fruit round, truncate, medium in size; apex flattened; cavity wide; suture lacking; yellow, covered with red; bloom light; skin thick; flesh yellow, melting, flavor sweet, luscious; very good; stone circular, thick, semi-clinging.

Churchill. Domestica. 1. N. Y. Sta. An. Rpt. 12:611. 1893.
A seedling found by G. W. Churchill on the shores of Lake Cayuga. Fruit large, blue; quality poor; not valuable.

Chypre. Domestica. 1. Duhamel Trait. Arb. Fr. 2:82. 1768. 2. Kraft Pom. Aust. 2:37, Tab. 187 fig. 2. 1796. 3. Prince Pom. Man. 2:96. 1832. 4. Hogg Fruit Man. 690. 1884. Cyprian 3. Die Pflaume aus Cypern 2. De Chypre 3. De Chypre 4. Prune de Chypre 1. Prune de Chypre 2, 3.
Chypre is an old variety of unknown origin. Fruit of medium size, round; suture shallow; cavity large; purple; bloom thick; flesh firm, greenish, sweet when fully ripe; quality fair; stone clinging; early.

Cinnamon. Domestica. 1. Ray Hist. Plant, 2. 1688.
An old and unimportant variety now obsolete.

Cistena. Prunus besseyi X Cerasifera. Cir. S. Dak. Exp. Sta. 1910.
Introduced in 1909 by the originator, N. E. Hansen of South Dakota Experiment Station. It shows the glossy, purple foliage of the Pissardi plum, one of its parents, and may be of some value as an ornamental.

City. Americana. 1. Minn. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 128. 1890. 2. Wis. Sta, Bul. 63:32. 1897. 3. Ont. Fr. Gr. Assoc. Rpt. 144. 1901. 4. Waugh Plum Cult. 146. 1901.
This variety came from the seed of a wild plum growing one-half mile from Springfield, Minnesota; introduced by H. Knudson in 1890. Tree upright when young but with a weeping tendency when older, vigorous, hardy and productive; fruit large, nearly round; cavity of medium width, deep; suture a distinct line; dark dull red over yellow; dots numerous, small, yellow, distinct; bloom heavy; skin thick, tough, slightly astringent; flesh yellow, firm, juicy, sweet; good; stone of medium size, oval, flattened, semi-clinging; medium to late.

Clara. Munsoniana. 1. Am. Gard. 14:51. 1893. 2. Tex. Sta. Bul. 32:482. 1894.
A large and attractive seedling of Wild Goose grown and introduced by G. Onderdonk, Texas.

Clarendon. Angustifolia watsoni. 1. Bailey Ev. Nat. Fruits 223. 1898.
One of several seedlings secured from northern Texas by F. T. Ramsey.

Clark. Species? 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:48. 1892. 2. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 294. 1903.
A wild seedling found in Anne Arundel County, Maryland. Tree moderately vigorous, not hardy in the North; fruit of medium size, roundish, bright red; dots numerous; stem short; cavity broad, deep; skin tough; flesh yellow, firm; inferior.

Cleavinger. Domestica. 1. U.S.Pat. Off.Rpt. 274. 1854. 2.HoffyiV. Am.Pom. 1860.
Originated about 1845 with a Mr. Fernsler of Philadelphia from the stone of an unnamed seedling; introduced by Wm. S. Cleavinger of West Philadelphia. Tree vigorous; fruit large, oval; suture distinct; dark purple; stem short, thick, surrounded by a fleshy ring; flesh deep yellow, coarse, juicy, vinous, slightly subacid; good; mid-season.

Cleveland. Munsoniana. 1, Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:49. 1897. 2. Can, Exp. Farm Bul. 2d Ser. 3:50. 1900. 3. Terry Cat. 1900. Mrs. Cleveland 1, 3.
A seedling of Wild Goose grown by H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa, in 1883. Tree vigorous, spreading and productive; fruit large, oblong, slightly pointed at the ends, light mottled red; good; clingstone; very early.

Clifford. Munsoniana. 1. Cornell Sta. BuL 38:80. 1892. 2. Kerr Cat. 1894. 3, Waugh Plum Cult, 184. 1901. Mrs. Clifford i, 3. Mrs. Clifford 2. A seedling of Wild Goose grown by Mrs. Clifford of Denison, Texas, and introduced by T. V. Munson and Son of the same place. Tree hardy, vigorous, spreading, productive; fruit large, pear-shaped, sometimes with a very distinct neck; suture shallow; bright scarlet with very small yellow dots; flesh yellow, firm, sweet, aromatic; good; clingstone; a little later than Wild Goose.

Climax's Brother. Triflora X Simonii. 1. Rural N. Y. 59:655. 1900.
One of Burbank's numerous crosses, having the same parents as Climax. The tree is an upright grower like Simon and the fruit resembles this parent in form and size; not as highly colored as Climax; unknown as yet by plum-growers.

Clinton. Hortulana mineri. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 162. 1881. 2. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:55, 86. 1892. 3. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 26. 1897. 4. Waugh Plum Cult. 172. 1901 .*
Fruit of medium size, roundish; cavity shallow; stem slender; suture a line; dull red; dots numerous; bloom thin; flesh yellow; quality fair; clingstone; late. Mentioned in the American Pomological Society's Catalog from 1897 to 1899.

Cluck. Angustifolia varians. 1. Kerr Cat. 1895. 2* Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 38. 1899. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 194. 1901. 4. Ga. Sta. Bul. 67:273. 1904.
Originated with George Cluck, Austin, Texas; introduced in 1896 by P. T. Ramsey. Tree vigorous, productive; blooms very late; fruit of medium size, roundish-oblong; cavity shallow; bright red with many small, yellow dots; skin tough; flesh yellow, soft; quality fair; stone medium, oval, turgid, clinging; mid-season.

Cluster. Domestica. Mentioned in Ray Hist. Plant. 2:1528. 1688.

Cochet. Domestica. 1. Lucas Vollst. Hand. Ohst. 471. 1894. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 2d Ser. 3:50. 1900. Cochets Pflaume 1. Cochet Pere 1.
Tree vigorous and productive; fruit large, oval, yellow with reddish dots; suture medium; flesh yellowish, rich, sweet, pleasant; early.

Coeur de Boeuf. Domestica. 1. U.S.D.A. Div. of Pom. Bul. 10:19. 1901.  Beefs Heart 1. Prunier de Carcassone.
Coeur de Boeuf originated in 1879 at Carcassonne, France, as a seedling of a variety introduced from the province of Lerida, Spain, in 1854. The following description was made from a tree under test on the grounds of this Station: Tree vigorous, hardy; fruit of medium size, roundish; cavity medium in size and depth; stem slender; suture medium; dark brownish-red, covered with minute russet dots; bloom heavy; skin medium thick; flesh yellowish, meaty, juicy, sweet, rich; good to very good; stone small, oval, semi-clinging; mid-season.

Coe Violet. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 905. 1869. 2. Cat. Cong. Pom. France 341. 1887. 3. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 425. 1889.  Coe a Fruit Violet 3. Coe's Golden Drop Violette 1, 3. Coe's Violet 1, 3. Coe's Violette 2. Coe Violette 3. Goutte d'Or Violette 3.
A variation from Golden Drop. Tree vigorous; fruit large, oval; suture distinct; cavity small; stem long, thick; light reddish; dots brown, numerous; flesh yellowish, sweet, juicy; good; clingstone.

Coferer. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 578. 1629. Coferers 1.
Parkinson describes this plum as, " Flat like a Peare Plum, early ripe and black, of a very good relish."

Coinage. Americana, 1. Terry Cat. 1900.
Said by its originator, H. A. Terry, to be a seedling of Gold Coin. Fruit large, slightly oblong, pale yellow ground, nearly covered with dark red; flesh firm; clingstone.

Coletta. Angustifolia varians. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:60, 86. 1892. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 194. 1901. 3. Ga. Sta. Bul. 67:273. 1904.
This plum was grown by G. Onderdonk of Texas; introduced in 1874. Tree slow in growth, hardy, somewhat open and thorny; leaves small, foliage sparse; fruit medium in size, round, bright red; skin tough; flesh yellow, soft; poor; clingstone; very early.

Coleus. Triflora X Cerasifera? 1. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:10. 1898.
Originated with J. S. Breece, North Carolina. Tree ornamental, vigorous; leaves large, reddish, conspicuously veined; fruit small, globular; suture faint; dull deep red; dots faint; skin thick and tough; flesh medium firm, red; flavor flat; quality very poor; stone small, flattened, clinging.

Colman. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:264. 1900. 2. Terry Cat. 1900. Collman 1.
H. A. Terry first fruited this variety in 1895. Tree upright, healthy, fairly productive; fruit large, round, brilliant red; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Colorado Queen. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Waugh Phim Cult. 146. 1901.  3. Ohio Sta. Bul. 162:254, 255. 1905. Colorado 2.
Introduced by J. W. Kerr, Denton, Maryland. Fruit of medium size, roundish; cavity lacking; suture a line; dull red with a light bloom; flesh light yellow; quality fair; stone of medium size; clinging; early.

Combination. Triflora X ? 1. Burbank Cat. 1901.
Grown by Luther Burbank. Tree uniform in growth; fruit large, roundish; cavity deep; suture distinct; stem short; light crimson; flesh straw color, sweet with slight pineapple flavor; early.

Comfort. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:265. 1900. 3. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:29. 1903.
Introduced by J. Wragg et Sons, Waukon, Iowa, in 1879. Fruit small, roundish; cavity narrow, shallow; suture a line; apex rounded; red; dots numerous; bloom thin; skin thick, tough; flesh dark yellow, firm, juicy, sweet; good; stone semi-clinging ; mid-season; mentioned in the Catalog of the American Pomological Society for 1899.

Communia. Domestica. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 87. 1890. 2. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:265. 1900. 3. Kan. Sta. BuL 101:117, 118, PL III fig. 119. 1901. 4. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 309. 1903.
Introduced from Denmark by a German colony located at Communia, Clayton County, Iowa. It resembles the Lombard so closely that they are often confused. The tree is said to be hardier and a slower grower than the Lombard, and its fruit of deeper blue and of higher quality. Subject to rot.

Compass. Prunus besseyi X Hortulana mineri. 1. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:10. 1898. 2. Budd-Hansen Am. HorL Man, 294. 1903. 3, 5. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:13. 1905.  Compass Cherry 1.
A hybrid widely known in the West which originated in 1891 under cultivation with H. Knudson of Springfield, Minnesota from a seed of Prunus besseyi pollinated by Miner; introduced by C. W. Sampson, Eureka, Minnesota, in 1897. Tree vigorous, branches slender; fruit smalt, roundish-oval, slightly flattened; cavity distinct; suture a line; brownish-red, with light bloom; skin tough; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, tender, acid; quality fair; clingstone.

Comptine. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 146. 1901.
Originated at Knoxville, Iowa. Tree low, spreading; fruit very small, round, light red; dots many, minute; flesh yellow; very poor; stone small, oval, clinging. One authority states that the color is yellow.

Comte Gustave d'Egger. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 905. 1869. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 432. 1889.  Comte Gustave d'Egger 2. Egger'sche Eier Zwetsche 2. Graf Gustav von Egger 2.
An Austrian variety grown by M. Liegel of Braunau from seed, of Abricotee. Tree moderately vigorous; fruit small, oblong-oval; suture broad, deep, distinct; skin pale yellow, bronzed in the sun and tinged with violet; flesh yellowish, fine, sweet, juicy, delicious; freestone.

Consul. Americana mollis. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:30. 1903.
A seedling of Wolf grown at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa. Fruit roundish, large; cavity narrow, medium in depth; suturealine; deepred; dots moderately numerous, yellow, distinct; bloom light; skin thick, tough; flesh deep yellow, juicy, sweet; good; stone semi-clinging; late.

Cooch. Domestica. 1. Can. Hort. 21:406. 1898.
A seedling grown by a Mr. Cooch of Ottawa, Canada, in 1889. Fruit large; halves unequal; suture distinct; cavity shallow; dark red; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, soft, sweet; good; late.

Cook. Cerasifera. 1. Kerr Cat. 1900. Cook's Early 1.
Fruit medium, roundish to oblong, red; clingstone; early.

Cook Choice. Americana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:78. 1892. 2. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 276. 1893. 3. Mich. Sta, Bul. 129:34. 1896.  Cook 3. Cook's Choice 1. Cook's Favorite 3. The Cook's Choice 2
This is an accidental seedling grown by H. A. Terry of Iowa in 1885. Tree vigorous; fruit medium, round, red; skin thin; flesh yellow; good; stone clinging; mid-season; a good culinary variety.

Cooper. Hortulana mineri X Munsoniana. 1. Kerr Cat. 10. 1900.
A cross between Forest Garden and Pottawattamie. It is reported by J. W. Kerr as being "a large, slightly oblong, red, clingstone variety, ripening mid-season."

Cooper, Domestica. 1. McMahon Am. Gard. Cal. 587. 1806. 2. Coxe Cult. Fr. Trees 236. 1817. 3. Prince Pom. Man. 2:97. 1832. 4. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 291. 1845. 5. Floy-Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 288, 302, 383. 1846. 6. Mag. HorL 14:152. 1848. 7. Elliott Fr. Book 417. 1854. 8. Hogg Fruit Man. 691. 1884. 9. Guide Prat. 160, 357. 1895. Cooper's 6. Cooper's Grosse Pflaume 9. Cooper's Grosse Rothe Zwetscheg. Cooper's Large 1, 4, 5, 8. Cooper's Large 3, 6, 9. Cooper's Large American 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9. Cooper's Large Red 3. Cooper's Large Red 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. Cooper's Large Red American 9. Coopers Plum'2. Cooper's Plum 3, 5. Cooper's Red 7. Grosse De Cooper 9. Grosse rouge de Cooper 9. La Delicieuse 5. La Delicieuse ?4, 8, 9. Lady Lucy 8. Red Mag* num Bonum 6 incor. Smith's Orleans 6. Violet Perdrigon 6 incor.
Cooper is said to have originated at the beginning of the Nineteenth Century from a seed of Orleans planted by Joseph Cooper of Gloucester County, New Jersey. The variety was imported into England about 1820 and became known in Europe under the name La Delicieuse which was corrupted into Lady Lucy. This variety is so similar to the Smith Orleans that it is impossible to separate them. They, may be identical, or they may have come true to seed from the same parent.

Cope. Domestica. 1. U. S. Pat, Off. Rpt. 274. 1854. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 906. 1869. Cope's Seedling 1.
A seedling raised by John Cope of Southwark, Philadelphia, some time prior to 1850. Fruit large, long-oval, dark purple; stem long, slender; flesh dry, somewhat acid; good for cooking; freestone.

Cornemuse. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 145. 1831.
Fruit medium in size, purple, obovate; quality fair; freestone.

Corymbus. Species? 1.Vt.Sta. An. Rpt. 12:222. 1899. 2.WaughPlumCult. 207. 1901.  The Beauty 1.
A variety first called "The Beauty" by the originator, A. L. Bruce of Texas, who gives the parentage as Smelt Cherry X Abundance. Fruit small, heart-shaped; cavity shallow; suture shallow; apex pointed; dark wine-red; skin strong; flesh soft, yellow, rich, sweet; good; stone small, round, smooth, clinging.

Cottrell. Americana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:37. 1892. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 37. 1899. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 146. 1901. 4. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:30. 1903.
Cottrell was raised as a seedling by R. T. Cottrell, Dover, Olmstead County, Minnesota, and was introduced by O. M. Lord of the same state in 1888. Fruit large, roundish; suture a line; cavity narrow; apex rounded; skin thin, not adherent; mottled red over yellow; bloom medium; dots numerous, small; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet; good; stone flattened, strongly and sharply margined, clinging; mid-season.

Couler. Americana? 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 235. 1882.
A variety from William Couler, Chickasaw County, Iowa; " a large plum of fair quality, but cracking badly before ripening; season just before Miner."

Coulommiers. Domestica. 1. Rev. Hort. 91. 1861. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 426. 1889.  Coulommiers Pflaume 2. Prune de Coulommiers 2.  Mentioned without a description.

Coulon Reine Claude. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 426. 1889. Coulon's Reine Claude 1. Reine Claude Coulon 1.
Tree vigorous, productive; fruit of medium size, roundish; cavity small; suture distinct; yellow; bloom thin; flesh yellowish, firm, sweet; good; early.

Coul Orleans. Domestica. Mentioned in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 150. 1831.

Court Royal. Domestica. Mentioned in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 145. 1831. Cowperthwait Green Gage, Domestica. Mentioned in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 148. 1831.

Cox. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 906. 1869. Cox's Seedling 1.
A seedling from a Mrs. Cox, York, Pennsylvania. Tree vigorous and upright; fruit very large, roundish-oval, slightly compressed; suture broad, shallow; yellow, sometimes splashed with green; cavity narrow, deep; flesh greenish-yellow, coarse, juicy, sweet; good; freestone; early.

Crable. Americana? 1. Waugh Plum Cult. 232. 1901.
A variety from Iowa. Fruit medium in size; obovate; cavity shallow; stem long, slender; suture a line; apex pointed; orange with crimson blush; dots many, minute, white; skin tough; flesh yellow; good; stone large, elliptical, slightly winged, clinging.

Craig. Americana. 1. Terry Cat. 1900. Prof. Craig 1.
A seedling of Harrison, grown by H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa. Fruit large, bright yellow tinged with red; flesh yellow, rich; quality good; semi-clinging.

Crescent. Hortulana mineri. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 287. 1887. 2. Terry Cat. 1900. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 172. 1901. Crescent City 1.
Originated with H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa, from seed of Miner about 1880; first fruited in 1885. Fruit of medium size, oval; cavity shallow; suture a line; dull red; dots many; bloom thin; flesh yellow; quality fair; stone large, oval, clinging; mid-season.

Crimson. Nigra. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:266. 1900.
Introduced by H. Knudson, Springfield, Minnesota. Fruit above medium, light red; skin thin; good; stone long, large, flattish; very early.

Crimson Beauty. Hortulana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1897. 2. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 11:283. 1898.
Fruit of medium size, oblong, cherry red; clingstone; earlier and more vigorous than Golden Beauty.

Crimson Drop. Domestica. 1.Am. Card!. 22:765. 1901. 2.RuralN. 1^.61:354. 1902. Brown's Crimson Drop 1,2.
This variety is said to be a sport from Golden Drop, which it resembles closely except in color, which is a deep rich red.

Croft Early. Domestica. 1. Elliott Fr. Book 425. 1854. Croft's Early 1.
Fruit small, reddish-blue; flesh yellow, dry; poor. Reported by Elliott as unworthy of further culture.

Cruger Scarlet. Domestica. 1. Mag. Hort. 1:365. 1835. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 293. 1845. 3. Elliott Fr. Book 417. 1855. 4. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 426. 1889.  Cruger's 2,3. Cruger1 s Früh Pflaume 4. Cruger's Plum 4. Cruger's Rote Pflaume 4. Cruger's Scarlet 2, 3. Cruger's Scarlet 4. Cruger's Scarlet Gage 2, 3, 4. Cruger's Seedling 2, 3. Cruger's Seedling 1, 4. Kruger's Seedling.
Raised by Henry Cruger, West Point, New York, from a seed of Washington. Fruit of medium size, roundish-oval, compressed; suture obscure; red in the sun, lilac on the shaded side; bloom light; dots numerous, yellow; cavity shallow; stem short, stout; flesh deep orange, dry, mild, agreeable; good; nearly free; mid-season. Mentioned in the American Pomological Society Catalog from 1875 to 1897.

Csaszar Sziloa. Domestica. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 152:209. 1898. 2. Mich. Sta. Sp. Bul. 30:18. 1905.
Imported from Hungary. Fruit large, roundish-ovate, compressed, dark purple; flesh tender, juicy, greenish-yellow, mild, vinous; quality fair; clingstone.

Culberson. Hortulana mineri X Hortulana. 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 12:223. 1899. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 208. 1901. Mammoth July 1, 2.
A cross between Miner and Crimson Beauty grown by A. L. Bruce, Basin Springs, Texas, and called Mammoth July, but renamed by Waugh in 1899. Fruit above medium, spherical or slightly pointed, dark red; dots numerous, yellow; skin thick, tough; flesh yellow; very good; stone small, round, flattened, clinging.

Cumberland. Hortulana. 1. Ga. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 50. 1885. 2. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38: 48,86, 1892. $. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 26. 1897. 4. WaughPlum Cult. 178. 1901.
Cumberland originated with Philip Schley, who in 1864 collected pits from trees growing on the Cumberland Mountains in Tennessee and from them grew this plum. Tree vigorous and productive; fruit of medium size, oblong, bright yellow; dots conspicuous; skin thick; flesh firm, meaty; good; clingstone; season late; this variety is similar to Golden Beauty.

Curlew. Domestica. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 131:183. 1897. 2. Rivers Cat. 35. 1898.
Originated by Thomas Rivers at Sawbridgeworth, England. Tree very productive, not hardy in this vicinity; fruit medium in size, roundish-oval, purple; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, sweet; firm; early.

Curry. Munsoniana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:266. 1900. 2. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 295. 1903.
A seedling grown by S. L. Curry, Welden, Iowa. Fruit large, oval, compressed; cavity deep; dark purplish-red; surface rough, dull; dots small, gray; bloom heavy; skin thick, not astringent; flesh yellow, firm, slightly astringent; good; stone large, flat, winged; early.

Cyca Mono. Triflora. 1. Va. Sta. Bul. 129:112. 1901.
Imported by the United States Department of Agriculture.

Cyclone. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1899. 2. Terry Cat. 1900.
Grown from seed of Harrison by H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa; first fruited in 1897. Tree vigorous, spreading, fairly productive; fruit large, dark red; good; mid-season.

Cydemarine. Domestica. Mentioned in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 145. 1831.


Daisy. Munsoniana X Triflora. 1, Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 12:223. 1899. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 208. 1901.
A variety grown by J. S. Breece, North Carolina. Fruit large, heart-shaped; suture indistinct; bright red, with many minute yellow dots; flesh firm, yellow, sprightly; good.

Dahlgreen. Americana. 1.Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:3$. 1897. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 147. 1901.
A variety introduced by Chas. Luedloff, Cologne, Minnesota. Fruit medium in size, oblong, mottled red; mid-season.

Dakota. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1900.
Fruit medium in size, round, mottled with dull purplish-red; clingstone; fruit cracks and is much injured by rot.

Dalrymple. Insititia. ! Hogg Fruit Man. 695. 1884. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 426. 1889. 3. Am. Gard. 14:146, 148 fig. 1892. Dalrymple Damson 2.
Dalrymple closely resembles the Shropshire Damson but is hardier and the tree is smaller.

Damas Ambre. Domestica? Mentioned in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 145. 1831. Damaschino Estivo. Domestica. 1. Gallesio Pom. Ital. 2:, PL 1839.  Damaschino d'Estate 1. Zuccherino 1.
According to Gallesio this is a strain of the Damaschino Settembrino and is common in parts of Italy. Flowers small and white, unfolding in clusters; fruit obovate like the Settembrino, but slightly larger and its skin, which is yellow, is more easily removed.

Damaschino Settembrino. Domestica. 1. Gallesio Pom. Ital. 2:, PL 1839. Susino Damaschino Settembrino 1.
An old Italian variety. Of the two plums which bear the name Damaschino this is the smaller and the more savory. Fruit small, obovate, golden-yellow; pulp fleshy and sugary.

Damas de Diffenbach. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:165. 1873. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 427. 1889.  Damas de Dieffenbach 2. Damas Noir de Dieffenbach 2. Dieffenbachs Damascene 2. Sieffenbachs Schwarze Damascene 2. Diffenbachs Damascene 1.
Liegel obtained this variety from a seed of the Saint Jean and dedicated it to Diffenbach, head gardener of the Botanical Garden in Vienna, Austria. Tree of medium vigor, small; fruit small, roundish-ovate; halves often unequal; suture shallow; purplish-black with a thick bloom; stem short; cavity shallow; flesh yellow, tender, juicy, sweet and slightly aromatic; freestone; mid-season.

Damas de Provence. Domestica. 1. Prince Pom. Man. 2:86. 1832. 2. Kenrick Am.Orch. 258. 1832. 3. Poiteau Pom. Franc. 1:1846. 4. Hogg Fruit Man. 357. 1866. 5. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 939. 1869. 6. MatHieu Nom. Pom. 443. 1889.  Damas de Provence 5, 6. Damas de Provence hatif i, 4, 5, 6. Damask of Provence 2. Early Damask of Provence 1, 5, 6. Provence Damask 1, 6. Provence Damask 5. Provencer Konigspflaume 6. Prune Damas de Provence 3. Prunus provincialis 3.
Damas de Provence is an old European variety; fruit of medium size, roundish; suture deep; cavity small; reddish-purple; bloom thick; flesh greenish, sweet; quality poor; freestone; very early.

Damas d'Ete. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:113. 1873. 2- Guide Prat. 353. 1895.  Summer Damson 1, 2.
Mas thought this variety was of English or American origin but there seems to be no reason for this conclusion. Tree small, very productive; fruit small, oval, purplish-black; flesh greenish, fine, juicy, sweet, highly flavored; clingstone; early.

Damas Dronet. Domestica. 1. Duhamel Trait. Arb. Fr. 2:75. 1768. 2. Kraft Pom^ Aust. 2:40, Tab. 191 fig. 2. 1796. 3. Prince Pom. Man. 2:86. 1832. 4. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 910. 1869. 5. Hogg Fruit Man. 693. 1884.  Damas Dronet 2, 4. Damson Dronet 1. Die kleine langlichte Damaskuspflaume 1 Dronet Damask 3.
Damas Dronet is an old French variety. Fruit small, oval; suture a line; stem slender; cavity narrow, deep; greenish-yellow; bloom thin; skin not adherent; flesh greenish, firm, sweet; good; stone small, free; mid-season.

Damas Dronet de Merlet. Domestica. 1. Duhamel Trait. Arb. Fr. 2:75. 1768.
Duhamel states that this is distinct from the Damas Dronet described by him on the same page.

Damas Jaune Musque. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:57. 1873.  Muskirte Gelbe Damascene 1.
A foreign variety first mentioned by Christ, a German writer. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit medium in size, usually ovoid; suture shallow or a mere line; skin tender, not adherent, yellow, with a thin bloom; stem long, slender; cavity shallow; flesh yellow, tender, firm, juicy, sweet, of musky flavor; freestone; very early.

Damas Noir de Tours, Domestica. 1. Forsyth Treat. Fr. Trees 21. 1803.
Mentioned by Forsyth in the preceding reference. It may be the same as Précoce de Tours, but we have no proof.

Damas Rouge de Biondeck. Domestica. 1. Baltet Cult. Fr. 490. 1908.  Mentioned by a French writer as early and good.

Damas Rouge Hatif. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 448. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 163, 354. 1895.  Damas Rouge Hatif 1. Haferkrieche 1,2. Rote Früh Damascene 1. Roihe Fruit Damascene 2.  A variety of little merit.

Damatie Rouge. Domestica. Listed in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 145. 1831. Damson Royal. Insititia. 1. Floy-Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 282. 1846.
Described in the preceding reference as similar to "Prune Damson," but larger.

Damas Violet, Domestica. 1. Duhamel Trait. Arb. Fr. 2:70. 1768. 2. Kraft Pom. Aust. 2:44, Tab. 199 fig. 1. 1796. 3. Quintinye Com. Gard. 68. 1699. 4. Willich Dom. Enc. 180. 1803. 5. Mag. Hort. 9:163. 1843. 6. Poiteau Pom. Franc. 1:1846. 7. Hogg Fruit Man. 729. 1884.
Damas Violet 2, 4, 7. Damas Violet Tardif ?5. Die veilchenfarbige Damascener-pflaume 2. Ladies' Plum 4. Long Violet Damask 3. Prune Gros-Damas Violet 6. Violet Damask 7.
An old variety of unknown origin concerning which there has been much confusion, Parkinson, in 1629, and a few later writers have made it synonymous to Queen Mother, but it differs from this variety in that Damas Violet has pubescent shoots and oval fruit, while the Queen Mother has glabrous shoots and round fruit. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit medium, purple; flesh yellow, firm, sweet and briskly flavored, separates from the stone; season early.

Damson Riley. Insititia. 1. Stark Cat. 29. 1910.
A variety from Ohio said to have been grown for about twenty years. Introduced by Stark Brothers, Louisiana, Missouri, in 1910.

Dana Yellow Gage, Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 275. 1845. 2. Cole Am. Fr. Book. 215. 1849. 3. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:109. 1873. Dana's Gage 2. Dana's Yellow Gage 3. Reine-Claude Jaune De Dana 3.
Dana Yellow Gage was raised by a Rev. Mr. Dana of Ipswich, Massachusetts. Fruit of medium size, oval, pale yellow; bloom thin; flesh sweet, juicy, clingstone; mid-season.

Daniel Weeping. Species? 1. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:10. 1898.
A hybrid which originated with a Dr. Daniel in Louisiana; introduced by J. L. Normand. Tree bushy, spreading and drooping; leaves thick and tough, ovate, acutely pointed, glandular.

Danish Damson. Insititia. 1. Kerr Cat. 25. 1897. 2. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:266. 1900. 3. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 310. 1903. 4. 5. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:15 1905.  Kreger 1. Kreger 2. Krueger 3.
H. Knudson, Springfield, Minnesota, imported this variety in the spring of 1884 and introduced it a few years later. It seems to be grown only in Iowa, Minnesota, South Dakota and adjoining states, being practically unknown in the East. Fruit small, roundish, dark blue; good; freestone; mid-season.

Darst. Domestica. 1. Mag. Hort. 11:112. 1845.
A seedling originated at Dayton, Ohio, in the garden of a Mr. Darst. Fruit medium in size, of excellent quality.

Date. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 575, 576. 1629. 2. Rea Flora 208. 1676. 3. Quintinye Com. Gard. 68, 69. 1699. 4. Duhamel Trait. Arb. Fr. 2:113. 1768. 5. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 908. 1869. 6. Koch Deut. Obst. 560. 1876.  Date Plum 5. Dattelpflaumen 6. Dattelzwetsche 5. D'Autriche 5. Great Date 3. Ienua 1. Prune Datte 4. Prune Datte 5. Prune d'Autriche 5. Quetsche Datte 5. Quetsche de Hongrie 5. White Date 2. White Date Plum 1. Yellow Date 2.
During the four centuries in which this variety has been cultivated in Europe numerous strains have arisen which have been designated by the general term Dattelpflaumen. The group is characterized by roundish or oval fruits, yellow or greenish in color, sometimes marked with red on the sunny side; flesh yellow, soft; poor in quality; clingstone; mid-season or later. The original variety is probably obsolete.

Datilles. Domestica. 1. Quintinye Com. Gard. 68, 70. 1699.  Little Date 1. Little Date 1.
A long-shaped red plum, mentioned by Quintinye, which has either disappeared or is now grown under a different name.

Datte Hongroise Jaune. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 427. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 159, 354. 1895.
This variety was sent into France by M. Bereczki Mate, of Hungary. The tree is vigorous, productive; fruit large, long, greenish-yellow dotted with red; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy; good; mid-season.

Dauphine. Domestica. 1. Poiteau Pom. Franc 1:1846. Prune Dauphine 1.
Poiteau says, " Duhamel regarded as synonyms the names Reine Claude and Dauphine. Since then a new plum has been shown, and I know not who named it Dauphine; but it is under this name that it has been introduced and cultivated in the nursery of the Jardin des Plantes and of Luxembourg."


Davenport. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:268. 1900. 2. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 295. 1903.
A seedling grown by N. K. Fluke, Davenport, Iowa, from seed of De Soto. Fruit medium in size, oval, sometimes conical; suture a line; skin smooth, clear yellow with pink blush on the sunny side; flesh yellow, firm, sugary; very good; freestone.

Davies Seedling. Domestica. Mentioned in Lotid. Hort. Soc. Cat. 146. 1831.  Davies' Seedling. Davis. Munsoniana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:35. 1897. 2. Terry Cat. 1900.
A variety grown from seed of Wild Goose in 1885 by H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa. Tree low, spreading, vigorous and productive; fruit large, bright red; quality fair.

Dawson. Species? 1. Card. Mon. 17:144. 1875.
At one time a profitable variety grown on the banks of the Ohio.

Dawson City. Nigra? 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 426. 1900.
A seedling raised at Indian Head Experimental Farm, Northwest Territory, Canada. Fruit of medium size.

Dean. Domestica. 1. Mclntosh Bk. Gard. 2:530. 1855.  Dean's Jedburgh Seedling 1.
A seedling grown at Dean's nursery, Jedburgh, England. Fruit of medium size, round, purple; freestone; adapted for dessert or kitchen; mid-season.

Deaton. Domestica. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:268. 1900. 2. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 310. 1903. Tobe's Gage 2.
Grown from a sprout of Reine Claude planted near Des Moines; introduced by J. Wragg et Sons, Waukee, Iowa. Fruit medium in size, oval, truncate; suture broad and shallow; skin greenish-yellow; dots small, numerous; bloom thin; flesh greenish, firm, juicy; good; clingstone.

Deck. Insititia. 1. Wild Bros. Cat. 1908-09. Decks Damson 1.
An improved strain of Damson introduced by Wild Brothers, Sarcoxie, Missouri.

Decker. Hortulana mineri. 1. Minn. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 401. 1896. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 172. 1901.  Decker's Late Seedling 1. Decker's Seedling 2.
A seedling raised about 1885 by H. C. Decker of Dresbach, Minnesota, from pits of a variety substituted for German Prune; introduced by W. S. Widmoyer of the same place about 1897. Fruit medium to large, conical; suture distinct; red; dots many, yellowish; flesh yellow; flavor rich; nearly free; mid-season.

Deep Creek. Americana. 1. Mich. Board Agr. Rpt. in. 1887. 2. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:37, 86. 1892. 3. Ohio Sta. Bul. 162:254, 255. 1905. Deepcreek 3.
Found growing wild in Kansas; introduced by Abner Allen. Tree slow and irregular in growth; branches thorny; fruit of medium size, roundish-oval, compressed; suture distinct; cavity small; stem short; dull red; skin thick; flesh yellow, firm, sweet; good; stone rough, pointed, free; mid-season; of little value.

De Delice. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 360. 1857. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 26. Ser. 3:55. 1900. Prune de Delices 2.

Tree vigorous and productive; fruit of medium size, roundish-oval; suture small; green, marbled and shaded with violet; bloom thin; flesh orange yellow, juicy, sugary, luscious; slightly clinging; late.

Defresne. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 427. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 158, 354. 1895.
A Belgian variety both vigorous and productive; fruit large, long, purplish; flesh greenish; good; mid-season.

De Gondin. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:91. 1873.
Grown by M. Vaubernier of Laval, Mayenne, and introduced in 1862 by M. M. Bruant et Company, nurserymen at Poiters, France. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit very large, roundish; suture disappearing at maturity; dark purple; bloom thin; flesh yellow, tender, juicy; freestone.

De la Toussaint. Species? 1. Guide Prat. 162, 354. 1895.
A very late and long keeping variety.

Delaware. Triflora. 1. Burbank Cat. 18. 1893. 2. Rural N. Y. 59:642. 1900. 3. Ibid. 60:694. 1901. 4, Waugh Plum Cult. 134. 1901.
Burbank produced this variety by crossing Satsuma with Kelsey; first offered for sale in 1893; disseminated in the East by J. L. Childs, Floral Park, New York. Tree semi-dwarf, productive but comes into bearing late; fruit of medium size, roundish-conical, dark purple, with thick bloom; flesh red, juicy, sweet and rich; good; stone clinging; mid-season.

De l'lnde. Domestica. 1. Horticulturist 6:561. 1851.
Described by Baptiste Desportes of Angers, France, in 1851. Tree vigorous;, branches long, upright; fruit large, obovate, violet-reddish; dots gray and blue; flesh reddish-yellow, firm, juicy, melting; quality fair.

De Montfort. Domestica. 1. Mag. Hort. 12:341. 1846. 2. Pom. France 2: No. 3. 1871. 3. Hogg Fruit Man. 713. 1884. 4. Lucas Vollsi. Hand. Obst. 470. 1894.  Montfort Pflaume 4. Prune de Montfort 2.
Originated in the nurseries of Madame Ebert, Montfortin, France; named and introduced by M. Prevost, Rouen, France. Tree vigorous, spreading, productive; fruit of medium size, roundish-oval; suture distinct; cavity shallow; dark purple, with russet dots; flesh green, juicy, sweet, rich; good; freestone; mid-season. Mentioned in the American Pomological Society's Catalog from 1877-1897.

De Montmirail. Domestica? 1. Guide Prat. 158, 354. 1895.
Tree of moderate vigor, productive; fruit medium in size, long-oval; yellow lightly blushed with red; flesh yellow; good; early.

Denbigh. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 147. 1831. 2. Hogg Fruit Man. 357. 1866. 3. Gaucher Pom. Prak. Obst. No. 92. 1894. 4. Bartrum Pears and Plums. 65, 71. 1903.  Cox's Emperor 2, 3. Cox's Emperor 4. Denbigh 3. Denbigh-Pflaume 3. Denbigh Seedling 4. Emperor 1. Jemmy Moore 4.
Tree vigorous, productive; fruit large, roundish-oval, bright red to reddish-brown; flesh golden-yellow, sweet, melting, pleasant flavor; freestone; mid-season.

Dennis. Americana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:79.. 1892. 2. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 276. I^93- 3* Waugh Plum Cult. 147. 1901.  Dr. Dennis 1, 2. Dr. Dennis 3.
Originated with H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa, supposedly from seed of Hawkeye; first fruited in 1891. Fruit round to slightly oblong, medium in size; suture a line; bright red; dots many, minute, white; flesh yellow; good; clingstone; early.

Dennis Seedling No. 13. Hortulana mineri.
Grown at the Iowa Experiment Station. The fruit is of medium size, roundish, dark red; dots conspicuous; suture a line; skin thick, tough; flesh firm, juicy, tender, sweetish; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Denniston Red. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 296. 1845. 2. Mag. Hort. 13:532. 1847. 3. Thomas Am. Fruit Cult. 337. 1849. 4. Mas he Verger 6: 133. 1866-73. 5. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 427. 1889.  Denniston's Red 1. Denniston's Red 5. Dennison's Red 5. Denniston's Rote Pflaume 5. Rouge de Denniston 4, 5.
Grown by Isaac Denniston of Albany, New York. The parentage is not known but Thomas thinks it is a seedling of Lombard. Fruit large, roundish-oval; suture distinct; cavity small; light red with yellow dots; bloom thin; flesh amber, juicy, rich, sprightly; good; stone small, oval, compressed, free; mid-season.

Denniston Superb. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 275. 1845. 2* Mas Le Verger 6:121. 1866-73. 3. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 427. 1889. 4. Bartrum Pears and Plums 63. 1903.  Dennison's Superb 3. Denniston's Superb 2. Denniston's Superb Gage 4. Madison 3. Superbe de Denniston 2t ^.
Grown by Isaac Denniston, Albany, New York, about 1835 or 1840. Fruit round, larger than Reine Claude of which it is probably a seedling, slightly flattened; suture distinct; cavity shallow; stem of medium length; pale yellow, blotched with red; bloom thin; flesh thick, meaty, moderately juicy, with a rich, vinous flavor; very good; stone small, roundish, thick, free; mid-season; catalogued by the American Pomological Society from 1877 to 1899.

D'Ente Imperiale. Domestica. 1. Guide Prat. 160, 355. 1895.
A variety closely resembling the Agen except that it is more vigorous in tree growth.

Denton, Angustifolia varians. 1. Gard. Mon. 13:279. 1871.
A variety introduced many years ago by J. W. Kerr; it closely resembles Yellow Transparent, but is a much smaller tree.

Derbyshire Green Gage. Domestica. Mentioned in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 148. 1831.

Deron. Domestica. Mentioned in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 146. 1831.

Deron's. De Seigneur. Species? 1. Guide Prat. 161, 355. 1895. De Prince {en Lorraine) 1.
Tree productive; fruit small, roundish, bluish; bloom heavy; flesh green, fine-grained, juicy, sweet; good; late.

Des Moines. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 147. 1901.

Originated in Iowa. Fruit small, round-oval; suture a line; dull red over yellow; dots many, minute; flesh yellow; quality poor; stone small, semi-free; mid-season

Dewey. Americana, 1. Terry Cat. 1900. 2. ///. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 136. 1903.  Admiral Dewey 1, 2.
A seedling of De Soto grown by H. A. Terry of Crescent, Iowa. Fruit large, round, dark red on an orange ground; clingstone; tree productive.

Diademe Imperial-Isabelle. Domestica? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 427. 1889.

Diamond. Americana. 1. Neb. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 121. 1890.
A seedling grown by John A. Hogg, Shelton, Nebraska, about 1880 from pits of a wild plum found in Buffalo County, Nebraska. According to Mr. Hogg, the variety "grows fully as large as most of the tame varieties; ripens the last of September and when fully ripe gets bright red on one side."

Diana. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bid. 63:35. 1897. 2. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:268. 1900.
A plum of the Van Buren type grown from a seed of Hawkeye by H. A.Terry, Crescent, Iowa; first fruited in 1893. Tree large, vigorous, upright-spreading; fruit truncate, conical or oval; suture distinct; cavity small, shallow; stem short, stout; yellow, washed and spotted with purple-red; dots indistinct; bloom thin; skin thick and tough; flesh yellow, meaty, sweet and rich; good; stone large, flat, oval, clinging; mid-season.

Diapree Blanche. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 578. 1629. 2. Langley Pomona 95, PI. XXIV fig. IV. 1729. 3. Duhamel Trait. Arb. Fr. 2:104, PI. XX fig. 11. 1768. 4. Kraft Pom. Aust. 2:44, Tab. 198 fig. 2. 1796. 5. Noisette Man. Comp. Jard. 2:500. 1860. 6. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 405. 1881.  Diaper'd Plumb 2. Diapree Blanche 4. Diapree Weisse 6. Die Weisse Bunt-farbige Pflaume 4. Prune Diapree Blanche 5. White Diapred 1. Yellow Diapree 2.
This plum has been mentioned by European writers for three centuries. Fruit of medium size, roundish; suture a line; cavity nearly lacking; skin tough; yellow; bloom thin; flesh firm, yellow, sweet, rich; quality good; mid-season.

Diapree Nouvelle De Kook. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:155. 1873. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 438. 1889.  Kook's Gelbe Diapree 2. Kooks Neue Diapre 1. Kook's Neue Diapree 2.
This plum originated as a second generation seedling with a Mr. Kook of New Brauenfels, Texas, and was named by Liegel to whom he submitted the variety. The fruit is small, oval; cavity small; skin clear yellow; flesh yellow, tender, aromatic; quality good; stone free; season early.

Dictator. Domestica. 1. Mag. Hort. 6:92. 1840. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 403. 1857. 3. Montreal Hort. Soc. Rpt. 55. 1878. Corse's Dictator 3.
A seedling raised by Henry Corse of Montreal about 1834. Tree hardy, vigorous; fruit large, brownish-purple; flesh juicy, rich; good; stone small.

Diel Grosse Weisse Damascene. Insititia? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 427. 1889.  Ak Erik 1. AI Erik 1. Dschau Erik 1. Frilhe Weisse Aprikosenpflaume 1. Gros-Damas Blanc.  Mentioned without description in the preceding reference.

Dine. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576. 1629.
Fruit large, white; dots numerous; late.

Dittisham. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 146. 1831.
Mentioned as cultivated in the London Horticultural Society Gardens.

Dixie. Triflora. 1. Horticultural Gleaner 1899.
Grown about 1894 in the vicinity of Whitesville, Georgia, from seed of Burbank, open to cross pollination. Fruit the size of Burbank, bright red; flesh juicy; good; late.

Dixie. Triflora. 1. Hood Cat. 1906.
An early Triflora variety.

Dochnahl Damascene. Domestica. 1. Oberdieck Dent. Obst. Sort. 444. 1881. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom, 427. 1889. DochnahVs Konigs Pflaume 2.
As tested in Germany, very unproductive.

Dojene. Domestica. 1. Knoop Fructologie 2:57. 1771.
Origin unknown. Tree productive; fruit large, oval; yellow; flesh watery; poor; stone clinging.

Dollaner. Domestica. 1. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 445. 1881. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 427. 1889.  Dollaner Zwetsche 2. Quetsche de Dollan 2.
A variety imported from France by the United States Department of Agriculture. Reported by Oberdieck as "a prune which has borne little fruit since 1856."

Domina. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 427. 1889. Domino 1.  Reference found by Mathieu in Monatsschrift fur Pomologie 7. 1858.

Domine Dull. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 146. 1831. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 296. 1845. 3. Floy-Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 302, ^8^. 1846.  Domine Dull's 1. Domine Dull's Plum 3. Dutch Prune 2. Dutch Quetszen 2, 3. German Prune 2, 3.
Mr. Dull, a Dutch domine, brought a prune seed from Holland and planted it in Kingston, New York. From this seed sprang the Domine Dull, a variety often confused with the German Prune. Fruit of medium size, long-oval; suture slight; stem long; cavity small; dark purple; bloom thin; flesh yellow, juicy, rich, sweet; good; clingstone; late. Mentioned in the Catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1867.

Don. Americana mollis. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:30. 1903.
A seedling of Wolf raised at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa. Fruit large, roundish; suture a line; uniformly bright red; dots numerous, small, distinct; bloom moderate; flesh deep yellow, juicy; sweet, rich; good; stone of medium size, oval, clinging; late.

Don Alteza. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576. 1629.
According to Parkinson "a very good sort."

Don Carlos. Domestica. Mentioned in Forsyth Treat. Fr. Trees. 21. 1803. 

Don Carlos*. Dora. Triflora X Munsoniana. 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 14:270. 1901.
A seedling from A. L. Bruce, Texas, said to be a cross between Abundance and Wild Goose. Fruit medium to large, cordate; suture faint; skin tender, bright red; dots minute; bloom heavy; flesh yellow, firm, sweet, rich; good; stone small, oval, clinging.

Doree. Domestica. 1. Mas he Verger 6:145. 1866-73. D'Agen Doree 1.
Found by Leo d'Ounous in an orchard planted by his father in Ariege, France; published for the first time by Mas in Le Verger. Tree vigorous; fruit medium, ovoid; suture shallow; skin tender, not adherent, golden-yellow tinged with rose-violet; stem slender, rather short; cavity shallow; flesh yellow, fine, juicy, very agreeably aromatic.

Dorell. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 393. 1857. 2. Ann. Pom. Beige 8:35, PI. 1860. 3. Hogg Fruit Man. 374. 1866. 4. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:27. 1873. 5. Oberdieck Dent. Obst. Sort. 409. 1881. 6. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 427. 1889. 7. Lucas Vollst. Hand. Obst. 473. 1894.  Dorr el 2. Dor ells Grosse Zwetsche 4. Dorelle's Neue Grosse Zwetsche 3,6. Dorell's Neue Purpurzwetsche 5. Dorelle's New Purple Prune 6. Dorells Neue Grosse Zwetsche 4, 6. Dorells grosse neue Zwetsche 7. Grosse Quetsche De Dorell 4. Grosse Quetsche Nouvelle 6. Nouvelle de Dorelle 3. Nouvelle De Dorr el 6. Nouveau De Dorrelle 6. Prune Grosse Quetsche Nouvelle 2. Prune nouvelle de Dorrel 2. Quetsche De Dorelle 6. Quetsche De Dorelle Nouvelle Grand 1. Quetsche Grosse Nouvelle De Dorrel 6. Quetsche De Dorelle Nouvelle Grande 6.
A seedling raised by Dr. Dorell, of Kuttenberg, Bohemia. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit large, oval; suture wide but shallow; cavity small; stem smooth, reddish; skin reddish-violet, marked with numerous russet dots; flesh yellowish, juicy, sweet, aromatic, agreeable; good for drying; late mid-season.

Dorell Aprikosenpflaume. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 427. 1889.  Abricotee Nouvelle de Dorell. DorelVs Neue Aprikosen Pflaume. Mirabelle de Doer ell.

Doris. Species? 1. Watkins et Bros. Cat. 20. 1897-8. 2. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 14:271. 1901. 3. Mass. Sta. An. Rpt. 17:161. 1905.
A variety of doubtful parentage from Burbank; introduced by Stark Brothers in 1895. Fruit small, roundish-oblate; suture faint; light red; dots numerous; flesh yellow, watery; quality poor.

Dorr. Domestica. 1. Cultivator 8:346. 1851. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 909. 1869.  Dorr's Favorite i, 2.
A Reine Claude seedling grown by either Isaac Denniston or Elisha Dorr, both of Albany, New York. Fruit large, oval; suture broad; cavity small; apex sunken; yellow with red dots; bloom thin; flesh yellow, coarse, juicy; good; clingstone; late.

Dorr Seedling. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 428. 1889. Semis de Dorr 1.
This may be identical with Dorr.

Dorsett. Munsoniana. 1. Meneray Cat.
A chance seedling from H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa; introduced by F. W. Meneray of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Fruit large, yellow blotched with red; skin thin; good; clingstone; early.

Dosch. Domestica. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 150. 1895. 2. Oregon Sta. Bul. 40:73. 1896. 3. Ibid. 45:30. 1897. 4- Washington Cat. 22. 1906. 5. Chico Nur. Co. Cat. 25. 1909. 6. Oregon Cat. 35. 1906. The Dosch 2.
The Dosch prune grew on the farm of Henry E. Dosch, Hillsdale, Oregon, from a sprout below the union on a Washington plum tree grafted on plum roots. Tree vigorous, round-topped, prolific, similar to Italian; fruit large, roundish-oval; apex flattened, base acute; suture shallow; stem medium; skin firm; dark purple; flesh greenish, firm, sweet; good; freestone.

Double. Domestica. 1. Knoop Fructologie 2:60. 1771. Prune de Double 1.
Double differs from Paisan Blanche in that it is a little larger, less yellow in color, and poorer in flavor.

Double Plum. Domestica. 1. Can. Hort. 16:193 fig. 541. 1893.
A novelty growing in the gardens of Chernigow, Russia, in which the fruit consists of two plums joined together, but easily separated at maturity; fruit bluish-red, sometimes yellow; flesh orange colored, sweet, juicy; quality fair; two stones, clinging.

Dougall Best. Domestica. 1. Rural N. Y. 43:779. 1884. Dougall's Best 1.
A chance seedling raised by James Dougall of Windsor, Canada. Tree productive; fruit oblong, tapering to the stalk; suture distinct; clear yellow, touched with carmine toward the sun; good; stone partially free.

Douglass. Americana, 1. Meneray Cat.
Grown by H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa, from seed of Harrison; introduced by F. W. Meneray, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Fruit large, oblong, yellow blushed with red; flesh yellow, sweet, rich, firm; semi-clinging.

Dove Bank. Domestica. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 358. 1866. 2. Garden 53:265. 1898.  Caledonian 2 incor.
Hogg could see no difference between this variety and the Goliath, but H. A. Pearson in the Journal of the Royal Horticultural Society, for 1897, says that they are distinct. Pearson adds, further; " The true variety was grown and distributed by Spencer, of Ilkeston, * * * and is said to have been found growing on the banks of the Derbyshire Dove; it differs from Caledonian (Goliath) in growth, and whereas the leaf glands of that variety are well developed and red in color, Dove Bank has small ill-developed glands of a pale color; with regard to the fruit there is no comparison between the two. Caledonian is a somewhat coarse cooking plum. Dove Bank is a splendid cooking plum, and good enough for dessert."

Downing Early. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 910. 1869. . Downing's Early 1.
Originated at Newburgh, New York. Tree moderately vigorous; branches short-jointed; fruit medium, oval, yellow with slight blush, and crimson dots; flesh yellow, sweet, slightly adherent to the stone; good; mid-season.

Downton Imperatrice. Domestica. 1. Kenrick Am. Orch. 259. 1832. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 274. 1845. 3. Hogg Fruit Man. 358. 1866. 4. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 428. 1889.  Downton Imperatrice 4. Downton's Kaiserin 4. Downtoner Kaiserin 4.
Grown by the famous horticulturist, Thomas A. Knight, from pits produced by pollinating Yellow Egg with Blue Imperatrice. Fruit medium, oval; suture slightly marked; skin thin, tender, pale yellow; flesh yellow, juicy, melting, agreeably sub-acid; good for preserving; stone clinging; late.

Drake Seedling. Domestica. 1. Can. Hort. 24:406. 1901. Drake's Seedling 1.
A seedling raised in the orchard of George Drake, Clarksburg, Ontario. Skin yellow, dull red on the sunny side; flesh yellow; a good cooking plum.

Drouth King. Munsoniana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 194. 1901.
Of unknown origin. Fruit small, oval, bright red; dots many, conspicuous; flesh yellow; good; stone of medium size, oval, clinging; mid-season.

Dr. Uff. Domestica. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 118:51. 1895. 2. Mich. Sta. Sp. Bul. 27: 14. 1904.3
Imported by the United States Department of Agriculture from Hungary. Fruit medium to large, roundish-ovate, dark purple; bloom light; flesh medium firm, juicy, yellow; good; clingstone; early.

Dr. Uff Szilvaja. Domestica. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 152:209. 1898.
Imported from Hungary as Dr. Uff but it differs markedly from this variety.  Fruit small to medium, roundish-oblong; skin greenish-yellow with a faint red tinge; stem one-half inch long; flesh greenish-yellow, tender, juicy, sweet, rich; good; freestone.

Dry Seedling. Domestica. 1. Gard. Chron. 29:898. 1869. 2. Hogg Fruit Man. 698.  1884. 3. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 26. Ser. 3:51. 1900. 4. Mathieu Nom. Pom.  428. 1889. Dry's Seedling 1,2. Semis de Dry 2.
A seedling raised by a Mr. Dry, at Hayes, Middlesex, England; awarded a first class certificate by the Royal Horticultural Society in 1869. Fruit large, roundish-oval; suture slight; reddish-purple; bloom thin; flesh dull greenish-yellow, firm yet juicy; freestone; early.

Duke. Munsoniana X ? 1. Kerr Cat. 1900. 2. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 14:271. 1901.
A supposed cross between Pottawattamie and the Duke Cherry, originating with Theodore Williams, Nebraska. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit larger than Wild Goose, of nearly the same form; cavity narrow, deep; suture a line; bright red; flesh yellow, firm, mild subacid; clingstone; mid-season. Waugh states that this variety resembles a Wild Goose crossed with an Americana and that he is unable to detect any cherry characters.

Duke of Devonshire. Domestica. Mentioned in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 146. 1831. Duke of Edinburgh. Domestica. 1. Jour. Hort. 21:216. 1869. 2. Flor. et Pom. 7:193. 1871. 3. Hogg Fruit Man. 698. 1884. 4. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 428. 1889.  Due d' Edinbourg 4.
A variety raised by a Mr. Dry, Hayes, Middlesex, England. Fruit large, roundish-obovate; suture shallow; skin thin, light purple; flesh reddish-yellow, juicy, richly flavored; freestone; good culinary plum.

Dumberline. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 146. 1831.
A variety under test in the London Horticultural Society Gardens in 1831.

Dummer. Domestica. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 698. 1884.
Raised in 1837 by a Mr. Dummer at Canterbury, England. Fruit large, red; like Red Magnum Bonum.

Dumiron. Domestica. 1. Cal. Nurs. Co. Cat. 11. 1897.
Imported from Transon Bros., Orleans, France, by the late John Rock of California; not introduced.

Dunkelblaue Kaiserin. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Norn. Pom. 428. 1889. Violette Kaiserin incor.

Dunlap. Hortulana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:79. 1892. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:36. 1897. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 185. 1901.  Dunlap No. 2 3. Dunlap's No. 22.
Originated and introduced by J. P. Dunlap of Nebraska. Fruit large, oval; cavity shallow; suture a line; surface smooth, glossy, bright red; dots many; bloom thin; flesh yellow, soft, juicy, sweet, rich; good; clingstone; mid-season; reported in the catalog of the American Pomological Society for 1899.

Dunlap No, 1. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. BuL 63:36. 1897. 2. Ibid. 87:13. 1900. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 148. 1901.  Dunlap 2. Dunlap (No. 1) 3. Dunlap's No. 1 1.
Another variety produced by J. P. Dunlap of Nebraska. Fruit medium in size, oblong; suture a line; greenish-yellow covered with dull purplish-red; bloom heavy; flesh tender, juicy, rich, sweet; freestone.

Dunlop Nut. Americana. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 305. 1893.
A hardy variety tested at the Experimental Farm at Ottawa.

Dunmore. Domestica. 1. Mag. Hort. 9:163. 1843. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 380. 1857. 3. Hogg Fr. Man. 359. 1866. 4. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 428. 1889.  Dunmore 4.
Fruit medium in size, oval; skin thick, greenish-yellow becoming golden; stem half an inch long;' flesh yellow, tender, juicy, sweet; good; freestone; late.

Durazen Zwetsche. Domestica? 1. Mathieu Nom,. Pom. 428. 1889.
Reference taken by Mathieu from the Pomologische Monatshefte 2. 1882.


Eagle. Angustifolia varians. 1. Kerr Cat. 1902-3. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 162:254,255.1905.
Originated in Texas; tree low, spreading; fruit of medium size, round; suture slight; skin light red; flesh yellow; good; stone clinging; early.

Early. Domestica. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 61. 1887. Skorospielka 1. From Russia.

Early Amber. Domestica. 1. Forsyth Treat. Fr. Trees 21. 1803. 2. Floy-Lindley Guide Orch. Card. 297. 1846.
Fruit small, roundish-oblong, pale greenish-yellow with crimson specks; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy; stone clinging; early.

Early Apricot. Domestica. 1. Prince Pom. Man. 2:70. 1832. 2. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:21. 1873. 3. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 430. 1889.
AbricoUe Hâtive 1, 3. Abricote'e Hâtive 2. Abricote Hâtive 1. AbricoUe Pricoce 3. Early Apricot Plum 1. Frühe Aprikosenpflaume 2. Frühe Aprikosenpflaume 3. Oberdiecks Frühe Aprikosenpflaume 2, 3.
The fruit ot Early Apricot is small, roundish; suture shallow; cavity distinct; pale red, darker in the sun; dots small, numerous; flesh yellowish-green, slightly juicy, firm; quality fair; clingstone; season early.

Early Blue. Domestica. 1. Ont. Fr. Growers Assoc. 87. 1896. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 52. 1897.
A Domestica of American origin. Fruit the size of Lombard; very early.

Early Blue. Domestica. 1. Miller Gard. Diet. 2. 1807. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 899. 1869. 3. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:13. 1873. 4. Hogg Fruit Man. 698. 1884.  Azure Hâtive 3. Azure Hâtive 2, 4. Black Perdrigon 2, 4. Blue Gage 3, 4. Blue Gage 1, 2. Cooper's Blue Gage 2, 4. Early Blue 3. Little Blue Gage 2.
An old European variety; rejected by the American Pomological Society in 1858. Fruit of medium size, roundish, dark purple; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy; flavor brisk and rich; freestone; early.

Early Cherry. Cerasifera X ? 1. Kerr Cat. 21. 1897.
From California; fruit small, round, red; clingstone; early.

Early Cluster. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 428. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 163, 355- 1895.  Mentioned in the preceding references.

Early Cross. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 380. 1857.
Originated with a Mr. Cross, Salem, Massachusetts. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit below medium, roundish, reddish-purple; bloom thick; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, sweet; clingstone; early.

Early Favorite. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 314. 1845. 2. Elliott Fr. Book 419. 1854. 3. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 395. 1857. 4. Mas Le Verger 6:11. 1866-73. 5. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 447. 1889. 6. Guide Prat. 152, 356, 1895. 7. Rev. Hort. 548, P1. 1909.  Early Favorite 4, 5, 6. Early Favourite 6. Early Favourite 4. Favorite Hâtive 7. Favorite Précoce 4, 5, 7. Favorite Précoce 6. Favorite Précoce de Rivers 5, 6. Précoce de Rivers 5. Prune Early Favorite 7. Rivers Early 5,6. Rivers Early Favorite 5. River's Early Favourite 5, 6. River's Early Favourite 3. River's Early No.i 1. River's Early No. 1 2. Rivers Früh Pflaume 5. Rivers Frühpflaume 6. River's No. 1 3, 5.
A seedling of Précoce de Tours raised by Thomas Rivers, Sawbridgeworth, England, about 1834. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit small, roundish-oval; suture shallow; bluish-black; dots russet; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, sweet; good; freestone; very early. Mentioned in the catalog of the American Pomological Society from 1852 to 1891.

Early Genesee. Domestica. 1. Gen. Farmer 9:232. 1848.
Originated in Brighton, Monroe County, New York. Fruit of medium size, long-ovate, golden-yellow; very early.

Early Golden Drop. Domestica. 1. Wickson Cal. Fruits 352. 1891. 2. Cal. Nur. Cat. 1898. Early Golden 2.
"Small, bright yellow, sugary and rich; pit free; ripens early."

Early Honey. Angustifolia varians. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:79. 1892. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 195. 1901. From Grayson County, Texas.

Early Mirabelle. Insititia. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 360, 376. 1866. 2. Mas Le Verger 6:1. 1866-73. 3. Oberdieek Deut. Obst. Sort. 410. 1881. 4. Guide Prat. 152, 36a. 1895.  Frühe von Bergthold 3. Mirabelle Précoce 1. Mirabelle Précoce 4, 5. Précoce de Bergthold 1,2. Mirabelle de Berihold 4. Précoce de Bergthold 4.
Thought to be of English origin; first noted by Hogg. Resembles the Mirabelle very closely, with which it is confused. Tree medium in vigor, very productive; shoots downy; fruit small, nearly round; suture indistinct; skin pale yellow, specked with red on the sunny side; flesh yellowish, sweet, juicy, agreeably aromatic; freestone; early.

Early Minnesota. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:36. 1897. 2. 5. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:17. 1905.
Found wild by Joseph Wood of Windom, Minnesota. Tree low, spreading, hardy, very productive; fruit small, round, yellowish-red; flesh sweet, juicy; stone free; very early

Early Normandy. Domestica. 1. Horticulturist 301256. 1875. 2. Le Bon Jard. 340. 1882. Normande Précoce 2.
Noted in the Horticulturist as originating in France. Tree vigorous; fruit as large as a Reine Claude, purple on the sunny side, light flesh-colored on the shady side; bloom light; flesh greenish, fine and melting, juicy, sweet; good; early.

Early Pale. Species? Letter from Burbank.
Originated with Luther Burbank and sold to Judge S. F. Lieb in 1897.

Early Pear. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 577 fig. 1629. 2. Rea Flora 209. 1676. Prunum Pyrinum praecox 1. An early strain of White Pear.

Early Perdrigon. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 151. 1831. 2. Prince Pom. Man. 2:65. 1832. 3. Poiteau Pom. Franc. i# 1846. 4. Hogg Fruit Man. 375. 1866. 5. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 936. 1869. 6. Mas Le Verger 6:147. 1866-73. 7. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 431. 1889. 8. Guide Prat. 153, 361. 1895. Früher Perdrigon 7. Früher Violetter Perdrigon 7. Moyeu de Bourgogne ljt 8. Perdrigon hatif 1. Perdrigon hdtif 2, 7, 8. Perdrigon Hâtive 2. Perdrigon Violet Hettif 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. Prune Perdrigon hatif 3. Prunus Calvellana 3.
There are two plums known under this name. Both are small, oval, purplish and are covered with a thick bloom. One, however, which seems to have been earliest known, is sweet, rich and of very good quality, ripening about the middle of August. The second variety was named by Calvel. It is vastly inferior in quality to the first and ripens in July. Neither variety is well known in America.

Early Red. Angustifolia varians. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 160, 162. 1881. 2. Cornell Sta Bul. 80:62. 1892. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 195. 1901.
Grown by G. Onderdonk of Mission Valley, Victoria County, Texas; introduced by the originator in 1879. Fruit smalls roundish; cavity large; suture lacking; red; dots few, white; skin thin; flesh soft, yellow, sprightly; quality fair; clingstone; early.

Early Red. Domestica. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 61. 1887. 2. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 86. 1890. 3. Can. Exp. Farm. Bul. 43:33. 1903. 4. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 310. 1903.  Early Red Russian 3. Early Red Russian No, 3 3. Krasnaya Skorospielkaya 1. Mixed Arab 2, 3. No. 3 2.
Early Red was imported by J. L. Budd from Dr. Regel, St. Petersburg, Russia, in the winter of 1881-82. The following season it was disseminated with a mixed lot of varieties, all of which became badly confused. Fruit large, oval; cavity small; suture shallow; dark red; bloom thick; dots white; flesh firm, meaty; quality fair; clingstone; early.

Early Royal of Nikita. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 380. 1857. 2. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:25 fig. 13. 1873. 3. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 429, 430, 441, 449. 1889.
Early Royal of Nikita 3. Frühe Konigspflaume Pflaume von Nikita 3. Frühe Nikitaer Konigspflaume 3. Nikitaner Frühe Konigspflaume 2. Nikitaer Frühe Konigspflaume 3. Nikita's Frühe Konigs Pflaume 3. Roy ale Hâtive de Nikita 3. Royal Hâtive de Nikita 3. Royale Hettive de Nikita 2.
According to Mas this variety originated in Nikita, Crimea. Fruit small, roundish, reddish-purple; bloom thick; flesh yellow, sweet, juicy; good; semi-clinging; early. [distinct from 'Early Royal'- ASC]

Early St. John. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 912. 1869.  Prune de St. Jean 1. St. Jean 1. St. John 1.
Tree vigorous; fruit medium in size, roundish-oblong, reddish-purple; flesh green, sweet, sprightly; freestone; mid-season.

Early Transparent Gage. Domestica. 1. Jour. Hort. N. S. 17:286. 1869. 2. Hogg Fruit Man. 722. 1884. 3. Guide Prat. 153, 364. 1895. 4. Rivers Cat. 34. 1898. 5. Bartrum Pears and Plums 63. 1902.  Early Apricot 3. Early Transparent 4. Early Transparent Gage 2, 3. New Transparent Gage 1. Reine-Claude Diaphane Hâtive 3. Rivers' Early Apricot 2. Rivers' Early Transparent Gage 5.
This seedling of Transparent Gage was raised by Thomas Rivers, Sawbridgeworth, England, in 1866. Tree hardy, productive, compact; branchlets pubescent; fruit medium in size, roundish-oblate; suture shallow; stem slender; yellowish-green, mottled with crimson; flesh greenish-yellow, firm, juicy; quality high; freestone; early.

Early Yellow Gage. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. App. 2:156. 1876.
Originated with Asahel Foote, Williamstown, Massachusetts. Tree vigorous, upright, productive; fruit of medium size, roundish-oval; suture shallow; cavity small; stem slender; pale yellow; bloom thin; flesh greenish-yellow, rather coarse, juicy, sweet; semi-clinging; early.

Early Yellow Prune. Domestica. 1. Horticulturist 8:536. 1853. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 86. 1854.
Originated in Bedford County, Pennsylvania. Tree vigorous, prolific; fruit medium, oval; skin yellow; very good; stone free.


Eason. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 578. 1629.
Described by Parkinson as "small, red and well tasted."

Eberly. Domestica. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 135. 1905 Eberly's Plum 1.
A seedling brought to notice by W. V. Eberly of the California Nursery Company. Fruit large, oval; cavity small; yellow, occasionally slightly russeted; dots numerous, silvery; flesh yellowish, translucent; sweet, rich; good; stone long, flat, free; late.

Ebon. Cerasifera X ? 1. Kerr Cat. 16. 1899.
Described by Kerr in 1899. Tree upright, with distinct foliage. Fruit medium in size, round to round-oblong, very dark red; flesh red; clingstone.

Ecully. Domestica. 1. Cat. Cong. Pom. France 364. 1887. 2. Guide Prat. 153, 364. 1895. 3. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 433. 1905. Reine-Claude d'Ecully 1, 2, 3.
A chance seedling grown by M. Luizet, at Ecully-les-Lyon, France; first fruited in 1866. Tree vigorous, very productive; fruit large, roundish; suture deep; halves unequal; cavity deep and rather wide; stem medium in length; skin yellow, slightly tinged with red; flesh yellowish, fine, rather firm, juicy, sweet, Reine Claude aroma; good; stone nearly free; mid-season.

Eddie. Species? Letter from J. W. Kerr.
Originated by Theodore Williams of Benson, Nebraska. Edith. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:269. 1900.
A seedling of Iowa Beauty grown by E. L. Hayden, Oakville, Iowa, about 1895. Tree upright, vigorous; fruit medium in size, globular; suture indistinct; dark red; dots numerous; bloom thick; good; stone of medium size; mid-season.

Edle Early, Domestica. 1. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 411. 1881. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 428. 1889.  Edle Frühpflaume 1, 2. Noble Précoce 2.
Found in a garden in Brunswick, Germany. Tree large, productive; fruit small, oval; suture a line; brownish-red, with gold-colored dots; flesh golden-yellow, tender, juicy, sweet; freestone; early.

Edouard Seneclauze. Domestica. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 361. 1866.
Fruit very small, obovate, golden-yellow; flesh sweet, richly flavored; freestone; early.

Eggles. Triflora X Hortulana. 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 14:271. 1901.
Sent out by A. L. Bruce, Texas. Fruit large, round; suture indistinct; bright red; dots many, minute, yellow; flesh yellow; stone oval, compressed, clinging; poor.

Eldora. Americana. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 333. 1894. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 148. 1901.
A seedling raised by Judge Samuel Miller of Missouri. Tree rapid in growth; fruit medium to large.

Eldorado. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:269. 1900. 2. III. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 135. 1903- 3* Ibid. 426. 1905.
A seedling grown by H. A. Terry of Crescent, Iowa, who introduced it in 1899. Fruit small, round; suture lacking; yellow overlaid with red; dots small, grayish; bloom thin; skin thick; flesh firm, yellow, subacid; clingstone; late.

Eldridge. Americana. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 42. 1883.
A variety from Wisconsin listed for eight years by the American Pomological Society.

Elfrey. Domestica. 1. Coxe Cult. Fr. Trees 234. 1817. 2. Prince Pom. Man. 2:98. 1832. 3. Horticulturist 7:403. 1852. 4. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 429. 1889.  Elfrey1 s Prune 2. ElfretKs Prune 2. Elfry's Plum 4.
Of unknown origin; quite widely disseminated and highly recommended in the South about fifty years ago. Tree vigorous; fruit medium in size, oval, blue; flesh greenish, firm, rich, slightly dry; mid-season.

Elisabeth Pflaume. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 429. 1889.  Elisabeth d'Eisner. Eisner's Elisabeth Pflaume.

Ella. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 2d Ser. 3:52. 1900.
A seedling of the Peach plum grown at the British Columbia Experimental Station; not introduced; closely resembles the parent.

Ellis. Munsoniana X Hortulana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:79. 1892. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 231. 1901.
Ellis is said to be a cross between Wild Goose and Golden Beauty, and to have originated in northern Texas; introduced by T. L. Ellis. Fruit large, round; skin very thin, red; good; semi-clinging.

Ellwood. Domestica. 1. Col., O., Hort. Soc. Rpt. 31. 1892. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 162: 254, 255. 1905. Elwood 1.
Introduced by Augustine and Company, Normal, Illinois; very similar to Lombard if not identical with it.

Elmore. Domestica. 1. Gard. et For. 7:243. 1894.
An early variety from Shasta, Sacramento County, California.

Eisner Grime Zwetsche. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 429. 1889.  Eisner's Von Gronow Grüne Zwetsche. Prune Celeste.

Elton. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 147. 1831.
Grown on the grounds of the London Horticultural Society.

Emerald. Domestica. 1. Can. Hort. 12:265. 1889. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 101. 1891. 3. Smith Cat. 3$. 1898. 4. Can. Hort. 22:340. 1899.  Early Green 1, 2, 4.
Originated with Warren Holton, Hamilton, Ontario; supposedly a seedling of Reine Claude. It was first called Early Green but was introduced by E. D. Smith of Winona, Ontario, under the name Emerald. Tree hardy and productive; fruit large, roundish; stem slender; suture medium deep; yellowish-green; very good; stone free, smooth; very early.

Emerald. Triflora X Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:270, 1900. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 209. 1901. 3. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 296. 1903. 4. Ia. Sta. Bul. 114:133. 1910. Burwood 4.
Emerald came from a cross between Brittlewood and Burbank made by Theodore Williams, Benson, Nebraska, in 1895. Tree resembles an Early Richmond cherry, hardy, productive; buds conspicuous; fruit large, roundish, yellow marbled with coppery-red; flesh yellowish, tender, fibrous, juicy, mild subacid; good.

Emerald Drop. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 275. 1845. 2. Ibid. 913. 1869. 3. Mas Le Verger 6:125. 1866-73. Goutte Emerattde 3.
Emerald Drop is a seedling of Washington grown sometime previous to 1845 by A. J. Downing, Newburgh, New York. Tree moderately vigorous, productive; fruit of medium size, oval; cavity small; suture distinct, sides unequal; yellowish-green; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Emerson. Angustifolia varians. 1. Kan. Sta. Bul. 101:131. 1901. 2. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:63. 1892. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 195. 1901. Emerson's Early 3.
Found wild in northern Texas; introduced by A. L. Bruce. Fruit small, round to oval, bright red, with many white dots; flesh yellow, soft; stone rough, clinging; early.

Emerson. Americana. 1. Minn. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 127. 1890.
Originated near Dubuque, Iowa. Tree productive; fruit large, roundish, red, thickly dotted with small gray spots; flesh firm; valuable for preserving.

Emerson Yellow. Angustifolia varians. 1. Kerr Cat. 20. 1897. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 195. 1901.
A seedling of the Emerson from Texas. Fruit of medium size, round, yellow; inferior.

Emigrant. Domestica. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 126. 1889. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 25. 1897.
A seedling of Lombard. Fruit large, oval, purple; quality fair; mid-season.

Emily May. Domestica. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:269. 1900.
A large attractive plum of the Pond type grown by Lillian A. Trotter, Owen Sound, Ontario, Canada. Fruit large, oval; suture well marked; clear light yellow; bloom thin; flesh firm, juicy, delicate; good; stone small, rough, free.

Emma. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:269. 1900. 2. Terry Cat. 1900.
Grown by H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa, in 1896. Fruit medium in size, almost round; skin thin, reddish color; good; stone large, clinging.

Engle. Domestica. 1. Mich Sta. Bul. 129:32, ^^. 1896. 2. Ibid. 187:77, 78. 1901. 3. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 311. 1903.
Fruit below medium size, roundish-oval; suture obscure; skin yellow; flesh firm, yellow, flavor rich; very good; very early.

Empereur. Domestica. 1. Mas Le Verger 6:63. 1866-73. 2- Mathieu Nom. Pom. 429. 1889.  Empereur de Mas 2.
Grown by M. Mas, France, from a seed of Golden Drop sown in 1850; reported in 1861 under the name Empereur. Fruit large, obovate; suture indistinct; skin tender, purple, streaked with deeper purple; flesh clear yellow, melting, juicy, sweet; stone small, clinging; early.

Emperor of Japan. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 429. 1889.  Empereur du Japan 1. Emperor of Japan 1. Kaiser Von Japan 1.
Mathieu found reference to it in Pomologische Monatshefte 134. 1882 and Obst-Garten 322. 1882.

Esjum Erik. Domestica. 1. U. S. Dept. Agr. Pom. Bul. 10:21. 1901.
Esjum Erik is an Old World variety imported by the United States Department of Agriculture in 1900. As tested at this Station it appears to be of little value for New York growers. Tree vigorous, unproductive; fruit small, obovate, necked; cavity nearly lacking; suture a line; purplish-black; bloom thick; dots inconspicuous; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, firm, sweetish, mild; quality not high; stone small, oval, dark colored, clinging; mid-season.

Essex Bullace. Insititia. 1. Land. Hort. Soc. Cat. 144. 1831. 2. Hogg Fruit Man. 689. 1884. 3. Rivers Cat. 37. 1909.  New Large Bullace 1,3. New Large Bullace 2.
Tree vigorous, very productive; fruit large, roundish, greenish-yellow; flesh juicy; late.

Esslinger Fiuhzwetsche. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 429. 1889. 2. Lucas Vollst. Hand. Obst. 473. 1894. Quetsche Précoce d' Esslingen 1.
Tree vigorous; an early and abundant bearer; fruit of medium size, bluish-black; bloom light; valuable for dessert and drying.

Esther. Hortulana mineri. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 287. 1887. 2. Cornell Sta. BuL 38:79. 1892. 3. Terry Cat. 1900. 4. Waugh Plum Cult. 173. 1901.
A seedling of Miner, grown by H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa; first fruited in 188g. Fruit medium in size, round-oval; suture a line; dark red; dots numerous; bloom thin; flesh yellow; good; stone oval, clinging; late.

Etopa. Prunus besseyi X Triflora. Cir. S. Dak. Exp. Sta. 1910.
Introduced in 1908 by the originator, N. E. Hansen of the South Dakota Experiment Station. It is a cross of Occident with Prunus besseyi in which the dark purplish flesh of the male parent is conspicuous.

Etta. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1900. 2. Terry Cat. 1900. 3. Wis. Sta. Bul. 85:13. 1901.
A seedling first fruited in 1895 by H. A. Terry, Iowa. Fruit large, nearly round; suture distinct; skin yellow, striped and splashed with red; flesh sweet, rich; good; stone oval, free; mid-season.

Eureka. Nigra. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:270. 1900.
Grown in 1896 by Theodore Williams, Benson, Nebraska, from seed of Cheney. Tree upright, vigorous, unproductive; fruit large; roundish, yellowish-red to purple; flesh firm, juicy; good; clingstone; very early.

Eureka. Munsoniana. 1. Am. Jour. Hort. 5:148. 1869.
Similar to Wild Goose.

Eva. Nigra. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 426. 1900.
From Manitoba; tested at the Indian Head Experimental Farm, Northwest Territory, Canada. Fruit small, red; excellent; mid-season.

Evelyn. Domestica. 1. Ont. Fr. Gr. Assoc. Rpt. 73. 1894. 2. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 137. 1894.
A seedling grown in the neighborhood of Owen's Sound, Canada; of local reputation.

Excelsior Damson. Insititia. 1. Green River Cat. 1899.
A freestone introduced in 1892 by the Green River Nursery Company and described in their catalog as being a particularly fine strain of the Damson.


Fairchild. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:271. 1900. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 148.  1901.
A seedling of De Soto supposed to have been fertilized by a wild plum; grown by J. H. Fairchild, Iowa, in 1894 and offered for sale in 1899 by Snyder and Son, Center Point, Iowa. Fruit above medium, roundish-oval, yellowish-red with whitish dots; flesh yellow, firm, juicy; quality fair; mid-season.

Fancy. Munsoniana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:271. 1900.
From a sprout of Wild Goose, originating with John Brown, Oakville, Louisa County, Iowa, in 1885. Tree vigorous, very prolific; fruit large, oblong, yellow with shading of red; bloom thin; flesh sweet, juicy; good; stone small, clinging; mid-season.

Fanning. Munsoniana. 1. Waugh Plum Cult. 185. 1901.
A chance seedling found in the yard of a Mr. Fanning, Rockdale, Texas. Fruit medium in size, round-oval, bright red; dots numerous; flesh yellow; quality fair; stone oval, clinging; mid-season.

Fawn. Munsoniana. 1. Waugh Plum Cult 231. 1901;
A variety first grown by David Miller of Camp Hill, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. Fruit of medium size, roundish; suture a line; bright red; dots numerous, large, yellow, giving a dappled or fawn color; bloom very thin; flesh yellow; quality fair; stone oval, clinging.

Femmonzi. Species? 1. Coates Cat. 1910-n.
A variety first grown by Frank Femmons of Ahwahnee, California, and introduced by the Leonard Coates Nursery Company, Morganhill, California, in the fall of 1910. Said to be large and handsome.

Field Marshall. Domestica. 1. Kenrick Am. Orch. 257. 1832. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 293. 1845. 3- Elliott Fr. Book 426. 1854.  Corse's Field Marshall 1,2. Corse's Field Marshal 3.
A seedling raised by Henry Corse of Montreal, Canada. Fruit large, oval, bright purplish-red; cavity shallow; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, subacid; stone long, pointed, clinging.

Figue Grosse Rouge. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 147. 1831.  Wilmots Early 1.
Fruit large, obovate; purple; freestone; quality medium; mid-season.

Fin de Siecle. Nigra. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 426. 1900.
A seedling raised at Indian Head Experimental Farm, Northwest Territory, Canada. Tree productive; fruit large; red; flavor fair; early.

Fine Bonte. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 913. 1869. 2. Mas he Verger 6:35. 1866-73. 3. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 429. 1889.  Feine und Gute 3. Fine Bonte 3.
Originated in the nurseries of Simon Louis, Moselle, France. Fruit small, irregularly ovate; suture indistinct; purple; bloom thin; stem very short, thick; flesh greenish yellow; very good; stone small, free; very early.

Fine Early Plum. Domestica. Mentioned in Forsyth Treat Fr. Trees 21. 1803.

Firba Konigspflaume. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 429. 1889.

Firbas Frühe Schuttenhoferin. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 429. ih
Mathieu found mention of it in Wiener Garten-Zeitung 287. 1884.

First. Species? 1. Burbank Cat. 1899. 2. Ibid. 1901. 3. Ga. Sta. Bul. 68:36. 1905.  No. 31,288 1.
According to the originator, Luther Burbank, this variety is one of the second generation of a combination cross of Hawkeye, Hammer, Milton, Wyant, Wayland and Burbank. It was introduced in 1899 under the breeding number 31,288, but grafting wood was not offered for sale until 1900. This is probably one of the earliest plums, ripening in California about three weeks before Red June. Fruit medium in size, roundish; stem short, slender; yellow with faint blush; flesh yellow, sweet, juicy; earliest.

First Best. Species? 1. Childs Cat. 136. 1910.
First Best was grown by R. D. Hoyt of Clearwater, Florida, in 1894 from seed marked "Hill Plum" received from W. Gollen of Saharanfur, India. The tree first fruited in 1904 and was introduced in the spring of 1910 by John Lewis Childs, Floral Park, New York, who states that it is an unusually early, yellow variety.

First Sweet. Nigra? 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 426. 1900.
A seedling raised at the Experimental Farm, Northwest Territory, Canada. Tree productive; fruit of medium size; skin red, thin; flavor excellent; early.

Fitzroy. Americana. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 119. 1904.
A seedling of Rollingstone grown at the Central Experimental Farm, Canada. Fruit above medium, roundish, slightly heart-shaped; suture a line; skin yellow washed with red; dots many; bloom moderate; flesh pale yellow, juicy, sweet; good; stone nearly free; cracks when ripe.

Flora Plena. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894-97.
J. W. Kerr, the introducer, found this plum in the yard of a friend in York County, Pennsylvania, it having been brought from Iowa. Tree dwarf; blooms profusely with beautiful pure white, very double flowers; no fruit.

Flushing Bulleis. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576. 1629.
Noted by Parkinson as a variety producing fruit in clusters like a bunch of grapes.

Foote. Insititia. 1. Mich. Sta. Sp. Bul. 35:21. 1906.
Fruit small, roundish-oblong; skin black; flesh rather dry, greenish-yellow; stone small, oval, clinging; mid-season.

Foote. Domestica. 1. Horticulturist 20:324. 1865. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 913. 1869. 3. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:77. 1873.  Footers Early Orleans 3. Foote's Early Orleans 1, 2, 3. Monsieur Hatif de Foote 3.
A seedling of Wilmot's Early Orleans raised in 1852 by Asahel Foote of Williamstown, Massachusetts. Tree large and vigorous; fruit of medium size, roundish-oval; suture absent; very black; flesh greenish, juicy; good; stone oval, flattened, clinging; very early.

Foote Golden Gage. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 914. 1869.
Raised by Asahel Foote, Williamstown, Massachusetts. Tree very vigorous; shoots slightly downy; fruit large, nearly round; suture shallow; stalk slender; cavity small; skin golden-yellow, obscurely splashed with green and tinged with red; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet, slightly vinous; very good; stone slightly adherent; mid-season.

Forest Rose Improved. Hortulana mineri. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 113:154. 1899.
An improved strain of Forest Rose somewhat larger than the original.

Forewattamie. Hortulana mineri X Munsoniana. 1. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:11. 1898. 2. Kerr Cat. 1900.
A cross between Forest Garden and Pottawattamie grown by Theodore Williams, Benson, Nebraska. J. W. Kerr, after testing it, states that it disclosed no special merits; fruit below medium, oval, dull red; flesh watery; poor.

Formosa. Triflora X ? 1. Fancher Creek Nur. Cat. 7. 1907-8. 2. Fancher Creek Nur. Cat., Burbank's Late Introductions, fig. 1909.  Wickson Challenge 1.
Grown by Luther Burbank, who states that it is of mixed parentage, including probably from fifteen to eighteen varieties. Tree very vigorous and productive; fruit large, oval to slightly cordate; suture very prominent; cavity medium; rich yellow with light bloom turning to clear red at maturity; flesh pale yellow, firm, sweet, rich, apricot flavor; good; stone semi-clinging; mid-season.

Forward Damask. Domestica. Mentioned in Quintinye Com. Gard. 70. 1699.

Frankfort Peach. Domestica. 1. Koch Deut. Obst. 572. 1876. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 3rd App. 180. 1881. 3. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 430. 1889.  Francjort Peach 3. Frankfurter Pfirschen Zwetsche 3. Kuchen Pflaume 3. Quetsche de Francfort 3. Quetsche-Peche de Francfort 3.
Tree spreading, productive; fruit of medium size, oval, compressed; suture shallow; cavity small; black; bloom thick; flesh yellow, coarse, juicy, sweet, good; stone oval, thin, free; mid-season.

Franklin, Triflora X ? 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 12:223. 1899. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 210, 211 fig. 1901.
Originated with A. L. Bruce, Texas, from Abundance crossed with an unknown variety. Fruit of medium size, oblate; suture a line; bright crimson over yellow; dots numerous; bloom thin; flesh yellow; good; clingstone.

Fraser. Domestica. 1. Am. Gard. 22:606. 1901. 2. Gard. Chron. 30:120. 1901. Fraser's Early Yellow 1.
Raised in the nursery of John Fraser, Woodford, England, about 1895. Tree small; fruit very small, oval; skin bright yellow; flesh soft; flavor poor; freestone; valuable because of its earliness.

Freeman. Munsoniana. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 276. 1893. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 87:13. 1901.  Freeman's Favorite 1.
Originated in 1885 with H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa, from seed of Wild Goose. Tree vigorous, fairly productive; fruit above medium, roundish-oblong; suture distinct; bright crimson, numerous dots on the lower half; flesh very tender, sprightly; good; clingstone; early.

Freestone. Species? 1. ///. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 424. 1905.
An inferior native variety; fruit small; clingstone; mid-season.

Freestone. Americana, 1. Terry Cat. 1900.
A seedling grown by H. A. Terry from seed of Harrison. Fruit large, pale yellow becoming light red at full maturity; good; stone semi-clinging.

Freestone Goose. Munsoniana. 1. Stark Cat. 29. 1910.
Originated by Theodore Williams, Benson, Nebraska, and introduced by Stark Brothers, Louisiana, Missouri, in 1910. The fruit is said to be larger and darker colored than the Wild Goose.

Freestone Quetsche. Domestica. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 152:209. 1898.
Imported by the Department of Agriculture and noted as vigorous.

Friedheim Damascene. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 430. 1889. 

Friedheim''s Rote Frühe Damascene. Damas Rouge de Friedheim. Fritze Herrnpflaume. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 430. 1889.

Frostproof. Cerasifera. 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 13:369. 1900. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 231. 1901.
Grown and introduced by J. H. G. Jenkins, Spring Garden, Missouri, about 1896. Fruit small, spherical; suture a fine line; dark crimson; dots minute; bloom thin; flesh yellow; good; clingstone; very early; blossoms resistant to frosts.

Frühe Englische Zwetsche. Domestica. Listed in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 430. 1889.

Frühe Gelbe Reine Claude. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 430. 1889. 

Frühe Gelbe Kaiser Pflaume.  Frühe Grime Zwetsche. Domestica. 1. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 445. 1881. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 430. 1889. Bischtin Erik 2. Herr Pflaume 2.
A German variety said to be suitable for moist soils.

Frühe Leipziger Damascene. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 430. 1889.  Damas de Leipsick 1. Fondante Noire 1.
Mathieu suggests that this may possibly be identical with Précoce de Tours.

Fuller. Species? 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:37. 1897. Fuller's Egg 1.
Reported by B. A. Matthews, Knoxville, Iowa, as a large, oval plum.

Fulton. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 382. 1857. 2. Cultivator 5:373.  1857.
A variety of uncertain origin found at Johnstown, Fulton County, New York. Tree vigorous and productive; fruit of medium size, oval; suture distinct; bright yellow; juicy; good; late and hangs to the tree well.

Funk. Triflora X ? 1. Munson Cat. 8. 1902. 2. Text. Dept. Agr. Rpt. 12:102. 1910. Funk's Early 2.
An accidental cross of Abundance raised by J. M. Funk, Grayson County, Texas. Tree vigorous, upright, prolific; fruit medium, heart-shaped, bright red; clingstone; very early.

Furst Damson. Insititia. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 361. 1866. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 913. 1869. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 127, 129. 1901. 4. Can. Exp. Farm Btd. 2d Ser. 3:51. 1900.  Eugene Furst 1, 2. Eugen Furst 3. Furst's Damson 4. Quetsche Précoce de Fur si 2. Sweet Damson 1, 2.
This plum is frequently confused with the Furst. The origin of the name and variety is unknown. According to Waugh, it is a German variety introduced in America about sixty years ago. Foliage Damson-like; fruit small, pear-shaped, with a neck; cavity shallow, abrupt; stem slender; suture obsolete; apex slightly pointed; skin tough, purplish-black; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, slightly acid; quality fair to good; stone nearly free.

Gabriel Combes. Domestica. 1. Rev. Hort. 332, PL 1895.  Prune Reine-Claude Gabriel Combes 1.
Of French origin, probably a seedling of the Reine Claude; first mentioned in 1895. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit spheroidal-ovoid, large, purple; cavity very small; suture slight; apex pointed; flesh amber-yellow, fine, juicy, sweet, aromatic, excellent; stone small, free; ripens after Reine Claude.

Galbraith. Domestica. 1. Horticulturist 8:536. 1853. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 382. 1857.
Said to have originated with a Mr. Galbraith near Boalsburg, Pennsylvania. Tree straggling; fruit of medium size, oval, purple; flesh tender, juicy; good; clingstone; early.

Gale. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1897-1900. 2, Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:37. 1897. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 149. 1901.  Gale Seedling 2. Gale Seedling 3. Gale's No.3 1.
Introduced about 1890 by I. Gale et Son, Waukesha, Wisconsin. Tree overbears; fruit below medium, roundish, compressed; suture distinct; apex slightly truncate; dull red; skin thin; flesh yellow, soft; quality fair; stone thick, rounded, nearly free; very early.

Galena. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:37. 1897. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 149. 1901.
Introduced by Charles Luedloff, Cologne, Minnesota. Fruit large, oval; yellow ground covered with red.

Galopin. Domestica. 1. Guide Prat. 160, 367. 1895. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 102. 1901.  Violette de Galopin 2. Violette Galopin 1.
A European variety. Tree poor; fruit of medium size, roundish; cavity shallow; stem short, thick; suture shallow; blue; many conspicuous dots; flesh yellow; quality medium; stone of medium size, oval, slightly necked, nearly free.

Garden King. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:273. 1900. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 149. 1901.
Found wild in 1853; in 1861 it was put under cultivation by Judge Elias Topliff of De Soto, Wisconsin, and subsequently turned over to A. R. Prescott, Postville, Iowa, who introduced it in 1896. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit medium, oval, scarlet; flesh sweet, juicy; freestone.

Garfield. Hortulana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bui 38:48, 86. 1892. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 179. 1901. 3. Ohio Sta. Bul. 162:254, 255. 1905.
Reported to have been found wild in Ohio; introduced by Leo Welz, Wilmington, Ohio, in 1887. Tree unproductive, lacking in hardiness; fruit small, oval; stem slender; cavity shallow; suture a line; bright red; bloomless; flesh yellow, juicy, acid; quality fair; stone small, long-oval, pointed, clinging; late.


Garlick. Domestica. 1. Londm Hort. Soc. Cat. 147. 1831. 2. Mag. Hort. 9:164. 1843.  Garlick's Early 1,2.
Fruit small, obovate, purple; good; freestone; obsolete.

Garnet. Triflora X Cerasifera. 1, U.S.D.A. Rpt. Pom. 45. 1895. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 211. 1901.
Found by J. L. Breece, Fayetteville, North Carolina, under a Kelsey tree which was probably pollinated from a Pissardi growing near, the foliage showing the reddish color of the Pissardi; first fruited in 1892. Fruit large, roundish-oval, dark garnet-red with minute russet dots; cavity small; suture indistinct; skin thin and bitter; flesh yellow with a tinge of red; flavor mild; stone medium, oval, clinging; more valuable as an ornamental than for its fruit.

Gates. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:38. 1897.
Originated at Owatonna, Minnesota. Fruit medium in size, flattened; suture distinct; very dull red; dots numerous, yellow; skin thick; flesh yellow; quality fair; stone distinctly margined; late.

Gaunt. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576, 577 fig. 1629. 2. Res, Flora 208. 1676.
Described in 1629 by Parkinson as " large, reddish, waterish, late."

Gaviota. Triflora X Americana. 1. Fancher Creek Nur. Cat. 1907. 2. Fancher Creek Nur. Cat., Burbank's Late Introductions, fig. 1909.  Rice Seed 1.
Originated with Luther Burbank about 1900; probably contains admixtures of other species than the ones mentioned above. Tree vigorous, productive, late blooming; fruit very large, oval; suture shallow; cavity medium; dark red over yellow ground; flesh yellow, firm, sweet, aromatic; good; stone extremely small; mid-season.

Gaylord. Americana. 1. U .S. D. A. Rpt. 441. 1889. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:24, 38 fig. 1897. 3. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:273. 1900.
Found growing wild by David Hardman, Nora Springs, Iowa, in 1854; introduced by Edson Gaylord of the same place about 1890. Tree vigorous with a tendency tc overbear; fruit of medium size, oval; cavity small; stem short; suture aline; apex slightly pointed; dull red over yellow; bloom thin; dots numerous, minute; skin thick, bitter; flesh yellow, melting; good; stone large, oval, flat, semi-clinging; mid-season.

Gaylord Gold. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:273. 1900.
Found wild in Rock Grove, Iowa, about 1870 by John Henry, Nora Springs, Iowa cions subsequently distributed by Edson Gaylord. Fruit of medium size, golden yellow; good; stone small, free; mid-season.

Gelbe Damascener Pflaume. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 431. 1889.  Reference taken by Mathieu from Obst-Garten 315. 1883.

Gelbe Jerusalempflaume. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 431. 1889.  Jaune de Jerusalem 1. Prune de Jerusalem 1.
A variety of doubtful merit and different from Yellow Jerusalem.

Gelbe Kirschpflaume. Cerasifera. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 432. 1889.  Cerisette Blanche. Myrobalan Jaune. Prunus Cerasifera Zanihocarpa. Serdali Irek.


Gelbe Spatzwetsche. Species? Listed in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 432. 1889.  Reitzensteiner Gelbe Zwetsche incor. Quetsche Jaune Tardive.

Gem. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 915. 1869.
Originated near Albany, New York. Fruit small, round; suture and cavity shallow; mottled with purple; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet; clingstone.

Gem, Americana, 1. Meneray Cat. The Gem 1.
A seedling of Lottie grown by H. A. Terry; introduced by P. W. Meneray, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Fruit of medium size, oblong, red and yellow, with whitish bloom; good; freestone.

Gemeiner Gelbe Spilling, Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 432. 1889.  Bauern Pflaume. Gelber Bidling. Krieke. Prunus Lutea. Spelge. Spilge. Spindel Pflaume.

Gentleman. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:41. 1873.
Probably of American origin as it was sent by Downing to M. Mas, but was not described by the American author. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit medium, oval; suture indistinct; skin thick, intense purple; bloom abundant; stem short; flesh yellowish, juicy, vinous; good; freestone; early.

Georgia. Triflora X ? uCornellSta.Bul.it7$:iS3. 1899. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 212. 1901.  Normand No. 20 1, 2.
One of the several seedlings sent out by J. L. Normand, Marksville, Louisiana. Named by L. H. Bailey in 1899. Fruit small, oval, greenish-yellow covered with bright red; flesh yellow, watery, fibrous, sweet; stone large, strongly clinging; fruit drops while green; worthless.

Gerishes Seedling. Domestica. Mentioned in Johnson Cat. Early Bradshaw.

Gersepflaume. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 431. 1889.
Reference taken by Mathieu from Wiener Garten-Zeitung 287. 1884.

Ghiston. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 276. 1845. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 222, 244. 1858. Ghiston's Early 1, 2.
Fruit large, oval, yellow; bloom thin; flesh yellow; quality poor; freestone; season early; rejected by the American Pomological Society in 1858.

Gibson. Domestica. 1. Horticulturist 25:319. 1870. Gibson's Seedling.
A seedling from W. L. Gibson of Elmira, New York. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit of medium size, deep amber color; bloom slight; skin thick, very astringent; flesh sweet, juicy, mild; good.

Gill. Domestica. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 94:58. 1909.
Introduced by S. R. Gill, Port Clinton, Ohio, who received it in 1882 from a nursery with Golden Drop trees. Tree vigorous, spreading and productive; fruit medium in size, round, reddish-purple; bloom light; flesh firm, sweet, rich; good; mid-season; excellent for canning.

Gisborne. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort, Soc. Cat. 147. 1831. 2. Horticulturist 10:16. I^55* 3- Mas Pom. Gen. 2:49. I^73+ 4- Mathieu Nom. Pom. 432. 1889.  De Gisborne 3. Gisborne's 1. Gisborne's 3. Gisborne's Early 2. Gisborne's Early 2, 4. Gisborne's Zwetsche 3. Gisbornes Zwetsche 4. Ovalrunde Spreckel Pflaume 4. Pater son's 1,4.
Tree vigorous, productive; fruit of medium size, oval; suture indistinct; skin golden-yellow, dotted with cherry-red on the sunny side, with pale bloom; flesh bright yellow, juicy, sweet; stone large, oval, free; mid-season.

Glaister. Domestica. 1. Wickson Cat. Fruits 358. 1891.
A variety from California introduced by Leonard Coates of Napa, California. Fruit very similar to Yellow Egg, but two weeks earlier.

Gloire d'Epinay, Domestica. 1. Rev. Hort. 444. 1898 2. Ibid. 86. 1899.
A sucker from a chance seedling found about 1850 by M. Donon of Epinay, France; named and presented to the National Society of Horticulture in 1898 by M. Gorion. Fruit above medium size, roundish-oval; suture shallow; deep blue; similar to Monsieur, but is later and ripens over a period of nearly two months.

Gloire de Louveciennes. Insititia. 1. Rev. Hort. 650. 1900. 2. Ibid. 476, fig. 1901.  Mirabelle Gloire de Louveciennes 1, 2.
Noted in the Revue Horticole as a Mirabelle introduced in 1900 by M. Lecointe. Fruit similar to Mirabelle de Nancy in shape and form, but larger; skin citron-yellow, dotted and shaded with red on the sunny side; flesh firm, very sweet, like the Apricot in flavor.

Gloria, Americana mollis. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 119. 1904.
A seedling of Wolf; fruit large, oval; cavity narrow; suture a line; bright red or yellow mottled with red; dots few; bloom light; skin thick, tough; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet; good; stone large, nearly free; variety promising.

Gloucestershire Violet. Domestica. 1. Jour. Hort. 17:285. 1888.  Minsterworth 1. Prince 1.
A very old variety first known as Prince; it is grown largely on the banks of the Severn, England, where it is propagated from seed or from root-suckers. Fruit small, oval, with slight tendency to a neck; suture distinct; dark mahogany; bloom thin; flesh greenish, tender, sweet, pleasant; stone small; free.

Glow. Maritima X Subcordata X Americana X Nigra. 1. Burbank Cat. 14. 1911.
From crosses of the species named Burbank grew this variety. Tree of medium size; branches slender and drooping. Fruit large, round, crimson, dotted with yellow; flesh orange color, rich; good; freestone; late.

G. No. 4 Domestica. 1. N. Y. Sta. Rpt. 9:347. 1890. 2. Mich. Sta. Bul. 177:42, 43. 1899.  G. No. 44 Jones (unpublished).
In 1890, Herbert A. Jones, Himrods, New York, sent this variety to a few experiment stations for testing. Fruit of medium size, roundish; suture very shallow; cavity medium deep; stem slender; skin thin; dark purple; bloom thick; dots numerous, sometimes irregular, russet; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, firm, sourish; poor; clingstone; mid-season; variety not worth propagating.

Goff. Americana. 1. Meneray Cat. Prof. GofI 1.
A seedling of Hawkeye grown by H. A. Terry; introduced by F. W. Meneray, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Fruit large, red over yellow; good; clingstone

Gold. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2, Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:273. 1900. 3. Terry Cat. 1900.  Golden 3.
A variety from H. A. Terry not to be confused with the Golden of Burbank (Gold of Stark Brothers). Fruit of medium size, roundish; cavity shallow, small; orange-yellow and red; bloom thin; skin rather thick, astringent; flesh yellow, firm, meaty, subacid; good; clingstone.

Gold Coin. Americana. 1. Terry Cat. 1900.
An unknown variety mentioned by H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa, as the parent of Coinage.

Gold Colored. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:39. 1897. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 150. 1901.
From Edson Gaylord, Gaylord, Iowa. Fruit of medium size, bright yellow; stone small, free.

Golden Cluster. Domestica. 1. Montreal Hort. Soc. Rpt. 93. 1885.
A seedling from Henry Corse of Montreal. Tree slow in growth, with long internodes; fruit of medium size, egg-shaped; hanging in dense clusters by firmly adherent stems; gold, tinged with brown; flesh firm, pleasant; ripening season long.

Golden Gage. Domestica. N. Y. Sta. Rpt. 12:611. 1893.
Golden Gage is a seedling of Golden Drop grown by J. T. Macomber, Grand Isle, Vermont. Fruit small, oval; cavity shallow; suture a line; apex round; skin thin; pale yellow with red specks; bloom thin; dots small; flesh yellow, very sweet; good; stone oval, slightly necked; free; mid-season; of little commercial importance because of inferior size and color.

Golden Gem. Species?
A variety originating from seed with P. P. Dawson, Payette, Idaho.

Golden Prolific. Species? 1. Ont. Fr. Exp. Sta. Rpt. 5:116. 1898.
Tree vigorous, productive; fruit medium, yellow; very good; clingstone; poor shipper.

Golden Prune. Domestica. 1. Wickson Col. Fruits 360. 1891. 2. Cal. Sta. Bd. Hort. 112. 1891. 3. U. 5. D. A. Rpt 291. 1893. 4. Waugh Plum Cult. 105. 1901.  Golden 2.
Grown by Seth Lewelling, Milwaukee, Oregon, from a seed of the Italian Prune; mentioned in the last two catalogs of the American Pomological Society. Fruit large, oval; cavity small, round, shallow, abrupt; stem short; suture shallow; apex depressed, sometimes cracking; light yellow; bloom thin; dots numerous, yellow; skin thin; flesh yellow, firm, tender, juicy; good; stone of medium size, long-oval, nearly free; mid-season.

Golden Queen. Americana. 1. Terry Cat. 1900. 2. III. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 426. 1905.
Originated with H. A. Terry; first fruited in 1897. Tree characterized by its luxuriant foliage; fruit large, roundish-oblong, golden-yellow; good; said to be valuable for dessert.

Golden Transparent. Domestica. 1. Card. World 10:448. 1893. 2. Rivers Cat. 34. 1898. 3. Thompson Gard. Ass't 157. 1901.
From Thomas Rivers, Sawbridgeworth, England; closely allied to the Transparent Gage, but is distinctly later and more golden in color; an excellent dessert plum.

Goldsmith. Domestica. Mentioned in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 147. 1831.  Goldsmith's Vienna. Gondin. Domestica? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 432. 1889.  Pflaume Von Gondin. Prune de Gondin.  Gonne. Domestica. 1. Ann. Pom. Beige 6:15, PI. 1858. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 917. 1869. 3. Oberdieck Dent. Obst. Sort. 409. 1881. Gonne's Rothe Pflaume 3. Prune Gonne 1. Prune Gonne 2.
Originated by Dr. Gonne of Fleurus, Belgium. Oberdieck gives the Gonne's Rothe Pflaume, which is evidently the same variety, as a seedling of the Red Egg. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit large, obovate, sometimes spherical; suture shallow to deep; carmine-red, dotted with russet; flesh yellow, juicy, melting, sweet; the pit lies in a large cavity, nearly free; mid-season.

Goose-Dye. Species? 1. Kerr Cat. 11. 1900.
A supposed hybrid between the Wild Goose plum and Dyehouse cherry grown by Theodore Williams. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit larger than Wild Goose, oval, cherry-red; clingstone; mid-season; said to be free from rot.

Goose-O. Munsoniana X Triflora. 1. Kerr Cat. 11. 1900.
A cross between Wild Goose and Ogon made by Theodore Williams, Benson, Nebraska. Tree suckers badly; fruit of medium size, roundish, red on a yellow ground; clingstone; mid-season.

Gordon. Domestica. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 46. 1897. Gordon N0.3 1.
A seedling of Imperial Gage. Fruit of medium size, roundish; yellow overspread with coppery-red; bloom profuse; skin acid; flesh rich, yellow, meaty, juicy, subacid; good; freestone; mid-season.

Gordon Castle. Domestica. 1. Gard. Chron. 26:364. 1866. 2. Garden 54:318. 1898.
A plum of the Reine Claude type which originated at Gordon Castle, England. Fruit large, obovate; greenish-yellow overspread with a reddish blush; flesh firm, sweet; good; midseason.

Gorman. Species? Mentioned in Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 169. 1909.

Govalle. Triflora X ? 1. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:14. 1898. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 215. 1901.
Grown by Joseph Breck, Texas, supposedly from the Kelsey. Introduced by F. T. Ramsey in 1898. Fruit medium, oval; cavity shallow; bright red; flesh slightly soft, fibrous, sprightly; good; clingstone; early.

Grace. Americana. 1. U.S.D.A. Rpt. 263. 1892. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 74. 1895.
Originated with W. R. Grace, Garden City, Kansas. Fruit of medium size, oblong, yellow striped with red, mottled and washed with dull purple; flesh yellow, melting, juicy; flavor rich, sweet; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Grand Précoce. Domestica? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 432. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 163, 357. 1895.  Mentioned in the preceding references.


Graiigrune Frühpflaume. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 432. 1889.
Mathieu found the variety referred to in Wiener Garten-Zeitung 287. 1884.

Gray Damask. Insititia. 1. Quintinye Com. Gard. 68, 70. 1699.
Mentioned by Quintinye as "a round plum of a gray color."

Grayson. Munsoniana X Americana. 1. Sherman Cat. 1897. 2.Vt.Sta.Rpt. 12:225. 1899.
A seedling of Wild Goose crossed with some Americana; from A. L. Bruce, Basin Springs, Texas, about 1893. Fruit of medium size, roundish; suture a line; clear red; dots many, conspicuous, yellow; bloom heavy; flesh yellow, soft; good; clingstone; season follows Wild Goose.

Great Bearer. Domestica. 1. Montreal Hort. Soc. Rpt. 56. 1878.  Corse's Great Bearer 1.
Undoubtedly originated with Henry Corse of Montreal, Canada. Fruit small, light blue; flavor fair; very prolific.

Greely. Domestica. 1. Me. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 130. 1888. 2. Ibid. 144. 1889. 3. Rural N. Y. 55'5i2. 1896. Greeley 1, 3.
Captain Eliphalet Greely of Portland, Maine, secured the original tree from Montreal; introduced by O. K. Gerrish of Portland. A large, purple plum so closely resembling Bradshaw that some growers believe them to be identical; its season seems to be earlier than Bradshaw.

Greenfield. Domestica. 1. Montreal Hort. Soc. Rpt. 51. 1878.
A seedling of Red Magnum Bonum raised by Mr. Greenfield of Canada. Tree hardy, productive; fruit large, red.

Green Indian. Domestica. 1. Willich Dom. Enc. 195. 1903. White Indian 1.
Reported in 1803 as a very desirable variety.

Green Italian. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 3d App. 181. 1869.
From Germany; tree moderately vigorous, fairly productive; fruit medium, oval; suture a line; greenish-yellow splashed with green; bloom thin; cavity small; flesh green, coarse, juicy, sweet, rich; good; semi-clinging; mid-season.

Green Oysterly. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 577 fig., 578. 1629. 2. Rea Flora 207. 1676.
Described as roundish, of medium size, greenish, juicy, flavor "reasonably good."

Green Perdrigon. Domestica. 1. Rea Flora 208. 1676.
Described by Rea nearly two hundred and fifty years ago as "a round plum, of medium size, green; flavor good."

Green Pescod. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576. 1629.
Parkinson states that "this plum is of medium size, pointed; mid-season."

Grelck. Cerasifera. 1. Wickson Cal. Fruits 358. 1891.
Supposedly a seedling grown by John Grelck of Los Angeles, California, who gave it to O. S. Chapin of San Diego County about 1883. Fruit small, round, light yellow with reddish shade, sprightly; good; season before Myrobalan; decidedly superior to Myrobalan.


Gros Damas de Tours. Domestica. 1. Quintinye Com. Gard. 70. 1699. 2. Duhamel Trait. Arb. Fr. 2:69. 1768. 3. Knoop Fructologie 2:56. 1771. 4. Forsyth Treat Fr. Trees 19. 1803. 5, Willich Dom. Enc. 4:300. 1803. 6. Miller Gard. Diet. 3. 1807. 7. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 145, 147, 1831. 8. Prince Pom. Man. 2:86. 1832. 9. Downing Fr, Trees Am. 917. 1869. 10. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 433. 1889.  Damas de Tours 10. Damas de Tours Gros 7. Damas de Tours Gros 8, 9, 10. Damas gros de Tours 3. Damas Violet of Tours 4. Great Violet Damask de Tours 5. Great Damask Violet of Tours 6, 10. Great Damask Violet of Tours 9. Great Plum of Tours 7. Great Violet Tours Damask 1. Gros Damas 6. Grosse Damascene von Tours 10. Gros Damas de Tours 8, 9, 10. Gros Damas Violet de Tours 6. Largest Damask of Tours 8. Largest Damask of Tours 9, 10.
For historical notes and description see Précoce de Tours.

Gros Damas Noir. Domestica? 1. Noisette Man. Comp. Jard. 2:500. 1860.
A small mediocre plum mentioned by Noisette as ripening the last of July.

Grosse Hâtive de Rodt. Domestica? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 433. 1889. Grosse Marange. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 433. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 156, 357. 1895. Hâtive d'Augny 1, 2
This variety was grown by M. Chabardin of Augny near Metz, France, where it is considered very promising because of its high quality and earliness. Fruit medium in size, roundish; purplish; flesh yellowish-green, sweet; quality best of its season; very early.

Grosse Rosspauke. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 434. 1889.  Mathieu found it noted in Wiener Garten-Zeitung 287. 1884.

Grosse Surpasse. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 26. Set. 3:52. 1900. 2. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 432. 1905.
A small round plum tested at British Columbia Experimental Farm; yellow; flesh yellow, tender, sweet, pleasant; stone small, clinging; mid-season.

Grosse Violette de Grugliasco. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 434. 1889.

Grüne Dattel Zwetsche. Domestica. 1. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 444. 1881. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 434. 1889.  Berliner Pflaume 2. Datte Verte 2. Grune Dattelzwetsche 1. Grüne Insel Pflaume 2 incor. Susina Verdachia Longa 2. Weisse Indische Pflaume 2.
Mentioned in the preceding references. Grunliche Dattelpflaume von Besancon is given by Guide Pratique, 1895, as a synonym of the Yellow Egg,

Grüne Herzformige. Domestica. 1. Kraft Pom. Aust. 2:30, Tab. 176 fig. 1. 1796.  Die Grüne herzformige Pflaume 1. Prune coeur de pigeon verd 1.
An old European variety. Flowers small; fruit heart-shaped, greenish-yellow; flesh yellow, firm; stone uncommonly rough and uneven.

Grüne Zwetsche Von Monrepos. Species? Listed in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 434. 188q. Guilford No. 2. Hortulana mineri. 1. III. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 135. 1903 2. Ibid. 422. 1905.
A seedling of Miner from Illinois. Tree moderately vigorous, productive; fruit yellow, with a pink cheek; good; freestone; mid-season.

Guimaraen. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 148. 1831.
Fruit medium in size, oval, yellow; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Guinea Egg. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:263. 1900.
Found wild about 1857 by Frederick Albright, near Bangor, Marshall County, Iowa; not introduced. Tree vigorous, hardy; fruit large, dark red; skin thin; flesh firm; good; stone small.

Gundaker. Domestica. 1. Horticulturist 6:524. 1851. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 383. 1857.
A large, heart-shaped, purple plum grown from seed by Samuel E. Gundaker, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, about 1820; of good quality.

Gundaker Prune. Domestica. 1. Horticulturist 6:524. 1851. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 382. 1857. Groundacre 1, 2.
A seedling grown by Samuel E. Gundaker, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, about 1820; sent out by Samuel Carpenter of Lancaster, Ohio, as Groundacre. Tree productive; fruit large, oval, light yellow; good.

Guthrie Apricot. Domestica. 1. Mag. Hort. 12:341. 1846. 2. U. S. Pat. Off. Rpt. 2:449. 1849. 3* Mclntosh Bk. Gard. 2:531. 1855 4. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 918. 1869. 5. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 434. 1889.  Abricot de Guthrie 5. Guthrie's Apricot Plum 2. Guthrie's Apricot 5. Guthrie's Golden 4. Guthrie's Golden 5. Guthrie's New Apricot 3.
A seedling raised by Charles Guthrie of Taybank, Dundee, Scotland. Fruit of medium size, roundish; suture slight; cavity small; yellow; bloom thin; dots red! flesh yellow, coarse, juicy, sweet; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Guthrie Russet. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 919. 1869. 2. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:167. 1873.  Rousse De Guthrie 2. Guthrie1s Russet 2.
A seedling of Reine Claude grown by Charles Guthrie, Taybank, Dundee, Scotland. Fruit large, oval; suture distinct; cavity small; stem slender; yellow, sometimes marbled with red; bloom thin; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Guthrie Topaz. Domestica. 1. Mag. Hort. 12:341. 1846. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 919. 1869. 3. Hogg Fruit Man. 728. 1884. 4. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 434. 1889.  Guthrie's Topaz 4. Guthrie*s Topaz 3, 4. Topaz 3. Topaze de Guthrie 4.
Grown by Charles Guthrie, Taybank, Dundee, Scotland, probably from seed of Reine Claude. Tree hardy, productive; fruit of medium size, oval, necked, suture distinct; cavity small; stem slender; yellow, with thin bloom; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet; flavor not high but pleasant; good; clingstone; mid-season. [Not to be confused with the 'Gutherie' cultivar of P. angustifolia introduced by Mail-Order Natives which is a selection from the wild (Florida) with a reduced propensity to sucker and bearing large crops of sweet-tart pinkish red fruit with yellow flesh, particularly well-suited for pies, tarts and sauces as well as being quite acceptable for fresh eating.  Skin crisp, with some extra acidity, very mild bitterness occasionally around pit. - ASC]

Gwalsh. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 148. 1831. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 301. 1845. 3. Thomas Am. Fruit Cult. 343. 1849.
From Thomas Hancock, Burlington, New York. Fruit large, obovate; suture indistinct; dark purple; flesh yellow, juicy, sprightly; quality fair; clingstone; mid-season.



Haag. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:24, 39. 1897. 2. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:274. 1900. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 150. 1901.
Purchased from a nurseryman of Minneapolis and introduced as Haag by J. S. Haag, Hosper% Sioux County, Iowa. Tree moderately vigorous, spreading; fruit above medium size, roundish; suture distinct; flesh greenish-yellow, tender, sweet; good; stone oval, clinging; mid-season.

Hackl Grosse Zwetsche. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 434. 1889.  Reference to this variety found by Mathieu in Wiener Garten-Zeitung 287. 1884.

Haferpflaume. Insititia? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 434. 1889.  Blaue Krieche Echte Hafer Pflaume. Echte Hafer Zwetsche. 

Haffner Herbstpflaume. Domestica? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 434. 1889.

Haffner Konigspflaume. Domestica? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 434. 1889.  Royale de Haffner.

Haku Botan. Triflora. 1. Va. Sta. Bul. 129:113. 1901.
Imported by the United States Department of Agriculture.

Hallenbeck. Domestica. 1. Cultivator 8:309. 1860. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 920. 1869.
Originated with Henry Hallenbeck, East Greenbush, Rensselaer County, New York. Fruit large, roundish-oval, one side often enlarged, reddish-purple; numerous minute dots; flesh greenish-yellow, very juicy, sugary, brisk flavor; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Halcyon. Triflora X Munsoniana? 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 12:225. l899- 2* Waugh Plum Cult. 215. 1901.
Grown by J. S. Breece, North Carolina. Fruit heart-shaped; suture faint; bright red; dots few; flesh yellow; quality fair; stone large, oval, clinging.

Hanford. Domestica. 1. IlL Hort. Soc. Rpt. 71. 1868. Hanford's Orleans 1.
Mentioned in 1868 by Lucius C. Frances in the report of the Illinois Horticultural Society.

Hanska. Americana X Simonii. 1. S. Dak. Sta. Bul. 108: PL 5. 1908.
Originated by N. E. Hansen of the South Dakota Experiment Station; first fruited in 1906 on two-year-old trees. Tree very vigorous, fruit of medium size, roundish-oblate, halves unequal; suture shallow; bright red; bloom heavy; flesh firm, reddish; stone very small; semi-free.  [For a more detailed description from a contemporary catalog click here;
for a description of its performance in the Southeastern U.S., click here -ASC]

Hanson. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2, Waugh Plum Cult. 151. 1901.
Said to be of value in the South. Fruit of medium size; nearly spherical; suture shallow; skin very thick; bright red over yellow; dots numerous; flesh yellow; sweet; goodj stone round, slightly flattened, clinging; early.

Happiness. Triflora X ? 1. Griffing Bros. Cat. 1906-1909.
A chance seedling found by Joseph Breck about 1899; introduced by F. T. Ramseyt Austin, Texas; fruit large, bright red; good.

Harlow. Domestica. 1. U.S.D.A. Rpt. 263. 1892. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 74. 1895.
Supposed to be a seedling of Bradshaw; raised by S. C. Harlow, Bangor, Maine. Tree vigorous, hardy, productive; fruit large, oblong-oval; skin smooth, reddish-purple; dots numerous, fawn-colored; bloom light; flesh greenish-amber, melting, mildly subacid; mid-season.

Harney. Domestica. 1. U.S.D.A. Pom. Rpt. 45. 1895.
Specimens of this plum from H. C. Cook, White Salmon, Washington, were described by the Division of Pomology, Department of Agriculture. Fruit large, roundish; cavity large, regular, deep, abrupt; suture shallow; purplish-red; dots large and small, russet; bloom thin; skin thin, tough; flesh pale yellow, tender, juicy, sweet, rich; very good; stone medium, roundish, nearly free; mid-season.

Harper. Munsoniana? 1. Ga. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 28. 1876. 2. Ibid. 24. 1881. Harper's 1.
Originated about 1870. Fruit red; clingstone; mid-season.

Harriet. Domestica. 1. Gard. Chron. 18:441. 1882. 2. Hogg Fruit Man. 705. 1884. Grown by Thomas Rivers, Sawbridgeworth, England, about 1870. Fruit of the Reine Claude type, medium in size; roundish-oblate; cavity deep; suture slight; skin thin but rather tough; golden yellow sometimes specked with red; bloom thin; flesh yellow, juicy, firm, very good; stone of medium size, oval, turgid, clinging; mid-season.

Harris, Hortulana mineri. 1. ///. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 225. 1877.
Tree and fruit much resemble Miner, but the ripening season is four weeks earlier; freestone.

Harrison. Americana. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 123. 1875. 2. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:38, 86. 1892. 3. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:39, 40. 1897. 4, Waugh Plum Cult. 170. 1901. Harrison's Peach 1, 2, 3. Harrison's Peach 4.
Found growing wild in Minnesota. Tree unproductive; fruit of medium size, oval; suture a line; cavity shallow; dots small; dull red; bloom thick; flesh yellow, tender, juicy, sweet; quality fair; stone oval, pointed, flattened, semi-clinging; mid-season. Harrison is the parent of a great number of varieties.

Hart. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:40. 1897. 2. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:274. 1900.  3. S. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:19. 1905. Hart's De Soto 1. Hart's De Soto 2, 3.
A sprout taken from a tree bought for De Soto by H. Hart, Sioux County, Iowa, about 1890; widely distributed by the Iowa Agricultural College. The fruit resembles De Soto in color and shape, but ripens from ten days to two weeks earlier; somewhat larger in size but inferior in quality.

Hartwick. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 151. 1901.  Noted as of little value.

Hartwiss. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 383. 1857. 2. Mas Pom. Gen. 2: 123. 1873. 3. Lauche Deut. Pom. No. 3. PI. 1882. 4. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 453. 1889. Hartwiss Gelbe Zwetsche 2, 3. Hartwiss Yellow Prune 1. Quetsche Jaune de Hartwiss 2. Quetsche Jaune de Hartwiss 4. Von Hartwiss' Gelbe Zwetsche 4.
Obtained by Liegel from a pit of Quetsche Jaune Précoce and dedicated by him to the Director of the Imperial Gardens at Nikita, Crimea. Tree large, productive; fruit medium in size, irregularly oval; suture broad and shallow; halves unequal; skin canary-yellow, rather adherent; bloom thin; flesh yellow, tender, sweet; freestone ; mid-season.

Harvest. Americana. 1. Minn. Hort. Soc. Rpt 127. 1890.
Brought in from the wild by H. Knudson, Springfield, Minnesota. Fruit large, roundish-ovate; skin thin, red; quality fair; early.

Hattie. Cerasifera. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 67. 1875. 2. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:75, 86. 1892. 3. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 13:369. 1900.
Cultivated in the South. Tree dwarfish; branches stiff and rough; leaves small, folded upward, finely serrate; petioles glandless; flowers small and clustered; fruit small, roundish; suture a line; cavity small; stem slender; dull red; bloom thin; dots many, conspicuous; skin thin, tough; flesh yellow, soft, watery; quality fair; clingstone; early.

Hayo-Simoni. Triflora. 1. N. Mex. Sta. Bul. 27:124. 1898.
An upright, vasiform tree; fruit above medium, roundish-oblate; suture distinct; dark red; dots minute, yellow; bloom abundant; flesh dull yellow, firm, juicy, sub-acid; good; clingstone; early.

Hazard. Domestica. 1. John Watkins Cat,
Mentioned by John Watkins, nurseryman, Withington, England.

Heaton. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894.
Received by J. W. Kerr about 1894 from H. A. Terry, Iowa. Fruit medium to large, oblong-oval, dark purplish-red; freestone; early.

Hector. Domestica.
A chance seedling found about 1890 by Edward Smith on his farm at Hector, New York; introduced by E. Smith and Sons, Geneva, New York. Tree vigorous, hardy and productive; fruit one and three-quarters inches in diameter, roundish; cavity deep; suture shallow; stem short, thick; skin tender; dark reddish-purple; bloom thick; dots inconspicuous; flesh light yellow, juicy, tender, sweet, mild; quality good; stone semi-clinging, oval, turgid, slightly winged and necked; mid-season.

Heep. Angustifolia varians. 1. Waugh Plum Cult. 195. 1901.
F. T. Ramsey, Austin, Texas, offered this sort in his 1897 catalog as an old variety found in the orchard of a Mr. Heep. Tree very vigorous and productive; fruit above medium size, red; quality fair.

Heikes. Triflora. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 62:23. 1894. 2. Ibid. 139:38, 42. 1897.  Burbank No.4 1.
Imported by Luther Burbank, Santa Rosa, California, in 1885, and named for W. F. Heikes of the Huntsville Nurseries, Huntsville, Alabama. As tested at the Cornell Experiment Station similar to Satsuma if not identical with it.

Heine Superbe. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 434. 1889.

Helen. Species? 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 36. 1875. Helen's Seedling 1.
Listed in American Pomological Society catalog for eight years.

Hendrick. Munsoniana? i, AIa. Sta. Bul. N. S. 11:12. 1890. Hendrick's 1.
Tree vigorous; fruit of medium size, spherical, yellow, blushed with red; flesh tender; good; early.

Henrietta Gage. Domestica. 1. Gen, Farmer 9:232. 1848. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 920. 1869. 3. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:169. 1873.  Early Genesee 2. Henrietta Gage 3. Reine-Claude D'Henrietta 3.
Originated about 1840 on the farm of a Mr. Brown, Henrietta, Monroe County, New York. Similar to Reine Claude but much earlier.

Henry Clay. Domestica. 1. Cultivator 3:20. 1855. 2. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:95. lS73-
A seedling of Howard raised by Elisha Dorr, Albany, New York; named by Dr. Warder of Cincinnati, Ohio; first fruited in 1852. Fruit large, oval; suture broad and shallow; stem long, rather thick; skin clear yellow, often washed and dotted with red on the sunny exposure; flesh clear yellow, sweet, vinous; good; stone small, clinging; mid-season.

Herbst Kriecke. Insititia? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 435. 1889.  Mention of the variety found by Mathieu in Wiener Garten-Zeitung 288. 1884.

Herbstpflaume. Domestica. 1. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 445. 1881.
A German variety; unproductive in dry soils.

Hereford Damson. Insititia. 1. Watkins Cat. 48. 1892?
Mentioned in the preceding reference as a favorite and very productive.

Herefordshire Prune. Domestica. 1. Thompson Gard. Ass't 4:160. 1901.
Fruit large, obovate; flesh firm, yellowish-green.

Heron. Domestica. 1. U.S.D.A. Pom. Rpt. 26. 1894. 2. Cornell Sta. Bul. 131: 187. 1897. 3. Rivers Cat. 35. 1898.
Originated and introduced by Thomas Rivers, Sawbridgeworth, England. Popular in England but on account of its poor foliage it is of little value in this country. Fruit large, roundish, dark purplish-red; dots small; skin sour; flesh greenish-yellow, firm, meaty, moderately juicy, subacid; good; stone large, oval, semi-free; early.

Heroy. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 435. 1889.

Herren. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 26. Ser. 3:52. 1900.
A vigorous variety of the Reine Claude type grown in Germany. Fruit of medium size, roundish, slightly flattened at both ends; suture distinct; sides often unequal; dull yellow; flesh yellowish, firm, coarse, sweet, juicy, pleasant; freestone; mid-season.

Herzformige Pflaume. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 435. 1889.  Prune Cordiforme.

Heupflaume. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 435. 1889.
Reference obtained by Mathieu in Wiener Garten-Zeitung 288. 1884.

Hiawatha. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:41. 1897. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 152. 1901.
Introduced by C. W. H. Heideman, New Ulm, Minnesota, as an example of a staminate-flowered plum; rarely productive. Fruit very large, roundish-oblong, purplish-red; clingstone; early.

Highland. Domestica. 1. Cal. State Bd. Hort. Rpt. 8:47. J^97-
A seedling of Agen, grown by Luther Burbank, Santa Rosa, California. Tree vigorous and productive; fruit large, long-oval, purplish-crimson; flesh yellow, firm, sweet; flavor excellent; stone nearly free.

Highlander. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 384. 1857.
Fruit large, irregularly ovate, deep blue; bloom thin; dots brown, numerous; yellow, juicy, vinous; semi-clinging; late.

Hilda No. 5. Hortulana mineri X ? 1. Ia. Sta: Bul. 46:274. 1900.
Originated under cultivation with J. F. Wagner, Bennett, Iowa, in 1894, from seed of Miner pollinated by a wild plum; not introduced. Fruit above medium size, dark red; used for jellies.

Hillside. Americana. 1. Minn. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 128. 1890.
Selected from wild plants by H. Knudson, Springfield, Minnesota. Fruit of medium size; skin thick, deep red, astringent.

Hilltop. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. V/is. Sta. Bul. 63:42. 1897. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 152. 1901.
Fruit small, round-oval; suture a line; skin deep red; dots very minute; thick bloom; flesh yellow; quality fair; stone large, half-free.

Hilman. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 87:13. 1901.
Fruit small, oblong; skin yellow, two-thirds covered with purple; dots conspicuous; flesh yellow, firm, sweet; stone small, oval; mid-season.

Hinkley. Americana. 1. Meneray Cat.
A seedling of Harrison grown by H. A. Terry and introduced by F. W. Meneray, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Fruit large, yellow with a red cheek; flesh yellow, rich, sweet, semi-clinging; good.

Hlubeck Aprikosenpflaume. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 435.

1889. Hoag's Seedling. Domestica. 1. N. Y. Sta. Rpt. 8:356. 1889.
Received for testing at the New York Experiment Station in 1889.

Hoffman. Munsoniana? 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:63. 1892. 2. Thomas Am. Fruit Cult. 492. 1897.
A wild variety from southwestern Missouri. Fruit of medium size, roundish, purplish-red; mid-season.

Hofinger Mirabelle. Insititia. Listed in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 43$. 1889.  Ho finger* s Rote Mirabelle, Roter Spilling incor. Hog.
A common name variously applied to P. americana, P. umbellata, P. hortulana and P. gracilis.

Holland. Domestica. 1. Coxe Cult. Fr. Trees 239. 1817. 2. Prince Pom. Man. 2:78. 1832. 3. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 301. 1845. 4. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 435- 1885.  Blue Holland 2, 3, 4. Holland Plum 1, 3. Holland Prune 4. Kensington Prune 2. Large Holland 2, 3.
An old variety supposed to have been brought into this country from Holland by the early Dutch settlers. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit roundish, slightly compressed, blue; stem very adherent; flesh juicy, melting, sweet, rich; freestone; mid-season.

Holland. Triflora X Angustifolia varians. 1. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:14. 1898. 2. Kerr Cat. 1900. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 215. 1901.
A cross between Lone Star and Kelsey, grown by D. H. Watson, Brenham, Texas; introduced by W. A. Yates in 1897. Fruit resembles Abundance in shape and size; yellowish-green splashed with red; flesh firm, juicy, vinous; semi-clinging; mid-season.

Holister. Munsoniana. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 275. 1893. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 185. 1901. Holister 1.
A variety said to have originated with a Mr. Holister of Cedar County, Iowa. Tree productive; fruit of medium size, roundish-oblong; cavity shallow; suture faint; clear bright red; flesh soft, yellow, sweet; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Holman Prune. Domestica. 1. Sarcoxie Nur. Cat. 1892. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 2d Ser. 3:52. 1900.
A seedling grown by D. S. Holman, Springfield, Maine. Fruit of medium size, oblong, pointed; greenish-yellow; flesh yellow, firm, sweet, juicy; stone small, pointed, free; mid-season.

Holme. Domestica. 1. Peachland Nur. Cat. Holmes Early Blue 1.
Introduced by J. Van Lindley, Pomona, North Carolina. Tree hardy, productive; fruit large, dark blue; good; early.

Holt. Americana. 1. U.S.D.A. Rpt. 392. 1891. 2, Colo. Sta. BuL 50:37. 1898. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 152. 1901.
Originated with B. J. Holt of Rutland, Ohio. Tree vigorous, spreading; fruit largei roundish, yellow shaded with red; flesh yellow, melting, juicy, mild subacid; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Homestead. Americana. 1. Minn. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 128. 1890. 2. Wis. Sta, Bul. 63:42. 1897.
Originated with H. Knudson, Springfield, Minnesota. Fruit small, round, deep red; skin not at all adherent; flavor rich, somewhat resembling a peach; stone small, free.

Honey. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat 1894. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 87:13. 1901. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 153. 1901.
Tree unproductive; fruit small, oblate; cavity shallow; suture a line; yellow washed and shaded with red; flesh sweet; quality fair; clingstone; early.

Honey Julian. Domestica. Listed in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 148. 1831.

Hoo Green Gage. Domestica. Mentioned in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 148. 1831.

Hoosier. Hortulana. 1. Sarcoxie Nur. Cat. 1900.
From Greene County, Missouri; introduced by Wild Brothers Nursery. Tree vigorous, spreading; fruit above medium size, roundish; suture a line; dark cherry-red; bloom thin; dots distinct; flesh yellow; good; clingstone; late.

Horemoritzer Reine Claude. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 435. 1889.
Reference found by Mathieu in Pomologische Monatshefte 33. 1889.

Horrigan. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm. Bul. 43:38. 1903.  Mentioned as being tested.

Horse. Species? 1. Knoop Fructologie 62. 1771. 2. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 148. 1831. 3. Prince Pom. Man. 2:87. 1832. 4. Kenrick Am. Orch. 263. 1832. 5. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 301. 1845. 6. Floy-Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 303. 1846. 7. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 13:335- ^99-  Early Damson 3. Horse Plum 3, 4. Irish Horse Plum 2. Large Early Damson 3. Large Early Damson 5. Large Sweet Damson 4. Prune de Cheval 1. Ros-pruim Double 1. Sweet Damson 3, 5.
Plums from at least two and possibly three species are known as the "Horse Plum." In New York the Horse Plum used by nurserymen as a stock is undoubtedly Prunus cerasifera. The plum referred to by Waugh, in the preceding reference, is a variety of Prunus domestica. It is difficult to determine the species referred to by the older writers, but from the frequency with which the word Damson appears as a synonym, it would seem that some at least had in mind Prunus insititia.
The Horse plum brought into this country by the early Dutch or French settlers, propagated by seedlings or suckers was probably an Insititia. During the first half of the last century, this plum was extensively raised in this State and large quantities were sold in the New York market. It is described as follows:
Fruit of medium size, oval ; suture distinct; reddish-purple; flesh greenish, firm, sweet, dry; poor; usually freestone; mid-season.

Horse Jag, Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort Soc. Cat. 148. 1831. 2. Mag. Hort. 9:164. 1843.  Horse Gage 1, 2.
Fruit small, round or slightly oval, red; stone clinging; mid-season.

Hoskins. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. BuL 63:42. 1897. 2. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. no. 1899. 3. 7a. Sta. Bul. 46:275. 1900.
Originated by a Mr. Hoskins of Pleasant Plain, Jefferson County, Iowa; and introduced by J. Wragg and Sons, Waukee, Iowa, in 1899. Tree productive; fruit of medium size, yellow; skin thin, tough; freestone; mid-season.

Houston County. Species? Mentioned in Cornell Sta. BuL 38:79. 1892. How Amber. Domestica. 1. Mag. Hort. 12:398, 399 fig. 1846. 2. Elliott Fr. Book 419. 1854. 3. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 384. 1857.  How's Amber 1, 2, 3.
A seedling selected from several hundred brought from New Hampshire and grown by Hall J. How of South Boston in 1838. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit of medium size, round; suture shallow; amber, spotted and mottled with rose; flesh coarsely veined, yellow, melting, juicy, rich; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Howard, Domestica. 1. Cultivator 1:316. 1853. 2. Ibid. 3:20. 1855. 3. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:185. 1873.  Howard's Favorite 1,2. Howard's Favorite 3. Favorite d1 Howard 3.
A seedling of unknown parentage produced by Elisha Dorr, Albany, New York. Fruit large, necked, yellow, dotted and shaded with carmine; stem very adherent; skin thick; flesh coarse, sweet, rich; clingstone; mid-season.

Howe. Triflora X ? 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 248. 1903. 2. Griffing Bros. Cat. 1906. 3. Ibid. 1909. Stumpe 3. Stumpy 1.
A seedling of Kelsey grown in the yard of a Mrs. Stumpe, Putnam County, Florida; introduced by Griffing Brothers in 1906. Fruit large, roundish, red; bloom delicate; suture a line; skin thin, leathery; flesh yellow, firm, juicy; good; stone small, oval, clinging; early.

Howell. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 302. 1845. 2. Horticulturist 7:402. 1852. 3. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 921. 1869.  Chapin's Early 3. Early Purple 2, 3. Howell's Early 1. Sea 2. Sea 3.
This variety derives its name from B. Howell of Newburgh, New York, who brought the original tree from Virginia as a sucker. It was supposed to have been introduced into the Southern States by cions from Germany. Tree of slow growth; fruit below medium, oval; suture indistinct; red; flesh juicy, rich, sweet; good; freestone; very early.

Hoyo Smomo. Triflora. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 62:23. 1894.
A name used by J. L. Normand, Marksville, Louisiana; probably a synonym.

H. T. S. 84,761. Species? 1. Rural N. Y. 61:674. 1902.
One of Burbank's plums. Fruit large, yellow with crimson blush; flesh yellow, firm, sweet, vinous, juicy; clingstone; a good shipper.

Huankume. Triflora. 1. N. Mex. Sta. Bul. 39:122. 1901.
Reported from New Mexico as weak in growth; fruit small, roundish, downy; yellowish-red; slightly acid; clingstone; resembles the apricot in flavor and appearance.

Hudson Gage. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 277. 1845. 2. Hogg Fruit Man. 365. 1866. 3. Guide Prat. 163, 364. 1895.  Hudson 2. Hudson 3. Hudson Gage 2,3. Hudson*s gelbe Frühpflaume 3. Reine-Claude d'Hudson 3.
Hudson Gage is one of several good varieties originated by L. V. Lawrence of Hudson New York. Fruit of medium size, oval; suture slight; yellow, obscurely streaked with green; bloom thin; flesh greenish, juicy, melting, sprightly; good; freestone; early; placed in the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1877.

Hughes. Munsoniana. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 166. 1885. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 195-6. 1901. 3. Ga. Sta. Bul. 67:275. 1904.
Originated in northeastern Mississippi where it is said to be one of the best of its species. Fruit of medium size, roundish; stem long, slender; cavity shallow; suture a line; bright red, striped with yellow; dots large, white; skin thin; flesh yellow, fibrous, watery, sprightly, subacid quality fair; stone of medium size, turgid, clinging ; late.

Hungarian Musk Prune. Domestica. ! Guide Prat. 158, ^6^. 1895. 2. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 432. 1905.  Basilic 1. Musqu4e de Besztercze 1. Proune bissioque (Roumanie) 1. Quetsche musque'e de Hongrie 1.
Hungarian Musk Prune is very similar to the German Prune; fruit of medium size, necked; cavity small; suture shallow; deep purple; bloom thick; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet, musky, aromatic; stone small, free; mid-season.

Hungarian No. 1. Domestica. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 31:349. 1895.
J. L. Budd of the Iowa Experiment Station received this plum from Europe with sprouts of his Ungarish. Fruit of medium size, prune-shape, bright yellow; freestone.

Hungarian No. 2. Domestica. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 86. 1890.  Imported by J. L. Budd from Russia; of little value.

Hunn. Triflora. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 139:43. 1897. 2. Ibid. 175:147. 1899.  Burbank No.i 1, 2.
A small, round plum named for C. E. Hunn of the New York State College of Agriculture; apex pointed; suture shallow; deep red; dots many, yellow; flesh soft, yellow, aromatic; quality fair; clingstone; mid-season.

Hunt. Munsoniana X Americana, 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 78. 1897. 2. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:275. 1900. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 153. 1901.
Originated about 1880 by Henry Hunt, De Soto, Dallas County, Iowa, from seed of Wild Goose probably pollinated by the De Soto, trees of which stood near. It was supposed at one time that Lombard was the male parent but no traces of Domestica blood can be detected in either tree or fruit; introduced in 1897 by M. J. Graham, Odel, Iowa. Fruit of medium size, roundish-oval; cavity shallow; suture a line; dark red; bloom heavy; dots large, conspicuous; skin thin, not astringent; flesh yellow, firm, mild; quality fair; stone large, ovate, winged.

Hunt De Soto. Americana. 1. 5. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:20. 1905. Hunt's De Soto 1.
Introduced by J. L. Budd of the Iowa Experiment Station; closely resembles De Soto, differing from it in being a little larger, darker red and a better keeper.


Ida. Americana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:38. 1892. 2. Colo. Sta. Bul. 50:37. 1898. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 153. 1901.
Originated with D. B. Wier of Illinois. Tree very thorny, of slow, irregular growth; fruit medium, roundish-oblong; cavity shallow; stem medium, stout, dull; red over yellow; bloom thick; skin thick; flesh pale yellow; quality fair; stone roundish, rather flat, clinging; mid-season.

Ida Green Gage. Domestica. 1. Cole Am. Fr. Book 212. 1849.
A seedling of Reine Claude originating near Mount Ida, New York. It very closely resembles its parent except that it is more strongly blushed and is a few days later; obsolete.

Idall. Munsoniana X Hortulana mineri. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:56. 1892. 2. Am. Gard. 19:234. 1898. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 173. 1901.  Idol 2. Idol 1. Idol 1, 2.
According to the originator, D. B. Wier, of Illinois, the Idall is a cross between Wild Goose and Miner. Fruit large, roundish-oval; cavity shallow; suture a line; red; dots many; skin tough; flesh yellow; good; stone of medium size, oval, clinging ; late.

Imperial. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:276. 1900.
A small plum of the De Soto type brought to notice by C. B. Ginrich, Laporte, Iowa. Fruit round, conical; cavity broad, deep; suture a line; yellow with red markings; bloom thin; flesh clear yellow, firm, brisk, acid; good; clingstone.

Imperiale Alexandrina. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 436. 1889. Imperiale de Milan. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 149. 1831. 2. Hogg Fruit Man. 365. 1866. 3. Mas Le Verger 6:67. 1866-73.  Maildndische Kaiserpflaume 3. Prune de Milan 2,3.
Originated near the city of Milan, Italy. Tree large, vigorous, spreading; fruit medium,oval; suture distinct; stem short, rather thick; skin tough, dark purple; bloom heavy; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, firm, sweet; good; usually freestone; mid-season.

Imperial Ottoman. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 149. 1831. 2. Horticulturist 1:11 fig. 1846. 3. Elliott Fr. Book 413. 1854. 4. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:137. 1873. 5. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 442. 1889.  Impe*riale de Turquie 4. Imperiale Ottomane 5. Imperial Ottoman 3, 4, 5. Ottoman 3. Ottomanische Kaiserpflaume 5. Ottomanische Kaiserpflaume 4. Turkische Gelbe Pjiaume 5.
Supposed to have been brought into this country from Turkey by William Prince. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit medium, roundish-oval; suture indistinct; stem of medium length, slender; greenish-yellow, clouded and mottled with darker shades; bloom thin; flesh yellow, juicy, pleasant; good; clingstone; very early.

Imperial Purple. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 923. 1869. 2. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:45. Jet73- Imperial Purple 2. Pourpre'e Imperial 2.
Raised by William Prince, Flushing, Long Island. Tree vigorous, productive, fruit medium in size, roundish-oval; suture barely indicated; stem of medium length, slender; intense purple; flesh yellowish, juicy, sweet; clingstone; mid-season.

Imperial Violet. Domestica. 1. Duhamel Trait. Arb. Fr. 2:99. 1768. 2. Kraft Pom. Aust. 2:33, Tab. 181 fig. 1. 1796. 3. Prince Pom. Man. 2:60. 1832. 4. Noisette Man. Comp. Jard. 2:497. 1860.  Die violete Kaiserpflaume mit scheckichten Blattern 2. Imperiale a Petit Fruit Violet 4. Impe'riale Violette a feuilles panachees 1. Impiriale violette cl feuilles panachees 2, 3.
A variety with variegated leaves and fruit, cultivated as an ornamental.

Imperial Washington. Domestica. i. Horticulturist 25:204. 1870.
A seedling of Lombard grown by G. P. Peffer of Pewaukee, Wisconsin. Tree vigorous and productive; fruit large, roundish, slightly oblate; suture faint; cavity lacking or small; brownish-red; dots yellow; skin thin, tender; flesh greenish-yellow, firm, juicy, rich; late.

Improved French Prune. Domestica. 1. Coates Cat. 1908. Miller 1.
A seedling of Agen grown by Luther Burbank and sold in 1898 under the name Miller to Leonard Coates, Morganhill, California, who introduced it under the name given above about 1908. Very similar to its parent but larger and more uniform in size.

Incomparable. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 924. 1869. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 451. 1889.  Incomparable 2. Incomparable Prune 1. Nonpareil 1, 2. Unvergleichliche 2.
Probably a seedling of the German Prune. Tree vigorous; fruit of medium size] long-oval; suture shallow; cavity small; deep purplish-black; bloom heavy; flesh yellow, sweet; good; clingstone; late.

Indian. Domestica. i. Kraft Pom. Aust. 2:36, Tab. 186 fig. 1. 1796.  Die grosse indianische braunrothe Pflaume 1. Grosse prune d'lnde rouge 1.
Fruit large, obovate, brownish-red; suture distinct; flesh yellow, firm; good; obsolete.

Indiana. Hortulana mineri. 1. Mich. Sta. Rpt. in. 1887. 2. Cornell Sta. BuL 38:56, 86. 1892. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 173. 1901.  Indiana Red 3. Indiana Red 1,2.
Supposed to have been found wild in Indiana; introduced by Dr. I. Cramer. Tree tender in severe climates; fruit medium in size, oval; cavity shallow; stem slender; suture a line; red; bloom thin; dots minute, small; flesh yellow, firm; quality fair; stone large; oval, clinging; season late.

Indian Chief. Munsoniana. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 36. 1875. 2. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:49, 86. 1892. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 186. 1901.
A southern variety of which the place of origin is not certainly known; Munson says southern Texas, Onderdonk thinks Georgia, others consider Arkansas as its birthplace. Tree vasiform, open; leaves short, broad, finely serrate; petiole short, glandular; fruit of medium size, oval; stem short, slender; cavity shallow; suture a line; dots numerous, white; bright red; skin thick; flesh yellow, melting, insipid; poor; stone long-oval, flattened, clinging; early.

Inkpa. Americana X Simonii. Cir. S. Dak. Exp. Sta. 1910.
Inkpa is a cross between Prunus simonii and Prunus americana made by N. E. Hansen of the South Dakota Experiment Station, who introduced the variety in 1910.

IoIa. Species? 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:79. 1892.
Originated by D. B. Wier, Illinois. Fruit large, oblong, yellow covered with red; flesh firm; freestone; late.

Iona. Hortulana mineri. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:39. 1892. 2. Thomas Am. Fruit Cult. 490. 1897. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 153. 1901.
Originated with D. B. Wier, from seed taken from a wild bush in southwestern Wisconsin. Tree vigorous, upright; fruit of medium size, oval; cavity shallow; suture aline; flesh yellow, firm, sweet; quality fair; freestone; late.

Iowa. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:43. 1897. 2. Minn. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 411. 1899. 3. 5. Dak. Sta. BuL 93:20. 1905.
From Allamakee County, Iowa, Fruit medium, oval; red over yellow; skin astringent; early.

Iowa Beauty, Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1898. 2. Ia. Hori. Soc. Rpt. 111. 1899. 3. Ia. Sta. BuL 46:276. 1900.
Taken from the woods about 1860 by Hugo Beyer, New London, Iowa. Fruit of medium size, oval, mottled yellow; flesh melting, juicy, sweet; good; early.

Irby. Hortulana. 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 11:284. 1898. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 181. 1901. 3. Tex. Nur. Cat. 1907.  Erby September 1,2. Irby September 3.
Found by Dan Irby of Texas growing on the grounds of an old Indian settlement. Fruit of medium size, bright red; late; similar to Wayland.

Ireland. Domestica. 1. Can. Hort. 21:391. 1898. Ireland's Seedling 1.
Fruit of medium size, dark blue; stem slender; cavity deep; suture distinct; flesh green, tender, juicy; good; early.

Ireland Golden. Domestica. 1. Ont. Fr. Exp. Sta. Rpt. 3:120. 1896 Ireland's Golden Gage 1.
Tree vigorous, hardy, productive; good; early.

Irene. Hortulana mineri. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:79. 1892. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 154. 1901.
Originated by D. B. Wier, Illinois. Fruit of medium size, oval; bright red; skin thick; flesh yellow, firm; clingstone; late.

Iris. Hortulana mineri. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:56. 1892. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 173. 1901.
Originated and introduced by D. B. Wier of Illinois. Fruit medium in size, oval; cavity shallow; suture a line; red; bloom thin; flesh yellow; poor; clingstone; late.

Ironclad. Americana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:38. 1892. 2. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:275. 1900.  3. Waugh Plum Cult. 154. 1901. Illinois Ironclad 1,2. Illinois Ironclad 3.
A wild variety from Illinois introduced by Stark Brothers in 1890. Tree dwarf; fruit of medium size, roundish-oval; stem slender; cavity of medium depth, flaring; suture shallow; dots many, small, yellow; dark red; bloom thick; skin thick; flesh yellow, firm, meaty, sweet; quality fair; stone oval, smooth, flattened, clinging; mid-season.

Iroquois. Hortulana mineri? 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:39. 1903.
From Charles Luedloff, Cologne, Minnesota. Fruit of medium size, roundish-heart-shaped; cavity narrow; suture a line; dark red; dots numerous, small, yellow; bloom thin; skin thick, tough; flesh }rellow, juicy, sweet; quality fair; stone oval, slightly flattened, clinging.

Isaac. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1897. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 154. 1901.
Brought to notice by M. S, Hubbell from a wild tree near Lincoln, Nebraska. Fruit small, roundish, red over a green ground; clingstone.

Isabella. Domestica. 1. Pom. Mag. 3:150. 1830. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 305. 1845. 3. Ann. Pom. Beige 6:93, PI. 1858. 4. Hogg Fruit Man. 366. 1866. 5 Mathieu Nom. Pom. 436. 1889. Die Isabelle 5. Prune Isabelle 3.
An English variety popular sixty-five years ago; said to produce three crops a year. Tree vigorous; fruit large, oval; suture distinct; deep, dull red, paler in the shade; dots many, dark colored; flesh yellow, rich, juicy, brisk; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Isabella. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1900. 2. Terry Cat. 1900
Originated with H. A. Terry, Iowa, in 1893. Tree low, spreading, productive; fruit of medium size, roundish; dark red on a yellow ground; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Isle-Verte. Domestica. 1. Quintinye Com Gard 68, 70. 1699. 2. Duhamel Trait. Arb. Fr. 2:107. 1768. 3. Prince Pom. Man. 2:94. 1832. 4. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:39. 1873. Grosse Gritne Pflaume 4. Grime Inselpflaume 4. Ilevert 2, 4. lie Vert 3. 7/e verte 3. ///# i^rfe 3. Ill vert 1. Inselpflaume Grime 4. Zsfe WrJ 3. Isle Verte 2. Prune de Savoye 3. Prune Ileverte 4. Savoy 3.
Tree very prolific; fruit of medium size, oval; suture a line; stem of medium length; skin yellowish-green, reddish on the sunny side; flesh clear yellow, juicy, sweet; clingstone ; used tor preserves and pickles.

Italian Damask. Domestica. 1. Duhamel Trait. Arb. Fr. 2:75. I768- 2- Kraft Pom. Aust. 2:42, Tab. 195 fig. 1. 1796. 3. Prince Pom. Man. 2:83. 1832. 4. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 302. 1845. 5. Poiteau Pom. Franc. 1846. 6. Hogg Fruit Man. 366. 1866. 7. Guide Prat. 157, 353. 1895.  Damas d'ltalie 1, 7. Damas d'ltalie 2, 3, 4, 6. Die walsche Damascenerpflaume 2. Prune Damas d'ltalie 5. Prunus italica 5.
Supposed to have originated in Italy. Tree productive, doing especially well in the South; fruit of medium size, roundish; cavity small; suture distinct; dark purple; bloom heavy; dots small, light; flesh yellowish-green, juicy, firm, sweet; good; stone thick, free; mid-season.

Itakenische Damascene (Diel's). Species? Listed in Mathieu Norn. Pom. 436. 1889.  Damas d'ltalie. 

Italienische Damascene (Liegel's). Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Norn. Pom. 436. 1889.  Damas d'ltalie.

Itasca. Nigra. 1. Mich. Sta. An. Rpt. 111. 1887. 2. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:39. 1892. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 171. 1901. Itaska 1, 2.
An inferior variety from Minnesota; introduced by P. M. Gideon, Excelsior, Minnesota, and W. F. Heikes, Huntsville, Alabama. Tree dense and stocky; fruit of medium size, oblong, dull purple-red; skin thick; flesh firm; quality fair; clingstone; mid-season.

Ithaca. Species? 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:79. 1892.
Supposed to have originated with Peter M. Gideon, Minnesota.

Ivason. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1897.
From Iowa. Tree vigorous; fruit large, roundish, purplish-red; semi-clinging; mid-season.

Ives. Domestica. 1. Mag. Hort. 15:118. 1849. 2- Cole Am. Fr. Book 211. 1849. 3. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 214. 1856. 4. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 924. 1869.  Ive's Seedling 1, 4. Ive's Washington 4. Ives' Washington Seedling 3. Washington Seedling 2.
A seedling of Washington raised by J. M. Ives of Salem, Massachusetts; named by C. M. Hovey; first fruited in 1845. Tree very vigorous; fruit large, roundish-oblong; distinct suture; skin yellow, mottled and dotted with red; bloom thin; stem short and slender; flesh amber, melting, rich; excellent; stone medium, ovate, free.

Ives. Insititia. 1. Am. Gard. 14:148. 1893. Ives Damson 1.
Grown locally in southern Connecticut. Tree productive; fruit purple, sour; clingstone; unusually late.



J. H. Rue. Species? 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:43. 1897.
First noted by J. L. Budd of Iowa. Tree productive; fruit the size of Stoddard; flesh firm.

J. Parks. Species? 1. ///. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 420. 1905.
Fruit small, light red; flesh meaty, firm; good; freestone; not troubled with rot.

Jacinthe. Domestica. 1. Duhamel Trait. Arb. Fr. 2:100, PL XVI. 1768. 2. Kraft Pom. Aust. 2:28, Tab. 173 fig. 2. 1796. 3. Coxe Cult. Fr. Trees 238. 1817. 4. Prince Pom. Man. 2:94. 1832. 5. Mas Le Verger 6:123. 1866-73.  Die Hyacinthenpflaume 2. Hyacinth 4. Hyacinthe Pflaume 5. Jacinthe 2. Prune Jacinthe 5.
An old variety imported from England by William Coxe. Fruit large, elongated; suture indistinct; clear purple; flesh yellow, firm, juicy; good; stone oval, semi-clinging ; mid-season.

Jacob. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 925. 1869.
Described only by Downing. Fruit of medium size, oval, necked, sides unequal; suture large; violet; flesh greenish, juicy, sweet; good; freestone; mid-season.

Jap No. 4. Americana X Triflora. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:276. 1900. 2. Ibid. 114:138. 1910. Japan Hybrid No.4 2.
A seedling from De Soto pollinated with some Japanese variety; sent out by the Iowa Experiment Station about 1895. Fruit of medium size, long-oval; suture distinct; mottled red over a yellow ground; dots none; skin thin, tender; flesh yellow, sweet; good; freestone.

Japan No. 1. Americana X Triflora. 1. Kerr Cat. 1899.
A hybrid grown by H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa.

Japan No. 3. Americana X Triflora. 1. Kerr Cat. 1899.  Another of Mr. Terry's hybrids.

Japan Hybrid No. 2 (a). Americana X Triflora. ! Ia. Sta. Bul. 114:137. 1910.
One of a number of hybrids produced by the late J. L. Budd of the Iowa Experiment Station. This one is of the Americana type; fruit medium in size, oval, dark red over yellow; flesh yellow, tender, sweet; good; freestone; mid-season.

Japan Hybrid No. 2 (b). Americana X Triflora. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 114:138. 1910.
From the same lot of hybrids as Japan Hybrid No. 2 (a). Fruit resembles Prunus americana; large, oval, red over yellow; skin thick, tough, bitter; flesh juicy, coarse, pulpy, sweet; fair in quality; mid-season.

Japanese Plum Seedling. Triflora. 1. Am. Gard. 14:515. 1893.
A seedling from Luther Burbank produced by pollinating Kelsey with Satsuma. Outwardly resembles Kelsey; flesh red, pleasant, juicy, meaty; vinous; stone small, clinging.

Jaspisartige Pflaume. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 436. 1889.  Lieflandische Grüne Zwetsche Weisse Violen Pflaume.

Jaune d'Este. Domestica. 1. Flor. et Pom. 186. 1872. Jean d'Este 1.
An old variety deserving of notice because of its earliness.

Jaune Tardive. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 2d. Ser 3:53. 1900. 2. Baltet Cult. Fr. 491. 1908.
Tree vigorous; fruit of medium size, oval, amber-yellow; flesh sweet; good.


Jaune Tres Hâtive Baboud. Domestica. i. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 26. Set. 3:52. 1900.
Tree vigorous, productive; fruit below medium, oval; suture shallow; cavity small; clear yellow; flesh yellow, tender, juicy, sweet, pleasant; good; freestone; very early.

Jean Morceau. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 149. 1831.
A variety grown at one time in the London Horticultural Society gardens.

Jennie Lucas. Angustifolia varians. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 160, 162. 1881. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 196. 1901. 3. Ohio Sta. Bul. 162:256, 257. 1905.
Jennie Lucas is a seedling grown by G. Onderdonk, Mission Valley Nurseries, Victoria County, Texas; introduced by the originator in 1875. Fruit of medium size, roundish; cavity shallow; suture a line; dots numerous, large, white; light yellow; skin thin; flesh yellow, soft, sweetish; quality fair; stone large, round, flattened, clinging; mid-season.

Jerusalem. Domestica. 1. Prince Treat. Hort. 27. 1828. 2. Prince Pom. Man. 2:95. 1832. 3. Poiteau Pom. Franc. 1.1846. 4. Noisette Man. Comp. Jard. 2:497 1860. 5. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 926. 1869. 6. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 433. 1889. 7. Lucas Vollst. Hand. Obst. 471. 1894. 8. Guide Prat. 163, 367. 1895.  Blaue Eierpflaume 6, 8. De Bordeaux 1, 2, 5. De Jerusalem 4. Jerusalem 6. Oeil de Boeuf 1, 2, 4, 5. Oeuil-de-Boeuf 6. Prune de Bordeaux 6. Prune de Jerusalem 3. Prune Violet de Jerusalem 5. Prunier de Jerusalem 2, 5, 6. Violette de Jerusalem 6. Violette Jerusalem 5. Violette Jerusalems pflaume 6. Violette Jerusalemspflaume 7. Wahre blaue Eierpflaume 6, 8.
The tree and fruit of this variety resemble the German Prune of which it is probably an offspring. Fruit large, oval; suture a line; dark purple; flesh yellowish, prune-like, firm, sweet; good; stone long, flat, free; mid-season.

Jessie. Americana. 1. U.S.D.A. Rpt. 263. 1892. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 154. 1901.
A seedling introduced from the wild by the Martin Nursery Company, Winfield, Kansas, about 1892. Tree productive, vigorous, suckers badly; fruit of medium size, oval; cavity shallow; suture a line; wine-red; flesh yellow, melting, fibrous, slightly subacid; good; clingstone; early.

Jewell. Munsoniana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:79. 1892. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 87:14. 1901. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 186. 1901.
A seedling of Wild Goose from H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa; first fruited in 1885. Fruit of medium size, round; cavity shallow; suture indistinct; red over a yellow ground ; bloom light; dots numerous; skin thin, not adherent to the pulp; flesh yellow, tender; quality fair; clingstone; mid-season.

Jodoigne Domestica. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 367. 1866. 2. Ibid. 708. 1884. 3. Lucas Vollst. Hand. Obst. 472. 1894.  Boulouf ?i. Jodoigne Green Gage 1, 2. Reine-Claude de Jodoigne 1, 2. Reine-Claude von Jodoigne 3. Royal de Vilvorde 1, 2.
Probably a Reine Claude seedling; tree large, vigorous; shoots smooth; fruit large, round, inclining to oblate, greenish-yellow, with brownish-red cheek; suture shallow; flesh whitish-yellow, firm, juicy, tender, sweet, rich; mid-season.


Joe Hooker. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Colo. Sta. Bul. 50:38. 1898. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 154. 1901.
Tree dwarfish; fruit of medium size, roundish-oval; cavity shallow; suture faint; red on a yellow ground; skin thick; flesh yellow; clingstone; late.

John A. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 137. 1894. 2. Ont. Fr. Gr. Assoc. Rpt 72. 1894. 3. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:276. 1900.
A cross between Evelyn and Italian Prune; originated with Richard Trotter, Owen Sound, Ontario. Tree vigorous; fruit large, oval or egg-shape; cavity narrow; bronze-red; bloom heavy; flesh greenish-yellow, firm, juicy, subacid; stone large; clinging; hangs well.

Johnny Roe. Domestica. 1. Garden 53:263. 1898.
An English variety propagated from suckers in Nottinghamshire.

Jones. Americana? 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:79. 1892. 2. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 334. 1894. 3. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:277. 1900.
Originated in 1880 with Mrs. Owen Jones, Crescent, Iowa, who planted the pits from a quart of "California plums" she had purchased; introduced by H. A. Terry about 1895. Tree upright, spreading, productive; fruit of medium size, oval; suture indistinct; dark red; bloom light; skin thick, tender; flesh firm, meaty; quality fair; stone smooth, not margined; clinging; mid-season.

Jones Late. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:43. 1897.
Introduced by H. A. Terry. Tree productive; fruit large, oval, red ; flesh firm; clingstone.

Jordan Seedling. Domestica. 1. Can. Hort. 14:329. 1891.
Supposed to be a seedling of Yellow Egg; originated with F. Jordan of Godericli, Ontario. The variety resembles Hulings so closely as to be almost indistinguishable.

Judson. Domestica. 1. Thomas Am. Fr. Cult. 342. 1849. 2. Elliott Fr. Book 427. 1854.
Originated in Lansingburgh, New York, some time in the early "forties." Fruit small, roundish; suture indistinct; cavity small; attractive pink; flesh juicy, rich, vinous; quality high; freestone; season just before Reine Claude.

Julia. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:277. 1900. 2. Terry Cat. 1900.  Edith of Terry 1.
A seedling from H. A. Terry in 1896. Tree productive; fruit large, round, yellow striped with light red; flesh firm; clingstone; mid-season.

Julian. Triflora. Noted in Sweet Cat. 1907.

Julien Gros i. Feuilles Panachees. Domestica. Mentioned in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat.  149. 1831.

July Fourth. Domestica? X Triflora X Americana. 1. Rural N. Y. 59:655 fig. 1900.
A second generation seedling from Luther Burbank; said to rank very high in quality.

July Green Gage. Domestica. 1. Jour. Hort. 9:128. 1865. 2. Hogg Fruit Man. 360, 367. 1866. 3. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 926. 1869. 4. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:99. 1873. 5. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 437. 1889. 6. Guide Prat. 152, 363. 1895. Bavay's Early Gage? i. Bavay1 s Frühe Reine-Claude 4, 6. Early Bavay 3, ?5. Early Green Gage? 2. Frühe Reine-Claude 6. Juli Reine-Claude 5. Julius Reine-Claude 5. July Green Gage 4, 5. Reine-Claude Davion 4, 6. Reine-Claude de Bavay Hâtive 2, 3, 4, 6. Reine-Claude de Juillet 6. Reine-Claude Hâtive 5, of some 6. Reine-Claude Hâtive d1 Avion 6. Reine-Claude Hâtive de Bavay 6. Reine-Claude Bavay Hâtive? 5.
July Green Gage was introduced into France from Normandy about the middle of the last century by a M, Davion. Tree productive; fruit of medium size, roundish; suture slight; stem short; cavity narrow, deep; yellowish-green sometimes spotted with red; bloom thin; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, aromatic, sweet; very good; freestone ; very early.

Jumelles. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 432. 1905.
Fruit of medium size, roundish; suture distinct; greenish streaked with yellow; flesh juicy, sweet, rich; stone small, semi-clinging; early.

Jumelles de Liegel. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 439. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 160, 358. 1895.  Jumelles de Liegel 1. Liegel's Zwillingspflaume 1. LiegeVs Zwillingspflaume 2.
Tree productive; fruit large, roundish, red; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet, vinous; good; late.


Kaga. Americana X Simonii. 1. Circ. S. Dak. Exp. Sta. 1910.
Introduced in 1910 by the originator, N. E. Hansen, of the South Dakota Experiment Station. It is a cross between Prunus simonii and some Americana.

Kaiser Wilhelm. Domestica. 1. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 407. 1881. 2. Gard. Chron. 26:717. 1886. 3. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 428. 1889.  Bamberger Eier Pflaume 3 incor. Blaue Eier 3 incor. Dark Blue Egg 2. Dunkel-blaue Eierp-flaume 1. Dunkleblaue Eierpnaume 3. LiegeVs Marokkol 3. Rodfs Grosse Früh Pflaumen-Zwetsche 3. Ungarische Blaue Eier 3.
A plum very well known in Germany. Tree large, productive; fruit large, oval; skin thick, not adherent, tough, somewhat sour, bluish-black; flesh yellowish, juicy, slightly sweet; clingstone.

Kampeska. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Colo. Sta. Bul. 50:38. 1898.
Tree productive, slow and stocky in growth; fruit small to medium, round; stem of medium length, thick; skin thick, purplish-red; bloom heavy; of medium quality; clingstone.

Kanawha, Hortulana. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 136. 1875. 2. Ga. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 24. 1881. 3. Rev. Hort. 535. 1893. 4. Waugh Plum Cult. 180, 181. 1901.  Canawa 1. Peach-leaved 2. Prune Kanawa 3. Rains 1.
Introduced by P. J. Berckmans who had received it from J. S. Downer of Kentucky in 1871. Fruit of medium size, oval; suture a line; dots many, white; bright red with a thin bloom; skin firm; flesh firm, meaty, sprightly; good; clingstone; season late; mentioned in the catalogs of the American Pomological Society from 1875 to 1899.

Kazan. Domestica. 1. Mich. Sta. Rpt. in. 1887.
A foreign plum listed by the Michigan Experiment Station.

Keindt. Domestica. 1. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 444. 1881.  Keindt's Frühedamascene 1.
A German variety noted as unproductive on dry soil.

Keith. Americana. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 436. 1888. 2 Ia. Sta. BuL 46:277. 1900. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 155. 1901. Kieth 3.
Of the De Soto type, from Delaware County, Iowa, previous to 1888. Fruit large, roundish-oblong; cavity shallow; stem short, thick; skin thin; orange overlaid with red; bloom thin; flesh yellow, firm, sweet, not juicy; good to best; stone large, flattened, clinging; mid-season; does not thrive in the South.

Kelbalan. Triflora X Cerasifera. 1. Kerr Cat. 1899. Kelsey No. 3.
Grown by Theodore Williams of Benson, Nebraska, from a seed of Kelsey pollinated with Early Cherry. Tree somewhat like Myrobalan; fruit large, roundish-conic, yellow shaded with red; clingstone; good.

Kelley. Species? 1. Van Lindley Cat. 1899.
Originated in South Carolina; introduced by R. Bates of Jackson, South Carolina. Tree prolific; fruit medium in size, yellow; good; early.

Kelmyro. Triflora X Cerasifera. 1. Kerr Cat. 1899. Kelsey No. 1.
From Theodore Williams of Benson, Nebraska; from seed of Kelsey, pollinated with Early Cherry. Very productive; fruit medium, round, pointed, dark red on a yellow ground; stone small, clinging; mid-season.

Kelroba. Triflora X Cerasifera. 1. Kerr Cat. 1899. Kelsey No. 2.
The same origin as Kelmyro. Tree vigorous, upright, productive; fruit above medium, round, pointed, yellow overlaid with light red; high flavor; stone small, clinging.

Kelsaw. Triflora X Munsoniana. 1. Vt. Sta.' An. Rpt. 14:271. 1901.
An accidental cross between Kelsey and a "Chicasaw;" from A. M. Augustine, West Point, Mississippi. Tree a rapid and thrifty grower. Fruit the size of Abundance, round-oval; stem an inch long; suture shallow; apex rounded; brilliant transparent red; dots minute; bloom thin; skin thin and tough; flesh yellow with pink markings, firm, sweet and rich; good to very good; clingstone; early.

Kelsey Prune. Domestica. Mentioned in Wild Bros. Cat. 1892.

Kelso. Domestica? 1. Vandevoort Cat.
Kelso is a yellow plum found about 1870 on the farm of Philip Cline of Sabina, Ohio. Peter Kelso, who afterwards purchased the Cline farm, brought the plum to J. M. Vandevoort, who introduced it about twenty-five years ago.

Kenellan. Domestica. Listed in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 149. 1831. Kennedy Red, Species? 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 26. Ser. 3:53. 1900.
A weak-growing and unproductive variety tested in British Columbia. Fruit small j long-oval; suture distinct; cavity small; dull red with a thin white bloom and golden dots; flesh yellow, sweet, coarse, moderately juicy; pleasant; clingstone; of no value.

Kent. Domestica. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 689. 1884. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 424. 1889 3. Garden 56:355. 1899. 4. Can. Exp. Farm BuL 26. Ser. 3:50. 1900. Bush 1. Bush 2. Bush Plum of Kent 4. Kentish Bush 3. Waterloo 1,2. Waterloo of Kent 2.
Found in a hedge at Boben, England in 1836. Tree hardy, strong, very productive, fruit large, round; skin dark maroon; flesh firm; flavor fair; fruit keeps three weeks after being gathered; valuable for market.

Kenyon. Species? 1. Mich. Sta. Rpt. in, 1887.
Listed as a native plum being tested at the Michigan Experiment Station.

Kester Green Gage. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 926. 1869.  Kester's Green Gage 1.
Originated with a Mr. Weaver of Mt. Pleasant, Pennsylvania. Fruit small, nearly round, one side enlarged; suture large; pale yellowish-green, splashed with deeper green; bloom thin; stem medium in length; cavity large; flesh greenish, juicy, sweet, rich; very good; semi-clinging.

Kester Yellow Gage. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 926. 1869.  Kester's Yellow Gage 1.
Of the same origin as Kester Green Gage. Tree vigorous, upright with smooth branches; fruit medium in size, roundish-oval; suture broad and shallow; light yellow overspread with thick bloom; stem medium; cavity small; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, sweet, rich; very good; semi-clinging.

Kicab. Species? 1. U.S.D.A. Pom. Rpt. 45. 1895. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 46. 1897.
A seedling grown by Benjamin Buckman, Farmingdale, Illinois. Fruit medium, roundish-oval; skin thick, crimson with dark purplish stripes, covered with thick bloom ; dots numerous, variable; flesh yellow, tender, melting, juicy, mild subacid; good to very good; stone large, oval, clinging; early.

Kickapoo. Americana. 1. Penn. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 52. 1892. 2. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:39, 86. 1892. 3. Ohio Sta. Bul. 162:256, 257. 1905.
Tree an open, straggling grower, very productive; fruit of medium size, oblong to oval; cavity medium; stem short to medium, stout; suture faint; dull red mottled with deeper shades; bloom heavy; flesh yellow, firm; good; stone of medium size, clinging; mid-season; recommended for market.

King. Munsoniana. 1. Am. Jour. Hort. 5:148. 1869. King of Plums 1.
A seedling of the Wild Goose which it closely resembles.

Kingston. Domestica. 1. Ellwanger et Barry Cat. 1888-1894. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 112. 1901. Smith's Prune 1.
Kingston closely resembles Diamond; its origin in Ontario, Canada, is about all that distinguishes it.

Kleine Blaue Frixhzwetsche. Domestica? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 437.  1889.

Kleine Gelbe Eierpflaume. Domestica. Listed in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 437. 1889.

Kleine Kirschpflaume. Cerasifera. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 437. 1889.  Prunus Cerasifera Fructu Minore.

Kleine Rosspauke. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 437. 1889.
Mathieu records this variety as mentioned in Wiener Garten-Zeitung 288. 1884.

Klondike. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:44. 1897. 2. ///. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 242. 1898. 3. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:277. 1900. Klondyke 2, 3.
Grown by John Wragg et Sons, Waukee, Iowa, from seed of De Soto; introduced in 1897 by W. F. Heikes, Huntsville, Alabama. Tree productive; fruit medium to small, roundish-oval; cavity narrow, deep; suture a broad line; skin thin, bright yellow shading into red; bloom thin; dots numerous, small; flesh yellowish, sweetish, watery; quality fair; stone small, clinging; early.

Knudson. Americana. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 162. 1891. 2. N. Dak. Sta. Bul. 2: 18. 1891. 3. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:44. 1897.  Kniedsen's Peach 1. Knudson's Peach 3. Peach 2.
Grown by H. Knudson, Springfield, Minnesota. Tree unproductive; fruit drops before ripe; of medium size, roundish, purplish-red; flesh sweet; clingstone; mid-season. Subject to plum-pocket. [Not to be confused with 'Peach', a P. domestica cultivar. -ASC]

Koa. Domestica. Mentioned in Forsyth Treat. Fr. Trees 21. 1803.  Koa's Imperial.

Kober. Americana. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 228. 1909.
Kober originated with N. K. Fluke, Davenport, Iowa. Fruit large, mottled and blushed with red; bloom rather thick; flesh moderately firm, sweetish; fair in quality; clingstone; mid-season.

Koch Kanigspflaume. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 437. 1889.  Karl Koch's Konigs Pflaume Royale de Koch Royale du Dr. Koch.

Koch Spate Damascene. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:161. 1873. 2. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 403. 1881. 3. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 437. 1889.  Damas Jaune Tardif de Koch 3. Damas Tardif de Kock 1. Koch's Gelbe Spat Damascene 3. Koch's Spate Aprikosen 3. Koch's Spate Damascene 2. Koch's Spate Damascene 3.
Liegel grew this variety from seed of Bricette and dedicated it to Koch, secretary of a horticultural society at Gotha. Tree medium, round-topped; fruit below medium, roundish-oval; suture a line; cavity shallow; stem short, slender, glabrous; skin free, yellow spotted with red on the sunny side; flesh yellow, fine, firm, juicy, sweet, rich; freestone; late.

Koepher. Species? 1. Gard. Mon. 10:18. 1868.
Noted as productive and free from curculio.

Kohlenkamp. Domestica. 1. Gard. Mon. 2:313. 1860. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 122. 1860. Kohlen Kamp 1.
A seedling raised by W. Kohlenkamp, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Tree vigorous, very productive; fruit borne in clusters, large, oval; stem short; cavity deep; reddish; bloom thin; flesh yellow, firm, dry; good; freestone; late.

Kopp. Americana. 1. U.S.D.A. Rpt. 441. 1889. 2. Colo. Sta. Bul. 50:39. 1898. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 155. 1901.
Introduced by O. M. Lord, Minnesota City, Minnesota. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit large, round; skin thick; purplish-red; flesh firm, sweet; clingstone; mid-season.

Korai. Domestica. 1. U.S.D.A. Pom. Rpt. 26. 1894. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 176. 1895.  Quetsche 1, 2.
Received from Hungary by the United States Department of Agriculture in 1893. Tree vigorous; fruit below medium, oblong-ovate; sides unequal; skin thick, tough; purple with numerous small, brown dots; flesh yellowish-green, coarse, melting; sub-acid; good; stone of medium size, narrow, pointed, clinging; mid-season.

Kroos-Pruim. Species? 1. Knoop Fructologie 2:58. 1761.
Originated in Holland. Fruit of varying colors and sizes, round; insipid, watery. Propagated by pits. Useful only as a stock.

Kume. Triflora. 1. Am. Card. 12:449. 1891.
An early variety.


Lachine. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:38. 1903.
Similar to Yellow Egg; hardy; productive; good; clingstone.

Lady. Insititia. 1. Cultivator 3:20. 1855-. Lady Plum 1.
A seedling of Mirabelle from Isaac Denniston, Albany, New York. Tree slender, vigorous, productive; fruit small, oval; stem short, stout; light yellow, with red spots; stone small, free; mid-season.

Lakeside No. 1 and No. 2. Hortulana. Letter from Kerr.
Two seedlings from Theodore Williams, Benson, Nebraska.

Lallinger Konigspflaume. Domestica. Listed in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 438. 1889.

Lambert. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1897. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 26. Ser. 3:53. 1900.  Labert 1. Laberfs Red 1. Lambert's Red 2.
A seedling from Ontario, Canada. Tree weak; foliage poor; fruit small, heart-shaped ; stem short; cavity lacking; suture a line; reddish; bloom thin; flesh reddish-orange, juicy; poor; stone large, clinging; mid-season.

Lammas. Domestica. 1. Ray Hist. Plant. 2:1529. 1688. 2. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 149. 1831.
Mentioned by Ray as being one of the best sorts of his time.

Lancaster. Munsoniana X Hortulana mineri? 1. Waugh Plum Cult. 186. 1901.
Grown by Charles B. Camp of Cheney, Nebraska, from a seed of Wild Goose supposed to have been crossed with Miner.

Lang. Americana. 1. S. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:21. 1905. Rang 1.
Sent to the South Dakota Station by C. W. H. Heideman of Minnesota. Tree vigorous, straggling in growth; fruit large, yellowish; skin thin; flesh sweet, juicy; good; stone small; keeps well; mid-season.

Langdon. Domestica. 1. Mag. Hort. 19:461 fig. 36. 1853. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 386. 1857. 3. Ibid. 927. 1869.  Langdon's Seedling 2. Langdon's Seedling 3.
Originated with Reuben Langdon of Hartford, Connecticut; believed to be a seedling of Washington. Tree vigorous, spreading; shoots strong, smooth; leaves large; fruit large, roundish-oval; suture a line; purplish-red to light green in the shade with some mottling; bloom thick; dots small; stem of medium length, stout, hairy; cavity deep; flesh yellow, melting, juicy, sweet, acid next to the skin; semi-clinging; early.

Lange Violette Damascene. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 438. 1889.  Blaue Damascenerin. Damas Violet?. Damas Violet Allonge. Damas Violet Longuet. Das Blaue Auge. Langliche Blaue Damascene!. The Great Damask Plum. .

Langsdon. Hortulana mineri. 1. Am. Jour. Hort. 5:144. 1869. 2. Barry Fr. Garden 418. 1883. 3. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:56. 1892.  Illinois Plum 1. Langdon 2.
Grown in Illinois previous to 1869. Tree medium in vigor; leaves obovate or elliptic-obovate, pointed, with small glands; fruit small, roundish-oblong, light red; bloom thin; skin thick; flesh firm; quality fair; stone clinging, small, nearly smooth, turgid, short, pointed; mid-season or later.

Lannix. Triflora X Munsoniana. 1. U.S.D.A. Pom. Rpt. 45. 1895. 2. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:15. 1898.
Supposed to have been produced from Abundance crossed with Wild Goose. Leaves large, oval, pointed, leathery; petiole short, stout, usually glandless; fruit oval, of medium size, coppery-red; bloom light; skin thin, tough, bitter; flesh yellowish, translucent, tender, juicy, slightly fibrous, mild subacid, rich, slightly bitter at the center; good; stone large, oval, clinging.

La Prairie. Americana. i.Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:44. 1897. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 155. 1901.
Taken from the woods about 1844 at Shopiere, Wisconsin; brought to notice by B. H. Smith. Tree productive; fruit large, golden, slightly astringent.

Large English Damson. Insititia. Mentioned in Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 26. Ser. 3:51. 1900.

Large Golden Prolific. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm BuL 26. Ser. 3:53. 1900. 2. Albertson et Hobbs Cat. 1904. 3. Stone et Wellington Cat. 1907.  V ail's Seedling 3.
Originated in Canada; a seedling of Yellow Egg. Tree vigorous, spreading; fruit above medium size, oblong, golden-yellow; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet, pleasant; early.

Large Green Drying. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 149. 1831. 2. Mag. Hort. 6:94. 1840. 3. Thompson Gard. Ass't 518. 1859. 4* Downing Fr. Trees Am. 927. 1869. 5. Mas. Pom. Gen. 2:191. 1873. 6. Guide Prat. 163, 366. 1895.  Grosse a seeker de Knight 6. Knighfs Green Drying 5, 6. Knight's Large Drying 4, 6. Knight's Large Green Drying 3. Large Green Drying 6. Verte a Secher de Knight 5, 6.
Raised by Thomas Knight; first fruited in 1838. Fruit large, round; suture shallow; greenish-yellow; bloom thin; flesh yellowish, firm, medium juicy, sweet and well flavored; excellent for dessert; clingstone; mid-season.

Large Queen. Domestica. 1. U.S.D.A. Pom. Rpt. 26. 1894. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 176.  1895.
Imported from Hungary by the United States Department of Agriculture in 1893 and fruited by E. C. Hoskins of Springbrook, Oregon. Fruit of medium size, roundish-oblate, dark wine color; bloom light; dots many, conspicuous; skin thick; flesh greenish-yellow, coarse, mild subacid; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Large Sugar Prune. Domestica. 1. Koch Dent. Obst. 572. 1876. 2. Lange Allgem. Garten. 2:421. 1879. 3. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 440. 1881. 4. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 434. 1889.  Ananas Zwetsche 4 incor. Bely Zwetsche 4. Blaue Eier Pflaume 4. Dorell's Grosse Ungarische Pflaume 4. Grosse Zuckerzwetsche 3, 4. Herrenhduser Blaue Eier Pflaume 4. Jacobi Zwetsche 4. Kladrauer Pflaume 4. Quetsche Sucree 4.
An early German prune used for table, market and drying. Tree large, broad-headed, productive; shoots pubescent, straight, dark brown; fruit large, oval, sometimes ovate; suture shallow; sides unequal; stem long, glabrous; skin free, sour, bluish-black; bloom thick; flesh yellow, firm, juicy, rich, sweet; freestone.

Large White Damson. Insititia. 1. Duhamel Trait. Arb. Fr. 2:72, PL 3 fig. 2. 1768. 2. Prince Pom. Man. 2:88. 1832. 3. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 952. 1869. 4. Hogg Fruit Man. 709. 1884. 5. Guide Prat. 161, 357. 1895.  Damas Blanc 3, 4. Damas Blanc Gros 2,3. Damas Blanc Hâtive Gros 3, 4. Damas Blanc Tres Hâtive 4. Damas Gros Blanc 5. Gros Damas Blanc 2, 4. Gros Damas Blanc 1,5. Large White Damask 4. Large White Damask 2. White Damask 3.
Probably of French origin; resembles the Small White Damson closely but is larger and longer. Branches smooth; fruit below medium, roundish-oval, greenish-yellow; bloom thin; flesh medium in sweetness and flavor; adapted for cooking; freestone; late.

Late Black Damson. Insititia. 1. Quintinye Com. Gard. 70. 1699. 2. Duhamel
Trait. Arb. Fr. 2:73. 1768. 3. Prince Pom. Man. 2:89. 1832. 4. Noisette Man. Comp. Jard. 2:495. 1860.

Black Damson 3. Damas Noir 3. Damas Noir Tardif 2, 4. Damas Noir Tardif 3. Late Damask? 1.
Fruit small, elongated, purplish-black; cavity shallow; suture a line; flesh yellowish-green, acid until thoroughly ripe; nearly freestone.

Late Blood. Triflora. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 62:23. 1894. 2. Ibid. 106:56. 1896.  Burbank No.3 1, 2. Hale 2. Hale 1.
Luther Burbank imported this variety in 1885; Bailey named it Hale in 1894 but changed it to Late Blood two years later. Similar to Satsuma; later, blooms earlier, is less pointed and differs in leaf-characters.

Late Bolmer. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 404. 1857. 2, Mathieu Nom. Pom. 439. 1889. Winter Bolmar 2.
Fruit of medium size, roundish, yellow, mottled with red in the sun; flesh yellow, firm, sweet but not rich; freestone; mid-season.

Late Chalons. Domestica. 1. Prince Pom. Man. 2:99. 1832. 2, Mathieu Nom. Pom. 450. 1889.  Tardif de Chalons 1. Tar dive de Chalons 1,2. Spate von Chalons 2.
Fruit of medium size, oval, light yellow with red blush, deepening to violet; flesh yellowish, melting, juicy, sweet; stone rough, clinging; very late.

Late Conical. Triflora X Simonii. 1. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:16 fig. 1898.
Originated by Burbank; named in 1898. Tree of rapid growth; leaves medium to large, broadly oval, abruptly pointed, tapering at the base, rather stiff, margins coarsely double-crenulate; petiole large, set with glands; fruit strongly conical, large; cavity shallow, abrupt; stem short; suture shallow; yellow overlaid with purple and red; dots numerous, large; bloom heavy; skin medium in thickness; flesh yellow, firm, sweet and agreeable; very good; stone of medium size, flattened, pointed, free.

Late Goose. Munsoniana. 1. Stark Bros. Cat. 1909.
From Theodore Williams of Nebraska. Fruit very large; handsome. Late Orange. Domestica. 1. Gard. Chron. 12:593. 1892. 2. Garden 64:262. 1903. 3. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 423. 1903.
Late Orange originated with Thomas Rivers, Sawbridgeworth, England, first fruiting in 1888; introduced by the originator in 1897. Tree vigorous; fruit similar to Reine Claude in size and appearance; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet; very good; season very late.

Late Prolific. Domestica. 1. Fish Hardy Fr. Bk. 2:56. 1882. 2. Rivers Cat. 3$. 1898-99. 3. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 423. 1903. River's Late Prolific 1.
A seedling of Early Prolific. Tree vigorous; fruit below medium size, round; suture shallow; stem of medium size; cavity lacking; dark purple; bloom heavy; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy; flavor pleasant; stone small; early to mid-season. Late Red Damask. Domestica. 1. Prince Pom. Man. 2:85. 1832. 2. Kenrick Am. Orch. 261. 1832. 3. Poiteau Pom. Franc. 1. 1846.  Damas rouge tardif 1. Gros Damas rouge tardif 1. Gros Damas Rouge Tardif 2,3. Large Late Red Damask 2. Late Red Damson 1.
According to Kenrick and Prince this variety was described in the 1825 edition of Duhamel's Traite des Arbres Fruitiers. Its description resembles that of Orleans very closely but its season is evidently later. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit large, oval; skin thick, adherent to the flesh, light purple; flesh yellow, melting, slightly coarse, juicy, sweet; good; late.

Late Reine Claude. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 148. 1831. 2. Horticulturist 2:479- 1847- 3. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 395. 1857. 4. Ibid. 935. 1869. 5. Guide Prat. 162, 364. 1895.  Late Gage 4. Late Green Gage 1. Late Green Gage 4. October Green Gage I2. October Green Gage 4. Reine-Claude dy Octobre ?2, 4. Reine-Claude d'October 3. Reine-Claude Tardive 4. Reine-Claude Tardive 2, 4.
First mentioned in the London Horticultural Society catalog in 1831. Origin unknown. Tree vigorous; shoots smooth, stout, short-jointed; fruit small, roundish; apex dimpled; skin greenish-yellow, mottled with red on the sunny side; bloom thin; flesh green, juicy, rich, sugary; good; freestone; late.

Late Rivers. Domestica. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 369. 1866. 2. Nicholson Diet. Gard. 3:166. 3. Thompson Gard. Assyt 4:158. 1901. 4. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 439. 1889. Tardive de Rivers 4.
A seedling from Thomas Rivers of Sawbridgeworth, England; first fruited in 1865. Branches smooth; fruit of medium size, round; suture shallow; stem long, slender; dark purple; flesh yellow, rich, sweet, sugary; flavor pleasant; clingstone; very late.


Late Rollingstone. Americana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:39, 42. 1892. 2. Colo. Sta. BuL 50:39. 1898. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 155. 1901.
A seedling of Rollingstone, grown by O. M. Lord of Minnesota. Tree medium in vigor, with a round, compact head; leaves obovate-oblong, short-acuminate, irregularly crenate; shoots red, smooth, glossy; petioles glandular, pubescent; fruit medium in size, roundish-oblate; cavity shallow; suture faint; yellow background overlaid with red; stem of medium length; dots numerous, yellow; bloom thick; skin thick; flesh yellow, firm; fair to good; stone of medium size, broad-oval, smooth, flattened; late.

Late Transparent. Domestica. 1. Nicholson Diet. Gard. 3:167. 2. Cornell Sta. BuL 131:188. 1897. 3. Thompson Gard. Ass't 4:158. 1901.  Late Transparent Gage 1.
A seedling of Transparent from Thomas Rivers of Sawbridgeworth, England. Tree dwarf, hardy, productive; fruit large, round, greenish-yellow, with purplish blush in the sun; flesh yellowish, firm, tender, juicy, sweet; high quality; stone very small; season ten days later than its parent.

Laubinger Sugar Prune. Domestica. 1. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 441. 1881. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 439. 1889.  Laubinger's Catharinen Pflaume 2. Laubinger's Zuckerzwetsche 1, 2.
From Germany. A true prune of value for table, compotes and drying. Tree vigorous, productive; shoots glabrous, violet-brown; fruit large, long-oval; suture shallow or lacking, divides the plum equally; stem not hairy; skin free, sourish; violet-brown to bluish-black; bloom thin; flesh yellow, firm, rather juicy, slightly tart; mid-season.

Laura. Species? 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 14:271. 1901.
From Theodore Williams, Nebraska; said to be a cross between Quackenboss and Red Glass. Tree apparently a pure Americana according to Mr. Williams.

Lawrence Early. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat, 149. 1831. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 928. 1869. 3. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 439. 1889.  Lawrence 1. Lawrence's Early 1. Lawrence's Early 2, 3. Lawrence's Früh Rote Pflaume 3.
This plum differs from the well-known American variety, Lawrence, in that it is smaller, of poorer quality, purple and earlier.

Lawson. Domestica. 1. Mclntosh Bk. Gard. 2:531. 1855. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 928. 1869. 3. Mas Le Verger 6:141. 1866-73. 4. Lange Allgem. Garten., 421. 1879. 5. Hogg Fruit Man. 710. 1884.  Anna Lawson 3. Anna Lawson 4. Damas Lawson 2, 5. Doree de Lawson 3. Golden Gage Lawson 2. Lawson's Golden 1,5. Lawson1 s Golden 3. Lawson's Golden Gage 1.
A seedling of Reine Claude pollinated with Golden Drop, grown in 1842 by Archibald Gorrie of Annat Gardens, Errol, Perthshire, Scotland; named in honor of Charles Lawson a nurseryman of Edinburgh. Tree hardier than either parent; fruit of medium size, oval; suture a line; cavity small; yellow with dull reddish blush; bloom thin; flesh, yellow, sweet, juicy; good; clingstone; mid-season.


Le Due. Americana. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 134. 1887. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 156. 1901. 3. Ohio Sta. BuL 162:256, 257. 1905. La Due 1.
Le Due was found growing wild at Hasting, Minnesota; introduced by W. G. Le Due. Fruit of medium size, roundish; suture faint; cavity small; bright red; bloom thin; flesh yellow, sweet, pleasant; quality fair; stone large, semi-clinging; mid-season.

Legal Tender. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:277. 1900.
Originated under cultivation with H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa in 1896; first fruited in 1899; parentage unknown. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit large, round, golden-yellow blotched with dark red; skin thin; fine quality; semi-clinging; mid-season.

Leib Sour. Simonii X Triflora. 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 14:272. 1901.
One of Burbank's hybrids; of the type of Wickson. Fruit large, round or slightly oblate; stem strong; cavity wide; suture shallow; apex slightly depressed; light red with thin bloom; dots many, prominent; flesh yellow, firm, meaty; flavor peculiar, aromatic, subacid; good to very good; stone medium, oval, flattened, clinging.

Leonard. Americana. 1. Montreal Hort. Soc. Rpt. 90. 1885. 2. Colo. Sta. Bul. 50: 40. 1898. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 156. 1901.
Originated with Charles Gibb, Montreal, Canada, in 1873 from a wild plum root obtained from Wisconsin. Fruit medium, round; cavity shallow; stem slender; dull dark red, mottled; dots small; flesh yellow, not firm, acid; quality fair; stone small, round-oval, smooth, semi-clinging; mid-season.

Leopard. Triflora X ? 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 14:272. 1901.
From Theodore Williams, of Nebraska, from a " Botan pit pollinated with Red Glass." Fruit large, round-oval; stem medium long, set in a shallow cavity; skin thick; light rich red; flesh yellow, firm; flavor Miner-like, rich and sweet; good to very good.

Lepine. Insititia. 1. Koch Deut. Obst. 570. 1876. 2. Lange Allgem. Garten. 2:420. 1879.
A variety of the Damson type raised by Lepine in Belgium; probably not known in this country; very similar to Norbe[r]t and by some said to be the same. Tree large, productive; fruit of medium size, round, somewhat compressed; suture shallow; skin removable, not sourish; dark blue; flesh greenish-yellow, firm, sweet, wine-like; stone free; late.

Leptune. Hortulana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:56, 86. 1892. 2. Bailey Ev. Nat. Fr. 203, 206, 208. 1898. 3. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 11:284. 1898.
Introduced by J. D. Morrow et Sons of Arkansas. Leaves elliptic-ovate to elliptic-obovate, very long-pointed and coarsely serrate; stalks either glandless or glandular; fruit of medium size, round; skin thick, dark red; dots yellow; flesh yellow, meaty; stone medium, nearly smooth, short-pointed, clinging.

Letta. Species? 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 133. 1891.
Found in Buchanan County, Iowa; introduced by J. Wragg et Son of Waukee, Iowa. Fruit as large as Hawkeye.

Lewis. Domestica. 1. U.S.D.A. Pom. Rpt. 46. 1895.
Received by the United States Department of Agriculture from H. C. Cook, White Salmon, Washington. Fruit large, roundish-oval; stem short, set in a moderately deep, abrupt cavity; red, a little darker than Lombard; bloom thin; dots numerous; flesh pale yellow; good to very good; stone large, oval, free; late.

Lewiston Egg. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 404. 1857. 2. Am, Pom. Soc. Cat. 222, 244. 1858. Lewiston's Egg 2.
According to Downing, from Lewiston, New York. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit medium, oval, pale yellow; flesh yellow, not very sweet; flavor medium; clingstone; mid-season. Rejected by the American Pomological Society in 1858.

Lex Plum. Domestica. 1. Kenrick Am. Orch. 263. 1832.
Noted as a large blue plum with rich, sweet, yellow flesh; very productive.

Liegel Rote Damascene. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 439. 1889.  Runde Rote Damascene. 

Liegel Apricot. Domestica. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 369. 1866. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 439. 1889. 3. Guide Prat. 163, 351. 1895.  Abricotee de Braunau Nouvelle 1, 2. Abricotee de Liegel 3. New Apricot of Braunau 2.
Liegel Apricot was grown by Dr. Liegel of Braunau, Germany. Fruit of medium size, roundish; suture deep; yellowish; bloom thin; flesh greenish-yellow, melting, juicy, sprightly; good; freestone; late.

Liegel Gage. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 439. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 161, 359. 1895.
A variety said to have been imported into France from England. Fruit of medium size, roundish, greenish; bloom thin; flesh yellow, juicy, rich; very good; late.

Liegel Unvergleichliche. Domestica? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 439. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 162, 359. 1895.
Received in France from Bohemia.

Lillian Augusta. Domestica. 1. Ont. Fr. Gr. Assoc. Rpt. 72. 1894. 2. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 136. 1894.
Grown by Richard Trotter, Owen Sound, Ontario. Tree hardy, productive; fruit large, egg-shaped; cavity small and shallow; stem nearly long; suture a line; greenish-yellow with a few broken stripes of deeper shade; flesh light yellow, firm, meaty, juicy, slightly acid; good to very good; stone medium to small, oval, turgid, roughened, partly free.

Lillie. Americana. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 276. 1893. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 156. 1901.
A seedling of Hawkeye, grown by H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa; first fruited in 1893. Tree vigorous and upright; fruit of medium size, round sometimes conical; cavity broad, shallow; stem slender; apex rounded; yellow overspread with mottled light and dark red; dots numerous; bloom thick; flesh sweet, melting; quality best; stone pointed, free; mid-season.

Lindow'sche Frühee Werder'sche Pflaume. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 439. 1889. Lindsay. Species? 1. Can. Hort. 27:22. 1904. Lindsay's Seedling 1.
Reported as a new plum from Guelph, Canada; large; good.


Little. Americana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:39. 1892. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:45. 1897.  Little Seedling 1, 2.
Introduced by Charles Leudlofl, Carver, Minnesota, but discarded by him on account of its size. Fruit small, red; stone small, rough, cherry-like.

Livland. Domestica. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 61. 1887.  Livlandscher bierpflaume 1.
A Russian variety imported by the Iowa Agricultural College in 1882.

Lizzie. Americana. 1. Meneray Cat.
A seedling of Harrison, grown by H. A. Terry; introduced by P. W. Meneray of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Tree vigorous, spreading; fruit large, pale yellow, with a red blush; flesh yellow, rich, no acidity; good; semi-clinging.

Lockey. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894.
Tree dwarfish, lacks in adaptability, blights badly, short-lived; fruit of medium size, greenish-yellow overlaid with red; good; clingstone.

Lone Star. Angustifolia varians. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 154. 1883 .2. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:63, 86. 1892. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 196. 1901.
Grown by E. W. Kilpatrick, Texas, from wild seed produced in eastern Texas. Fruit of medium size, oval; cavity broad, shallow; stem slender; suture lacking; red; bloom thin; dots numerous, white; skin thin; flesh soft, yellow, sweet; good; stone oval, clinging; early. Mentioned in the American Pomological Society catalog in 1897.

Long Blue. Domestica. 1. Ia. Hori. Soc. Rpt. 86. 1890. 2. Mich. Sta. Bul. 118:54. 1895. 3. Wis. Sta. An. Rpt. 13:214. 1896. 4. Kan. Sta. Bul. 101:121. 1901.  Orel No.20 2, 3. Orel N0.20 1.
One of the Russian varieties imported by J. L. Budd about 1882. Tree hardy, vigorous, unproductive; fruit medium to large, oblong-oval; purplish-red with light bloom; dots numerous, small; flesh yellow, juicy, subacid, pleasant; quality fair; stone rough and strongly margined, semi-clinging.

Long Leaf Wonderful. Domestica. 1. N. Y. Sta. An. Rpt. 12:611. 1893.
Long Leaf Wonderful was sent out in 1893 by Luther Burbank; no description is available and the variety is probably extinct.

Long Red. Domestica. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 86. 1890. 2. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt 401. 1898. 3. Kan. Sta. Bul. 101:119, 122 fig. 1901.  Orel No. 19 2, 3. Orel ig 1.
Introduced from Russia by J. L. Budd of Iowa about 1882. Tree hardy, vigorous; fruit medium to large, roundish-oblong, purplish-red; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, sweet, pleasant; excellent for culinary use; stone semi-clinging.

Long Scarlet, Domestica. 1. Mag. Hort. 1:365. 1835. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 303^ 1845. 3. Ant. Pom. Soc. Cat. 36. 1875.  Red Gage (incorrectly of some) 2. Scarlet Gage 2, 3. Scarlet Gage 1,2.
Downing states that the original tree was first noted in the vicinity of Newburgh about 1823 and that the variety was disseminated by him. Tree very hardy, an abundant bearer; shoots downy; fruit medium, oblong-obovate; cavity narrow, very shallow; stem three-fourths of an inch long; bright red or purplish-crimson on the sunny side, pale yellowish-red on the shaded side; flesh deep yellow, juicy, becoming rich and sweet if allowed to hang; clingstone; mid-season. Listed in the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1875, but dropped in 1897.

Long Violet Damascene. Domestica. 1. Oberdieck Dent. Obst. Sort. 444. 1881.
Unproductive on dry soil as tested in Jeinsen, Germany.

Longworth. Domestica. 1. U.S.D.A. Rpt. 392. 1891. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 74. 1895.
Said to have originated many years ago with Nicholas Longworth, Cincinnati, Ohio. Resembles Lombard and is better in quality. Fruit of medium size, roundish-oval, purplish-red; flesh yellow, sweet, pleasant; mid-season to late.

Lot d'Ente. Domestica. 1. Wickson Cat. Fruits 356 fig. 1891. UEnte 1.
This variety is of the same type if not the same as the Agen.

Lottie. Americana mollis. 1. Terry Cat. 1900. 2. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 120. 1904. 3. III. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 424. 1905. Lotta 3.
Originated with H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa, from seed of Van Buren. Fruit large, white or pale yellow; good; freestone.

Louisa. Americana. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 930. 1869. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 37. 1899. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 156. 1901.
Found growing wild in Missouri about 1860; introduced by Samuel Miller, Blufl-ton, Missouri. Fruit of medium size, roundish; suture a line; cavity small; stem short; dull red; bloom thick; dots numerous; flesh firm, yellow; quality fair; stone large, flat, clinging; mid-season.

Louise-Brune. Insititia? 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:71. 1873. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 439. 1889.  Louise Brune 2. Louisen's Braune Damascene 2.
Raised by M. de Maraise, a Belgian pomologist. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit round-oval; suture narrow and very shallow; skin purple; bloom thick; flesh yellowish-green, firm, rather sweet; good; stone oval, thick, free; type of the Damsons.

Louisiana. Triflora X ? 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 139:43. 1897. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 217. 1901. Normand No.15 1.
One of the several seedlings sent out by J. L. Normand, Marksville, Louisiana, who states that it is the offspring of a Triflora variety crossed with a native; named by Bailey in 1897. Tree spreading, weak and slender in habit; fruit of medium size, heart-shaped; suture faint; cavity shallow; greenish with dull blush; dots many, whitish; flesh yellow, fibrous, sprightly subacid; quality fair; clingstone; fruit drops before ripe

Lovett. Domestica. 1. Gard. Mon. 29:47. 1887.
A seedling of Reine Claude, from York County, Pennsylvania, about 1867. Tree very vigorous and productive; fruit very large, roundish; suture slight; cavity shallow; dark red; dots minute, yellow; flesh yellow, firm, sweet; semi-clinging; very early.

Lovett. Triflora. 1. Lovett Cat. 1898. Fourth of July 1.
A chance seedling from the Lovett homestead in Pennsylvania; introduced in 1898 by J T. Lovett, Little Silver, New Jersey. Fruit of medium size, roundish; suture indistinct; bright red; bloom light; flesh yellow, firm, rich, sweet, vinous, highly aromatic; good; freestone; very early.

Lovett Late. Domestica. 1. Cole Am. Fr. Book 218. 1849.  Lovett's Late Long Red 1.
An excellent long-keeping variety mentioned by Cole in 1849.

Lowry. Domestica. 1. Smith Cat. 1899. Lowry's Gage 1.
A chance seedling found growing in a fence corner at St. Davids, Ontario; introduced by E. D. Smith in 1899. Fruit of medium size, yellow; good; early.

Lucas Konigspflaume. Domestica. i. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 421. 1881. 2. Mathieu Norn. Pom. 439. 1889. Royale de Lucas 2.
A table and market variety in Germany. Tree vigorous, productive in moist soils; fruit large, oval; suture shallow, divided unequally; skin somewhat sourish, easily removed, bluish-red to dark blue on the sunny side; dots fine, yellowish, numerous; flesh soft, golden-yellow, sweet, highly flavored; stone not always free; ripens before the Reine Claude.

Luedloff. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:46. 1897. 2. Ibid. 87:14. 1901.  LuedlofFs Seedling 1, 2.
From Charles Luedloff, Cologne, Minnesota. Fruit medium in size, oblong; suture distinct; yellow overspread with bright red; dots small, numerous; quality hardly fair; stone oval, sharply pointed, nearly free.

Luedloff Green. Americana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:40. 1892. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:46. 1897. LuedlofFs Green 1, 2.
From Charles Luedloff, Cologne, Minnesota, about 1889; discarded by him later. Tree regular and abundant in bearing; fruit medium to small, oblong, flattened; skin thick, mottled with deep red; flesh firm, sweet; fair quality; stone small, nearly free; medium late.

Luedloff Red. Americana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:40. 1892. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63: 46. 1897. LeudlofFs Red 1, 2.
Much like Luedloff Green but red in color. Tree moderately productive; fruit very good; medium season. Good for culinary purposes.

Lunn. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:35. 1903. 2. Quebec Pom. Soc. Rpt. 9. 1905. Montreal No. 60 1.
From W. W. Dunlop, Outremont, Quebec. Fruit large, oval; cavity shallow; suture a distinct line; dark purple; dots indistinct, brownish; skin tough; flesh yellowish-green, firm, juicy, sweet, rich; very good; clingstone; mid-season.

Luscombe. Domestica. Mentioned in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 149. 1831.  Luscombe's Seedling.

Lutts. Triflora. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 175:131 fig., 132. 1899. 2. Mass. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 1:106. 1900. 3. Ga. Sta. Bul. 68:5 %] 31- 1904. Wasse-Botankio 1, 2, 3.
Sent out under the name Wasse-Botankio but renamed in 1899 by Bailey after Henry Lutts of Youngstown, New York. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit small, roundish, dark red with numerous fine, golden, dots; bloom heavy; flesh yellow, soft, with a slight almond flavor; good; clingstone; one of the earliest.

Lyon. Domestica. i. Mich. Sta. Bul. 104:100. 1894. 2. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 367. 1896. 3. Mich. Sta. Bul. 169:246. 1899.   Bailey 1. Bailey 2, 3.
Brought to notice by S. S. Bailey of Grand Rapids, Michigan, and grown for a number of years by the Michigan sub-station at South Haven under the name Bailey; renamed Lyon b}^ the Michigan Horticultural Society in 1896. Tree vigorous, upright, spreading, productive; fruit large, roundish; suture slight; cavity shallow; clear yellow with light bloom; flesh yellow, tender, rich, sweet, moderately juicy; good; semi-clinging; mid-season.

Lyon Apricot. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 26. Ser. 3:53. 1901.
Received by the British Columbia Experiment Station at Agassiz from a Mr. Spaath of Berlin, Germany. Fruit above medium in size; roundish; suture shallow; bright red; bloom thin; flesh yellow, firm, juicy, sprightly; good; stone slender, free; early


M. J. De Wolf. Species? 1. 5. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:25, 52 fig. 1905.
The most promising from a lot of seedlings grown by M. J. De Wolf, Letcher, South Dakota, from seed taken from the orchard of H. J. Gurney, Elk Point, South Dakota. Fruit large, roundish; cavity wide, shallow; suture a line; red marbled on the shady side with yellow; dots many, large, conspicuous; flesh dark yellow, tender, sweet, juicy; good; freestone; mid-season.

Macedonia. Munsoniana. 1. Kerr Cat. 19. 1897. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 186. 1901.  Transparent 2.
Fruit of medium size, roundish-oval; suture faint; cavity shallow; light red; bloom thin; flesh yellow; quality fair; clingstone; mid-season.

Mackland. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1899.
Tree vigorous; fruit above medium size, red over yellow; clingstone; rots badly.

Macomber. Domestica. Listed in Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 39. 1899. Macomber No. 1 and No. 2. Americana. Letter from Kerr.
Two inferior seedlings from a Mr. Macomber of Vermont.

Madame Henri Deschars. Insititia ? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 439. 1889.  Mirabelle Tar dive Mme. H. Deschars 1.
Mathieu's notice refers to Journal de la Societe Nationale et Centrale dJ Horticulture de France 608. 1878.

Madame Nicolle. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 439. 1889. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 2d Ser. 3:53. 1900. Souvenir de Madame Nicolle 1.
A European variety tested on the grounds of the British Columbia Experimental Station; inferior.

Madam Leeds. Species ? 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:279. 1900.
A seedling unintroduced and of unknown parentage grown by George Temple, presumably of Iowa. Tree resembles Poole Pride, productive; fruit the size of Wild Goose, bright red; drops easily; late.

Madeleine. Domestica? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 439. 1889. 2. Guide Prat 156, 359. 1895.
Tree vigorous, moderately productive; fruit large, oval; yellow with reddish spots; good; early.


Madison. Domestica. 1. Cultivator 6:355. 1849. 2. Horticulturist 4:214. 1849. 3. Thomas Am. Fruit Cult. 355. 1867.
A chance seedling from the garden of Isaac Denniston, Albany, New York; first fruiting in 1847 and supposed to be a cross between Bleeker and Blue Gage. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit of medium size, oval; suture shallow; cavity small; yellow with reddish blush; bloom thin; flesh yellow, firm, juicy, rich, sweet, pleasant; good; freestone; very late.

Mainzer Frühezwetsche. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 439. 1889. Majestic Damson. Insititia. 1. Stone et Wellington Cat. 1907.
Introduced by Stone and Wellington of Toronto, Ontario. Fruit large, purple; bloom heavy; freestone; early.

Mallard, Domestica. 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 289. 1889. 2* Cornell Sta. Bul. 131: 189. 1897. 3. Rivers Cat. 34. 1898.
A seedling from Thomas Rivers, Sawbridgeworth, England. Tree of moderate vigor and hardiness; fruit large, oval; suture distinct; deep purple; flesh yellow, rich, juicy; good; freestone; early; said to rot but little; not hardy.

Mamelonn6e. Domestica. 1. Gen. Farmer 10:241. 1849. 2. Hogg Fruit Man. 371. 1866. 3. Guide Prat. 157, 359. 1895.  Die Brustwarzenpflaume 3. Mamelon 3. Mamelon Sageret 2.
Raised by M. Sagaret of Paris, France. Tree of medium size; fruit roundish-oval, strongly necked, yellowish-green, mottled with red; light bloom; flesh yellowish, firm, juicy, sweet; similar to Reine Claude except in shape.

Manitoba. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894.
Fruit of medium size, roundish-oval, clear red; freestone.

Manitoba No. 1. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1897. 2. 5. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:22. 1905.
A wild variety from Manitoba, Canada. Fruit of medium size, bright red; skin thick and bitter; very early.

Manitoba Seedlings. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1897-1900. 2. S. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93: 22. 1905.
Several seedlings bearing the numbers 2, 4, 5, 6 and 7 were grown by N. E. Hansen of the South Dakota Station from seed obtained in Manitoba. Early bearing and productivity are their chief desirable characters.

Mankato. Americana. 1. Minn. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 332, 481. 1896. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 157. 1901. 3. Minn. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 228. 1903.  German Prune Seedling 3.
Originated on the farm of Louis J. Eider, four miles north of Mankato in Nicollet County, Minnesota; introduced by S. D. Richardson and Son of Winnebago City, Minnesota, in 1890. Tree vigorous, fairly productive; fruit above medium size, oval; cavity shallow; suture faint; skin free from the pulp; dull red; dots yellow; flesh yellow, sometimes red next the stone, sweet, rich; good; semi-clinging; late.

Manning. Domestica. 1. Manning Book of Fruits 103. 1838. 2. Thomas Am. Fruit Cult. 335. 1849. 3. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 930. 1869. Large Long Blue i. Large Long Blue 2,3. Manning's Long Blue 2,3. Manning's Long Blue 3. Mannings Long Blue Prune 3. Manning's Long Blue Prune 2. Manning's Prune 3.
Received by Robert Manning from Landreth's Nursery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, without a name; probably a seedling of the German Prune. Tree vigorous; fruit large, long-oval; suture obscure; cavity small; dark purple; bloom thick; flesh greenish-yellow, firm, juicy, sweet, sprightly, pleasant; good; stone long, pointed, free; mid-season; ripening period long.

Marais des Cygne. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat, 5. 1900.
Introduced by J. W. Kerr in 1900. Tree vigorous and productive; fruit of medium size, roundish, purplish-red; good; clingstone; subject to rot; mid-season.

Marange. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 440. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 156, 359. 1895.  Petit-Monsieur ? 1, 2.
Tree small, very productive; fruit small, round, reddish-violet; skin unusually free; flesh yellow; very good for its season; very early.

Marble. Hortulana mineri X Hortulana. 1. Vi. Sta. An. Rpt. 12:225. 1899. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 217. 1901. Fourth of July 1.
Grown by A. L. Bruce of Texas, who states that it is a cross between Weaver and Crimson Beauty, but Waugh considers Mr. Bruce's Weaver to be Miner. Fruit small, heart-shaped; cavity medium deep; suture shallow; dark wine-red; skin tough; flesh yellow, sweet, rich; good; stone small, clinging.

Marble. Species? 1. Minn. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 412. 1899.
Originated in Brown County, Minnesota; tree vigorous and productive; fruit small, round, mottled red; good; mid-season; subject to rot.

Marbled-Plum. Domestica. 1. Rea Flora 207. 1676. 2. Ray Hist. Plant. 1529. 1688. Marble Plum 2.
Fruit mottled yellow and red at full maturity becoming a uniform red; flesh firm; good.

Marcellus. Americana mollis. i. Kerr Cat. 9. 1898. 2. S. Dak. Sta. BuL 93:24, 50, 51 fig. 1905. 3. Ohio Sta. BuL 162:256, 257. 1905.
Grown by H. A. Terry of Crescent, Iowa from seed of Van Buren; first fruited in 1893. Tree vigorous, upright-spreading; fruit of medium size, roundish; cavity small; suture lacking; light red; bloom light; flesh yellow; quality fair; clingstone; mid-season.

Marcus. Americana. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 333. 1894. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:47. 1897. 3. 5. Dak. Sta. BuL 93:24, 50 fig. 1905.
Originated with M. E. Hinckley, Marcus, Iowa, from seed gathered from a grove of wild plums on the Little Sioux River in 1870. Tree vigorous, upright; fruit large, round, dark red, resembling Miner; flesh firm, meaty; good; early.

Mardy. Domestica. 1. Ohio Hort. Soc. Rpt. 9. 1890.
A seedling from West Virginia grown by a Mr. Mardy. Fruit large, oval, red.

Margate. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 578. 1629.
Parkinson says of it "the worst of a hundred."

Marietta. Triflora X ? 1. Ga. Sta. Bul. 67:264 fig. 1904. 2. Ibid. 68:7 fig., 36. 1905.
A chance seedling found growing on the grounds of the Kennesau Wholesale Nursery Company, in 1900, at the edge of a block of Triflora varieties. Tree very vigorous, productive; fruit of medium size, broadly conical, yellow overlaid with red; dots yellow; skin slightly waxy; flesh soft, juicy, pleasant; quality fair; clingstone; free from rot.

Marjorie. Americana. 1. Terry Cat. 1900.
A seedling of Lottie grown by H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa. Fruit large, round, light yellow partly overspread with red; dots small; flesh yellow, rich, sweet; semi-clinging.

Marigan. Domestica. 1. Quebec Pom. Soc. Rpt. 9. 1905.
Tree productive. Fruit large, round, greenish-yellow with a blush; good.

Marion. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1897. 2* Colo. Sta. Bul. 50:40. 1898. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 157. 1901.
Tree productive; fruit of medium size, roundish, flattened at the apex; suture a line; cavity shallow; stem long, slender; red on a yellow ground; bloom thin; skin thick; flesh sweet, juicy; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Marketman. Triflora. 1. Burbank Cat. 1893. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 138. 1901.  Shipper 1, 2.
A seedling of Satsuma grown by Luther Burbank and sold under the name Shipper but changed by Waugh to prevent confusion with an older Shipper. Tree moderate in growth, sturdy and upright; fruit oval, light red; bloom light; flesh firm, sweet, juicy; fruit keeps and ships well.

Marmorierte Eierpflaume. Domestica. Listed in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 440. 1889.  Prune d'Oeuf Marbr6e. Marster. Domestica? 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 96. 1887. 2. Brown Bros. Cat. 1900.  Marster's 2.
Supposed to have originated in South Carolina about 1883; reported four years later by J. R. Hart from Nova Scotia; introduced by Brown Brothers of Ontario. Tree hardy, productive; fruit of medium size, oval, dark purple; flesh fine-grained, rich; good; mid-season.

Marten. Domestica. 1. Horticulturist 6:133. 1851. 2. Cultivator 6:268. 1858. 3. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 931. 1869.  Marten1s Seedling 3. Marten's Seedling 1, 2.
A chance seedling found growing in the garden of a Mr. Marten, Schenectady, New York, by Professor Jackson of Union College. Tree very vigorous, productive; fruit large, roundish-oblong; suture deep; cavity small; yellow, streaked with green and dotted with red in the sun; flesh yellow, slightly coarse, juicy, sprightly; very good; freestone; mid-season.

Mary. Domestica. i. Card. et For. 7:19. 1894. 2. Storrs et Harrison Cat. 1898.
A supposed cross between Duane and Yellow Gage grown by R. A. Hunt, Euclid, Ohio, about 1882; introduced by Storrs et Harrison in 1898. Tree very productive; fruit of medium size, yellow; bloom delicate; flesh yellow; good; mid-season.


Mary. Americana mollis. i. Kerr Cat. 1900. 2. Terry Cat. 1900.
Grown from seed of Van Buren in 1893 by H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa. Tree productive, spreading; fruit light red on a yellow ground; good; mid-season.

Maryland. Angustifolia watsoni X (Prunus besseyi X Angustifolia watsoni). 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Colo. Sta. Bul. 50:41. 1898. 3. Vt. Sta. Bui 67:17. 1898.
Grown by J. W. Kerr from seed of Utah Hybrid; introduced by the originator in 1894. Tree larger than the parent; fruit small, round; suture lacking; dark brownish-red; flesh soft, watery, sweet, pleasant; quality fair; clingstone.

Mas. Domestica? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 440. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 163, 359. 1895.  Similar to De Montfort.

Mason. Angustifolia varians. 1. Kerr Cat. 1897. 2. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 464. 1900. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 196. 1901.
Originated near Leander, Williamson County, Texas, with a Mr. Mason; introduced about 1896 by F. T. Ramsey. Tree vigorous; fruit of medium size, heart-shaped, red; flesh firm; good; clingstone; very early.

Matchless. Domestica. 1. Rea Flora 208. 1676. 2. Langley Pomona 93, 97, PI. 24 fig. 1. 1729. White Matchless 2.
Fruit yellow; bloom white; excellent flavor; very productive.

Mathews, Hortulana. 1. Stark Bros. Cat. 1902. 2. III. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 211. 1906.  3. Ia. Sta. Bul. 114:139. 1910. Matthews 2.
Grown by B. A. Mathews of Knoxville, Iowa, as a sport from Peach Leaf; introduced by Stark Brothers, Missouri. Tree hardy; fruit small, ruby-red; recommended for jellies and preserves.

Mauchete. Domestica. 1. Prince Pom. Man. 2:93. 1832. MoucheUe 1.
A French variety of the Reine Claude type. Fruit small, oval; suture a line; cavity minute; greenish; bloom heavy; flesh green, firm, sweet; freestone; mid-season.

Maude Lacy. Americana. 1. Terry Cat. 1900.
A seedling of Hawkeye grown by H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa; fruit large; bright yellow with a red cheek; flesh firm; semi-clinging.

Maugeron. Domestica. 1. Duhamel Trait. Arb. Fr. 2:76. 1768. 2. Knoop Fruct-ologie 2:52, 57. 1771. 3. Kraft Pom. Aust. 2:42, Tab. 195 tig. 2. 1796. 4. Poiteau Pom. Franc. 1. 1846. 5. Prince Pom. Man. 2:81. 1832. 6. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 931. 1869. 7. Hogg Fruit Man. 694. 1884. 8. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 426. 1889. Damascene Maugeron 6,8. Damascene von Mangeron 8. Damascene von Maugeron 8. Damas de Mangeron 6, 8. Damas de Mangeron 7. Damas de Maugeron 3, 5, 8. Damas de Maugerou 1, 4. Damas de Maugerou 8. Damas de Maugiron 8. Damas Violet 2. Die Damascenerpflaume von Maugeron 3. Konigs Pflaume von Maugerou 8. Mangeron 6, 7, 8. Maugeron 4, 8. Maugeron Damask 5. Maugeron Damask 6, 8. Maugiron 2.
An old variety, probably of French origin. Tree vigorous; fruit large, roundish-oblate; stem slender; cavity shallow; suture a line; purplish; bloom thick; flesh greenish-yellow, firm, sweet and agreeable; freestone; September. Prince states that there are two varieties under this name, differing in size, but no other writer mentions the two.

Mayerboeck Zwetsche. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Noni. Pom. 440. 1889.  Mayerboeck's Rote Zwetsche.

Mayer Hellrote. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 440. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 163, 359. 1895. Mayer's Hellrothe Damascene. "A variety of little merit."

Mayer Konigspflaume. Species ? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 440. 1889.  Royalel Die Koniginl Roy ale de Mayer. Mayers Rothe Damascene. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:87. 1873. 2. Guide Prat. 163, 359. 1895.  Damas Rouge de Mayer 1. Damas Rouge de Mayer 2. Damas Rouge de Moyer 1. Mayers Braunrothe Konigspflaume 2. Mayers Rothe Damascene 1.
A seedling of Red Magnum Bonum raised by Liegel and dedicated to his colleague A. J Mayer. Tree of normal vigor; fruit large, thick-ellipsoid, slightly truncated; suture wide, shallow; stem medium in length and size; cavity shallow; skin tender, not adherent; purple; flesh yellowish, fine, melting, juicy, sweet and aromatic; clingstone; mid-season.

McCartney. Angustifolia varians. 1. Munson Cat. 1898. 2. WanghPlum Cult. 197. 1901.
Brought to notice by F. T, Ramsey, Austin, Texas; fruit of medium size, roundish; suture visible; dots whitish; golden-yellow; flesh sweet, melting; very good; clingstone.

McGillivray. Species ? 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 424. 1897.
Tree vigorous, unproductive; fruit small, oval, light red; flesh yellow, juicy, slightly astringent; clingstone; early.

McPherson. Species? 1. Tex. Sta. Bul. 32:479. 1899.
Tree low, bushy, thorny, hardy; fruit small, round, golden-yellow; flesh yellow; quality fair; clingstone.

McRea. Triflora. 1. Glen St. Mary Cat. 21. 1911.
McRea was grown near Lake City, Columbia County, Florida, from seed of Kelsey; introduced in the fall of 1910 by the Glen Saint Mary Nursery Company. Fruit of medium size, roundish; yellow, washed with dull red in the sun; dots numerous; bloom thin; flesh yellow, firm, juicy, subacid; good; mid-season.

Meads. Triflora. 1. Rural N. Y. 64:711. 1905. Meads Seedling Plum 1.
A seedling grown by H. O. Mead, Lunenburg, Massachusetts. Fruit large, light reddish-purple; flesh yellow, firm, juicy; good; stone semi-clinging; mid-season.

Mediterranean. Domestica. 1. Horticulturist 6:133. I^5I- 2+ Downing Fr. Trees Am. 931. 1869.
Originated in central New York. Tree vigorous, hardy, productive; fruit medium in size, ovate, necked; cavity small; light crimson; flesh yellow, sweet, sprightly; good; freestone; mid-season.

Meigs. Domestica. 1. Thomas Am. Fruit Cult. 342. 1867.
Fruit large, roundish-oval; suture indistinct; dull reddish-purple, with numerous gray dots; stalk long, slender, curved; cavity small; flesh greenish-yellow, rich, excellent; clingstone; late.

Melnicker Zwetsche. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 440. 1889. Melon. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1898. 2. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:280. 1900. 3. Wis. Sta. Bul. 87:14 1901.
From Iowa. Fruit medium in size, roundish; cavity lacking; suture slight; yellowish-red; bloom thin; flesh fibrous; quality fair; freestone; mid-season.

Meneray. Species? 1. Meneray Cat.
A seedling of unknown parentage from H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa; introduced by F. W. Meneray of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Fruit and foliage indicate a fusion of Americana and Triflora blood. Fruit large, oblong, pear-shaped, yellow tinged with red; good.

Mereton. Species? 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 26. Ser. 3:54. 1900. 2. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 432. 1905. Mereton's Egg. 1. Merton's Egg 2.
Fruit small, oval; cavity small; yellow; flesh yellowish; poor; of no value.

Meroldt. Domestica. 1. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 436. 1881. 2. Lauche Dent. Pom. PI. IV, 13. 1882. 3. Hogg Fruit Man. 712. 1884. 4. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 440. 1889.  Meroldt1 s Gelbe Reine-Claude 4. Meroldt's Golden Gage 3. Meroldt's Golden Gage 4. Meroldt's Reineclaude 1, 2, 4. Reine-Claude de Meroldt 4.
This variety was grown by Dr. Meroldt, Lischnitz, Bohemia, probably from the seed of the Apricot plum. Tree grows quickly, medium in size; fruit medium, roundish; suture shallow; skin adherent; yellow, sometimes with reddish spots; cavity shallow; stem extremely short, finely hairy; flesh yellow, firm, juicy, sweet, with Reine Claude flavor; freestone; mid-season.

Merryweather. Insititia. 1. Garden 74:527, Col. PL 1910.
This plum originated with H. Merryweather and Sons of Southwell, Notts, England, and received an award of merit in 1907 from the Royal Horticultural Society. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit large, juicy, purple; Damson-like flavor; good; excellent for preserving.

Merunka. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 152. 1831. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 61. 1887. 3. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 86. 1890. 4. U.S.D.A. Pom. Rpt. 46. 1895. 5. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:279, 280. 1900.  Leipsic 2, 5. Leipzig 3. Leipzig Early Quetsche 1. Marunka 4. Quetsche de Leipzig 2. 113 Riga 3. Zwetsche Leipziger 2.
In 1884 J. L. Budd of the Iowa Experiment Station introduced several plums from Russia. Among these the Merunka and Leipsic proved to be identical. The name Merunka is retained because Leipsic has been used as a synonym of German Prune. Fruit of Lombard type, medium in size, oval; cavity deep, narrow; suture faint; apex depressed; purplish-red; bloom thin; skin thin; flesh yellow, tender, sweet; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Merville d'Automne. Domestica? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 440. 1889. 2. Guide Prat, 162, 359. 1895.
A large yellow variety of good quality ripening about mid-season.

Meyer, Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894-1900.
Tree vigorous and productive; fruit large, round; cavity small; purplish-red over yellow; clingstone; mid-season.

Miama. Domestica. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 162:256, 257. 1905.  Miami 1.
Miama as tested at the Ohio Experiment Station proved to be identical with Lombard. J. W. Kerr of Denton, Maryland, who introduced the variety in 1894 writes: "When I first received cions from the West, I thought it was a native; but finding it to be a Domestica, dropped it at once."

Mignonne. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 149. 1831.
Reported by the London Horticultural Society as growing on their grounds.

Miles. Species? 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:79. 1892. 2. ///. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 135. 1903. 3, Ibid. 424. 1905.
Said to have originated in Illinois from seed secured in North Carolina. Tree productive; fruit small, light red; quality fair; clingstone.

Miller. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894.
Tree vigorous and productive; fruit large, round, red on an orange ground; clingstone; mid-season.

Miller. Domestica. 1. Ohio Sta. Bul. 162:241, 256, 257. 1905.
Fruit very large, roundish, sides unequal; cavity narrow, deep; stem short, stout; suture distinct; dark purple on a dark green ground; dots numerous, bronze; bloom heavy; flesh greenish-yellow, rich, sweet; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Miller. Species? 1. Glen St. Mary Nur. Cat. 1907.
Introduced by the Glen St. Mary Nursery Company of Florida in 1907. Fruit of medium size, greenish-yellow; very good.

Miller No. 1. Domestica.
Miller No. 1 is an unintroduced seedling of German Prune supposedly crossed with Jefferson; grown by D. J. Miller of Millersburg, Ohio. Fruit of medium size, long-oval tapering to both ends; suture a line; cavity shallow; deep yellow; bloom thin; dots conspicuous; flesh yellow, tender, sweet, good; stone large, long-oval, semi-clinging, pointed; mid-season; resembles the German Prune in shape and size.

Miller No. 5. Munsoniana. Letter from Kerr.
Grown by David Miller, Camp Hill, Pennsylvania. Tree productive; fruit of medium size, red; clingstone.

Millett, Americana. 1. 5. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:25. 1905. Millet?s Wild Plum 1.
From South Dakota. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit small.

Millett Early Red. Americana. 1. 5. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:25. 1905.  Millett's Early Red 1.
A variety found growing wild near Pierre, South Dakota. Trees low and bushy, hardy, unproductive; fruit small, red on a yellow ground; skin thick; flesh firm, sweet; quality fair; stone large; early.

Millett T. T. Americana. 1. 5. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:25. 1905.
From South Dakota; fruit very small.


Millett Very Early Red. Americana, i. S. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:25. 1905.  Millett's Very Early Red 1.
Not as early as Millett Early Red.

Mills. Domestiea. 1. Waugh Plum Cult. 116. 1901.
Fruit medium in size, oval; cavity shallow; suture faint; purplish-red; dots prominent, white; flesh greenish; quality fair; freestone; late.

Mills Seedling. Nigra? 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:39. 1903.
Fruit roundish heart-shaped, below medium in size; cavity narrow, moderately deep; suture a line; deep red; dots obscure; bloom light; skin moderately thick, tender; flesh deep yellow, juicy, slightly sweet, astringent; poor; stone of medium size, oval, flattened, nearly free.

Milton Gage. Domestica. 1. Mag. Hort. 6:94. 1840.
Reported by C. M. Hovey as fruiting in the nursery of Charles Downing, Newburgh, New York, seventy years ago.

Minco. Hortulana mined X Hortulana. 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 14:272. 1901. 2. Munson Cat. 1902.
A cross between Miner and Wayland from T. V. Munson in 1896. Tree vigorous and productive; fruit of medium size, roundish-oval; cavity lacking; suture a line; bright, dark red faintly striped; dots many, distinct; bloom light; flesh yellow, firm, rich, sweet, meaty; very good; freestone; late.

Minion. Domestiea. 1. Quintinye Com. Gard. 69. 1699.
Mentioned by Quintinye as a "yellowish-white" plum.

Minnesota. Domestiea. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 31:348. 1895. 2. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 2:319. 1903.
A European variety introduced into Minnesota from Denmark. Tree vigorous, very hardy; fruit large, ovate; suture distinct; cavity deep, narrow; dark blue; flesh yellow, juicy, subacid; very good; stone small, free.

Minnesota Seedling. Americana. Letter from J. W. Kerr.
An inferior variety from a Mr. Macomber of Vermont.

Minnetonka Americana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:40. 1892. 2. Kerr Cat. 1897. 3. Colo. Sta. Bul. 50:41. 1898.
Introduced by Peter Gideon of Minnesota. Tree small, slow-growing, bushy top; fruit small, oval, red on a yellow ground; skin thick; flesh firm, acid; clingstone; mid-season.

Minnie. Domestiea. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:280. 1900.
From H. Knudson, Springfield, Minnesota, who raised it from the seed of a large blue Domestiea plum. Tree vigorous, upright; fruit medium in size, necked, greenish-yellow; good; late,

Minnie. Triflora X Munsoniana. 1. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:17. 1898. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 219. 1901.
Originated in North Carolina with J. S. Breece, who considers it an offspring of Abundance pollinated with Wild Goose. The foliage resembles that of Abundance.

Mirabelle De Bohn. Insititia, 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:177. 1873. 2. Lucas Vollst. Hand. Obst. 472. 1894. 3. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 423. 1889.  Bohns Gestreifte Mirabelle 1, 3. Bohns Mirabelle 2, 3. Bohns Mirabelle 1. Mirabelle de Bohn 3. Mirabelle Rayee 3.
Liegel received this variety from Henry de Bohn of Upper Austria. Tree of medium vigor, productive; fruit small, roundish; suture a line; skin tender, yellow, marbled with red; stem slender; flesh yellow, tender, melting, juicy, sweet, aromatic; freestone; mid-season.

Mirabelle de Flotow. Insititia. x; Mas Pom. Gen. 2:105, fig. 1873. 2. Rev. Hort. 476. 1901.  Flotows Allerfruheste Mirabelle 1. Mirabelle La Plus Hâtive de Flotow 1. Von Fldiows Mirabelle 1.
According to Mas, " this variety was obtained from a seed of Perdrigon Violet by Liegel and dedicated by him to M. de Flotow, of Dresden, one of the first collaborators of The Illustrirtes Handbuch." Tree vigorous, very productive; fruit small, spherical, yellow, dotted with red on the sunny side; stem medium in length and size; cavity shallow; flesh yellow, tender, soft, sweet, of Apricot flavor, very pleasant; early.

Mirabelle de Ronvaux. Insititia. x+ Guide Prat. 163, 359. 1895.  "A variety of little merit."

Mirabelle Double de Herrenhausen. Insititia. 1. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 426. 1881. 2, Guide Prat. 155, 360. 1895. 3. Rev. Hort. 476. 1901. Herrnhauser Doppelte Mirabelle 1. Herrnhauser doppelte Mirabelle 2. Tree vigorous, very productive; fruit small to medium, yellow mottled with red; flesh yellow, sweet; good; late, following Drap d'Or.

Mirabelle Prrfcoce de Flaford. Insititia. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 440. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 163, 360. 1895.
Reported as being similar to Early Mirabelle

Mirabelle Verte. Insititia. 1. Mas Le Verger 6:91. 1866-73. 2. Guide Prat. 162, 360. 1895. Grilne Mirabelle 1, 2.
From a Herr Commans of Cologne, Prussia. Tree moderately vigorous; fruit small, roundish-oblate; suture deep; cavity deep, wide; skin tender, free; green marbled with yellow; stem short; flesh green, fine, soft, sweet, aromatic; freestone. Resembles Reine Claude and may contain Domestica blood.

Mission Prune. Domestica. 1. Bailey Cyc. Hort. 3:1376. 1901.
A large number of plums were planted over a century ago around the old Mission at Santa Clara, California; after the abandonment of the Mission this variety was found propagating itself by suckers and was cultivated as late as 1870.

Mississippi. Munsoniana. 1. Ga. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 50. 1885. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 187, 188 fig. 1901. Mississippi Red 2.
Introduced by J. M. Shell of Georgetown, Texas, about 1875. Fruit large, oval; cavity very shallow; suture lacking; clear red; dots many, yellow; skin thin, tough; flesh soft, yellow; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Missouri. Munsoniana? 1. Ga. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 39, 41, 99. 1889. 2. AIa. Col. Sta. Bul. 11:12. 1890.
An unimportant variety occasionally found in Alabama and Georgia. Fruit of medium size, oblong, red; flesh firm; good; clingstone; late.

Missouri Green Gage. Domestica. 1. Bailey Ann. Hort. 196. 1891. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 113:160. 1899. 3. Ibid. 162:239, 256. 1905.
Introduced in 1891 by Stark Brothers, Louisiana, Missouri. As tested by the Ohio and New York Experiment Stations it appears to be either identical with or a strain of the Imperial Gage.

Mistake. Domestica. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 152:210. 1898. 2. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 548. 1901.
Fruit above medium size, oblong-oval; suture distinct; sides unequal; purple; flesh yellow, coarse, juicy, sweet, pleasant; mid-season.

Mitchelson. Insititia. 1. Card. Chron. 892, 894. 1860. 2. Flor. et Pom. 152. 1862. 3. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 932. 1869. 4. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:65. 1873.  De Mitchelson 4. Mitchelson 3. Mitchelson's 1, 2. Mitchelson1 s 4.
Raised by a Mr. Mitchelson, at Kingston on the Thames, England; a seedling of a Damson. Fruit above medium size, oval; suture indistinct; dark purple; dots few, fawn-colored; bloom thin; flesh yellow, tender, very juicy and sweet; freestone; excellent for culinary purposes.

Mivian. Domestica. Listed in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 150. 1831.

Mollie. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1900. 2. III. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 422, 424. 1905.  Molly 2.
Originated with Theodore Williams of Benson, Nebraska. Fruit small, round, red, watery; clingstone; mid-season.

Monon. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 11. 1897.
Tree very productive; fruit small, greenish with dull red blotches; poor; clingstone; subject to rot.

Monona. Species? 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:24, 48. 1897.
From Christian Steinman, Mapleton, Iowa; said to be the size of Miner but two weeks earlier.

Monolith. Triflora? X Munsoniana? 1. U. 5. D. A. Pom. Rpt. 46. 1895. 2. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:17. 1898.
Originated by J. S. Breece of North Carolina; thought to be a cross between Abundance and Wild Goose although it does not show Triflora characters. Fruit of medium size, roundish; cavity medium; suture shallow; coppery-red, striped with darker red; skin thin, bitter; flesh yellowish, translucent, meaty, tender, juicy, fibrous, mild, subacid, rich; good; stone semi-clinging.

Monsieur a Fruit Vert. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 441. 1889.
Mathieu found it referred to in Journal de la Societie Nationale et Centrale d*Horticulture de France 281. 1883.

Mont Barbat d'Ente. Domestica. 1. Wickson Cal. Fruits 356. 1891.
An improved type of Agen coming from the Mont Barbat orchard in the Lot Valley, France.

Montgomery. Domestica. 1. Horticulturist 6:187, 294, 524. 1851.  Montgomery Prune 1.
Found by E. W. Carpenter of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, growing on the premises of a Mr. Montgomery about 1830. Tree very productive; fruit large, oval, purple; quality very good.

Montmorency. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:35. 1903. 2. Quebec Pom. Soc. Rpt. 9, 66, 68. 1905. Reine-Claude de Montmorency 2. Reine-Claude de Montmorency 1.
Montmorency is thought to be a seedling of the Reine Claude, imported into Canada in 1790 by Lord Dorchester; extensively cultivated in the eastern part of Quebec but unknown in the United States. Tree very hardy, productive; fruit medium in size, roundish; cavity narrow, shallow; stem medium in length; suture indistinct; skin tough, greenish-yellow, blushed with red; flesh yellow, very juicy, moderately firm, sweet, rich; very good; stone small, oval, nearly free.

Montreal. Species? 1. Ont. Fr. Exp. Sta. Rpt. 64. 1897.
Mentioned by Harold Jones of Martland, Ontario, in the report of the Fruit Experimental Station for 1897.

Moody. Domestica. 1. Mich. Sta. Sp. Bul. 27:15. 1904.
Tree productive; fruit large, reddish-purple, good; mid-season. Moon. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Colo. Sta. Bul. 50:42. r898.
Fruit of medium size, round; no suture; deep red over a yellow ground; skin thin; flesh moderately firm, subacid; clingstone; mid-season.

Moore Early. Insititia. 1. Ont. Fr. Exp. Sta. Rpt. 5:116. 1898.  Moore's Early 1.
An extremely hardy variety of the Damson type. Tree spreading; fruit of medium size; grows in clusters; dark purple; good; nearly freestone; desirable for jellies and preserves.

Moreman. Hortulana. 1. Kerr Cat. 13. 1899-1900. Moreman Cherry 1.
Originated by Theodore Williams, Benson, Nebraska. Tree vigorous; fruit large, bright red; clingstone. [distinct from the other P. hortulana 'Moreman'. - ASC]

Morines. Domestica. 1. Quintinye Com. Gard. 70. 1699.
A red plum noted only by Quintinye.

Morin Hettif. Cerasifera? 1. Knoop Fructologie 2:59. 1771.
Fruit of medium size, round, red; resembles the Myrobalan plum except that its leaves are larger and its season a little later.

Mountain. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:35. 1903.
A promising variety from W. W. Dunlop, Outremont, Quebec. Fruit of medium size, roundish; cavity medium; suture distinct; greenish-yellow more or less overspread with dull coppery-red; dots yellow, distinct; bloom thin; flesh yellowish-green, sweet, rich; very good; clingstone; mid-season.


Mountain Plum. Munsoniana? i. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 86. 1871. 2. Gard. Mon. 20:177. 1878.
A late variety of the "Chicasaw" group.

Mount Royal. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:35. 1903. Dunlop 54 1.
A seedling from W. W. Dunlop, Outremont, Quebec. Fruit of medium size, roundish; cavity medium deep; suture distinct; dark purple; dots numerous, distinct; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, firm, sweet; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Moyen. Domestica. 1. Quintinye Com. Gard. 68. 1699. Pitch Plum 1.
Mentioned by Quintinye as "a dry plum having a sharp and sourish taste."

Moyen de Bourgoyne. Domestica. 1. Prince Pom. Man, 2:95. 1832.  Moyen de Bourgogne 1.
Probably not the same as the Moyen of Quintinye. According to Prince it is a large, oval, yellow plum, of indifferent quality; late. This name applied to a purple variety is a synonym of Early Perdrigon.

Moyer. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 26. Ser. 3:54. 1900.
Tree vigorous, unproductive. Fruit of medium size, roundish; stem short; cavity small, shallow; suture shallow; dark reddish-purple; flesh greenish-yellow, firm, juicy, sweet, pleasant; clingstone.

Moyret. Domestica. 1. Mas Le Verger 6:31 fig. 16. 1866-73. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 933. 1869. 3. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 441. 1889.  Moyret's Gage 2. Moyrets Gage 3. Moyret's Reine Claude 3. Reine-Claude Moyret 1. Reine-Claude Moyret 2,3.
A chance seedling of the Reine Claude obtained on M. Moyret's place at Neu-ville-sur-Ain, France. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit medium, roundish, reddish to violet-purple; suture wide, shallow; cavity wide, deep; stem rather short; flesh green, fine, a little firm, juicy, sweet, aromatic; of high quality; freestone; mid-season.

Mudson. Angustifolia varians? 1. Ga. Hort. Soc. Cat. 13. 1905.
A productive variety recommended for family use by the Georgia Horticultural Society; fruit yellowish-red, juicy; clingstone; very early.

Mulberry. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 282. 1845. 2, Mag. Hort. 13: 530. 1847. 3. Thomas Am. Fruit Cult. 332. 1849.
Originated in the garden of Isaac Denniston, Albany, New York. Tree moderately vigorous; fruit large, oval, strongly necked, pale with a few crimson spots; dots white; bloom thin; flesh greenish-yellow, coarse, melting, juicy, rich, sugary; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Muldraugh. Americana. 1. Am. Jour. Hort. 5:146. 1869.  Muldraugh's-hill Plum 1.
Found growing wild on Muldraugh's Hill, Harden County, Kentucky. Tree vigorous, large, unproductive; the clusters of flowers which appear before the leaves are mostly staminate; fruit large, light red.

Mule. Munsoniana X Prunus persica. 1. Kerr Cat. 18. 1899. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 219. 1901.
A hybrid produced by J. W. Kerr from seed of Wild Goose plum pollinated by the Troth Early peach; introduced by the originator in 1896. Tree resembles the plum; foliage very much like that of the peach; worthless, inasmuch as the buds do not open and contain only deformed anthers and no pistil.

Muncy. Americana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:80. 1892. 2. Kerr Cat. 1894. 3. Tex. Dept. Agr. Bul. 12:103. 1910. Muncey 3.
Tree vigorous; fruit medium in size; dull red; clingstone; mid-season.

Munson. Angustifolia varians. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:80. 1892. 2. Tex. Sta. Bul. 32:479. 1894. 3. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 38. 1899. 4. Waugh Plum Cult. 197. 1910.
Originated under cultivation by G. Onderdonk, Victoria, Texas; introduced by the originator in 1888. Tree not hardy as far north as Ames, Iowa; fruit of medium size, oval; cavity shallow; stem slender; suture a line; bright red; bloom thin; dots many; skin thin; flesh yellow, soft; quality fair; stone oval, flattened, clinging; early.

Murdy. Domestica. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 169:247. 1899. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 162:256, 257- 1905.
The Murdy as tested by the Ohio Experiment Station is considered identical with the Pond, but as tested at the Michigan Experiment Station, it ripens two weeks later, has a deeper cavity, finer texture and lighter colored spots on its skin.

Muscat Free. Domestica. i# Mich. Sta. Bul. 118:52. 1895. 2. Mich. Sta. Sp. Bul. 27:15. 1904.
Evidently a strain of the Italian Prune; imported from Hungary in 1894 by the Department of Agriculture and tested at the Michigan Experiment Station. Tree low, spreading, slow-growing; fruit of medium size, long-oval, flattened on one side; suture broad, distinct; black with thick bloom; flesh greenish-yellow, moderately firm, juicy; very good; freestone; not as sweet as Italian Prune and a week later.

Muscle, Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576, 577 fig. 1629. 2. Rea Flora 207. 1676. 3. Ray Hist. Plant. 1529. 1688. 4. Prince Pom. Man. 2:105. 1832. 5. Watkins Cat. Red Mussell 1. Black Muscle 4. Black Mussell 1. Mussel 4. Mussell 5. Mussell Plum 1. Red Muscle 2, 3. White Mussell 1.
Of very early European origin, once considered of value but now only used as a stock; the old writers described both a red and a black form. Fruit small, oval, dark red; flesh not juicy; poor; stone large.

Musk Damson. Insititia? 1. Quintinye Com. Card. 68, 70. 1699. 2. Duhamel Trait. Arb. Fr. 2:74. 1768. 3. Kraft Pom. Ausi. 2:33, Tab. 180 fig. 2. 1796. 4. Noisette Man. Comp. Jard. 2:495. 1860. 5. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 933. 1869. 6. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 425. 1889. Christ's Damascene 6. Damas Fin 6. Damas Musque 2, 3, 4. Damas Musque 5, 6. Damasquinee 6. De Chypre 5. Die musquat Damaskuspflaume 3. Feine Damascened. Musk Damask 6. Musk'd Damask 1. Muskierte Damascene 6. Musque de Malta ?5, 6. Prune de Chypre 2, 5, 6. Prune de Malte 2, 6. Prune de Malthe 5. Schwarze Muskateller Pflaume 6. Spate Schwarze Damascene 6. Suisina Grossella Piccola 6.
Noisette suggests Damascus, Syria, as the probable place of origin of Musk Damson. Fruit small, roundish; suture distinct; cavity small; dark purple; bloom thick; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet, musky; good; semi-clinging; mid-season.

Musk Perdrigon. Domestica. I. Langley Pomona 92, PL 23 fig. 3. 1729.
Fruit nearly black, with a bloom; freestone; early.

Mussey. Americana. 1. Cornell Sta. BuL 38:40. 1892.
Found wild in Kansas; introduced by Abner Allen. Fruit large, roundish-oblong, yellow, mottled with red; flesh firm, good; semi-clinging; very late.


Nagate-Maru. Triflora. 1. Va. Sta. BuL 129:114. 1901. 2. Ga. Hort. Soc. Cat. 13. 1904. 3. Ga. Sta. BuL 68:13 fig., 31. 1905. Nagatus rnaru 2. Nagats-Maru 2.
Resembles Abundance but is three weeks later. Fruit large, oblate-conical, red over yellow; dots numerous; flesh yellow, firm; good.

Naples. Domestica. 1. Wild Bros. Cat. 26. 1892. 2. W. et T. Smith Nur. Cat. 24. 1897. 3. Storrs et Harrison Cat. 138. 1893-98. Beauty of Naples 1, 2, 3.
Naples as catalogued by nurserymen is of the Yellow Egg type although Lyon and Thomas knew a purple variety of this name. Tree vigorous and productive; fruit of medium size, oval; cavity small; skin thin, tender; golden yellow mottled with red in the sun; bloom thin; flesh light yellow, firm, sweet, mild; good;, stone oval, rough, clinging; late.

Native Red. Species? 1. Ont. Fr. Gr. Assoc. Rpt. 87. 1896.
Received by the Fruit Growers' Association of Ontario from W. N. Snelling of Ottawa. A very attractive bright red plum of medium size.

Nebraska. Hortulana mineri. 1. Kerr Cat 1894. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 174. 1901. 3. Ga. Sta. BuL 67:278. 1904.
Tree spreading, vigorous, short-lived, productive; fruit medium in size, roundish-oval; cavity shallow; red with numerous yellow dots; skin thick, tough; flesh yellow, juicy, melting; fair to good; stone medium in size, oval, clinging; late.

Nebraska Seedling. Species? 1. Country Gent. 26:238. 1865.
Reported in 1865 by R. O. Thompson of Nebraska as a freestone plum of great excellence; trees very productive and free from curculio.

Nebraska Wonder. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. BuL 46:281. 1900.
Found wild in 1892 by A. Webster, Golden, Burt County, Nebraska; introduced by H. P. Sayles, Ames, Iowa, in 1897. Tree dwarf, spreading, prolific, bears early; fruit large, round, slight yellow tinge, mottled red when over-ripe, without astringency when fully ripe; ships well; early.

Neils. Species? 1. Can. Exp. Farm BuL 2d Ser. 3:54. 1900.
Under test at the Canadian Experimental Farm at Agassiz, British Columbia.

Nellie. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2, Wis. Sta. BuL 63:49. 1897. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 158. 1901. Nelly 1, 2.
Fruit large, oblate; suture faint; stem medium; yellow blushed with pink; flesh firm, yellow; good; stone of medium size, round, semi-clinging; medium to late.

Nellie Blanche. Americana. 1. Terry Cat. 1900. 2. Rural N. Y. 65:726 fig., 730.  1906. 3. Ia. Sta. Bul. 114:141. 1910. Blanche 3.
Grown by H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa; fruited first in 1897. Tree vigorous, upright, productive, bears early; fruit large, oblong; stem medium, set in a small cavity; skin thick; yellow mottled with red; flesh meaty, very sweet and rich; good; stone large, clinging; mid-season.

Nelson. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 150. 1831. 2. Hogg Fruit Man. 373. 1866. 3. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:55. 1873. 4. W. N. Y. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 21:20. 1876.  Knevetfs Late Orleans 2, 3. Monsieur tardif de Kneveit 3. Nelson's Victory 1,2,4. Nelson's Victory 3. Victoire de Nelson 3.
An old variety renamed in honor of the famous English admiral. Fruit of medium size, round, deep purple; flesh sweet and pleasant; freestone; mid-season; suitable for culinary purposes.

Never Fail. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:281. 1900.
Purchased of an Eastern nurseryman for Wolf but proved not true to name; introduced by J. S. Haag, Hosper, Iowa. Tree vigorous, slightly spreading; fruit large, round, red; good; ripe with De Soto.

New American. Americana. 1. S. Dak. Sta. Bul. 26:14. 1891. 2. Ibid. 93:26. 1905.
Of no value in South Dakota because of its lateness.

New Goderich. Domestica. 1. Ont. Fr. Exp. Sta. Rpt. 4:66, 102, no. 1897.
Thought to be a seedling of Lombard. Tree vigorous, spreading, hardy, productive; fruit medium to large, round; stem short, inserted in a shallow cavity; suture distinct; brownish-red with heavy bloom; flesh yellow, coarse; quality poor.

New Green Gage. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 148. 1831.  Mentioned; probably obsolete.

New Large Bullace. Insititia? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 433. 1889.  Grosse Prunelle Nouvelle New Large Bullace.

Newton. Americana. 1. Munson Cat. 8. 1894. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 162:256, 257.  1905- 3+ Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 23. 1905.
Received by T. V. Munson from Theodore Young of Wichita Falls, Kansas. Munson says this variety is distinct from Newtown Egg. Tree vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit large, oblong, irregular; stem short and stout, set in a small cavity; suture indistinct; dull red; bloom thin; flesh yellow; good; freestone; late.

Newtown Egg. Americana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:40. 1892. 2. Waugh Plum Cult.  153. 1901. Newton Egg 2.
Originated with Charles Luedloff, Carver, Minnesota. Tree open, straggling, productive; fruit medium to large, oblong-oval, purplish-red over yellow, thickly sprinkled with many yellow dots; flesh yellow, firm; good; stone long, nearly flat, smooth, semi-clinging; mid-season.

New Wine Sour. Domestica. Listed in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 154. 1831. Nienburger Egg Plum. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:183. 1873. 2. Koch Dent. Obst. 570. 1876. 3. Oberdieck Dent. Obst. Sort. 408. 1881. 4. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 548. 1901. Niemburg Egg 4. Nienburger Eierpflaume 1. Nienburger Eierpflaume 3. Oeuf de Nienburg 1.
Found in the garden of a priest at Nienburg, Hanover, Germany, by M. Oberdieck, Tree vigorous, an early and abundant bearer; fruit large, obovate; suture broad and deep; dark brownish-red; bloom thin; flesh yellow, firm, sweet; stone small, free; mid-season. Good for dessert and drying.

Nikitaer Blaue Frühzwetsche. Species? Mentioned*in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 441. 1889.  Bal Erik. Blauer Spilling. Gus Erik. 

Nikitaer Dattelzwetsche. Domestica. 1. Oberdieck Dent. Obst. Sort. 444. 1881. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 441. 1889. Bardak Erik 2.
Mentioned as unproductive in dry soil at Jeinsen, Germany.

Nikitaer Hahnenpflaume. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 441. 1889.  Hahnenhode. Nikitaner Hahnenhode. Rognon-de-Coq de Nikita.

Nikko. Species? 1. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:18. 1898.
Originated by Burbank and introduced in 1898; parentage unknown. Said to be " a good, dark red, red-fleshed, conical plum."

Nimon, Hortulana X Munsoniana. 1. Munson Cat. 7. 1896. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 181. 1901. 3. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 167. 1905.
A seedling of Wayland pollinated by Wild Goose; from T. V. Munson, Denison, Texas. Tree moderately hardy, vigorous; fruit medium in size, ovate; cavity shallow; crimson; dots numerous, white; flesh yellow, firm, meaty, sweet; good; stone small, clinging; mid-season.

Noire Americaine. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 441. 1889.

Noire de Montreuil. Domestica. 1. Duhamel Trait. Arb. Fr. 2:68. 1768. 2. Prince Pom. Man. 2:92. 1832. 3. Hogg Fruit Man. 714. 1884. 4- Mathieu Nom. Pom. 437. 1889.  Bieler Pflaume 4. Damas Noir Hâtive 4. Early Large Black 1. Frühee Schwarze Pflaume 4. Frühe Grosse Schwarze Plflaume 4. Grosse Früh Pflaume 4. Grosse noir de Montreuil 2. Grosse noire Hâtive 2, 3, 4. Grosse Noire hâtive 1. Large Early Montreuil 2. Johannispflaume 4. Large early black 2. La Madeleine 3. Morocco Pflaume (of some) 4. Montreuil 2. Noire de Montreuil 1, 2, 4. Prune de Saint-Jean 4. Saint-Jean 4. War an Erik 4.
According to Duhamel, this name is used for two varieties. One is of medium size, elongated, purplish-black, strongly resembling Gros Damas de Tours; flesh firm, yellowish with a rather agreeable flavor; nearly freestone; early. The other is large, round, of the same color as the first, but its season is later and its flesh is coarse and insipid. For historical notes see Précoce de Tours.

Nolan. Munsoniana. 1. Am. Jour. Hort. 5:148. 1869.
Probably a seedling of Wild Goose which it resembles very closely.

Nolton Ungarische. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 441. 1889.  Reference found by Mathieu in Monatsschrift fur Pomologie 9. 1861.

Nome. Americana. 1. Meneray Cat.
From H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa. Tree vigorous; fruit large, round, red over yellow; good.

Nona. Triflora? X Munsoniana. 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 12:226. 1899. 2. Ibid. 14:274, 277. 1901. 3. Ohio Sta. Bul. 162:252. 1905.
Originated with D. H. Watson, Brenham, Texas; introduced by W. A. Yates, 1897. Tree healthy, upright; foliage healthy, abundant; fruit medium to large, oval; cavity abrupt; stem short; suture obscure; apex slightly pointed; dark red, obscurely striped; dots numerous, small, yellow; bloom light; skin thick, somewhat astringent; flesh yellow mottled with red, fibrous, juicy; good; stone medium, roundish-oval, flattened, clinging; early.

Norbert. Domestica. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 373. 1866. 2. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:73. ^73-3. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 441. 1889. 4. Guide Prat. 161, 360. 1895. De Prince 4. Lepine 3 and 4 incor. Norbert 3. Norbert's Pflaume 3. Prune de Lepine 1, 3. Prune de Prince 1, 3. Schwarze Mirdbelle 3.
Found wild in the woods of Halanzy, Luxembourg, France. Mas distinguishes Prune de Lepine as a separate variety. Fruit very small, round; suture obscure; dark purple; bloom thick; flesh greenish-yellow, firm, sweet; stone small, free. Useful for drying.

Norby. Americana. 1. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 2:298. 1903.
Originated with A. Norby, Madison, South Dakota; No. 13 of his seedlings. Fruit large, roundish; sides unequal; dark red; stone round, flat; mid-season.

Norby No. 1. Americana. 1. S. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:28. 1905.
Originated with A. Norby, Madison, South Dakota. Under test at the South Dakota Experiment Station. The variety bears large, fine fruit of good quality; mid-season.

Norby No, 11. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:283. 1900. 2. S. Dak. Sta, Bul. 93:28. 1905. No.11 1.
Another of A. Norby's seedlings; grown from seed of selected varieties in 1895. Reported by the South Dakota Experiment Station to be worthy of propagation. Tree upright, hardy, productive; fruit above medium size, oval to roundish-oblong; rich yellow overspread with red; bloom thin; dots small, white, numerous; flesh yellow, firm; good; stone long, oval, nearly free; early.

Norman. Munsoniana? 1. Gard. Mon. 20:177. 1878.
Mentioned by W- S. Carpenter of Rye, New York, in 1878 as an improved variety of the "Chicasaw" group.

Normand Perdrigon. Domestica. 1. Duhamel Trait. Arb. Fr. 2:87. 1768. 2. Kraft Pom. Aust. 2:30, Tab. 177 fig. 1. 1796. 3. Prince Pom. Man. 2:65. 1832. 4. Poiteau Pom. Franc. 1. 1846. 5. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 441. 1889. Der blaue Rebhuhn aus der Normandie 2. Normannischer Perdrigon 5. Norman Perdrigon 5. Norman Perdrigon 3. Perdrigon de Normandie 5. Perdrigon Normand 1. Perdrigon Normand 2, 3, 5. Prune Perdrigon Normand 4, 5. Prunus neustriensis 4. Schwarzer Perdrigon 5.
A very good French variety. Fruit of medium size, roundish; suture shallow; cavity small; reddish-purple; bloom heavy; flesh yellow, melting, sweet; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Normand's Seedlings. I. Cornell Sta. BuL 175:151. 1899.
J. L. Normand,1 Marksville, Louisiana, disseminated twenty hybrid seedlings, numbered from one to twenty, which were selected from over 30,000 seedlings; most of these are crosses between Triflora and selected native sorts.

Normand No. 5. See Alabama. Normand No. 11. Triflora X ?
Fruit above medium size, oval to oblong-conic; apex pointed; stem medium, set in a small cavity; yellow overspread with bright red; dots numerous, yellow; flesh yellow, firm, juicy, aromatic, sweet, good; stone long and narrow, clinging; late. Drops before ripe.

Normand No. 12. Triflora X ?
Inferior to No. 11 in color, flesh-characters and keeping quality. Drops before ripe and has a tendency to crack.

Normand No. 15. See Louisiana. Normand No. 16. Triflora X ?
Fruit resembles No. 12; greenish-white with red blush; flesh pale yellow, soft, juicy, bitter; clingstone; drops before fully ripe. Normand No. 17. Triflora X ?
Fruit the size of Burbank, somewhat similar in shape but less pointed, greenish-yellow thinly covered with dark red, spattered with dots and broken lines of paler color; flesh greenish, tinged with yellow, very juicy, somewhat acid; poor; clingstone; drops before ripe.

Normand No. 18. Triflora X ?
Equal to No. 11 in size but inferior in quality; keeps and ships well. Normand No. 19. Triflora X ?
Fruit about the size of Wild Goose, but not as regular in form; color and bloom much the same as that variety; flesh of the same color but firmer and of better quality than Wild Goose; stone medium, clinging; late.

Normand No. 20. See Georgia. ,

North. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 934. 1869. 2. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:143. 1873. North's Seedling 1.
Raised by Professor North, Clinton, New York. Tree vigorous, bears early, productive; fruit large, roundish-oval; suture broad and shallow; reddish-purple; bloom thin; flesh yellow, melting, juicy, sweet; good; clingstone; early.

North Carolina. Hortulana mineri. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2, Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:50. 1897, 3. Kerr Cat. 1897.  N. C. Seedling 1. North Carolina Seedling 2, 3.
J. W. Kerr says this variety is subject to twig-blight; reported of value in Iowa; fruit large, deep red.

North Star. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:50. 1897. 2. Ibid. 87:14. 1901.
Originated with Martin Penning, Sleepy Eye, Minnesota, from seed of Surprise; resembles its parent very closely. Tree hardy, dwarfish; fruit large, juicy, sweet; clinging; mid-season.

Nota Bene, Domestica. 1. Kenrick Am. Orch. 257. 1832. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 293, 1845. 3. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 425. 1889.  Corse's Nota Bena 1. Corse's Nota Bene 2, 3. Nota Bene de Corse 3.
One of the best of the seedlings raised by Henry Corse, Esq., Montreal, Canada. Tree very vigorous, productive and hardy, short-lived; fruit large, round, pale brown sometimes shading to green; flesh greenish, firm, juicy, sweet and rich; good; freestone.

November Gage. Domestica. 1. Mag. Hort. 6:92. 1840.
Raised by Henry Corse of Montreal and distributed at the same time as his Nota Bene.

Noyes. Americana? i, Kerr Cat. 1897. 2. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:283. 1900. 3. Wis. Sta. Bul. 87:14. 1901. Noyes' Seedling 1. Noyes Seedling 2.
Originated with a Mrs. Noyes, Springville, Iowa, about 1881, from pits purchased for California plums; introduced by a Mr. Osborn about 1888. Craig places Noyes in Prunus hortulana and Waugh, while classifying it with the Americanas, suggests that it is Hortulana mineri. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit large, roundish to oblong; apex sometimes flattened or depressed; cavity shallow; suture distinct; skin thick, tough, rather acid; yellow nearly overspread with red; dots numerous, yellow; flesh tinged with red, melting, rich and sweet; good; stone large, clinging; early to mid-season.


Nutmeg Insititia. I Parkinson Par. Ter. 576. 1629. ?. Rea Flora 209. 1676.
Fruit the shape of a nutmeg, no larger than a Damson, greenish-yellow; good; late; obsolete.


Oakley Park Wild. Species? Listed in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 150. 1831. Oatey Americana. 1. Kerr Ca+. 1894.
In answer to an inquiry Kerr states that " The Oatey is above medium to large, dull purplish-red when fully matured; clinging. Tree does not succeed here."

Oberdieck Gestreifte Eierpflaume. Domestica? 1. Mathieu Noni. Pom. 442. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 157, 360. 1895.
Introduced into France by M. Oberdieck, the German pomologist. Fruit large, long-oval, yellow blushed with red; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet; good; early.

Oberley. Domestica. 1. Gard. Mon. 2:120. 1860. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 934. 1869. 3. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:131. 1873. Oberley's Greenwood 2. Oberley's Greenwood 1.
Originated in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, on the farm of a Mr. Oberley. Tree thrifty, very productive; fruit medium in size, round; suture distinct; skin amber, but nearly covered with rosy red; bloom thin; flesh juicy; quality fair; clingstone.

October. Domestica. 1. Can. Hort. 20:454 fig. 1257. 1897.
Sent to the office of the Canadian Horticulturist by A. M. Smith of St. Catherines. Fruit medium in size, roundish; skin thin, dark purple; flesh yellow, tender, juicy, rich sweet and very agreeable.

Oddy. Domestica. Listed in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 150. 1831, Oddy's.

Odegard. Nigra. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:50. 1897. 2. Minn. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 411. 1899. 3. 5. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:28, 49 fig. 1905. Odegaard 2.
Originated about 1888 near Brookings, South Dakota; found among a lot of seedlings grown from wild plum pits sent from Minnesota; bought by H. T. Odegard of Brookings; introduced by A. Norby of Madison, South Dakota. Tree very productive, hardy and vigorous; foliage large; fruit large, oblong; suture very shallow from basin to apex; dark red; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet; good; early.

Odell. Domestica. 1. Col., O , Hort. Soc. Rpt. 31. 1892. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 113:160. 1899. 3. Mich Sta. Sp. Bul. 30:19. 1905.
According to the introducers, Augustine and Company, Normal, Illinois, this variety was found as a seedling growing in a fence corner at Odell, Illinois; introduced about 1890. Resembles and may be identical with Lombard; ripens at the same time.

Ogeechee Angustifolia varians. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:64. 1892.
Found wild in Georgia; introduced by G. Bourquin. Fruit of medium size, round, red; clingstone; early.

Oglesby. Species ? 1. ///. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 135. 1903. 2. Ibid. 424. 1905.
Reported by H. T. Thompson of Marengo, Illinois, as a small, handsome red plum; freestone; very late.


Ohio. Munsoniana. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 154. 1883. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 187. 1901. 3. Ga. Sta. Bul. 67:279. 1904.  Ohio Prolific 2. Ohio Prolific 1, 3.
Tree vigorous, productive, irregular in growth; foliage dense; fruit medium in size, roundish, yellow overspread with bright red; dots numerous, yellow; flesh yellow, juicy, melting; fair in quality; clingstone; mid-season.

Okaw. Species? Noted in Bailey Ann. Hort. 175. 1890. Oku Botan. Triflora. 1. Va. Sta. Bul. 129:114. 1901.
A variety sent out by the United States Department of Agriculture.

Old Gold. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 87:14. 1901. 3. 5. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:30. 1905.
Introduced by C. W. H. Heideman of Minnesota. Tree hardy, productive, subject to shot-hole fungus; fruit medium in size, round to slightly oblong; cavity shallow; stem slender; clear yellow with a dark red blush; dots small; skin thick, tough; flesh yellow; quality fair; stone roundish-oval, smooth, clinging; mid-season.

Olive. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 578. 1629.
Noted by Parkinson as " shrubby; fruit like an olive in color and size; very good; late."

Ollie. Hortulana X Munsoniana. 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 12:226. 1899.
Grown by A. L. Bruce, Basin Springs, Texas; from seed of Wayland crossed with Wild Goose. Fruit medium, oval; cavity shallow; suture obscure; dark red; flesh yellow with some red; stone medium, round, flattened, clinging.

Olson. Species? 1. 5. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:30. 1905.
Found on the Vermilion River, near Vermilion, South Dakota. Tree productive; fruit of fair size; stone very large; late.

Omaha. Triflora X Americana. 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 14:272. 1901. 2. Ibid. 15:266. 1902.
From Theodore Williams, Benson, Nebraska; a cross between Abundance and Brittlewood. Fruit variable in size, nearly spherical; cavity deep, rounded; stem long; suture faint; apex rounded; light red, a shade darker than Wild Goose; dots many, small; bloom considerable; flesh moderately firm, yellow, juicy, rich and sweet; stone rather large, oval, flattened; early; not introduced.

Omega. Americana. 1. Terry Cat. 1900. 2. ///. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 424. 1905.
Originated by H. A. Terry of Iowa. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit large, slightly oblong, red over yellow with numerous light dots; good; late.

Onderka Damascene. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 442. 1889.  Damas d* Onderka. Onderka.

Ontario. Species? 1. Mich. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 38. 1874. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 2nd Ser. 3:54. 1900.
Tree vigorous, very productive; fruit medium to large, roundish-oval, marbled yellow; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet; good; clingstone; early to mid-season.

Opata. Prunus besseyi X (Munsoniana X Triflora). 1. CircS. Dak. Exp. Sta. 1910.
Opata was grown by N. E. Hansen of the South Dakota Experiment Station from a cross between Golden and Prunus besseyi; introduced in a small way in 1908. Tree productive; fruit of medium size, roundish; cavity wide; dark red; bloom rather heavy; flesh green; said to be good; stone small; very early.

Orange. Domestica. 1. Knoop Fructologie 2:59. 1771. Prune de Orange 1.
Fruit of medium size, oval, yellow blushed with red; flesh soft and juicy; good; freestone.

Orange Cherry. Species? 1. Kerr Cat. 18. 1899. Orange's Cherry Plum 1.
Originated in Florida where it is grown as a substitute for the cherry.

Orel No. 21. Domestica. 1. S. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:30. 1905.
Introduced from Russia by Professor J. L. Budd of Iowa about 1882. Unproductive and deficient in hardiness.

Orenge, Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576, 577 fig. 1629.
Mentioned by Parkinson as "a yellowish plum, moist and somewhat sweetish."

Oriental. Triflora. 1. Rural N. Y. 64:743. 1905. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 234. 1907. Perry's Seedling 1.
Introduced by F. L. Perry of Bridgeport, Connecticut, as a cross between Burbank and Satsuma. Tree hardy, vigorous; fruit large; skin thin; flesh dark, sweet; good; ripens two or three weeks earlier than Satsuma and hangs a month after ripening.

Orillia. Domestica. 1. Can. Hort. 26:422. 1903.
A seedling shown at the Orillia fruit exhibit in 1903; grown from a Lombard seed by Frank Kean. Tree vigorous, bears regularly; fruit similar in size and appearance to Quackenboss with a smaller stone and heavier bloom.

Osage. Munsoniana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Me. Sta. An. Rpt. 12:66. 1896. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 188. 1901. . 4. Tex. Dept. Agr. Bul. 12:103. 1910.  Osage 48 2. Wonder 4.
Tree productive, tender; fruit medium in size, round to oval; cavity shallow; stem slender; bright red with numerous light dots flesh yellow; quality fair; stone medium, oval, flattened, clinging; mid-season.

Ottoman Seedling. Domestica. 1. N. Y. Sta. Rpt. 9:347. 1900.
Received by this Station for testing in 1890 from L. M. Macomber, North Ferris-burgh, Vermont, as a seedling of Imperial Ottoman. Tree productive; fruit medium to large, oval, suture slight or lacking; stem an inch long, slender, inserted with scarcely a depression; dull red or greenish-red; bloom thin; flesh yellowish-green, juicy, sweet; very good; stone medium, oval, small wing; early to mid-season.

Outremont. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:38. 1903.
Under test at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa.

Overall. Domestica. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 716. 1884.
Fruit large, oval; suture faint; stem three-quarters of an inch long inserted without a depression; dark purple; flesh coarse, pleasantly flavored; clingstone; mid-season.

Owatona. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:52. 1897. 2. Wis. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 137. 1899. 3. 5. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:31. 1905.
A wild variety from Owatonna, Minnesota. Trees hardy, productive; fruit medium in size, oblong; suture distinct; red; flesh yellow, tender, bitter; lacking in flavor; mid-season. Owen Sound. Species? I. Can. Hort. 11:259. ietetet- 2. Ibid. 14:350. 1891.  Owen Sound Beauty 1, 2.
A seedling grown by R. Trotter of Owen Sound, Ontario, from pits of an unnamed plum. Tree strong, healthy; fruit large, roundish-oblong; suture distinct, dividing the plum into unequal parts; brownish-purple; dots light, numerous; bloom thick; flesh orange, very juicy, rich and excellent; freestone; late.

Oxford. Nigra. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:52. 1897. 2. 5. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:30. 1905.
This variety is from Minnesota and resembles Aitken, but is more vigorous; lacks productiveness; fruit large, roundish-oval, deep red; flesh orange-yellow; good; stone large, thin, clinging; very early.

Oyama. Triflora. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 119. 1904. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 66. 1905.
A seedling of the Red June grown at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada, from seed planted in 1895. Fruit of medium size, roundish to broad-oval; cavity narrow, of medium depth, abrupt; suture a distinct line, not depressed; apex rounded; deep red; dots obscure; bloom thin; flesh yellow, firm, juicy; sweet, not rich; quality medium; stone small, oval, clinging.


Paddock Magnum Bonum. Domestica. 1. Floy-Lindley Guide Orch. Card. 420. 1846.
Originated from a pit brought from Russia in 1805 by a Captain Paddock. Closely resembles the Red Magnum Bonum of which it may be a seedling; clingstone.

Paine. Domestica. 1. Am. Jour. Hort. 3:97. 1868. Paine's Seedling 1.
A chance seedling raised by A. W. Paine of Bangor, Maine. Fruit medium to large; oval; cavity shallow, one-sided with a small lip; stem long, stout; suture slight; golden-yellow, blotched with red; bloom thin; flesh yellow, coarse, rich, sweet; clingstone; early.

Paisan Blanche. Domestica. 1. Knoop Fructologie 2:60. 1771.  Paisan Blanche et Double 1. Prune de Paisan blanche and simple 1.
Fruit large, round; suture large, deep; greenish-yellow; flesh soft, juicy; good; clingstone; very productive.

Paisan Noire. Domestica. 1. Knoop Fructologie 2:60. 1771.  Prune de Paisan Noire 1.
Said to resemble "Paisan Blanche" in form, size and productiveness but is purple and the suture is a little deeper, flesh more watery and inferior in flavor.

Palmer. Triflora. 1. U.S.D.A. Pom. Rpt. 46. 1895. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 47. 1897.
Probably a seedling of Abundance, grown by J. S. Breece of Fayetteville, North Carolina, about 1892. Fruit of medium size, roundish-conical, coppery-red with numerous russet dots; bloom light; skin thin, bitter; flesh yellowish, translucent with yellow veins, meaty, tender, juicy, fibrous, mild subacid, rich; good to very good; stone large, long, oval, clinging; very early.

Pander. Triflora. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 47. 1897.
A seedling of Abundance grown by J. S. Breece, Fayetteville, North Carolina. Fruit large, roundish, light to dark crimson; dots minute russet, raised; bloom slight; skin thin, slightly bitter; flesh yellow, translucent, rather firm, meaty, juicy, sugary vinous, rich; very good; stone oval, medium in size, clinging; season with Wild Goose.

Pappaconi. Domestica. i. Noisette Man. Comp. Jard. 2:499. 1860.
Imported into France from the Royal Gardens of Naples. Fruit larger than Dame Aubert, brilliant yellow, ripens in September.

Papeleu. Domestica. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 716. 1884.
Fruit medium in size, round, symmetrical; stem moderately long, set in a narrow depression; suture very shallow; golden-yellow when ripe, mottled with pale straw color; dots small, crimson; bloom light; flesh yellow, tender and juicy, rich, sugary and highly flavored; freestone; mid-season.

Paquet. Domestica. 1. U.S.D.A. Pom. Rpt. 26, Col. PL 1894.
Originated in 1889 with Peter Paquet, Oregon City, Oregon. Fruit very large, oval; cavity large, deep, regular; stem about an inch long, rather stout, curved; suture moderate; apex truncated; yellow washed with red; dots many, yellow; skin thick; flesh yellow; very good; stone oval, semi-clinging; early.

Park. Domestica X ? 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Ibid. 25. 1897. 3. Ohio Sta. Bul. 162:256, 257. 1905.
Kerr says this is reputed to be a hybrid of Prunus domestica with a native variety. Tree upright-spreading; fruit above medium size, oblong-oval; cavity broad and deep; stem of medium length, stout; greenish-yellow; flesh yellow; good; stone of medium size, clinging; mid-season.

Parker. Species? 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:52. 1897.
Reported as very productive and regular in bearing; fruit large; good; early.

Parrott. Species? 1. Kan. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 30:63. 1908-09.
Parrott originated with A. H. Griesa, Lawrence, Kansas. Fruit small, bright red; bloom thin; stone small; very late.

Parsonage. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 367. 1857.
Originated at Rhinebeck, Dutchess County, New York. Tree very vigorous, upright, productive; fruit medium to large, oval; stem medium; cavity small; pale yellow splashed with green; flesh yellow, juicy, rich; freestone; mid-season.

Partridge. Species? 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 2nd Ser. 3:54. 1900. 2. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 548. 1901.
Grown at the Experimental Farm, Agassiz, British Columbia. Tree vigorous; fruit medium, round; suture distinct; red with white bloom; flesh yellowish, sweet, pleasant; early.

Pasqua. Nigra? 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 426. 1900.
Sent out by Thomas Frankland, Stonewall, Manitoba. Fruit large, red; late.

Pathfinder. Trinora X (Triflora X Simonii?) 1. Rural N. Y. 68:752. 1909.
Pathfinder, a cross between Chabot and Wickson, was grown by William Strong Arkansas. Fruit heart-shaped, strongly pointed, dark colored; flesh firm, fine-grained and sweet.


Patten A. Munsoniana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:286. 1900.
Received by the Iowa Experiment Station from C. G. Patten, Charles City, Iowa, with whom the variety originated. Fruit medium in size, ellipsoidal, flattened at both ends; cavity deep; suture a well-marked groove; bright red to purplish-red; dots small, numerous; bloom thin; flesh firm, meaty; good; stone of medium size, winged, flat, clinging; not introduced.

Patten B. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:286. 1900.
Of the Stoddard type, from C. G. Patten, Charles City, Iowa. Fruit medium to large, conical, somewhat pointed; cavity shallow; stem long; suture clearly outlined; apex pointed; dark purplish-red; dots numerous, small; bloom thick; skin thick, brittle; flesh yellow-brown; good; stone large, flat, clinging.

Peach Leaf. Hortulana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:52. 1897. 2. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 11:285.  1898. Peachleaf 2.
A variety of unknown origin grown for many years by B. A. Mathews of Iowa. Given as synonymous to Kanawha by the American Pomological Society. Waugh says this is an error. Fruit medium in size, round; cavity slight; suture a faint line; deep wine red; dots many, small; flesh yellow, firm; good; stone medium, rough.

Peach-plum. Domestica. i. Ray Hist. Plant. 2:1529. 1688. 2. Rea Flora 208. 1676. Peach Plum 1.
A yellow variety grown in the Seventeenth Century. [apparently differs from 'Peach'- ASC]

Peake. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 578. 1629. Parkinson says of it, "long, whitish and very good."

Pearl. Americana mollis. 1. Kerr Cat. 11. 1898. 2. Terry Cat. 5. 1900. 3. Ill. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 424. 1905.
From H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa; grown from seed of Van Buren planted about 1891. Tree very productive, vigorous, upright; fruit large, white becoming pale red; of best quality; ripens last of August.  [not to be confused with the other 'Pearl' plum. -ASC]

Pear Plum. Domestica. 1. Kraft Pom. Aust. 2:45, Tab. 199 fig. 2. 1796. 2. N. E. Farmer Dict. 266. 1797. Die veilchenfarbige Birnpflaume 1. Prune poire grosse violette 1. Kraft in 1796 described a little-known Pear plum. Tree medium in size, unproductive; fruit very large, pear-shaped; suture distinct; stem long; reddish-purple; flesh juicy, unpleasant; freestone. This may or may not be the same as the New England variety of this name mentioned in the references.

Peasant. Species? 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 2nd Ser. 3:55. 1900.
Tested by the Experimental Farm at Agassiz, British Columbia. Tree vigorous; fruit small, roundish, purple; flesh yellowish, juicy, sweet; mid-season.

Peerless. Americana, i. Meneray Cat.
A seedling of Harrison grown by H. A. Terry and introduced by F. W. Meneray, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Fruit large, oblong, dark red; skin thin; flesh yellow, firm; good; freestone.

Pekin. Species? Letter from Kerr.
Originated by Theodore Williams, Benson, Nebraska.


Pendent. Munsoniana X Hortulana mineri. 1. Kerr Cat. 19. 1898. 2. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:18. 1898.
A cross between Pottawattamie and Forest Garden from Theodore Williams of Benson, Nebraska; introduced by J. W. Kerr in 1898. Tree slender, a rapid grower, productive; fruit medium to large, roundish inclined to oblong, red; semi-clinging; mid-season.

Penning. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 11. 1897. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 160. 1901.  Penning1s Free 2. Penning's Free 1.
Originated with Martin Penning of Minnesota; a perfect freestone.

Penning Peach. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 7. 1896. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:52. 1897. 3. Kerr Cat. 11. 1899.
C. W. H. Heideman of Minnesota says this variety was introduced about thirty years ago as the Peach plum and was sold under that name by Northwestern nurserymen; he added the name Penning to avoid confusion; it closely resembles Harrison and is by some considered identical with that variety. Tree hardy and healthy, a shy bearer; fruit medium to large, oblong, purplish-red; flesh sweet; semi-clinging; mid-season.

Penobscot. Domestica. 1. Horticulturist 1:19,6. 1846. 2. Elliott Fr. Book 428. 1854. 3. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 222, 244. 1858.
Originated about 1840 with James McLaughlin of Bangor, Maine. Rejected by the American Pomological Society in 1858. Tree productive; fruit large, oval; suture distinct; cavity small; stem of medium length; greenish-yellow with a red blush in the sun; bloom thin; flesh yellow, sweet; flavor pleasant; stone long, pointed at both ends, clinging; early.

Pennock. Prunus besseys X Domestica? 1. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:18. 1898. 2. Colo. Sta. Bul. 50:43. 1898. Pennock's Hybrid 2.
Pennock was raised in 1893 by C. E. Pennock of Fort Collins, Colorado, from seed of Prunus besseyi supposed to have been pollinated by Arctic. Tree dwarfish, upright; leaves of medium size, ovate, coarsely serrate, thickish, finely tomentose on either side; petiole short, stiff, sometimes with one gland at the base of the blade; fruit small, roundish; suture slight; deep blue; bloom heavy; flavor intermediate between the plum and cherry; stone small, round and cherry-like.

Peoly Early Blue. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 309. 1845. 2. Thomas Am. Fruit Cult. 346. 1849.
From Massachusetts. Fruit medium in size, oblong; stem short; suture obscure; dark blue; bloom light; flesh yellow; pleasant; fair quality; semi-clinging; early.

Perdrigon des Alpes. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 151. 1831.
The London Horticultural Society listed Perdrigon des Alpes and Perdrigon Violet des Alpes as distinct varieties but there seems to be little difference between them.

Perdrigon of Cernay. Domestica. 1. Quintinye Com. Gard. 68, 69. 1699.  Cernay Perdrigon 1.
Mentioned in the preceding reference as round or oblate, with a dry and mealy flesh.


Perdrigon Tardif. Domestica. 1. Quintinye Com. Gard. 67. 1699. 2. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 151. 1831. 3. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:125. 1873. 4. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 450. 1889.  Datnas de Septembre 4 incor. Konigs pflaume aus Paris 4. Konigspflaume von Paris 3. Later Perdrigon 1. Roy ale de Paris Tar dive 4. September Damascene 4 incor. Spate Herrn Pflaume 4. Spate Konigs Pflaume 4. Spate Konigs Pflaume aus Paris 4. Spater Perdrigon 4. Spater Perdrigon 3.
Quintinye, in 1699, mentioned a Later Perdrigon which is probably this variety. Duhamel confused this variety with the Imperatrice but they are distinct. In America this Perdrigon is unknown. Tree small; leaves small, obovate; flowers very small; fruit small, roundish-ellipsoid; suture distinct; skin thick, purplish-black; stem short; cavity shallow; flesh yellowish, fine, firm, sweet; freestone; late.

Pershore. Domestica. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 375. 1866. 2. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:111. I^73* 3- Garden 49:225. 1896. Pershore Yellow Egg 3.
Grown largely in the Pershore district, Worcester County, England. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit medium, obovate; suture indistinct; golden-yellow; flesh clear yellow, neither juicy nor sweet; quality fair; stone small, clinging; fit only for culinary purposes; propagated by suckers.

Petite Quetsche Sucre'e, Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:181. 1873. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 437. 1889. Ananas Zwetsche 2. Kleine Zuckerzwetsche 2. Kleine Zucker Zwetsche 1.
A German variety produced from seed of Violette Diaper. Fruit small, oval; suture shallow; cavity small; stem slender; dark purple; bloom thick; flesh yellow, fine-grained, juicy, sweet; freestone; mid-season. Phiolenartige Gelbe Zwetsche. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 442. 1889.
Mathieu found the name of this variety in Wiener Garien-Zeitung 288. 1884. Pilot. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:24, 52. 1897. 2.7^.87:15. 1901. 3. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:31. 1904.
Originated with M. E. Hinckley at Marcus, Iowa, from seed of a wild plum gathered on the Little Sioux River near Cherokee, Iowa; seed planted in 1870. Tree open, spreading, drooping; fruit large, oblong-oval with rounded apex; suture distinct; yellow mottled with light and dark red; skin thick, tough; flesh firm, rich and sweet; good; stone long-oval, pointed, margined; mid-season; cracks and rots in wet seasons.

Pink Damson. Insititia? 1. Montreal Hort. Soc. Rpt. 93. 1885.
Fruit small, pinkish-red; flesh light pink, soft; quality fair; very early.

Pioneer Prune. Domestica. 1. Pioneer Nur. Cat. 1900.
A variety grown for several years by the Pioneer Nursery Company, Salt Lake City, Utah; discarded because of its close resemblance to the Italian Prune.

Piper. Americana. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 162. 1891. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:52. 1897. 3. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:287. 1900. 4. Wis. Sta. Bul. 87:15, 16 fig. 4. 1901.  Piper's Peach 1, 2, 3. Piper's Peach 4.
Found wild near Mankato, Blue Earth County, Minnesota, about 1887 by J. S. Harris of Crescent, Minnesota. Tree vigorous, upright, hardy, productive; fruit large, round, bright red; flesh orange-yellow, sweet and rich; good; stone roundish, slightly margined, nearly free; mid-season; mentioned in the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1899.

Piram. Angustifolia varians. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:80. 1892. 2. Tex. Sta. BuL 32:490, 491. 1894. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 197. 1901.
A seedling from Goliad County, Texas, originated by G. Onderdonk; named after Piram Hall about 1875. Tree hardy, productive; fruit medium to large, roundish; suture indistinct; light yellow; dots white; bloom thin; skin thin and tender; flesh yellow, soft, sweet; fair to good; clingstone; mid-season.

Pissardi. Cerasifera. 1. Rev. Hort. 191. 1881. 2. Gard. Mon. 25:367. 1883. 3, Rural N. Y. 44:479. 1885. 4. Gard. and For. 1:178. 1888. 5. Garden 55:314. 1899. 6. Bailey Cyc. Hort. 1447. 1901.
Prunus Cerasifera Atropurpurea 5. Prunus Pissardi 5. Prunus Pissardii 3. Purple-leaved Plum 3. The Purple Myrobalan 5. Prunus Pissardi 1, 2, 4.
See Prunus cerasifera, p. 48. Tree large; shoots purplish; foliage while unfolding tinged with red, later becoming dark purple; fruit medium in size; skin purplish, showing color in unripe stage, thin, tough; suture obscure; flesh firm, juicy, moderately acid, inferior in quality; clingstone.

Plantz. Domestica. 1. Cat. State Bd. Hort. Rpt. 129, 130 fig. 1891.  Plantz's Seedling 1.
A chance seedling found by W. A. Plantz of New Castle, California, about 1883. Tree thrifty, productive; fruit large, oval, tapering towards the stem, reddish-purple; flesh yellow sugary, rich, juicy and sweet; ripens in California about three weeks before the Hungarian Prune.

Plunk. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:44. 1897. 2. Kerr Cat. 9. 1897. 3* Waugh Plum Cult. 160. 1901. Large Red Sweet 3. Large Red Sweet 1, 2.
Introduced by Charles Luedloff, Cologne, Minnesota. Tree a rapid grower with good foliage; fruit large, round, dark red or purplish-red; flesh reddish, not juicy, very sweet; good; clingstone; early.

Pomaria. Domestica. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpi. 189. 1867.
A seedling of the Reine Claude from South Carolina, about 1867. Tree productive; fruit medium in size, blue; bloom heavy; superior to its parent in flavor.

Pomona. Americana X Hortulana mineri? 1. S. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:31. 1904.
Originated by E. D. Cowles, Vermilion, South Dakota; under test at the South Dakota Experiment Station. Said to be " a natural cross of Forest Garden and Miner."

Pond Purple. Domestica. 1. Kenrick Am. Orch. 209. 1835. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 309. 1845. 3. Thomas Am. Fruit Cult. 344 fig. 368. 1867.  Pond's Purple 2. Pond's Seedling 2, 3.
Grown in the garden of Henry Hill, Boston; introduced by Samuel Pond of Cambridge, Massachusetts. As it resembles the well-known Pond, it has been confused with that variety. Young branches downy; fruit of medium size, roundish; stem short; purple; flesh yellowish, rather dry, sweet, mingled with acid; quality fair; freestone; early.

Pontbriant. Domestica. 1. Pom. France 7:30 fig. 1871. 2. Cat. Cong. Pom. France 344. 1887. -^e Pontbriant 2. Prune De Pontbraint 1.
Raised by M. F. Morel, Lyons, France, from seed of the Purple Gage planted in 1851. Tree of medium vigor; fruit large, round, a little more truncated at the base than at the apex; cavity narrow, shallow; stem long and stout; suture shallow and wide; reddish-purple, deeper on the sunny side; bloom heavy; flesh pale yellow, medium fine grained, melting, very juicy, with a very sweet and aromatic flavor; freestone.

Pontford. Domestica. 1. Watkins Cat. 46. 1892?
Tree very productive; fruit of medium size, purple; mid-season; suitable for market

Pontotoc. Hortulana. 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 11:286. 1898.
Mentioned in the catalog of F. T. Ramsey in 1898 as not yet well tested.

Porsch Rote Zwetsche. Species? Listed in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 443. 1889.

Potter. Americana? 1. Waugh Plum Cult. 233. 1901.
Mentioned by Waugh who says it originated in Cherokee County, Iowa, and is probably an Americana.

Poupart. Domestica. I, Hogg Fruit Man. 717. 1884. Poupart's 1.
Mr. Poupart, market gardener at Brompton, grew this variety, according to Hogg, who says it is an enormous bearer and an excellent preserving plum. Fruit medium, nearly round, resembling Purple Gage; light purple, dotted and streaked with" darker shades; flesh reddish, firm, sweet, with a Sloe flavor; freestone.

Powell Damson. Insititia. 1. Watkins Cat. 48. 1892?
Mentioned in the preceding reference as a new variety. Tree vigorous, productive and large.

Prairie Flower. Hortulana mineri. 1. Col., 0., Hort. Soc. Rpt. 5:10. 1890. 2. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 276. 1893. 3. Mich. Sta. Bul. 118:54. 1895. 4. Waugh Plum Cult. 175. 1901. Prairie 3. Prairie Flower 3.
Prairie Flower, a supposed seedling of Miner, originated in Adrian County, Missouri; introduced by Stark Brothers about 1884. Fruit of medium size, roundish-oval; suture a line; cavity shallow; skin thick, red over yellow; bloom thin; flesh yellow; good; stone oval, slightly flattened, clinging; season late. Mentioned in the last two issues of the catalog of the American Pomological Society.

Prairie Rose. Nigra? 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 426. 1900.
A seedling raised at the Experimental Farm at Indian Head, Northwest Territory, Canada. Fruit of medium size, red; good; mid-season.

Précoce Defresne. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 443. 1889. Précoce de Freudenberg. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 430. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 156, 361. 1895.  Freudenberger Früh Pflaume 1. Freudenberger Frilh Pflaume 2. Précoce de Freudenberg 1.
This variety is of German origin. Fruit of medium size, oval, reddish-brown; flesh yellow, firm; good; early.

Précoce de Lucas. Domestica. i. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 2d App. 156. 1876. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 439. 1889. 3. Lucas Vollsi. Hand. Obst. 474. 1894.  Lucas Fnihzwetsche 2, 3. Précoce de Lucas 2. Quetsche Précoce de Lucas 2.
Of foreign origin; tree vigorous, an early and abundant bearer; fruit large, oval; stem long, slender; dark blue; bloom heavy; flesh greenish, juicy, sweet; freestone; mid-season. Précoce de Reutlinger. Domestica. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 433. 1905.  Pre*coce de Reutlinger Prune 1.
Tested at the Experimental Farm at Agassiz, British Columbia. Fruit below medium size, oval; stem short; cavity small; suture well denned and one side enlarged; deep purple; flesh yellowish, tender, sweet, juicy, rich; stone small, free; mid-season.

Premium. Americana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:41. 1892. 2. Colo. Sta. Bul. 50:43. 1898. Peffer's Premium 1, 2.
Introduced by George P. Peffer of Pewaukee, Wisconsin. Tree vigorous with an open top, productive; leaves of medium size, broad-ovate; fruit medium in size, round or inclining to oblate; cavity very shallow; stem medium; suture nearly obsolete; deep red over orange-yellow; dots numerous, small; bloom thin; flesh yellow, firm; fair to good; stone circular, smooth, clinging; mid-season.

Preserver. Triflora X Angustifolia varians. 1. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:18. 1898. 2. Kerr Cat. 11. 1900.
A supposed cross between Kelsey and Early Red; from D. H. Watson, Brenham, Texas; introduced by William A. Yates in 1897. Tree vigorous, compact; fruit of medium size, roundish, dark red; flesh red, firm; mid-season.

President. Americana. 1. Meneray Cat. The President 1.
A seedling of Harrison grown by H. A. Terry, and introduced by F. W. Meneray, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Tree productive; fruit large, yellow, covered with red; flesh yellow, sweet, rich, firm; semi-clinging.

President. Domestica. 1. Card. World 12:123. 1895. 2. Garden 58:294. 1900. 3. Ibid. 64:262. 1903.
Raised by Thomas Rivers of Sawbridgeworth, England; first fruited in 1894 and introduced in 1901 by the originator. Tree compact, productive; fruit large, oval, deep purple almost black; bloom heavy; flesh with a sweet, rich flavor; freestone; late. Recommended for culinary and market use.

President. Triflora X Simonii. 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 12:226. 1899.
Grown by Luther Burbank as a seedling of Wickson; named by Waugh in 1899. Fruit large, heart-shaped; cavity deep, rounded; stem short, very stout; suture shallow; apex pointed; dark, fire-red; dots many, minute; bloom thin; skin thin; flesh firm, meaty, yellow; flavor peculiar, a trifle like musk-melon; quality poor; stone large, oval, pointed, flattened, semi-clinging.

President Courcelles. Domestica. 1. Guide Prat. 162, 361. 1895. 2. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 401. 1898. 3. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 2nd Ser. 3:55. 1900.  President Courcelle 3.
Tested at the Experimental Farm at Agassiz,, British Columbia. Tree vigorous; fruit of medium size, globular or sometimes heart-shaped; suture shallow; purple; flesh pale yellow or greenish, juicy, sweet, pleasant; mid-season.

Presley. Hortulana mineri X Hortulana. 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 12:227. 1899.
From A. L. Bruce, Basin Springs, Texas. Waugh says its parentage is probably Miner by Wayland. Fruit of medium size,inclined to oval; cavity shallow; bright red; dots numerous, indistinct; flesh yellow; good; stone small, round, flattened, clinging.

Price. Americana. 1. Meneray Cat. Prof. Price 1.
A seedling grown by H. A. Terry; introduced by F. W. Meneray, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Fruit large, oblong, yellow, tinged with red; good; clingstone.

Pride of Waterloo. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 3rd App. 182 fig. 1881. 2. W. N. Y. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 44:92. 1899.  Pride of Waterloo! 2. Raised by A. H. Doles, Waterloo, New York, from seed of Smith Orleans; distinct from Pond with which it is sometimes confused. Tree upright, vigorous, very productive; branches smooth, reddish-brown; fruit large, oval, narrowing towards the stem; suture indistinct; cavity large; stem medium in length and thickness; reddish-purple; bloom thin; flesh deep yellow, coarse, juicy, sweet, sprightly, not rich; stone slightly adherent; mid-season.

Primate. Domestica. 1. Rivers Cat. 35. 1898-9. 2. Thompson Card. Ass't 4:159. 1901. 3. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 433. 1905.
A seedling first fruited by Thomas Rivers, Sawbridgeworth, England, in 1890, and introduced by him in 1897. Fruit large, round; stem short, set in a medium cavity; suture distinct; sides often unequal; purplish-red; dots numerous, small, golden; bloom thin; flesh yellowish, juicy, sweet; good: stone small, free; ripens late and hangs well after maturing.

Prince. Domestica. 1. Ray Hist. Plant. 2:1529. 1688.
Ray mentions a variety by this name. It may be the same as Gloucestershire Violet.

Prince Early Damson. Insititia. 1. Prince Pom. Man. 2:87. 1832. Prince's Early Purple 1.
A seedling raised by William Prince. Fruit of medium size, ovate, dark purple, pleasant; freestone; early.

Prince Orange Egg. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 392. 1857. 2. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:187. 1873.  Oeuf Orange De Prince 2. Prince's Orange Egg 2.
Grown by William Prince. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit large, globular; cavity medium; stem short, stout; reddish-purple; dots brownish-yellow; bloom thick; flesh greenish-yellow, a little coarse, juicy, sweet and sprightly, not rich; semi-clinging; mid-season.

Prince Orange Gage. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 405. 1857.
Noted only by Downing, who describes it as follows: "Fruit medium, roundish-oval; suture moderate; skin yellow; stalk long, set in an open cavity; flesh light yellow, coarse, juicy, pleasant, but not rich; adheres to the stone; first of September."

Prince Primordian. Domestica. i. Prince Treat. Hort. 25. 1828. 2. Prince Pom. Man. 2:79. *et32- Prince's Blue Primordian 1. Prince's Blue Primordian 2.
A seedling of White Primordian, grown by William Prince. A very early variety, of about the same size as its parent, oval in shape, blue; flesh pleasantly flavored. [unclear, but 'White Primordian' may be the same as 'Early Yellow' -ASC]

Pringle. Insititia? 1. U. 5. D. A. Rpt. 503, PI. 63. 1905.
Pringle is a Damson-like variety originating as a sprout from the stock of a Lombard tree in the orchard of A. C. Pringle, Mears, Michigan; introduced by E. Hawley et Sons of Hart, Michigan, about 1896.

Pringle Blue. Domestica. 1. N. Y. Sta. Rpt. 12:612. 1893.
Received by the New York Experiment Station in 1890 from L. M. Macomber, North Ferrisburg, Vermont. Tree very productive; fruit large, irregular-oval; cavity medium; suture shallow; skin thin, tender; purplish-black; bloom thick; dots small, numerous; flesh pale yellow, dry, firm; flavor flat; fair; stone semi-clinging; mid-season; of no value.

Pringle Purple. Domestica. 1. A7. Y. Sta. Rpt. 9:347. 1890.
Received by the New York Experiment Station in 1890 from L. M. Macomber, North Ferrisburg, Vermont. Tree productive; fruit of medium size, roundish, compressed; cavity small; suture a line; skin thin, tender; reddish-purple, unattractive; bloom thinnish; dots small, numerous; flesh light yellow, moderately juicy, slightly fibrous, firm, mild; good; stone nearly free; mid-season; of no value.

Procureur. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:63. 1873.
Platte Hellrothe Konigspflaume 1.
Probably of French origin. Tree vigorous, early, productive; fruit large, round, flattened at the ends; suture well defined; dull yellow, almost covered with bright purple; bloom thin; flesh pale yellow, juicy, sweet, aromatic; quality fair; stone small, free; mid-season.

Profuse. Species? Letter from Kerr.
Originated by Theodore Williams, Benson, Nebraska.

Prof. Wittmack. Insititia? X Domestica? 1. Gard. Chron. 3:364. 1888.
The parentage of this variety is not definitely known but it is thought to be a Mirabelle crossed with Italian Prune; grown by Herr Ulhorn, Grevenbroich, Lower Rhenish Prussia. A sweet plum of the prune type; freestone; good for either dessert or drying.

Pruneau. Species? 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 117. 1875.
Reported from Quebec, Canada, in 1875; commonly grown from suckers.

Prune d'Agen Double. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 420. 1889.

Prune d'Amour. Domestica. Listed in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 421. 1889. Prune d'Automne, Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:9. 1873. Herbstpflaume 1.
Raised by Dr. Dorell of Kuttenberg, Bohemia. Tree of capricious growth; fruit small, globular; suture indistinct; purplish-black; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy; good; freestone; late.

Prune de Laghouat. Domestica? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 438. 1889.


Prune d'Ente Imperiale. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 429. 1889. Prune de Rudolphe. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:189. 1873. Rudolph's Pflaume 1.
Liegel received this variety in 1842 from Count Bressler of Hungary. Origin uncertain. Tree vigorous, an early and prolific bearer; fruit medium in size, obovate; suture indistinct; golden-yellow, dotted with red; flesh clear yellow, sweet, juicy; good; stone obovate, clinging; mid-season.

Prune de Seigneur. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 450. 1889.  Prune de Prince. +  Prune Tardive. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 2nd App. 157. 1876.
Tree vigorous, very productive; fruit below medium size, oval; stem long, slender, set in a small cavity; black; bloom thick; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, sweet; freestone; very late.

Pseudo Mirabelle. Insititia. Mentioned in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 152. 1831. Purple Favorite. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 307. fig. 126. 1845.  2. N. Y. Agr. Soc.Rpt. 293 fig. 1848. 3. Mag. Hort. 16:455, 456 fig. 27. 1850. 4. Mas he Verger 6:83, fig. 42. 1866-73.  Favorite Pourpre 4. Purple Favourite 4.
The original tree of Purple Favorite was planted at Newburgh, New York, by the father of A. J. Downing; from whence it came is not known. Fruit of medium size, roundish; cavity slight; suture lacking; brownish-purple; bloom thin; flesh pale yellow, tender, juicy, sweet; quality very good; stone small, round, free; mid-season. Listed in the American Pomological Society catalog since 1852.

Purple Flesh. Triflora. 1. Stark Bros. Cat. 1909.
A purple-fleshed variety introduced by Stark Brothers and recommended by them as being hardy.

Purple-leaved Hybrid. Triflora X Cerasifera. 1. Burbank Cat. 16 fig. 1893.  K. P. 193 1.
A seedling of Kelsey pollinated by Pissardi; from Luther Burbank, Santa Rosa, California. Resembles the male parent in wood, bark, leaves, flowers and fruit; very ornamental on account of its large purple leaves. Fruit larger than Pissardi, dark purple with many white dots; bloom thin; flesh reddish-purple throughout, firm, subacid; good; ripens several weeks before Kelsey.

Purple Panhandle. Angustifolia watsoni. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Ibid. 21. 1897.  3. Bailey Ev. Nat. Fruits 222, 223. 1898. 4. Waugh Plum Cult. 233. 1901.
Introduced from the Panhandle of Texas by F. T. Ramsey, Austin, Texas. Tree small, rapid in growth; fruit below medium in size, round-oblong, inclining to conic, purplish-red; quality poor; clingstone; early to mid-season.

Purple Yosemite. Species? 1. Card. Mon. 20:176. 1878. 2. Penin. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 65. 1891. 3. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:32. 1903.  Yosemite 1. Yosemite Purple 3.
Introduced by W. S. Carpenter of Rye, New York, who secured it from the "Rocky Mountains." Fruit large, roundish; cavity shallow; suture a line; skin thick, deep, dull red; dots yellow, distinct; bloom medium thick; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet; quality fair; stone oval, flattened, clinging; mid-season.

Puymirol d'Ente. Domestica. i. Wickson Cat. Fruits 356. 1891.
Originated at Puymirol in the southwest of France; introduced into California; a type of the Agen. Tree productive; fruit large, inclined to oblong; flesh very sweet; ripens a little earlier than Agen.


Quaker. Americana. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 308. 1884. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 160. 1901. Found in the wild by Joseph Bundy of Springville, Linn County, Iowa; introduced about 1862 by H. C. Raymond, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Fruit large, roundish; cavity shallow; suture a line; stem long; skin thick, dark red; bloom thick; dots many; flesh yellow, sweet, pleasant; good; stone large, oblique-oval, flattened, semi-clinging; mid-season.

Quality. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:24, 55. 1897. 2. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:287.
1900. 3. Wis. Sta. Bul. 87:15. 1907. Gaylord Quality 2.
Of unknown origin; top-grafted about 1880 by Edson Gaylord of Nora Springs, Iowa, who afterwards distributed the variety. Fruit below medium in size, round, dull purplish-red; dots white; bloom heavy; flesh soft; quality fair; stone turgid; mid-season.

Quebec. Domestica. Mentioned in Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:38. 1903. Queen. Americana. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:31. 1903. Golden Queen 1.
From H. A. Terry coming from unknown parents and bearing its first crop in 1897. Tree upright; fruit large, round, bright golden-yellow; very good; said to be excellent for canning or dessert.

Queen May. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:36. 1903.
First grown by Thomas Clark, Chateaugay, Quebec. Tree strong and productive; fruit large, round; cavity narrow; suture indistinct; greenish-yellow; bloom thin; dots indistinct; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, firm, sweet, rich; very good; clingstone.

Queen Mother. Domestica? 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576, 577, 578. 1629. 2. Rea Flora 207. 1676. 3. Ray Hist. Plant. 2:1529. 1688. 4. Quintinye Com. Gard. 69, 70. 1699. 5. Langley Pomona 94, PL XXIV fig. 3. 1729. 6. Prince Pom. Man. 2:87. 1832. 7. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 310. 1845. 8. Floy-Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 291. 1846. 9. Mas Le Verger 6:41. 1866-73. 10. Hogg Fruit Man. 719. 1884. 11. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 437, 448. 1889. 12. Guide Prat. 160, 361. 1895.  Cherry of some ?i, ?3[ Coeur de Pigeon n. Damaske Violet ?i. Damas Violet 7, 11, 12. Konigin Mutter 11. Moschatelle of some 3. Muscadine ?i. Petit Damas Rouge 9, 12. Petit Damas Rouge 6, 11. Pigeon's Heart 7, 10, 11, 12. Pigeons Heart 4. Queene Mother of some 1. Queen Mother 9, 11, 12. Red Queen Mother 7, 11. Rotes Taubenherz 11. Rotes Taubenherz 11. Small Red Damask 6. Small Red Damson 6.
Queen Mother and Damas Violet have been confused for nearly three centuries, yet they are distinct, as our descriptions show. Hogg thought the Queen Mother mentioned by Ray and pictured as a cordate-shaped fruit by Parkinson, was the Myrobalan. Tree medium in size, compact, spherical; fruit small, nearly round; suture slightly pronounced, halves equal; cavity nearly lacking; stem medium in length; skin red to violet on the sunny side; flesh yellow, firm, juicy, sweet; good; freestone; mid-season.

Queen of Arkansas. Species? Mentioned in Tex. Sta. Bul. 32:490. 1894.  Quetsche k feuille argentee. Species? 1. Guide Prat. 162, 362. 1895. Frühzwetsche mit Silberblatt 1. Silberblattrige Zwetsche 1.
A variety from Hungary having silvery-colored leaves; said to ripen two weeks before the German Prune.

Quetsche Aplatie. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:23. 1873. 2. Mathieu Norn. Pom. 423. 1889.  Breitgedriickte Zwetsche 2. Breitgedriickte Kaiser Zwetsche 2. Breitgedriickte Zwetsche 1. Donauers Zusammen Gedriickte Zwetsche 1, 2. Plattrunde Zwetsche 1, 2. Quetsche Aplatie 2.
Found in a garden by M. Donauer of Saxe-Cobourg, Gotha. Fruit of medium size, obovate, compressed; suture broad, shallow; dark purple; bloom thick; flesh green, sweet, aromatic; good; stone rough, free; mid-season.

Quetsche Buhl-Eltershofen. Domestica. 1. Mas Le Verger 6:159. 1866-73.
A seedling raised by M. Liegel of Germany and named in honor of M. Buhl-Eltershofen. Fruit above medium size, long-ovate; suture distinct; deep purple; bloom light; flesh greenish-white, juicy; quality good; stone large.

Quetsche Datte des Allemands. Domestica. 1. Guide Prat. 160, 362. 1895.
Fruit large, irregular-oval, darker color than German Prune; flesh yellow, sweet; good; late.

Quetsche de Dobrowitz. Species? 1. Guide Prat. 160, 362. 1895.  Dobrowitzer Frühzwetsche 1. Quetsche de Doubrawie 1.
A Hungarian variety maturing about fifteen days earlier than German Prune.

Quetsche de Kreuter. Domestica? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 438. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 163, 363. 1895.  Kreuter's Zwetsche 1. Kreuters Zwetsche 2. Quetsche de Kreuter 1.  A variety of little merit.

Quetsche de Millot. Domestica. 1. Baltet Cult. Fr. 496. 1908.
Mentioned by Baltet as a better variety than the German Prune.

Quetsche De Ransleben. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:153. 1873.  Ranslebens Pflaume 1. Ranslebens Zwetsche 1.
A seedling of Reine Claude raised by M. Ransleben of Berlin, Germany. Tree vigorous, an early and abundant bearer; fruit small, long-oval; suture indistinct; purplish-brown; thick bloom; flesh green, juicy; stone rough, free.

Quetsche de Transylvanie, Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 450. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 163, 362, 1895.  Quetsche de Transilvanie 2. Siebenburger Zwetsche 1. Siebenburger Zwetsche 2.
Mentioned as "of very doubtful value."

Quetsche Dr. Letricourt. Domestica. 1. Le Bon Jard. Preface XLVII. 1882. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 455. 1889. 3. Guide Prat. 161, 362. 1895. De Pologne 3. Imperiale Blanche ? 2, 3. Prune de Pologne 2. Quetsche de Letri-court 2. Quetsche de Letricourt 3. Quetsche Jaune 2, 3. Zwetsche Von Le*tricout 2.
Fruit elliptical, elongated at both ends; skin yellow, sometimes washed red; flesh yellowish, very juicy, sweet.

Quetsche Freestone. Domestica. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 205:37. 1903. 2. Mich. Sta. Sp. Bul. 27:15. 1904.
Probably a seedling of German Prune imported by the United States Department of Agriculture in 1894. Fruit small, oval; suture distinct; dark blue; flesh yellow, juicy, tart; late; inferior to German Prune.

Quetsche Hâtive. Domestica. 1. Baltet Cult. Fr. 494. 1908.
A medium sized, long-oval, dark purple prune; good; early.

Quetsche Jaune Précoce. Domestica. 1. Mas Le Verger 6:99, fig. 50. 1866-73. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 431. 1889.  Gelbe Frühzwetsche 1. Gelbe Frühzwetsche 2. Quetsche Jaune Précoce 2.
Fruit of medium size, oval, yellow; flesh yellow, sprightly, tender, juicy; said to make good prunes; early.

Quetsche Longue Précoce. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 444. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 163, 362. 1895.
A variety of little merit.

Quetsche Maraichere. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:107. 1873. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 431. 1889. 3. Guide Prat. 163, 362. 1895.  Die Gartenzwetsche 3. Gartenpflaume 2, 3. Garten Pflaume 1. Garten Zwetsche 1,2. Maraichere 3. Prune Maraichere 1,2. Quetsche Maraichere 2.
From M. M. Bauman et Sons, Bollwiller, Germany. Tree of medium vigor, an early and abundant bearer; fruit medium, ellipsoidal; suture indistinct; skin dark purple; bloom thin; flesh yellow, sweet, aromatic; freestone; excellent for drying.

Quetsche Pointue. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:51. 1873. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 450. 1889.  Provinz Zwetsche 2. Quetsche de Province 1. Spitszwetsche 1. Spitzzwetsche 2.
Liegel received this variety in 1816 from M. Grob of Eichelstadt, Bavaria, under the name of Quetsche de Province. Tree vigorous, an early and productive bearer; fruit large, long-ovate, obtuse at the stem end, acute-pointed at the apex; suture broad, deep; deep purple; bloom thick; flesh yellowish, sweet; good for culinary purposes; stone long, narrow, clinging.

Quetsche Précoce de Buhlerthal. Domestica? 1. Guide Prat. 164, 363. 1895.  Frühzwetsche von Buhlerthal 1. Zwetsche Frühe Von Buhlerthal 1.
A new variety from Germany maturing very early.

Quetsche Précoce De Frauendorf. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:97. lS73-  Fmuendorfer Frühe Zwetsche 1.
Introduced by Eugene Furst, Frauendorf, Bavaria; distinguished from the German Prune by its larger size, earlier maturity and superior quality.

Quetsche Précoce Liegel. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2153. 1873. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 439. 1889.  Liegels Frilhzwetsche 1. Liegels Frühzwetsche 2. Quetsche Hâtive de Liegel 2. Quetsche Précoce de Liegel 2.
Found growing among German Prune trees by M. Liegel; differs from the German Prune only in that its fruit matures a few days earlier.

Quetsche Précoce De Schamal. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:5. 1873.  Schamals Frühzwetsche 1.
Originated by M. Schamal of Jungbunzlau, Bohemia. Fruit small, obovate; suture narrow, shallow; dark purple; flesh yellow, sweet, perfumed; good; freestone.

Quetsche Ronde. Domestica. 1. Knoop Fructologie 2:62. 1771.
A strain of the German Prune.

Quetsche Verte D'ltalie. Domestica. 1. Kraft Pom. Aust. 2:34, Tab. 182 fig. 2. 1796. 2. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 152. 1831. 3. Mas. Le Verger 6:97. 1866-73. 4. Guide Prat. 162, 363. 1895.  Die lange, grune und grosses welsche Pflaume? 1. Grune Eierpflaume 4. Grune Zwetsche 4. Italienische Grüne Zwetsche 3, 4. Verdage D'ltalie 3, 4. Vertage d'ltalie tres-grosse 1.
A European plum of unknown origin. Tree large; fruit large, ellipsoidal; suture very shallow; skin tender, not adherent, greenish-yellow, specked with red; stem short; flesh greenish-yellow, melting, juicy, aromatic; of first quality; clingstone; mid-season.

Quitique. Species? Letter from F. T. Ramsey. 
Selected from the wild near Quitique, Texas.


Rachel. Hortulana mineri. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:58, 86. 1892. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 175. 1901. 3. Ga. Sta. Bul. 67:280. 1904.
Fruit small, roundish; suture a line; cavity shallow; bright red; dots yellow, conspicuous; blue; flesh yellow, melting; quality fair; clingstone; mid-season.

Rademakers. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 444. 1889. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 2nd Ser. 3:53. 1900. Brugnon de Neerveteren 1. Rademaker's Prune 1.
Under test at the British Columbia Experimental Station.

Ragland. Triflora X Angustifolia varians. 1. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:19. 1898. 2. Kerr Cat. 11. 1900. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 223. 1901.
A hybrid grown by D. H. Watson, Brenham, Texas, supposedly from seed of Kelsey pollinated by Yellow Transparent; introduced by W. A. Yates in 1897. Fruit of medium size, oblate; cavity broad, rounded; suture lacking; bright clear yellow; dots yellow; bloom white; flesh yellow, firm, juicy, sweet, rich; very good; stone small, clinging; early.

Raisin. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 152. 1831. 2. Mag. Hort. 9:165. 1843.
An old European variety now obsolete. Fruit small, round, greenish; of medium quality; clingstone.

Ramsey Last. Munsoniana. Letter from Kerr.
Originated with F. T. Ramsey, Austin, Texas. Fruit small; good; late for its group.

Ranette. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 444. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 160, 363. 1895.
Fruit large, roundish-oval, reddish-brown; flesh yellow, juicy, good; freestone; late.

Rangheri. Insititia. 1. Koch Deut. Obst. Sort. 571. 1876. 2. Lange Allgem. Garten 2:420. 1879. 3. Mas Le Verger 6:155. 1866-73. 4. Lauche Deut. Pom. PL IV. 14. 1882. 5, Mathieu Nom. Pom. 444. 1889. 6. Can. Exp. Farms RpU 465. 1900.  Mirabelle de Rangheri 3. Mirabelle Hâtive de Rangheri 5. Mirabelle Rangheri 5. Mirabelle de Rangheri 5. Mirabelle Rangheris 2. Rangheri1s Aprikosen Pflaume 5. Rangheri1 s Frilhe Gelbe Mirabelle 4, 5. Rangheri1 s Frilhe Mirabelle 5. Rangheri's Gelbe Mirabelle 5. Rangheris Mirabelle 1. Rangheris Mirabelle 3. Rangheri's Mirabelle 4, 5, 6.
Raised by Liegel from the stone of the Abricotee de Braunau plum, and dedicated by him to M. Henri Rangheri, a merchant at Prague, Bohemia. Tree of medium vigor; fruit medium, roundish-oval; suture indistinct; cavity shallow; skin golden-yellow with red spots on the sunny side; flesh yellow, juicy, tender, sweet, aromatic; of first quality; freestone; mid-season; valuable for table and household purposes.

Rareripe. Americana. 1. S. Dak. Sta. Bul. 26:14. 1891. 2. Ibid. 93:32. 1905.  Rare Ripe 1.
Tree hardy and productive; fruit small, dark red; flesh sweet; clingstone; inferior to Harrison but better than De Soto; mid-season.

Ray. Hortulana mineri X Munsoniana. 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. \i\2i]}. 1899.
A supposed cross between Miner and Wild Goose from A. L. Bruce of Basin Springs, Texas. Fruit small to medium, oval to roundish; cavity medium deep; suture faint; dark red; flesh yellow; clingstone.

Raymond. Species? 1. Cornell Sta. BuL 38:80. 1892.
Mentioned by Bailey in 1892 in an unclassified list of plums.

Raynes. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:36. 1903. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 66. 1905. Dunlop 53 1.
Disseminated by W. W. Dunlop, Outremont, Quebec. Fruit of the prune type, above medium size, oval; suture distinct; dark reddish-purple; bloom moderate; flesh yellowish-green, firm, sweet; good; freestone; mid-season.

Reagan. Hortulana X Americana. 1. Tex. Cat. 1907.
An offspring of Wayland crossed with an Americana; introduced by the Texas Nursery Company in 19.07. Fruit large, red, rich; good; very late.

Reagles Gage. Domestica. 1. Cultivator 6:269. 1858. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 941. 1869. 3. Hogg Fruit Man. 720. 1884. Reagles' Gage 1, 2.
A seedling of Washington raised by C. Reagles, Schenectady, New York. Tree vigorous, upright; fruit of medium size, spherical; suture broad, shallow; greenish-yellow, splashed with darker green; bloom light; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, sweet, vinous; good; freestone; mid-season.

Rebecca. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 18 94-1900.
Fruit above medium in size, roundish-oblong, purplish-red; clingstone; mid-season.

Reche. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894-1901.
Tree strong and productive; fruit large for the species, globular; dull purplish-red; clingstone.

Red Cloud. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 18971900.
Fruit small, roundish, mottled red; inferior; clingstone.

Red Gage. Domestica. 1. Am. Card. Col. 588. 1806. 2. N. Y. Agr. Soc. Rpt. 292 fig. 1848. 3. Hooper W. Fr. Book 251. 1857. 4. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 443. 1889. 5. Guide Prat. 157, 162, 364. 1895.  Auserlesene Rote Reine-Claude 4. Auserlesene rothe Reineclaude 5. Lombard 3 incor. Prince's Red Gage 2, 4, 5. Prince's Rote Reine-Claude 4. Prinzens rothe Reineclaude 5. Red Gage 4, 5. Reine-Claude Rouge Americaine 5. Reine-Claude rouge de Prince 5. Reine-Claude Rouge de Prince 4.
Red Gage was grown from a seed of Reine Claude in 1790 by William Prince, Flushing, Long Island, New York. Fruit of medium size, oval; suture lacking; stem short; dark red in the sun ranging to pale red in the shade; flesh greenish, tender, juicy, sweet; very good; stone small, free; mid-season.

Red Gage of Dutchess County, Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 942. 1869.
Originated in Dutchess County, New York. Fruit of medium size, roundish-oval, slightly compressed; suture distinct; cavity large; color yellow overlaid with a light reddish-purple; dots numerous; flesh yellow, juicy; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Red Glass. Hortulana mineri X Domestica. 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 14:272. 1901. 2. Ia. Sta. Bul. 114:143. 1910.
Red Glass originated with Theodore Williams of Benson, Nebraska, as a seedling of Miner pollinated by Quackenboss. Fruit large, oval, red; bloom thick; flesh firm, meaty, tender, sweet; good; mid-season.

Red Glass Junior. (Hortulana mineri X Domestica) X Domestica. 1. Am. Br. Assoc. Rpt. 2:185. 1906.
A hybrid from Theodore Williams of Benson, Nebraska, from seed of Red Glass crossed with Quackenboss. The variety is hardy and gives promise of value in Nebraska.

Red Horse. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1897.
Fruit of medium size, roundish-oblong, dull red; inferior; clingstone.

Redick. Americana. Mentioned in Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 228. 1909.

Red Magdalene. Domestica. Mentioned in Watkins Cat. 1892.

Red May. Triflora X Munsoniana. 1. Sherman Cat. 189.8. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 224. 1901.
A seedling of Abundance fertilized by Wild Goose from A. L. Bruce, Texas; introduced by J. S. Kerr, Sherman, Texas, in 1898. Fruit of medium size, oblong, pointed, deep red; similar to Red June but ten days earlier.

Red October. Species? 1. Tex. Dept. Agr. Bul. 12:103. 1910. A variety reported as worthless in Hale County, Texas.

Red Panhandle. Angustifolia watsoni. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Ibid. 1897. 3. Bailey Ev. of Nat. Fr. 222, 223. 1898. 4. Waugh Plum Cult. 233. 1901. Of the same origin as Purple Panhandle. Tree irregular and straggling in habit, very productive; fruit small to medium, irregular-oval or oblong, dull dark red with scattering dots; bloom thick; skin tough; flesh reddish-yellow; very poor; stone large, roundish-oval, slightly flattened, clinging; early.

Red Pear. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576. 1629. 2. Rea Flora 208. 1676. 3. Ray Hist. Plant. 2:1528. 1688. 
Mentioned as poor in quality. May be identical with the Pear Plum.

Red Peascod. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576, 577. 1629. 2. Rea Flora 208.  1676. 3. Ray Hist. Plant. 2:1529. 1688. Red Pescod 1.
Cultivated in the Seventeenth Century. Fruit elongated, watery; poor in quality; very late.

Red Perdrigon. Domestica. 1. Duhamel Trait. Arb. Fr. 2:86. 1768. 2. Kraft Pom. Aust. 2:27, Tab. 172 fig. 2. 1796. 3. Willich Dom. Enc. 4:299. 1803. 4. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 312. 1845. 5. Oberdieck Dent. Obst. Sort. 445. 1881. 6, Mathieu Nom. Pom. 448. 1889.  Die rothe Rebhuhnpflaume 2. Perdrigon rouge 1. Perdrigon rouge 2, 4, 6. Podie-brader Pflaume 6. Red Perdrigon 6. Roter Perdrigon 6. Rot her Perdrigon 5.
Red Perdrigon was first described by Duhamel; probably introduced into America during the latter part of the Eighteenth Century. Tree very productive; fruit small, oval; cavity small; suture lacking; dark red; dots small; bloom heavy; flesh yellow, firm, juicy, sweet, aromatic; freestone; late mid-season.

Red Primordian. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 575. 1629. 2. Floy-Lindley Guide Orch. Card. 286, 382. 1846. 3. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 943. 1869, 4. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:149, fig. 75. 1873.  Early Red Primordian 2. Red Primordian 2, 4. Rouge Hâtive 4.
Common in Europe nearly three centuries ago. Fruit of medium size, pear-shaped, reddish, pleasant; good; early. Downing and Mas described a variety under this name supposed to have originated with William Prince. It is very similar to the older variety of which it may be a seedling.

Red Prune. Domestica. 1. Horticulturist 8:536. 1853. Bottle Plum 1.
From Pennsylvania. Fruit long-pyriform, with a slender neck; suture distinct; pale red; good; it closely resembles the Red Date.

Red Skin. Munsoniana. Letter from Kerr.
Originated by Theodore Williams, Benson, Nebraska.

Red Violet 1. Ray Hist. Plant. 2.11528. 1688.
Mentioned by Ray in the preceding reference together with blue and amber sorts but without description.

Red Virginal. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 153. 1831. 2. Prince Pom. Man. 2:74. 1832. 3. Elliott Fr. Book 429. 1854. 4. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 950. 1869. 5. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 448. 1889. Rote Jungfernpflaume 5. Virgin 2. Virgin 3, 4. Virginal a Fruit Blanc 4 incor. Virginal a gros Fruit blanc 4 incor. Virginal Blanc 4 incor. Virginale 3. Virginale a Fruit Rouge 5. Virginale Blanc 4 incor. Virginale Rouge 2, 5. Virginal Rouge 1. White Virginale 4 incor.
Fruit of medium size, roundish, reddish-purple; bloom thick; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy; good; semi-free.

Red Winter. Domestica. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 61. 1887. Krasnaya osimaya 1.
Imported by the Iowa Agricultural College.

Reed. Hortulana. 1. N. J. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 12. 1882. 2. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 11:286 fig. 1898.
Originated with P. H. Reed of Hightstown, New Jersey, from pits brought from Illinois; introduced by Charles Black of the same place. Tree vigorous; leaves large, dark green; fruit small, round; suture a faint line; skin thick; dark red; dots yellow; flesh yellow, meaty; quality fair; stone turgid, semi-clinging; late.

Reel. Americana mollis. I, Kerr Cat. 1898. 2. Terry Cat. 1900.
Grown by H. A. Terry of Crescent, Iowa; a seedling of Van Buren; first fruited in 1896. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit large, pale yellow with a red cheek; good.

Regina. Nigra? 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 426. 1900.
A seedling raised at Indian Head Experimental Farm, Northwest Territory, Canada. Fruit small, red; skin thick; good.

Reine-Claude Abricotine. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 445. 1889. 2+ Guide Prat. 156, 363. 1895.
Fruit small, whitish; flesh light yellow, sweet; good; early.

Reine Claude d'Ecully. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 445. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 153, 364. 1895.
Tree vigorous; fruit large, round; cavity small; suture distinct; greenish-yellow; bloom thin; flesh firm, sweet, juicy; good; freestone; mid-season.

Reine Claude d'Oberdieck. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 446. 1889.

Reine Claude de Brignais. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 452. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 162, 364. 1895.  Reine-Claude de Brignais 1. Violette Reine-Claude Von Brignais 1.
Said to be superior to Reine Claude.

Reine Claude de PEchoisier. Domestica. i. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 2nd Ser. 3:55. 1900.
Of French origin. Not hardy in Canada.

Reine Claude de MezeL Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 2nd Ser. 3:55. 1900.
Of French origin. Tree vigorous; fruit medium, globular; suture shallow; skin greenish-yellow; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet; early.

Reine Claude de Razaimbaut. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 446. 1889. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 2nd Ser. 3:55. 1900.  Reine-Claude de Razaimbaut 1. Reine-Claude de Razimbaud 1. Reine-Claude Pr#coce de Razimbaud 1.
Imported from France by the Canadian Experimental Farm at Agassiz, British Columbia. Tree vigorous; fruit small, roundish; skin green; flesh green, juicy, sweet; mid-season.

Reine Claude de Saint-Avertin. Domestica. i. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 446. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 155, 364. 1895.
Fruit rather large, roundish, greenish-yellow blushed with red; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet, aromatic; very good; late.

Reine Claude de Vandenbrok. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 446.  1889. Reine Claude de Wazon. Domestica. 1. Guide Prat. 160.364, 1895. 2. Baltet Cult. Fr. 491. 1908.
Tree vigorous, productive; fruit nearly large, obovate, greenish-yellow, washed with red; flesh juicy, sweet and acidulated; very good; mid-season.

Reine Claude Descarde. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 445. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 163, 364. 1895.
An inferior variety of the Reine Claude type.

Reine Claude Hamaitre. Domestica. z. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 446. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 163, 364. 1895.
A variety of the Reine Claude type of doubtful value.

Reine Claude Monstrueuse de Mezel. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom.

Pom. 446. 1889. Reine Claude Sagot. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 2nd Ser. 3:56. 1900.
Probably of French origin; as tested in Canada, tree weak; foliage small, scanty; fruit medium in size, globular; stem one-half inch long; cavity small; suture distinct; skin whitish-yellow; flesh yellowish, rather dry, tender, fine-grained, very sweet; stone small, roundish, free; mid-season.

Reine Claude Von Bollwiller. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 445.  1889.

Reine des Mirabelles. Insititia X Domestica. 1. Guide Prat. 164, 364. 1895. 2. Rev. Hort. 476. 1901. Konigin der Mirdbellen 1.
Produced by crossing the Mirabelle and the Reine Claude. Tree vigorous and productive; fruit large, yellow, dotted with red on the sunny side, juicy; good; mid-season.

Reine Victoria. Domestica. i. Hogg Fruit Man. 380. 1866.
According to Hogg this is a French variety distinct from Victoria. Fruit roundish-oval, reddish-purple; flesh juicy, rich, agreeable, freestone; similar to Kirke but two or three weeks later.

Reisenzwetsche. Species? 1. Mathieu Norn. Pom. 447. 1889.  Reine-Claude Geante 1.
Mathieu gives reference to Monatsschrift für Pomologie 281 1858.

Reizenstein Yellow Prune. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 943. 1869.  2. Mas Le Verger 6:119. 1866-73. 3. Mathieu Norn. Pom. 446. 1889. 4. Guide Prat. 161, 362. 1895.  De Reizeinstein 4. Jaune de Reizenstein 4. Pruneau Jaune de Reizenstein 2, 3. Prune de Reizenstein 2,3. Quetsche Jaune de Reizenstein 3. Quetsche Jaune de Reizenstein 2, 4. Reizensteiner Gelbe Zwetsche 3. Reizensteiner Gelbe Zwetsche 2, 4. Reizen-steiner Pflaume 2, 3, 4. Reizensteiner Zwetsche 3, 4. Reizenstein1 s Yellow Prune 2, 3, 4. Susina Settembrica Quialla 3, 4.
Probably originated in Italy. Tree of medium vigor, very prolific, not hardy; fruit of medium size, irregularly ovate; suture indistinct; skin golden-yellow; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet; stone rough, free.

Reutlinger Frühzwetsche. Domestica? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 447. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 162, 363. 1895.  Quetsche Prdcoce de Reutlingen 2 Reutlinger Frühzwetsche 2.
An attractive variety ripening in early mid-season.

Rhinebeck Yellow Gage. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 405. 1857.  Rhinebeck Yellow Gage 1.
Originated at Rhinebeck, New York. Tree vigorous; fruit large, oval; suture deep; cavity shallow; yellow; flesh coarse, juicy, sweet, pleasant; clingstone; mid-season.

Rhodes. Domestica. 1. Quintinye Com. Gard. 68, 69. 1699.
Mentioned by Quintinye " as long and black."

Rhue. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 944. 1869. Rhue's Seedling 1.
A seedling from Pennsylvania. Fruit large, oval; suture broad, shallow; cavity deep; reddish-purple; flesh greenish-yellow, coarse, juicy, sweet, vinous; semi-clinging; good; early. Richard Trotter. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 98. 1898.
Reported as one of the hardiest of the European varieties tested by the Experimental Farm at Ottawa, Canada.

Richland. Domestica. 1. Gard. Mon. 1:2, 154 fig. 1859. 2. Ibid. 5:18. 1863.  3. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 944. 1869. 4. Can. Exp. Farm. Bul. 43:36. 1903. Copper 2.
Originated on the farm of Randall Elden, Richland, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, about 1820. Tree hardy, vigorous, productive and said to he resistant to the curculio; fruit medium in size, oval; cavity small; suture aline; skin thick, bluish; dots small; flesh greenish-yellow, firm, slightly sweet; quality fair; stone large, oval, flat, clinging; mid-season; listed in the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 187$.

Riga 11. Domestica. 1. Mich. Sta. Rpt. in. 1887.
Imported from Russia by J. L. Budd of the Iowa Experiment Station.

Rigny. Domestica. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 683. 1884. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 420. 1889.  Admiral Rigny 2. Admiral de Rigny 1. Amir at de Rigny 2. Georg IV 2. Jackson? 2.
Described as of medium size, roundish-oval; suture shallow; yellowish-green flaked and striped with darker green, with a few crimson dots on the sunny side; stem of medium length; cavity shallow; flesh yellow, tender, melting, juicy and rich; nearly freestone; early.

Rising Sun. Domestica. 1. Kenrick Am. Orch. 258. 1832.  Corse's Rising Sun 1.
Originated by Henry Corse, Montreal, Canada. Fruit large, bright yellow, tinged with red next to the sun; good; productive.

Rivers Early. Insititia. 1. Jour. Hort. N. S. 29:177. 1875. 2. Hogg Fruit Man. 695. 1884. 3. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 447. 1889. 4. Rivers Cat. 35. 1898.  Damas Précoce de Rivers 3. Rivers' Early Damson 1, 3, 4.
Grown by Thomas Rivers, Sawbridgeworth, England, from a seed of St. Etienne. Fruit of medium size, sweet and juicy; good.

Robert. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 87:15. 1901. Robert's Freestone 1.
Fruit of medium size, oblong, flattened; suture a line; light greenish-yellow overlaid with purplish-red; skin thick, tough; flesh moderately firm, sweet but not rich; stone nearly free.

Roby Yellow. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 944. 1869.
A seedling raised by H. R. Roby, Fredericksburg, Virginia. Tree moderately vigorous; fruit small, round; suture broad, shallow; cavity small; greenish-yellow; bloom heavy; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, sweet; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Rockford. Americana. 1. U.S.D.A. Rpt. 392. 1891. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 161 fig. 1901. 3. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 128. 1906.
Introduced in 1889 by C. G. Patten of Charles City, Iowa, who found the variety in 1871 on the farm of O. J. Green who, in turn, had brought it as a young tree from a grove near Rockford. Tree productive; fruit medium in size, roundish; cavity medium; suture shallow; skin thick, tough; dark and somewhat purplish-red; bloom thick; dots small; flesh yellow; good; stone large, oval, flattened, clinging; mid-season; listed by the American Pomological Society since 1897.

Rocky Mountain. Species? 1. Can. Hort. 15:157. 1892. 2. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:80. 1892. Rocky Mountain Seedling 2.
Reported in the Canadian Horticulturist as a "heavy cropper and of first quality." Bailey mentions a "Rocky Mountain Seedling " in an unclassified list. The Rocky Mountain described by Waugh is not to be confused with these two varieties as it is undoubtedly a Sand Cherry.

Rodney, Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 152. 1831. Rodney Gage 1.
Described in the London Horticultural Society catalog as large, oval, purple; quality fair; clingstone.

Rodt Blaue Zwetsche. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 447. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 163, 365. 1895.
"A variety of little merit."

Rodt Frühe Grosse Pflaumenzwetsche. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom.  447. 1889. Grosse Hâtive de Rodt.

Rognon D'Ane. Domestica. 1. Prince Pom. Man. 2:100. 1832.
Fruit large, oval, dark purple; mid-season; similar to Yellow Egg except in color.

Rognon de Coq. Domestica. 1. Quintinye Com. Gard. 68. 1699. 2. Miller Card* Diet. 3:1754. 3. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 152. 1831.  Quetsche Rognon de Coq 3.
Mentioned only by the earlier writers. Fruit long; suture deep, prominent; light yellow streaked with red; clingstone; late.

Rollande Galloppi. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 944. 1869.
Fruit of medium size, long-oval, necked; suture distinct; cavity small; yellowish-green, dotted with crimson in the sun; bloom light; flesh yellowish-green, juicy, sweet; good; clingstone; late.

Ronald Fancy. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 945. 1869.
Fruit of medium size, oval; suture distinct; cavity medium deep; yellow, striped with green; bloom thin; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, sugary, vinous, sprightly; good; freestone; very late.

Roselle. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:287 1900. Hoffman Seedling 1.
A chance seedling grown by Ernest Hoffman, Roselle, Carroll County, Iowa, in 1892. Fruit large, roundish-oval, yellow blushed with red; sweet; semi-free; mid-season.

Ros-Prium Double. Domestica. 1. Knoop Fructologie 2:62. 1771.
Similar to the Horse plum except that it is smaller.

Ross. Domestica. 1. Can. Hort. 23:438. 1900. Ross Seedling 1.
A seedling, supposedly of Bradshaw, grown by J. T. Ross, Hamilton, Canada Fruit of much the same appearance as Bradshaw but inferior in quality; earlier in season.

Rossy Frühe Zwetsche. Species? Listed in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 447. 1889.

Rossy's Früh Zwetsche. Rostrave Bell. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 945. 1869.
Originated with John D. Stephens, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit large, roundish-oval; suture broad, shallow; cavity deep; reddish-purple; dots brown; flesh yellow, coarse, rather dry, vinous; good; semi-clinging ; mid-season.

Rote Mirabelle. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 448. 1889.

Damasine Kleine Kirsch Pjiaume Mirabelle Rouge. Rotes Zeiberl. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 448. 1889.  Rote Herbst Zeiberl 1.
Referenced by Mathieu from Wiener Garten-Zeitung 288. 1884.

Rote Zwetsche. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Norn. Pom. 448. 1889. Rosinen Pflaume, Spitzige Rote Pflaume. Spitz Pflaume.

Rothe Jungfernpflaume. Domestica. 1. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 445. 1881.
A German variety said to be unproductive in dry soil.

Rouge Hâtive de Nitka. Domestica. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 96. 1877.
Mentioned in the preceding reference as of medium size, purple, juicy, rich; good; mid-season.

Roulette. Munsoniana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:50, 86. 1892. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 142. 1897. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 188. 1901. Rowlett 2.
Supposed to have originated in Texas. Fruit of medium size, oval; cavity small; suture a line; skin thin; bright red; dots numerous; bloom thin; flesh yellow; quality fair; stone oval, flattened, clinging; mid-season. Listed in the catalog of the American Pomological Society since 1899.

Round. Species? 1. III. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 83. 1888.
J. Webster of Centralia, Illinois, states that he received this variety from a Mr. Spears of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Of high quality; especially adapted for canning.

Round Leaf Wonderful. Domestica. 1. N. Y. Sta. Rpt. 12:612. 1893.
An obscure variety found only in a few collections. Fruit of medium size, long-oval; suture a line; cavity small; dark purple; bloom thick; dots small; flesh yellow, fine-grained, tender, sweet, mild; very good; stone flattened, oval, free; mid-season.

Rowley. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:36. 1903.
Originated with Jos. Rowley, Cummings Bridge, Ontario. Tree very productive; fruit above medium size, round; suture a line; purplish-red; flesh yellow, moderately juicy, firm, sweet, rich; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Royal. Domestica. 1. Rea Flora 207. 1676. 2. Quintinye Com. Card. 69. 1699. 3. Langley Pomona 92, PI. XX fig. 8. 1729. 4. Kraft Pom. Aust. 2:40, Tab. 191 fig. 1. 1796. 5. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 945. 1869. 6. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 438. 1889. Die Konigliche grosse Pflaume 4. French Royal 4, 5, 6. Kings Plum 1. Konigs-pflaume 6. La Roy ale 5, 6. La Royal 2. Prune Roy ale 5, 6. Royal tres-grosse 4, 6. Royal Red 5, 6. Royal 5, 6. Royal 2. Royal Plumb 3. Roy ale 5. Roy ale 6. Sir Charles Wor sky's 3, 5, 6. Wahre Konigspflaume 6.
Royal is an Old World variety supposed to have originated in France. Tree a slow grower; top bushy; shoots pubescent; fruit medium in size, roundish; suture distinct; cavity narrow; reddish-purple; dots small, brownish; bloom thick; flesh yellow, melting, juicy, rich, subacid; quality very good; stone small, roundish, pointed,free; mid-season.

Royal Bullace. Insititia. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 689. 1884.
Royal Bullace is the largest of the Bullaces. Fruit round; suture faint; cavity wide, deep; stem short, slender; greenish-yellow, mottled with red; bloom thin; flesh green, sprightly; good; freestone; late.

Royal Dauphine. Domestica. 1. Miller Gard. Kal. 184. 1734. 2. Forsyth Treat. Fr. Trees 21. 1803.  Royal Dauphin 2. Royale Dauphin 1.

Fruit large, oval, dark red shading to light red, mottled; bloom thick; flesh greenish-yellow, sweet; good; freestone; mid-season.

Royal de Braunac. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 2nd App. 157. 1876.
Fruit of medium size, roundish-oval; suture very slight; light red with dark purple blush; dots numerous, brown; bloom heavy; flesh greenish-yellow, coarse, rather firm, juicy, rich; clingstone; mid-season.

Royale de Behrens. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 422. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 163, 365. 1895.  Behren's Konigspflaume 1. Behrens Konigspflaume 2. Royale de Behrens 1.  Listed in the preceding references.

Royale de Siebenfreud. Domestica? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 450. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 158, 365. 1895.  Royale de Siebenfreund 1. Siebenfreund's Konigspflaume 1. Siebenfreud1 s Konigs-pflaume 2.
Grown by Liegel and named by him in honor of M. Siebenfreud, of Tyrnau, Hungary. Fruit large, long-oval, brownish-red; flesh pale yellow, juicy; good; mid-season.

Royale Hâtive de Liegel. Domestica. 1. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 420. 1881. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 430. 1889. 3. Guide Prat. 163, 365. 1895.  Frühe Konigspflaume 2. Frühe Konigspflaume 3. Konigspflaume Frühe 1. Rouge de Liegel 2. Royale Hâtive de Liegel 2. Royale Hâtive 2.
Similar to the Royal Hâtive but inferior in quality.

Royale Violette de Keindl. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 437. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 157, 365. 1895.  Keindl1 s Violette Konigspflaume 2. Keindt's Violette Konigspflaume 1. Royale Violette de Keindt 1.
Originated by Liegel and named after Mr. Keindl, a German pomologist. Fruit large, oval, violet; flesh greenish-yellow, firm, juicy; good; early.

Royal Pea. Domestica. Mentioned in Forsyth Treat. Fr. Trees. 21. 1803.

Royer Aprikosen Pflaume. Domestica. Listed in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 449. 1889.  Abricotee de Royer. Prune-Abricot de Royer.

Ruben Burgunder Zwetsche. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 449.  1889.

Ruby. Domestica. 1. Gard. and For. 7:243. 1894.
Charles H. Shinn of Berkeley, California, describes this variety as a dark red prune coming from Lake County, California.

Ruby. Triflora X Munsoniana. 1. U.S.D.A. Pom. Rpt. 46. 1895. 2- Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 12:228. 1899. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 224. 1901.
Originated by J. S. Breece, Fayetteville, North Carolina, from seed of Abundance pollinated with Wild Goose; fruit borne in 1894. Fruit of medium size, oval; suture faint; dark, wine-red; skin thick; fiesh yellow, firm, meaty, slightly fibrous, sweet, rich; good; clingstone.

Ruby. Munsoniana. 1. Orchard Home Nur. Cat. 7. 1891. 2. Terry Cat. 8. 1900.
A seedling of Wild Goose introduced by L. T. Sanders of the Orchard Home Nursery, Plain Dealing, Louisiana, in 1891. Fruit slightly smaller than the parent, round, red with small dots; flesh solid; good; a good shipper.

Rudolph. Domestica. ! Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 438. 1881. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 449. 1889.  Frankfurter Pflaume 2. Rudolphspflaume 1. Rudolph Pflaume 2.
In Germany considered valuable for dessert, compotes and market. Tree quick in growth, large; shoots almost glabrous, dark brownish-red; fruit large, of prune shape; suture shallow; halves usually equal; stem hairy; cavity shallow; skin easily removed, yellow often flecked with red, sometimes reddish; flesh yellow, tender, juicy, very sweet, sprightly; nearly freestone; mid-season.

Rue. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:288. 1900. 2. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 300. 1903. 3. S. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:34. 1905. /. B. Rue 1, 2, 3.
Originated with J. B. Rue, Pottawattamie County, Iowa; distributed by Professor J. L. Budd. The fruit closely resembles Stoddard except in the stone, that of the latter being large and flat, while that of the former is small and round.

Ruff Choice. Domestica. 1. Tex. Sta. Bul. 32:484. 1894.
Under test at the Texas Experiment Station.

Ruff Spanish. Species? 1. Tex. Sta. Bul. 32:490. 1894.
Under test at the Texas Experiment Station.

Russian Mirabelle. Insititia. 1. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 324. 1903.
Described by Budd and Hansen as a Russian plum; hardier than the Mirabelle of western Europe and differing in tree and fruit. Fruit small, roundish-oblate, bright yellow; suture indistinct to distinct at the apex; cavity narrow; stem medium in length and thickness; flesh yellow, juicy, rich; quality best; freestone.

Russian No. 2. Domestica. 1. Mich. Sta. Rpt. in. 1887. 2. Colo. Sta. Bul. 50:45. 1898.
Imported from Russia. Fruit of medium size, irregular in shape; suture a line; deep purple with heavy bloom; flesh firm, subacid; quality fair; freestone.

Russian No. 3. Domestica. 1. Mich. Sta. Rpt. in. 1887. 2. S. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:35. 1905.
Said to be unproductive and not hardy.


Sada. Americana mollis. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:59. 1897. 2. Ibid. 87:15. 1901. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 163. 1901.
A seedling of Van Buren grown by H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa; first fruited in 1893. Fruit large, round; suture a line; cavity shallow; red over a yellow ground with many conspicuous dots; skin thick, tough, astringent; flesh dark yellow, mushy; quality fair; semi-clinging; mid-season.

Saffold. Species? 1. Am. Card. 14:51. 1893. 2. Bailey Ev. Nat Fruits 175. 1898.
A variety brought into Texas from Alabama about 1853 by General Saffold of Sequin, Texas, where for years it was the only cultivated plum. Although inferior to later introductions, it is excellent for preserves and still retains a place among Texan varieties.

Sagetsuna. Triflora. 1. Normand Sp. Cir. 1895. 2. Kerr Cat. 8. 1901. 3. Ga. Sta. Bul. 68:6, 33. 1905. Sagetsuma 3. Wasse Botankyo 2.


A variety imported from Japan by J. L. Normand, Marksville, Louisiana. In 1901, J. W. Kerr fruited Sagetsuna and Wasse Botankyo and found them identical. Tree vigorous with straggling habit; fruit large, conic, red over a yellow ground, with numerous dots; flesh yellow, firm ; good; clingstone; earlier than Abundance.

St. Anne. Domestica. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 40. 1899. Bonne St. Ann 1.
Originated in Vermont; catalogued by the American Pomological Society in 1899 and 1901. Fruit blue; good.

Saint Antoine. Domestica. 1. Traite Prat, Sech. Fruits 172. 1893.  Prune de Bordeaux 1.
A plum found in the neighborhood of Gironde, France. The prunes from this variety are know as Prunes de Bordeaux. The fruits are less esteemed than those of the Agen.

Saint Antonio. Domestica. Mentioned in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 153. 1831.

St. Aubert. Domestica. 1. Gard. Chron. 36:1205. 1873. 2. Guide Prat 157, 365. 1895,  Saint Aubert 2.
Of Belgian origin; resembles Golden Drop but is a month earlier and is superior in quality and productiveness; fruit oval, rounded at both ends, greenish spotted and marked with a crimson blush; color and flavor of the flesh like Reine Claude.

Sainte Therese. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 449. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 160,365. 1895.
Tree vigorous, productive; fruit large, long-oval, reddish-purple; flesh fine-grained; good; clingstone; mid-season.

St. Etienne. Insititia. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 381. 1866. 2. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 431. 1881. 3. Gard. Chron. 24:187. 1885. 4. Guide Prat. 160, 365. 1895. 5. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 480. 1904.  Mamelonnee? 4. Pflaume von St. Etienne 4. Pflaume von St. Etienne 2.
Tree vigorous; fruit globular or frequently roundish-oval; suture distinct dividing the sides equally; stem medium; cavity narrow; skin not adherent; yellow blushed and spotted with red on the sunny side; flesh yellow, tender, melting, juicy, sweet with a fine flavor; stone small; free; early.

St. James. ' Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 152. 1831. 2. Mag. Hort. 9:165. 1843. 3. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 311. 1845.  St. James* Quetsche 1, 2, 3.
A strain of the German Prune; tree very productive; fruit of medium size, oblong, purple; good; clingstone; mid-season.

St. John. Domestica. 1. Willich Dom. Enc. 4:195. 1803. 2. Horticulturist 3:396. 1848. 3. Elliott Fr. Book 429. 1854.  Prune de St. Jean 3. Prune de St. Jean 2.
A foreign variety of unknown origin. Tree very productive; fruit of medium size, round, purplish-blue; flesh greenish-yellow; early.

St. Lawrence. Domestica. 1. Mich. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 38. 1874. 2. Barry Fr. Garden 416. 1883. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 122. 1901.
A seedling of Smith Orleans grown on the grounds of Ellwanger et Barry, Rochester, New York. Tree vigorous and productive; fruit variable in size, averages medium, roundish-oval; cavity deep, rounded; stem short; suture shallow; dark reddish-purple; bloom heavy; flesh yellow, juicy, melting, sweet; quality poor to fair; clingstone; mid-season.

Saint Martin Quetsche. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 152. 1831. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 283. 1845. 3. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 55. 1852. 4. Elliott Fr. Book 414. 1854. 5. Mas Le Verger 6:49. 1866-73.  Coe's Late Red 5. Prune Violette D'Octobre 5. Rouge Tardive De Coe 5. Saint-Martin 5. Saint Martin's 4. Saint Martin's Quetsche 4. Violette October Pflaume 5.
Of German origin; introduced into this country during the second quarter of the Nineteenth Century. Fruit of medium size, ovate, yellow, sometimes blushed; covered with a thin bloom; flesh yellowish, juicy, rich; good; late; fruit hangs to the tree long after maturity.

Saint Pierre. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 449. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 156, 366. 1895.
Fruit resembles Mirabelle, though it is larger; yellow marbled with red; flesh yellow; good; stone nearly free; very early.

St. Reme. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 153. 1831.
Cultivated in the garden of the Horticultural Society of London.

Sandalls. Domestica. 1. Jour. Hort. N. S. 15:247. 1868. 2. Card. Chron. 30:1311, 1347. 1870. Sandall's Plum 2.
Originated about 1800 with a Mr. Sandall at Crab Tree, Fulton, England. Tree vigorous and attains great size; fruit of medium size, round, dark purple; flesh firm, reddish-yellow, juicy, pleasant; good; clingstone; very late.

Sanders. Angustifolia varians? 1. Waugh Plum Cult. 200. 1901. Honey Grove 1.
Introduced by J. S. Kerr, Sherman, Texas, in 1898. Fruit small, purplish-red; quality fair; very early.

Sanderson. Americana. 1. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 300. 1903.
Originated in Minnesota. Fruit large, roundish-oval, light red over a yellow ground; skin slightly astringent; good; semi-clinging.

Sandle. Domestica. Mentioned in Watkins Cat. 1892?

Sandoz. Species? 1. Crete Cat. 1906.
Introduced by E. F. Stephens of the Crete Nursery, Crete, Nebraska. Tree hardy; productive; fruit red; early.

Sand Plum. Angustifolia watsoni. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 889. 1869. 2. Neb. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 173. 1895. 3. Kansas " The Plum" 20,45. 1900.
Sand Plum is the common name for Prunus angustifolia watsoni.

Sannois. Domestica. 1. U.S.D.A. Div. Pom. Bul. 10:20. 1901.  Sannois Quetsche 1.
Originated in Sannois, France. A rather unattractive plum in appearance, but with a fine flavor and high quality. As grown at this Station the tree is small, vigorous, upright-spreading; fruit above medium to large, roundish-oblate, slightly compressed; suture shallow; stem medium in thickness and length; cavity wide, deep ; apex flattened; dull, reddish-purple with darker shades in the sun; bloom moderate; dots numerous,brownish; skin thick, tough; flesh dark coppery-yellow, juicy, rather coarse, very fibrous, tough, firm, sweet; very good; stone medium, irregular-oval, turgid, rough, clinging; very late.

Sansoto. Prunus besseyi X Americana, 1. Cir. S. Dak. Sta. 1910.
Sansota originated in 1907 as a cross between De Soto and Prunus besseyi made by N. E. Hansen of the South Dakota Experiment Station; introduced in 1910. Tree productive; fruit small, round, black; bloom heavy; flesh yellowish-green, sprightly; clingstone.

Santa Rosa. Triflora. 1. Fancher Creek Nur. Cat. 1907. 2. Ibid. 1909.
Originated by Burbank; introduced by the Fancher Creek Nursery Company in 1907. Fruit very large, round, suture distinct; cavity medium deep; dark purplish crimson with thin bloom; flesh reddish near the skin shading to amber near the center; good; clingstone; keeps and ships well.

Sapa. Prunus besseyi X Triflora. 1. 5. Dak, Sta. Bul. 108. 1908.
Grown by Hansen of the South Dakota Experiment Station from a cross of Sultan and a selected seedling of the Prunus besseyi; fruited in 1907. Fruit small, round, glossy, dark purple; flesh dark red.

Saratoga. Domestica. 1. Bailey Ann. Hort. 103. 1889. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 25. 1897. 3. Mich. Sta. Bul. 169:243, 247. 1899. 4. Waugh Plum Cult. 121. 1901. 5. Ohio Sta. Bul. 162:256, 257. 1905.
Introduced by Green's Nursery Company in 1889. Found in a garden at Saratoga Springs, New York, in 1897. The American Pomological Society placed it on its fruit catalog list. As tested at this Station it is identical to the Lombard in fruit-characters but differs in foliage. It is safe to assume that it is a seedling of the Lombard.

Saskatchewan. Nigra? 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 426. 1900.
Taken from the wild by Thomas Stonewall, Manitoba; tested at the Indian Head Experimental Farm, Northwest Territory. Fruit of medium size, red; good; early.

Satin. Hortulana X Triflora. 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 12:228. 1899.
Grown by J. S. Breece, Fayetteville, North Carolina, supposedly from a cross between Moreman and some Japanese variety. Fruit of medium size, roundish-oval; suture a line; red with numerous large, yellow dots; skin thick, tough; flesh firm, yellow; good; clingstone.

Satsugon. Triflora. 1. Rural N. Y. 64:677. 1905.
Originated in 1900 with Levi Bell, Sparkill, New York, from a cross between Ogon and Satsuma. Fruit large, roundish; cavity deep; dark red; flesh red, firm, meaty; freestone; quality good; mid-season. The originator states that this variety will keep in an ordinary cellar for two months after picking.

Satsuland. Triflora X Domestica.? 1. Rural N. Y. 64:677. 1905.
A cross between Satsuma and Richland grown by Levi Bell, Sparkill, New York, about 1900. Fruit below medium size, oval, cavity lacking; stem long; purplish-red; clingstone.

Sauvageon. Domestica. 1. Montreal Hort. Soc. Rpt. 94. 1885.  Corse's Sauvageon 1.
Raised from seed by Henry Corse of Montreal, Canada. Tree strong, vigorous, hardy, productive; fruit dark blue; flesh reddish tinged, firm, sweet and pleasant; late.

Sayer Favorite. Domestica. i. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 94. 1877.
In 1877 J. E. Johnson in a report to the American Pomological Society mentioned this as a very fine seedling variety growing in Utah.

Scaldatone. Domestica. Mentioned in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 153. 1831. Scanarda. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 449. 1889. Die Scanarda. Scanarda.

ScaudatelIa. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 153. 1831. 2, Gallesio Pom. Ital. 2: PI. 1839.  Scaldatello 1. Susino Scaudatella 2.
An old variety well known in Italy. Fruit medium, obovate, yellow; flesh yellow, meaty, juicy and sweet.

Schamal. Domestica. 1. Ann. Pom. Beige 7:31, PI. 1859. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 897. 1869. 3. Le Bon Jard. LIL 1884. 4. Guide Prat. 161, 354. 1895.  Automne de Schamali 2. Damascena Schamali 1, 2, 4. D'Automne de Schamal 2. Prune d'Automne de Schamal 1, 3, 4. Prune d'Automne de Schamali 2. Schamal 4. Schamals Herbstpflaume 4.
Obtained by M. Schamal, nurseryman and pomologist at Jungbunzlau, Bohemia; first noted by Liegel in 1844. Tree vigorous, productive; young branches smooth, brownish-red; fruit large, pear-shaped; suture deep; halves unequal; stem slender, smooth; purplish-red; flesh yellowish, juicy, tender, sweet, vinous; stone oval, free; mid-season.

Schenectady. Domestica. 1. Mag. Hort. 446. 1847. 2. Thomas Am. Fruit Cult. 342. 1849. 3. Elliott Fr. Book 414. 1854. 4. Cultivator 6:52, 269. 1858. 5. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 947. 1869. 6. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 402. 1881.  Catharinenpflaume von Schenectady 6. Schenectady Catharine 4. Schenectady Catherine Plum 1, 2, 5. Schenectady Catherine 3.
Originated at Schenectady, New York, about 1800; introduced by Dr. Herman Wendell. It was described in the American Pomological Society's catalog for twenty-two years. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit small, roundish-oval; suture shallow; cavity small; reddish-purple; bloom thin; flesh greenish-yellow, melting, juicy, rich, sweet; very good; freestone; mid-season; said to reproduce itself from seed.

Schieblers Eier Pflaume. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 449. 1889.

Schiebler Luisante. Domestica. 1. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 409. 1881.
A seedling of the Red Egg plum, similar, but not an improvement.

Schlachter Früh Zwetsche, Domestica? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 449. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 163, 366. 1895.
A variety resembling German Prune.

Schley. Munsoniana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:65, 87. 1892. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 188. 1901. Schley1 s Large Red 1, 2.
Originated near Augusta, Georgia; introduced by J. W. K. Nelson of that state. Fruit of medium size, roundish-oval; suture slight; cavity of medium depth; bright red with numerous dots; skin tough; flesh yellow; poor; clingstone; mid-season.

Schmidt Rote Zwetsche. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 449. 1889.  Quetsche Rouge de Schmidt 1.
Mathieu found it referred to in Wiener Garten-Zeitung 289. 1884.

Schoenthal. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894-1900.
Fruit of medium size, globular, dull red; stone semi-clinging.

Schone von Riom. Domestica. 1. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort/ 445. 1881.
Mentioned as an unproductive variety on dry soils.

Schuyler Gage. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 147. 1831. 2. Cultivator 1:306. 1844. 3. Ibid. 3:19. 1855. 4. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 947. 1869. 5. Mas he Verger 6:103. 186673.  Reine-Claude de Schuyler 5. Schuyler Gage 5.
A seedling of Reine Claude grown at Albany, New York, by General Schuyler of revolutionary fame, who refused to disseminate it. His successor in the ownership of the tree, John Bryan, also guarded the variety jealously, so that it was not until about 1847 when E. C. Mclntosh came into possession of the estate that the variety was introduced. Fruit of medium size, oval; suture shallow; cavity small; yellow splashed with green and dotted with red; bloom thin; flesh yellow, juicy, rich, sweet; very good; freestone; late.

Scioto. Insititia. 1. U.S.D.A. Yearbook 502. 1905.  Mussel 1. Chickasaw 1.
Cultivated for nearly eighty years in the noted Damson district at ChilHcothe, Ohio. It was brought there in 1831 by Miss Palace Hill from the nursery of her brother, Joseph C. Hill, Petersburg, Virginia, who in turn had found it on the farm of Thomas Hill near Boilings Bridge, North Carolina. The variety is of the Damson type and the seed of it was probably brought from Europe by the early colonists. Fruit small, oval, necked; suture slight; cavity lacking; dark blue; bloom heavy; good.

Scribner. Triflora X Munsoniana. 1. U. 5. D. A. Pom. Rpt. 46, Col. PI. 1895. 2. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:19. 1898. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 225. 1901.
From J. S. Breece, Fayetteville, North Carolina, supposedly from a cross of Abundance pollinated by Wild Goose. Fruit large, roundish-oval; suture faint; cavity large; stem short, stout; dark red with many small dots; bloom heavy; flesh yellow, firm, meaty; quality very poor; clingstone.

Sea-Egg. Triflora. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 106:62. 1906.
Bailey mentions this variety as coming from Burbank and describes it as; "globular heart shaped in outline and mottled red; flesh very thick and meaty; orange-yellow, sweet and excellent, with a slight muskiness, cling."

Semiana. Domestica. 1. Forsyth Treat. Fr. Trees 21. 1803. 2, Thomas Am. Fruit Cult. 344, 346. 1849. 3+ C0le Am. Fr. Book 217. 1849. 4. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 947. 1869.  Blue Imperatrice 2, 3, 4. Semiana of Boston 4. Semina 1. Simiana 2.
At one time grown extensively around Boston; often confused with Blue Imperatrice and the Semiana or Suisse of Europe. It is, however, much inferior to either of the above. Tree vigorous, very productive; fruit of medium size, oval, necked; cavity very small; deep purple; flesh greenish, juicy, subacid, not rich; clingstone; very late.

Seper. Nigra? i. Kerr Cat. 1897-1900. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 171. 1901.  Seper's Peach 2. Seper's Peach 1.
Introduced by J. W. Kerr, Denton, Maryland. Fruit large, roundish-oblong, dark red; quality poor; clingstone.

September, Americanat 1. Meneray Cat.
One of H. A. Terry's numerous varieties; introduced by F. W. Meneray of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Fruit large, round, bright red; fair quality. September Damask. Insititia. 1. Duhamel Trait. Arb. Fr. 2:77. 1768. 2. Kraft Pom. Aust. 2:45, Tab. 200 fig. 1. 1796. 3, Prince Pom. Man. 2:84. 1832. 4. Poiteau Pom. Franc, 1. 1846. 5. Hogg Fruit Man. 357. 1866. 6. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 9.47. 1869. 7, Mas Pom. Gen. 2:1. 1873. 8. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 451. 1889.  Damas de Septembre 1, 2, 5, 7. Damas de Septembre 3, 6, 8. Die spate oder September Damaskpflaume 2. Michaelis Pflaume 8. Munchenpftaume 8. Prune Damas de Septembre 4. Prune de Vacance 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. Prunier des Vacances 3, 6, 8. Sankt-MicheVs Pflaume 8. September Damascene 8. September Damask 3. September Damask 7, 8. September Damson 1. Vakanzpflaume 8.
An old variety probably of French origin. Tree of medium vigor, productive; shoots downy; fruit small, roundish to slightly elongated; suture shallow; stem short; cavity shallow; skin tender, purplish-black, covered with a thick bloom; flesh greenish, fine, melting, sweet, agreeable when well ripened; freestone; late.

Shaker. Americana? 1. ///. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 80. 1880.
Grown in Iowa from seed brought from Ohio. Fruit red, coloring a month before maturity; ripening period very long.

Shaw. Species? 1. Bailey Ann. Hort. 103. 1889.
Mentioned by Bailey in the Annals of Horticulture as introduced by Lovett in 1889; not listed in Lovett's catalogs.

Shedd Cluster. Munsoniana? Letter from F. T. Ramsey.
A prolific variety resembling Robinson selected from the wild on the line between Lampasas and Coryelle counties, Texas, by a Mr. Shedd.

Sheldon. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 948. 1869.
Originated on the farm of Wareham Sheldon, Huron, Wayne County, New York. Tree vigorous and prolific; fruit large, oval; suture a line; cavity small; purplish-black; bloom thick; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, aromatic; good; freestone; mid-season.

Shepherd Bullace. Insititia. 1. Watkins Nur. Cat. 48. 1892 ? 2. Thompson Gard. Ass't 4:160. 1901. Shepherd's White 2.
A large Bullace mentioned without description in the preceding references.

Shepway Bulleis. Insititia. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576. 1629.
Parkinson mentions under this name a large "dark bluish-brown" plum of the Bullace type inferior to the common variety.

Shilling. Domestica. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 162:256, 257. 1905.
A variety introduced by J. W. Kerr in 1894. Fruit of medium size, oblong-oval, pointed at the apex; cavity shallow; suture a line; stem short, stout; dull red; bloom light; flesh yellow; quality poor; clingstone; mid-season.

Shipper. Triflora. 1. Burbank Cat. 18. 1893. 2. Childs Cat. 62. 1896.
A seedling of Satsuma grown by Burbank; introduced in 1896 by John Lewis Childs, Floral Park, New York. Fruit oval, light red; flesh very firm, juicy, sweet; keeps and ships well; mid-season.  [distinct from 'Shipper'- ASC]

Shirata Bene. Triflora. 1. Lovett Cat. 1892. 2. Ohio Sta. Bul. 162:256, 257. 1905.
Introduced as a crimson plum but described at the Ohio Experiment Station as yellow.

Shviata Bene. Triflora. 1. Gard. Mon. 367. 1887.  Uwase 1. Blood Plum 1.
H. H. Berger states that the above name and synonyms were applied to a red-fleshed variety indigenous to Japan. Probably a class name.

Siamese. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 284. 1845.
Fruit in pairs firmly attached on one side and hanging from a single stem. The original tree grew in the garden of Win. Roe, Newburgh, New York. Fruit of medium size, obovate; cavity small; skin pale yellow; flesh yellow, juicy, sprightly; quality fair; clingstone; mid-season.

Sidone. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 450. 1889.

Siebenburger Pflaume. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 450. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 163, 366. 1895.
"A variety of little merit."

Sierra. Subcordata. 1. Can. Hort. 19:405. 1896. Sierra Crimson 1.
Reported in the preceding reference by S. S. Watkins, Grizzly Flats, California, as a very good wild plum growing high up in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Said to bear beautiful crimson fruit about the size of the Reine Claude, of good quality; highly recommended for jelly.

Silassy. Domestica. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 118:52. 1895. 2. Ibid. 152:211. 1898.
Imported from Hungary by the Michigan Experiment Station.

Silas Wilson. Americana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:80. 1892. 2. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 105. 1900. 3. Terry Cat. 1900.
Grown by H. A. Terry, from seed of Hawkeye; first fruited in 1891. Fruit large, oval; cavity shallow; suture a line; red over a yellow ground; dots numerous; flesh yellow, juicy; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Silva Koning Claudie. Domestica. 1. Wickson Cal. Fruits 358. 1891.  Miller's Early 1.
Described by Wickson as an undetermined variety brought from Germany by Dr. L. E. Miller, of California, in 1854; introduced by C. M. Silva et Son of Newcastle, California, in 1887. Fruit purplish-black; fine flavor; similar in size to the Early Royal, and about a month earlier.


Sirocco. Triflora X ? ! U.S.D.A. Pom. Rpt. 47. 1895. 2. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:19. 1895.
J. S. Breece, of Fayetteville, North Carolina grew this variety as a cross between Abundance and Marianna. Fruit of medium size, roundish-oval; cavity small; suture a line; coppery-red with streaks of yellow; dots minute, russet; flesh reddish near the skin but yellow towards the stone, juicy; good.

Sisson. Subcordata kellogii. 1. Bailey Ev. Nat. Fruits 216, 217. 1898.
Fruit larger than the wild Subcordata; yellow or red; flesh soft and palatable. See the discussion of Prunus subcordata, page 74.

Sixby. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 87:15. 1901.
Sent out by Edson Gaylord, Nora Springs, Iowa. Fruit small; suture distinct; bright red with conspicuous dots; skin adherent; flesh deep yellow tinged with red, crisp, rich; stone oval.

Six Weeks. Triflora X Angustifolia varians? 1. Kerr Cat. 10. 1901-2. 2. Tex. Nur. Cat. 8. 1907. 3. Tex. Dept. Agr. Bul. 12:102. 1910. Early Six Weeks.
Grown from seed of Abundance crossed with an early " Chicasaw;" named and introduced by J. S. Kerr of Texas. Tree vigorous, upright, rapid in growth, resembles the native variety more than Triflora; fruit large, oblong, yellow tinged red; early.

Skuya. Triflora X Americana. 1. 5. Dak. Sta. Bul. 108. 1908.
A cross between De Soto and Red June made by Hansen of the South Dakota Experiment Station resulted in eight seedlings of which the above was the first to fruit. Fruit large, dark, dull red and yellow, sweet; good; stone small.

Sloe. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894-1900. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:59. 1897.
Sloe is a small native variety that has been given the common name of the wild European plum. (See the following name.) Fruit small, roundish-oblong; skin thick, dark red; clingstone; mid-season. The name is also applied in one locality or another to nearly all of the American species of plums as they grow wild.

Sloe. Spinosa. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576. 1629. 2. Ray Hist. Plant. 1529. 1688. 3. Knoop Fructologie 2:63. 1771. 4. Prince Pom. Man. 2:106. 1832.
Blackthorn 4. Black Prunella 2. Common Sloe 4. Epine noire 4. Petit prunallier 4. Pruneola 1. Prunelle 3. Prune Sauvage 3. Prunus silvestris 3. Prunus spinosa, foliis lanceolatis 3. Prunelier 4. Prunus spinosa 4. Prunier epineux 4. Prunallier 4. Slee-Pruim 3. White Prunella 2. White Blossomed Sloe 4.
See Prunus spinosa.

Small Green Drying. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 153. 1831.
A variety under test in the garden of the London Horticultural Society.

Small White Damson. Insititia. 1. Duhamel Trait. Arb. Fr. 2:81. 1768. 2. Kraft Pom. Aust. 2:44, Tab. 198 fig. 1. 1796. 3. Floy-Lindley Guide Orch. Card. 300. 1846. 4. Noisette Man. Comp. Jard. 2:496. 1860. s+ Mas Le Verger 6:127. 1866-73. 6. Hogg Fruit Man. 726. 1884. 7. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 427. 1889.  Damas blanc petit 6, 7. Damascenen Mirabelle 7. Die Kleine Weisse Damascener-pflaume 2. Kleine Weisse Damascene 7. Klein Weisse Damassener Pflaume 5. Petit Damas Blanc 1,5. Petit Damas Blanc 2, 3, 7. Prune Petit Damas Blanc 5. Prunier Damas k petit fruit blanc 4. Small White Damask 6. Small White Damask 7. White Damask 3.
Probably a French variety. Tree of medium productiveness; shoots smooth; fruit small, roundish, inclining to ovate; stem medium in length, slender; skin yellowish, tinged with red on the sunny side; flesh yellow, firm, juicy, sweet and well flavored; freestone; mid-season; culinary.

Smiley. Munsoniana. 1. Cornell Sta. Btd. 38:80. 1892. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 40. 1899. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 188. 1901. 4. Ga. Sta. Bul. 67:281, 282. 1904.
Thought to have originated in Alabama. Tree vigorous with an open and spreading habit, very productive; fruit medium or above, roundish-oval to roundish-oblong; cavity shallow, rounded; suture a line; red with numerous small, yellow dots; skin tough; flesh yellow, soft; quality fair to good; stone medium, oval, somewhat flattened, clinging; mid-season.

Smith. Americana. I. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 87:18. 1901. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 164. 1901.
A seedling of Quaker grown by C. A. Smith, Caroline County, Maryland. Tree of straggling, open growth, vigorous and productive; fruit large, sometimes very large, roundish-oval to roundish-oblong; suture a line; apex rounded; cavity shallow, narrow; stem short and stout; yellow overspread with dark red; dots small, yellow; bloom heavy; skin thick, tough; flesh deep yellow, juicy, firm, sweet; good to best; stone large, oval, nearly free; medium early. Waugh says, "One of the best Americanas I ever saw."

Smith October. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 146. 1896.
A seedling grown by A. M. Smith, St. Catherines, Ontario. Fruit of medium size, slightly one-sided; suture obscure; black, somewhat mottled; bloom light; flesh dark yellow, firm, subacid; quality fair; stone small, globular with a deep hollow alongside a thickened margin.

Smith Prolific. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 2nd Ser. 3:56. 1900. 2. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 433. 1905.
Under test at the Experimental Farm at Agassiz, British Columbia. Fruit medium in size, globular; cavity deep; stem short; suture distinct and terminating in a depression; yellowish with a purple-red cheek; bloom thin; flesh yellowish, juicy, sprightly; stone of medium size, clinging; mid-season.

Smith Red. Nigra? 1. Wis. Sta. Rpt. 11:345. 1894. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:59, 60. 1897. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 171. 1901. Smith's Red 1,2.
Sent to the Wisconsin Experiment Station in 1890 by I. F. Gale et Son, Waukesha, Wisconsin. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit large, round-oval; suture a line; stem short and stout, set in a shallow cavity; purplish-red, shading to orange; dots minute; bloom thin; skin thick with a very slight harshness; flesh yellow, firm, sweet; fair to good; stone large, oval, thin, clinging; mid-season.

Snelling. Nigra. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 136. 1894. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43*.39-
Grown by W. H. Snelling, New Edinburgh, Ontario, about 1880 from a sprout of an old tree growing at Gatineau Point, Quebec. Fruit medium to large, usually round; stem an inch long, set in a round cavity; suture distinct; yellowish-red, mostly covered with darker red; bloom light; skin thin, tender, apt to crack when fully ripe, slightly astringent; flesh soft, very juicy, sweet; good; stone large, flat; mid-season.

Snyder. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:288. 1900. 2. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 301. 1903.
A seedling of De Soto; originated in 1893 with J. A. Fairchild, Coggon, Linn County, Iowa. Tree vigorous, upright; fruit large, roundish, oblique-truncate; suture a line; apex depressed; stem stout set in a shallow cavity; light red with darker shades of red; dots large; bloom thin; flesh yellow, firm, brisk subacid; fair to good; stone large, oval, flat, clinging.

Souris. Nigra? 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 426. 1900.
Under test at Indian Head, Northwest Territory, Canada.

South Cumberland. Species? 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 151. 1891.
P. J. Berckmans of Augusta, Georgia, says in the above reference that this variety has been known for twenty-six or twenty-seven years in his section. Fruit golden yellow; very good.

Southern Beauty. Species? 1. Wild Bros. Cat. 1892. 2. Kerr Cat. 1894.
Tree peach-like in growth and general appearance; wholly barren; possibly the Blackman renamed; worthless.

Southern Golden. Species? 1. AIa. Sta. Bul. 11:12. 1890.
Noted in the preceding reference as a feeble grower; fruit medium in size, oblong, yellow, tender; quality best; early.

Spanish Damask. Domestica. 1. Kraft Pom. Aust. 2:129, Tab. 175 fig. 2. 1796. 2. Forsyth Treat. Fr. Trees 21. 1803. 3. Willich Dom. Enc. 4:300. 1803. 4. Poiteau Pom. Franc. 1. 1846. 5, Hogg Fruit Man. 693. 1884. 6. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 439. 1889.  Damas d'Espagne 1, 6. Damas D'Espagne 5. Die Damaskpflaume aus Spanien 1. Liegel's Spanische Damascene 6. Prune Damas D'Espagne 4. Prunus hispanica 4. Spanish Damascene 2. Spanish Damask 6. Spanish Red Damask 3.
Fruit small, roundish; suture shallow; cavity small; stem short; purplish-black; bloom thick; flesh yellow, tender, juicy, not rich; quality fair; freestone; mid-season.

Spanish King. Domestica. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 355. 1878. 2. Ibid. 145. 1880. S.Mich. Sta. Bul. 169:243, 247. 1899. 4. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:279. 1900. 5. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 326. 1903. Rex 1, 2. Spanish 3.
Introduced into Marion County, Iowa, by John Laike, a German, under the name Rex, through cions obtained in 1872 from a Spanish consul. Several tests show this variety to be identical with the Lombard. If the origin given is correct, the belief that the Lombard is an old European variety is substantiated.

Spate Zwetsche Von Karlstadt. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 450. 1889. Speckled Gage. Domestica. 1. N. Y. Sta. An. Rpt. 7:92. 1888.
Originated as a sucker from trees secured in Montreal by James Tobias. Fruit small, round, purplish, speckled with conspicuous dots; very sweet; good.

Speer. Americana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:42. 1892. 2. Colo. Sta. Bul. 50:45. 1898. 3. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 305. 1898.
Found wild by J. A. Speer, Cedar Falls, Iowa. Tree small, very hardy, spreading, productive, apt to overbear; fruit medium or below, irregular-oval to oblong; suture distinct; cavity shallow; stem short, slender; purplish-red on a yellow ground; dots numerous, small; bloom heavy; flesh yellow, firm and sweet; good; stone large, oval, flat, ends blunt, semi-clinging; medium late.

Spicer. Munsoniana. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 2nd Ser. 3:56. 1900.
Originated with Charles Luedloff of Minnesota; according to the above reference of no value in British Columbia.

Spilling Jaune-double. Insititia. 1. Knoop Fructologie 2:63. 1771.
Except in its larger size and poorer quality this variety closely resembles the White Wheat.

Splendid. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:288. 1900. 2. Kerr Cat. 6. 1900.
Found wild by I. K. Teeter near Magnolia, Harrison County, Iowa, in 1878; introduced by J. W. Kerr in 1900. Tree dwarfish, bears early, productive; fruit medium in size, dark red; skin tough; flesh yellow, very firm, sweet; good; semi-clinging; medium to late.

Splendor. Domestica. 1. Burbank Cat. 15 fig. 1893. 2. Cal. State Bd. Hort. Rpt. 47. 1897-98. 3. Am. Gard. 21:36. 1900. 4. C7. 5. D. A. Yearbook 274, PL XXXVI. 1903. Cross-bred Prune A.P.-318 1.
Splendor was originated by Luther Burbank in 1886 from a cross between Pond and Agen. In 1893 it was sold under the name Cross-bred Prune A.P.-318 to Stark Brothers of Louisiana, Missouri, who introduced it the following year under its present name. The fruit is twice the size of Agen, ovoid, compressed, dark purple; bloom heavy; flesh yellow, rich, sweet; freestone; hangs well to the tree and ripens its crop all together.

Spotted Gage. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 949. 1869.
Tree vigorous, very productive; fruit medium or above, oval; suture shallow; greenish-yellow shaded, mottled and splashed with crimson and lilac; dots numerous, light; bloom thin; flesh coarse, yellow, sugary, juicy, a little vinous; good; semi-clinging; mid-season.

Springer. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 87:8. 1901. 2. Wis. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 91,94. 1901.
Found wild by Wm. A. Springer of Fremont, Wisconsin; sent to the Wisconsin Experiment Station in 1890 and named by Professor E. S. Goff. Tree productive; fruit of large size, deep purplish-red shading to yellow; dots numerous, yellow; bloom moderate; skin thick, tender, not harsh; flesh deep yellow, sweet and rich; stone large, thick margined, clinging; mid-season.

Stabeler Seedling. Species? 1. Elliott Fr. Book 429. 1854.
According to Elliott, an American variety; fruit medium in size, oval, greenish-yellow with white specks; flesh yellowish, adhering to the stone; mid-season.

Standard. Domestica. I. Gard. Chron. 13:600. 1853. 2. Mclntosh Bk. Gard. 2:533. 1855. 3. Ann. Pom. Beige 8:25, PI. 1860. 4. Hogg Fruit Man. 382. 1866. 5. Mathieu Norn. Pom. 429. 1889.  Etendard d'Angleterre 5. UEtendard De L'Angleterre 3. Standard of England 5. Standard of England 1, 2, 4.
An English variety raised from seed about 1845 by Henry Dowlmg of Woolston. Fruit above medium size, obovate; suture shallow; stem medium; cavity small; bright red, shading to purplish-red; dots yellow; bloom thin, violet; flesh greenish, firm, juicy, brisk flavor; good; stone small, oval, nearly free; mid-season.

Standard. Domestica. 1. Burbank Cat. 11.1911.
This Standard is a cross between Tragedy and Sugar recently sent out by Luther Burbank. Professor E. J. Wickson of the College of Agriculture at Berkeley, California, describes it as follows: "Freestone, pit small f inch by f inch. Flesh yellowish, melting, fine-grained; very juicy and sweet; skin dark blue, sub-color dark red, medium texture."

Stark Green Gage. Domestica. 1. Bailey Ann. Hort. 196. 1891. 2. Stark Bros. Cat. 1891.
Stark Green Gage is said to be a seedling of Missouri Green Gage; introduced by Stark Brothers in 1891. As tested at this Station both of these varieties are identical with Imperial Gage.

Steinman. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:59. 1897. 2. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:288. 1900. 3. Ibid. 114:144. 1910. Steinman No.2 3.
Of the type of Stoddard, originated in 1883 by C. Steinman, Mapleton, Iowa, from a mixed lot of seed of De Soto, Quaker and Forest Garden. Tree productive; fruit of medium size, oval, conical, one-sided; stem short; suture distinct; apex pointed; crimson with numerous dots; bloom thick; skin thin; flesh yellow, watery, sweet; good to very good; stone medium, oval, pointed; late.

StelIa. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 6. 1900. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 164. 1901.
Grown by Theodore Williams of Benson, Nebraska. Tree spreading, very productive; fruit large, globular, purplish-red; season medium.

Steptoe. Domestica. 1. Oregon Sta. Bul. 45:31. 1897. 2. Mich. Sta. Bul. 152:211. 1898. 3. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 548. 1901.
Originated with Calvin Throop near Steptoe Butte, Washington; introduced by George Purdy, Colfax, Washington. Tree upright, vigorous, bears every year; fruit resembles Italian Prune very much but is larger and ripens two weeks earlier; ovate, purple; bloom thin; flesh yellowish, juicy, sweet, pleasant.

Sterling. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 12. 1898.
Cataloged by J. W. Kerr for three years; not described.

Stickney. Species? 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:60. 1897.
A tender-fleshed variety of the season and size of Rollingstone, grown by Franklin Johnson of Baraboo, Wisconsin.

Stint. Domestica. 1. Garden 52:261. 1897. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 2nd Ser. 3:56. 1900. 3. Garden 62:133. 1902. 4. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 450. 1889.  Stintpflaume 4.
Introduced by Thomas Rivers of Sawbridgeworth, England, in 1885. Tree dwarfish, very productive; fruit small, roundish, red or reddish-purple; flesh orange, juicy, sweet, fine; good; stone free; early.

Stonewood. Domestica. 1. Mag. Hort. 9:165. 1843.
Listed in the catalog of the London Horticultural Society. Fruit of medium size, roundish, purple; good; freestone; mid-season.

Stout. Domestica. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894.
An inferior blue variety originated by Mr. Stout of Kent County, Delaware; tested by J. W. Kerr.

Strawberry. Angustifolia watsoni. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:65/ 1892. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 234. 1901.
Tree dwarf, symmetrical, much subject to twig-blight. Fruit small, roundish; cavity shallow; stem slender; skin thin, red; bloom thin; flesh yellow, soft; quality poor; stone roundish, clinging.

Striped-leaved. Domestica? 1. Forsyth Treat. Fr. Trees. 21. 1803.
Mentioned by Forsyth as one of the sorts commonly grown in England in his time.

Sucker State. Hortulana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:50, 87. 1892. 2. Col., O., Hort. Soc. Rpt. 82. 1892. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 182. 1901.
The origin of this variety is not known, but it is thought to have come from Illinois. Tree vigorous, fairly productive; fruit medium or above, round-oblong; suture a line; cavity shallow; stem slender; dark red; dots numerous, small, yellow; bloom very thin or lacking; skin thick; flesh yellow, firm; good; stone of medium size, clinging; late.

Suisse. Domestica. 1. Duhamel Trait. Arb. Fr. 2:82. 1768. 2. Forsyth Treat. Fr. Trees 21. 1803. 3. Prince Pom. Man. 2:63. 1832. 4. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 949. 1869. 5. Hogg Fruit Man. 726. 1884. 6. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 450. 1889.  Altesse 3, 5, 6. La Prune Suisse 2. Monsieur Tardif 4, 5, 6. Monsieur Tar dive 3, 4. Prune d'Altesse 4, 6. Prune de Monsieur Tar dive 3. Prune Suisse 1. Prune Suisse 3, 4. Swiss Plum 3, 4, 6. Semiana 6. Simiana 4. Schweizer Pflaume 6. Switzer's Plum 4, 5, 6.
An old European variety known under many names. In the French nurseries, it has been badly confused with the Blue Imperatrice so common in England. Tree vigorous and productive; fruit small, oval, dark purple shading to dark red; bloom heavy; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy and melting; good; clingstone; late.

Sultan. Domestica. 1. Jour. Hort. 21:243. 1871. 2. Flor. and Pom. 145, PI. 1875. 3. Hogg Fruit Man. 727. 1884.
Raised by Thomas Rivers, Sawbridgeworth, England, from seed of Belle, about 1871. Tree vigorous, very productive; fruit medium to large, round with a deep suture; stem medium; cavity wide; deep red; bloom thick; flesh greenish-yellow, firm, juicy, brisk and pleasant; clingstone; early mid-season; said to be an excellent culinary plum.

Sultaneck Erick. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 451. 1889.

Sunrise. Domestica. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 78. 1897.
Exhibited by C. C. Stirling, Grand Rapids, Michigan, at the meeting of the American Pomological Society in 1897 . Fruit of medium size, round, yellow and lilac; of the Reine Claude type.

Sunrise. Americana, 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 102. 1902. 2. Can, Exp. Farm Bui, 43:32. 1903.
A seedling of De Soto from the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada. Fruit large, oval; cavity narrow, shallow, abrupt; suture distinct, but not depressed; apex rounded; yellow more or less covered with bright red; dots few, yellow, distinct; bloom medium; skin thick, moderately tough; flesh deep yellow, juicy, sweet; good; stone large, flat, oval, free or nearly so; late.

Sunset. Americana. 1. Colo. Sta. Bul. 50:46. 1898. 2. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:289. 1900.
Originated by Charles E. Pennock of Bellevue, Colorado, in 1892. Tree vigorous, hardy, very productive; fruit large, oval or oblong; suture distinct; stem rather long, slender; deep red on a yellow ground, beautifully shaded; flesh firm, of excellent quality; mid-season.

Surpasse Monsieur. Domestica. 1. Prince Pom. Man. 2:63. 1832. 2. Noisette Man. Comp. Jard. 2:498. 1860. 3. Le Bon Jard. 341. 1882.
A hybrid between Monsieur and Jerusalem raised by M. Noisette of Paris; first fruited in 1819. Tree very vigorous; fruit above medium size, round, purplish-black; flesh yellow, a trifle harsh; excellent; mid-season.

Svedske Tidlig Leipziger. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 153. 1831.
Grown in the gardens of the London Horticultural Society prior to 1831.

Svedske Ungersk. Domestica. Listed in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 153. 1831.

Swan. Domestica. 1. Rivers Cat. 35. 1898. 2.Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 2nd Ser. 3:56. 1900.
Raised by Thomas Rivers of Sawbridgeworth, England. Tree very productive; fruit large, red; freestone; mid-season.

Swan Golden. Domestica. 1. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 2nd Ser. 3:56. 19.00. 2. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 548. 1901. 3. Ibid. 433. 1905. Swan 3. Swan's Yellow 2.
Found only in the preceding reports. Fruit of medium size, roundish; suture distinct; cavity small; stem short; yellow; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet, tender; stone small, mid-season.

Sweet Damson. Insititia. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 146. 1831. 2. Mag. Hort. 9:163. 1843.
An English variety similar to Shropshire except in its sweetness.

Swift. Americana. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 119. 1904.
A seedling of De Soto grown at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada. Fruit large, broad-oval, much flattened; cavity narrow, shallow; suture a line; apex slightly flattened; yellow, mottled and washed with deep red; dots obscure; bloom light; skin thick, moderately tough; flesh pale yellow, juicy, sweet, pleasant; stone above medium, oval, almost free.

Szillassy Piros. Domestica. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 152:211. 1898.  Noted in the preceding reference as a variety imported from Hungary.



Tardive de Corny. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 451. 1889. 2, Guide Prat. 155, 366. 1895.
This variety is a seedling grown by Victor Simon of Corny, Metz, France. Tree rather small in trunk, but forms a large head, regularly productive; fruit of medium size, roundish, clear yellow blushed with red; bloom thin; flesh yellow, firm, juicy, sweet and aromatic; good; late.

Tardive de Fourqueux. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 451. 1889.
Mathieu took his references from the Journal de la Societe Nationale et Centrale d'Horticulture de France 169. 1885.

Tardive de Genes, Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 451. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 162, 366. 1895.
An Italian variety noted for its size, lateness and color. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit very large, roundish-oval, yellow; flesh firm, sour; very late.

Tardive Musquee. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen, 2:147. 1873. 2. Cat. Cong. Pom. France 370. 1887. 3. Rev. Hort. 536, 561. 1893. 4. Lucas Vollst. Hand. Obst. 470. 1894. Spate Muskateller Pflaume 4.
Originated by M. M. Baltet, a nurseryman at Troyes, France, about 1859. Tree weak, productive; fruit medium to above, round-oval with an indistinct suture, very deep purple; bloom thick; flesh greenish, melting, with aroma of musk; good; mid-season. This may be the Late Muskatelle of Lucas.

Tarleton. Cerasifera. 1. Kerr Cat. 21. 1897. 2. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 13:370. 1900.
Waugh says this variety, which comes from Georgia, is very similar to Early Cherry. Tree vigorous, spreading and irregular in growth; fruit small, round; suture indistinct; stem medium, set in a shallow cavity; red; bloom thin; flesh yellow, soft, sweet; quality fair; stone small, clinging; very early.

Tatge. Domestica. 1. Penin. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 12. 1892. 2. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 76. 1895. 3. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:289. 1900. 4. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 326. 1903. 5. Ohio Sta. Bul. 162:258. 1905.
Tatge is said to have originated at Belle Plains, Benton County, Iowa. In 1892, J. W. Kerr of Maryland mentioned this plum as a new variety, brought to notice about 1890. Tatge is so similar to the Lombard that many authorities have noted them as identical. J. L. Budd of Iowa considered it somewhat hardier and less subject to rot.

Tawny. Domestica. 1. Ray Hist. Plant. 2:1528. 1688.
Given by Ray in a list of the best sorts of plums cultivated in his time.

Taybank. Domestica. 1. Mag. Hort. 12:341. 1846. 2. Mclntosh Bk. Card. 2:532. 1855. 3. Hogg Fruit Man. 727. 1884.  Guthries Taybank 1, 2, 3.
Grown by Charles Guthrie, of Taybank, Dundee, Scotland; probably an offspring of Reine Claude. Fruit nearly large, ovate; suture faint; stem medium, inserted almost without a depression; greenish-yellow with specks of russety-red on the sunny side; flesh yellow, juicy, tender, melting, very sweet, approaching Reine Claude in flavor but not equal to that variety; clingstone; mid-season.

Tecumseh. Americana, i. Kerr Cat. 13. 1897. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 2nd Ser. 3:52. 1900. Hughes Late 1.
J. W. Pool of Indiana who introduced this plum named it Hughes Late but later changed the name to avoid confusion with the variety named Hughes. Fruit medium in size, round, yellow mottled with bright red changing to coppery-red when fully ripe; clingstone; mid-season.

Temple. Species? 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 1875-1899.
Listed by the American Pomological Society in its catalog from 1875 to 1899.

Tenneha. Species? Mentioned in Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:80. 1892.

Tennessee. Munsoniana. 1. Am. Jour. Hort. 5:148. 1869. Tennessee Plum 1.
A strain of Wild Goose.

Terrell. Triflora X ? 1. Am. Pom.Soc.Rpt. 249. 1903. 2. Glen. St. Mary Nur. Cat. 1904.
A seedling of Excelsior from Jay Terrell, Hastings, Florida; introduced by the Glen St. Mary Nurseries, Glen St. Mary, Florida. Tree healthy, vigorous, similar to Excelsior, bears heavy crops annually; fruit medium to large, nearly round; suture a line; apex blunt; cavity medium in depth; stem short and slender; reddish-yellow, somewhat mottled and deepening to wine-red; dots minute, yellowish; skin thin, tough; flesh greenish-yellow, meaty, subacid, rich; excellent; stone small, broadly oval, turgid, clinging; ripens in June in the South.

Terry, Americana mollis. 1. Stark Bros. Cat. 1896. 2. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:271. 1900. 3. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 224. 1902. 4. S. Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:40. 1905.  Free Silver 2. Free Silver 1, 3, 4.
H. A. Terry of Crescent, Iowa grew this variety from seed of Van Buren; first fruited about 1896. Tree vigorous, upright, open; fruit large, regular, oval; cavity small, shallow; suture indistinct; dark red; dots small, gray; bloom thin; flesh yellow, firm but melting; good; stone large, oval, clinging; mid-season; ripens very evenly.

Terry De Soto. Americana. 1. Terry Cat. 1900. 2. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:289. 1900.  Terry's Desota 1.
A seedling of De Soto, grown by H. A. Terry. Tree vigorous, upright, productive; fruit large, golden-yellow overspread with light crimson, mottled with darker shades; flesh yellow, rich and sweet; clingstone; early.

Texas Belle, Munsoniana. 1. Ga. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 34, 57. 1888. 2. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:50. 1892. 3. Tex. Sta. Bul. 32:481. 1894. Belle 2. Paris Belle 1, 3.
Grown by Stephen H. Turner of Texas; introduced by Dr. W. W. Steele of Paris, Texas. Tree small, drooping, hardy and productive; fruit medium to large, roundish, light red; flesh yellow, firm, sweet and pleasant; stone short and turgid, clinging; last of June in Texas. Mentioned in the catalog of the American Pomological Society in 1897.

Texas Gage. Domestica. 1. Tex. Sta. Bul. 32:484. 1894.
Noted in the preceding reference as having been grown at the Texas Experiment Station.

Thanksgiving. Domestica. i. Green Cat. 8. 1902. 2. W. N. Y. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 25. 1904. Thanksgiving Prune 1.
Thanksgiving originated with a Mr. Gridley of Chili, New York; introduced in 1902 by Charles A. Green of Rochester, New York. Fruit of medium size, oval; suture distinct; purplish-black; sweet; good; late; shrivels and keeps for some time after picking.

Theresa. Domestica? 1. U.S.D.A. Rpt. 264. 1892. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 74. 1895.
Originated at Bloomingburgh, Ohio; named for Mrs. Theresa M. Morris of that place. Tree bears heavily and regularly, hardy; fruit of medium size, roundish-oval, reddish-purple; bloom heavy; flesh yellowish-green, very mild, sweet; good;, early.

Thomas. Domestica. 1. Mag. Hort. 7:388. 1841. 2, Downing Fr Trees Am. 315.  1845. 3. Mag. Hort. 14:155. 1848. 4. Hovey Fr. Am. 1:95. l85I- 5- Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 439. 1881. Thomaspflaume 5.
Found in the garden of Wm. Thomas of Boston for whom it was named by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society; first fruited about 1840. Tree vigorous, productive, bears early; fruit large, roundish-oval inclined to oblong; suture shallow with sides unequal; cavity small and narrow; stem medium, rather stout; deep amber mottled and shaded with soft red; dots white, numerous, bloom thin; flesh yellow; juicy, somewhat coarse with a mild pleasant flavor; quality medium; stone rather large, roundish-ovate, light in color, free; mid-season.

Thomas October. Domestica? 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 85. 1854.
Said to have originated in Upper Dublin Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. Fruit medium in size, pale red; good.

Thompsons Golden Green. Species? 1. Country Gent. 26:238. 1865.
From R. O. Thompson, Nebraska. Fruit bronze or gold in color, dotted with red in the sun; very sweet, juicy; freestone.

Thorndyke Gage. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 950. 1869.
Originated near Newburgh, New York. Tree moderately vigorous; fruit below medium size, roundish; suture slight; pale green; flesh greenish, juicy, sweet, pleasant; clingstone; good; mid-season.

Thousand-and-one. Munsoniana. i.Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 189. 1901.
Origin unknown. Fruit small, round; suture indistinct; cavity small; bright red with many small, conspicuous dots; flesh yellow, soft; stone small, oval, clinging; mid-season or earlier.

Thresher. Domestica. 1. Pioneer Nur. Cat. 1900.
An improved strain of Agen grown by a Mr. Thresher of California.

Throop. Domestica. 1. Mich. Sta. Bul. 152:211. 1898. 2. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 547. 1901. 3. Mich. Sta. Sp. Bul. 27:16. 1904.
From George E. Ruedy, Colfax, Washington, in 1896. Tree vigorous, upright, productive; fruit of medium size, ovate; cavity small; suture shallow; dark purple; bloom thin; flesh yellow, firm, coarse, sweet, pleasant; quality fair; freestone; mid-season.

Throop No. i. Domestica. i. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 2nd Ser. 3:57. 1900.
Tree vigorous, productive; fruit large, oval; suture broad, distinct; cavity usually-lacking; red with thin bloom; flesh yellow, firm, juicy, sweet, rich; stone roundish, free; early.

Throop No. 2. Domestica. 1. Mich. Sta. Sp. Bul. 27:16. 1904.
Tree vigorous, unproductive; fruit large, roundish; sides unequal; suture broad; cavity small; reddish-purple; bloom heavy; dots few, yellow; flesh greenish-yellow, firm, a little coarse, sweet; good; stone semi-clinging; mid-season.

Throssel. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:290. 1900.
Found wild on the Des Moines River by a Mr. Throssel, Pierson, Woodbury County, Iowa. Tree vigorous, hardy; fruit large; suture distinct; late.

Tillemond. Domestica. 1. Prince Pom. Man. 2:93. 1832.  Belle Tillemond 1. Prunier de Tillemond 1.
Fruit very large, oval; cavity slight; stem large; light purple, with a darker cheek; flesh greenish, somewhat melting, sharp and acid, not pleasant; late.

Tobias Gage. Domestica. 1. N. Y. Sta. Rpt. 12:612. 1893.
Tobias Gage is a supposed seedling of Reine Claude received for testing at this Station in 1888 from J. T. Macomber, Grand Isle, Vermont. Tree moderately vigorous and productive; fruit below medium in size, oblate; suture and cavity shallow; dark coppery-yellow with a dull mottled red blush; bloom thin; flesh yellow, slightly fibrous, firm, sweet; quality good; stone small, semi-clinging; not equal to Reine Claude in appearance or quality.

Togo. Triflora. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 119. 1904.
A seedling of Red June from the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada, from seed planted in 1895; named in honor of Admiral Togo. Fruit above medium, roundish; suture usually indistinct; cavity narrow, medium in depth, abrupt; yellow overlaid with deep red, with many small, inconspicuous dots; flesh yellow, firm, juicy, sweet; good; stone of medium size, oval, flattened, clinging.

Tokeya. Prunus besseyi X Simonii. 1. 5. Dak. Sta. Bul. 108. 1908.
One of a lot of hybrids originated at the South Dakota Experiment Station, first fruiting in 1906. Fruit one and three-eighths inches in diameter, flat, dark red; flesh green, sprightly subacid, intermediate between that of the two parents; good; stone very small; early.

Tomato. Cerasifera. 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 13:370. 1900.
According to "Waugh, a seedling of Pissardi, from A. L. Bruce, Basin Springs, Texas. Fruit small to medium, spherical; cavity shallow; stem short, slender; dark red; dots very minute; bloom thin; flesh soft, yellow; poor to fair; stone large, oval, flattened, clinging; mid-season.

Tomlingson. Species? 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:80. 1892.
Given by Bailey in a list of native plums.

Towakong. Rivularis. 1. Bailey Ev. Nat. Fruits 223. 1898.  Creek 1. Rivularis 1.
The Indian name of Prunus rivularis.

Trabesche. Domestica. i. Ia. Sta. Bul. 28:231. 1895. 2. Ibid. 31:348. 1895.  Trabeshe 2.
A Russian variety introduced into this country by Charles Gibb; tested at the Iowa Agricultural Experiment Station. Tree hardy, bears early; fruit large, oval, blue; quality best; freestone; mid-season.

Transparente. Species? 1. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 406. 1881. 2. Guide Prat. 157, 366. 1895.  Durchsichtige 1. Die Durchsichtige 2. Frühe Gelbe Reine Claude 2.
Distinct from the English variety, Transparent. Fruit of medium size, oval clear greenish-yellow; flesh yellow, firm, juicy, aromatic; good; clingstone; early.

Trapps Konigspflaume. Domestica. 1. . Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 423. 1881. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 451. 1889.  Konigspflaume von Trapp's 1. Roy ale de Trapp 2. Von Trapp's Konigs Pflaume 2.
Produced by Liegel. Tree vigorous; fruit medium in size, oblate; suture shallow; halves equal or nearly so; stem with short hairs; cavity wide, deep; skin easily removed, sourish; bluish-black; dots fine, numerous, golden; bloom thick; flesh greenish-yellow, fine, juicy, sprightly, pleasant; freestone; ripens before the Reine Claude.

Traubenpflaume. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 451. 1889. Usum Erreck 1.
Reference found by Mathieu in Obst-Garten 47. 1885.

Trauttenberg. Domestica. 1. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:81. 1873. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom% 453. 1889.  Die Ziickersusse 2. Konig Zwetsche 2. Sucree de Trauttenberg 2. Sucree-Douce De Trauttenberg 1, 2. Trauttenberg Ziickersusse 1. Von Trauttenberg1 s Ziickersusse 2.
Originated in Bohemia; named in honor of Baron Trauttenberg, a zealous pomologist. Fruit medium in size, obovate and flattened; suture a line; skin brownish-purple; bloom thick; flesh yellowish-green, juicy, very rich, aromatic; excellent for dessert; stone rough, free; mid-season.

Trianon. Domestica. Listed in Lond. Hort Soc. Cat. 153. 1831.

Trinkle No. 4. Triflora. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 135. 1905.
John W. Trinkle of Madison, Indiana, grew this plum from seed of Burbank about 1897. Tree vigorous, spreading; fruit large; suture medium; apex small; cavity large, regular, deep; yellowish; dots small, yellow; skin thick, tenacious, bitter; flesh yellowish, slightly translucent, meaty, moderately juicy, mild subacid; good to very good; mid-season.

Trostle. Species? 1. Waugh Plum Cult. 234. 1901.
Known only in the vicinity of Kingsley, Iowa. Fruit dark red.

Trouvee de Vou6che. Species? 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 398. 1857. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 451. 1889.  Trouvee de Vaunege 2. Trouvee de Vone"che 2.
Found wild by Gregoire (probably of Belgium) and introduced by him. Tree moderately vigorous; fruit medium to small, oval, regular, reddish-violet with a darker cheek; bloom violet; flesh juicy, sweet; very good; mid-season.

Truro. Americana X Hortulana mineri. 1. U.S.D.A. Pom. Rpt. 47. 1895. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 164. 1901.
From Ezra W. Tucker, Williamsfield, Illinois, about 1895. A seedling of Weaver crossed with Miner. Tree upright, hardy; fruit large, oblong; suture shallow; cavity small, shallow; red with many, small, russet dots; flesh yellowish with yellow veins, tender, melting, juicy, mild subacid; very good; stone medium, oval, clinging; late.

Tucker. Species? 1. U.S.D.A. Pom. Rpt. 26. 1894.
Another seedling from Ezra W. Tucker; said to be grown from seed taken from a cluster of trees containing Weaver, Miner, Wild Goose and two prune trees; first fruited in 1894. Tree resembles Wild Goose; fruit medium to large, pyriform, greenish-yellow, overspread with light purplish-red; dots many, small; skin thick, tender, almost sweet; very good; stone large, angular, clinging; mid-season.

Tudor. Munsoniana? 1. Tex. Sta. Bul. 32:481. 1894.
Tested at the Texas Experiment Station. Tree vigorous and productive; fruit above medium size, oblong, light red; skin very thin; flesh acid unless fully ripe.

Turkey. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576, 577. 1629. 2. Rea Flora 208. 1676.  3. Ray Hist. Plant. 2:1529. 1688. 4. Langley Pomona 95, 97, PL XXV fig. V.  1729. 5. Abercrombie Card. Ass't 13. 1786. Turkie 1. Turky 2. Turkey Plumb 4.
From the brief descriptions of the Seventeenth Century writers, it appears that Turkey was a large blue plum of the   type but the variety has either long since been buried under the hosts of new sorts that have been developed or a new name has been given it.

Turkish Prune. Domestica. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 152. 1831. 2. R. G. Chase Cat.  3. Rice Bros. Cat. 1908. Quetsche Turkish 1.
The name "Turkish Prune," although sometimes applied to the Italian Prune does not seem to be connected with any particular variety. It may be a synonym of the "Jerusalem Prune" or it may have developed, as a corruption of the still older "Turkey" plum mentioned by Parkinson and other writers in the Seventeenth Century.

Twice Bearing. Domestica. 1. Duhamel Trait. Arb. Fr. 2:113. 1768. 2. Prince Pom. Man. 2:103. 1832. 3. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 144. 1831. 4. Poiteau Pom. Franc. 1:1846. 5. Mas he Verger 6:79. 186673. 6. Nicholson Did. Gard. 3:235. 7. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 455. 1889.  Bifere 2, 7. Bifere 5. Bon deux fois Vant 2. Bonne deux fois Van 3. De Deux Saison 5. Deux fois Van 2. P. biferum 6. Prune bifere 2. Prune de Deux Saisons 2,7. Prune qui fructifie deux fois Van 5, 7. Prunier bifere 4. Prunier Fleurissantet Pous-sant Deux Fois 5,7. Prunier qui fructifie deux fois par an 1, 2. Prunus bif era 1. Zweimal Bluhende und Zweimal Tragende Bunte Pflaume 5, 7. Zweimal Tragende 7.
A Domestica of ancient origin grown more as a curiosity and an ornamental than for utility. Fruit long, almost olive-form; suture faint; skin reddish-yellow, heavily tinged with brown; bloom heavy; flesh coarse, yellow, green beneath the suture, juice insipid; stone almost smooth, acutely pointed, clinging. The first crop is borne the beginning of August; the second very late; both worthless.


Twins. Domestica. i, Montreal Hort. Soc. Rpt. 55. 1878. Corse*s Twins 1.
A curious double plum which originated with Henry Corse, Montreal, Canada; inferior.

Tzaueron. Insititia? 1. Rev. Hort 357. 1891.  Le Prunier Tzaneron 1. Tzaneron 1.
Very generally grown throughout southeastern Europe. Tree below medium size; branches upright; leaves small; glabrous, oval, deep green in color; fruit grows in clusters, small, pale yellow; flesh firm, juicy, sprightly, refreshing. This variety is an important commercial sort in the country where it is grown.


Ulysses. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 950. 1869.
From western New York; fruit above medium size, roundish-oval, whitish, shaded and mottled with violet-purple; bloom thin; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Uncle Ben. Domestica? 1. Gard. and For. 7:243. 1894. 2. Kansas "The Plum" 29. 1900.
Originated in Stanislaus County, Mapa Valley, California; fruit medium to large, golden-yellow, spotted with red; flesh sweet, juicy, very good; freestone; late.

Ungarische Dattel Zwetsche. Domestica? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 451.  1889. Ungarische Spate Bouteillen Zwetsche.

Union. Domestica. 1. Cultivator 6:269 fig* I^95* 2; Ont. Fr. Exp. Sta. Rpt. 120. 1898. 3. Ohio Sta. Bul. 113:161. 1899. 4. Waugh Plum Cult. 124. 1901.  Reagles' Union Purple 1. Union Purple 2, 3. Union Purple 4.
Union originated about 1850 with C. Reagles of Schenectady, New York. Tree hardy, productive; fruit medium in size, roundish-oval, dark purple; bloom thick; stem adheres strongly to the fruit; flesh dark yellow, firm, tender, sweet, mild; quality fair; stone oval, turgid, clinging; mid-season.

Uryany. Domestica.
Introduced from Ammassia, Turkey, by the United States Department of Agriculture in 1904 and sent to this Station for testing. Tree vigorous, upright with a dense top; fruit variable in size, roundish to roundish-ovate; suture a line; cavity narrow, deep, abrupt; stem rather thick, short; dark purple; dots numerous, very small, yellowish; bloom heavy; skin thin, tough, astringent; flesh yellow, tender, very juicy, sweet, pleasant; good; stone of medium size, somewhat flattened, clinging; season late.

U. S. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 6. 1900. 2. Waugh Plum Cult. 165. 1901. 3e Wis. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 109. 1903.  Brittlewood No. 2 3. United States 3.
Originated by Theodore Williams of Benson, Nebraska. Tree vigorous and productive; fruit large, spherical, dark purplish-red; flesh a trifle coarse; good; clingstone; medium to late.


Valence. Domestica. 1. Mag. Hort. 9:163. 1843. 2. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 145, 153. 1831. Damas de Valence 1, 2. Saint Loo 2.
Fruit small, roundish, purple; clingstone; late.

Valentia. Domestica. i. Forsyth Treat, Fr. Trees 21. 1803.  Mentioned as a plum of value by Forsyth.

Valienciennes. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Norn. Pom. 451. 1889.  Die Valienciennes. Edle Konigs Pflaume. Value. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 6. 1902-3. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:39. 1903.
Originated by Theodore Williams of Benson, Nebraska; introduced in 1902 by J. W. Kerr, Denton, Maryland. Tree vigorous, healthy and productive; fruit large, round or sometimes inclined to oblong, dark red; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Van Benschoten. Domestica.
Van Benschoten was introduced by a Mr. Snyder of Kingston, New York. Fruit of medium size, roundish, greenish-yellow with russet spots; good; stone small, free.

Van Buren. Americana mollis. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 286. 1887. 2, Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:42. 1892. 3. Colo. Sta. Bul. 50:46, PL XV. 1898. 4. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 43:32. 1903.
Van Buren came from a wild seedling in Van Buren County, Iowa; introduced by J. Thacher. Tree spreading, moderately productive and slow growing; fruit of medium size, roundish; cavity small; suture a line; skin thick; red over yellow; bloom thin; flesh yellow, juicy, firm, sweet; quality good; clingstone; season late.

Van Deman. Americana. 1. U.S.D.A. Rpt. 392. 1891. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 88. 1895. 3. Terry Cat. 1900. 4. Waugh Plum Cult. 165. 1901.  Van Dieman 2.
Van Deman is a seedling of Hawkeye grown by H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa; first fruited in 1891. Fruit large, oval; cavity small; suture a line; skin thick; dark red; bloom thick; flesh yellow; quality fair; stone oval, flattened, clinging; season late.

Van Houten. Species? 1. Terry Cat. 5. 1900.
A plum of unknown parentage from H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa; first fruited in 1895; dwarfish; productive; fruit very large, round, bright red; mid-season.

Venetianische Zwehnal Tragende. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 452.  1889. La Bonne Deux Fois V An. La Venitienne.

Venus. Munsoniana. 1. Terry Cat. 8. 1900.
From H.A. Terry; of unknown parentage. Tree upright, productive; fruit very large, yellow overspread with light pinkish-red becoming darker red; dots numerous, white; flesh yellow, very sweet and rich; good; clingstone; early.

Verdacchio. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576. 1629. 2. Rea Flora 208. 1676. 3. Gallesio Pom. Ital. 2:fig. 1839. Verdock 1, 2.
An old Italian variety. A few of the modern writers hold it to be the Reine Claude but according to Gallesio, it is a distinct plum. Fruit medium in size, obovate, greenish; flesh crisp, sweet, agreeable; very good.

Verdache. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 451. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 161 366. 1895.
Tree very productive; fruit small, oval, yellowish olive-green with flesh the same color, sweet; late; said to be excellent for making prunes or for cooking.

Vermilion. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:44. 1897. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 165. 1901.  Le Due Vermillion 1, 2. Le Due Vermillion 3.
Grown for some years by J. W. Kerr, but dropped in 1901. Fruit medium in size, roundish-oblong, bright red; flesh yellow, very good; clingstone; late.

Vermilon Hâtive. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 452. 1889.

Vesuvius. Cerasifera X ? 1. Fancher Creek Nur. Cat. 1907-8. 2. Ibid. 1909.  Foliage Plum 1, 2.
Grown by Luther Burbank from a cross between Pissardi and some native or Triflora sort; introduced by the Fancher Creek Nurseries in 1907. Tree vigorous, elm-like in habit of growth, not productive; fruit small, roundish, purplish-red; flesh yellow; quality fair; stone small; valuable only as an ornamental.

Vick. Munsoniana X Americana? 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 287. 1887. 2. Ibid. 276. 1893. 3. Wis. Sta. Bul. 87:14. 1901. James Vick 1, 2, 3.
Supposed to be a seedling of Wild Goose crossed with some Americana; originated by H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa, about 1880. Fruit of medium size, roundish-oval; dots numerous; suture distinct; bright red; bloom light; flesh yellowish-green, tender; quality fair; stone small, clinging; mid-season.

Victor. Nigra? 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 426. 1900.
A seedling raised at Indian Head Experimental Farm, Northwest Territory, Canada. Fruit of medium size; mid-season.

Victoria. Species? Letter from Kerr.
Originated by Theodore Williams, Benson, Nebraska; fruit large, firm; poor. [Not to be confused with the British 'Victoria' plum, which is a P. domestica and is sold by nurseries such as Raintree.  -ASC]

Violet. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 578. 1629. 2. Langley Pomona 92, fig. VII. 1729. 3. Garden 50:223. 1897. 4. Mich. Sta. Sp. Bul. 27:16. 1904.  Early Violet 3. Violette 4. Violet Plumb 2.
This variety is possibly the same as Précoce de Tours but we are unable to identify it positively with this or any other known variety. The " Violette " mentioned in the fourth reference above may not be identical with the Violet of the older writers but it seems to be similar. According to Parkinson the Violet is " a small and long blackish blew plum, ripe about Bartholomew tide, a very good dry eating plum."

Victor Sand Cherry. (Prunus besseyi X Munsoniana) X Domestica. 1. Am. Br. Assoc. Rpt. 2:184. 1906.
Theodore Williams of Benson, Nebraska pollinated Prunus besseyi with Wild Goose and the resulting seedling was fertilized with pollen from Quackenboss. This final cross resulted in the variety under discussion. Fruit nearly two inches in diameter; apparently of value.

Violet Imperial. Domestica. 1. Horticulturist 4:196. 1849.  Die Violette Kaiserpflaume 1. Imperiale Violette 1.
Violet Imperial is usually considered the same as Red Magnum Bonum but Liegel describes it as distinct in that its leaves are shorter, its fruit smaller, darker and ripening period three or four weeks later.

Violet Royal. Domestica. Mentioned in Miller Gard. Kal. 155. 1734.

Violette Americaine. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 452. 1889.
Mathieu found reference in Revue Horticole 351. 1869.

Virgata. Species? 1. Ga. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 51. 1889.
A tender shrub of value only as an ornamental. Flowers semi-double, rose colored; fruit of medium size, oblong, yellow; flesh yellow, juicy, subacid; quality fair; clingstone; very early.

Virgie. Hortulana mineri X Hortulana. 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 12:229. 1899.
Originated with A. L. Bruce of Texas; a cross between Miner and Crimson Beauty. Fruit medium, nearly round; suture a line; cavity very shallow; deep crimson with many yellow dots; flesh yellow; good; stone small, round, slightly flattened, clinging.

Virginia Damson. Insititia. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 151." 1891.
Mentioned in the preceding reference as doing well in Virginia.

Von Berlepsch Zwetsche. Domestica. Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 453. 1889.  Berlepsch's Violette Zwetsche. 

Von Bose Rote Zwetsche. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom.Pom. 453. 1889.

Von Lade Spate Mirabelle. Insititia. Listed in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 453. 1889.

Von Moro Reine Claude. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 453. 1889.
Mathieu's reference taken from Pomologische Monatshefte 1. 1878.

Voslauer Zwetsche. Domestica. 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 453. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 163, 367. 1895.
Similar to the Italian Prune.

Vulcan. Triflora X ? 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 12:229. 1899.
A hybrid grown by Luther Burbank; much like Wickson. Fruit very large, oval, with sides unequal; cavity large, abrupt; stem short, very stout; suture deep at the top; purple with darker shades; dots numerous, yellow; flesh red next the skin, sweet and pleasant; excellent; stone large, elliptical, slightly flattened, clinging.


Wabash. Species? 1. Ind. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 72. 1868.
Noted as a native variety grown in Gibson and Posey Counties, Indiana. Tree low and shrubby, bearing early; fruit large, conical.

Wady. Species? 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 286. 1887. 2. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:80. 1892. 3. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:62. 1897. Wady's Early 1, 2, 3.
Reported as of little value except for early ripening and productiveness; fruit small; good for canning.

Wagner. Americana. 1. Ia. Sta. Bul. 46:291. 1900.  Wagner No.9 1.
A seedling of Weaver fertilized with a wild variety; grown by J. F. Wagner, Bennett, Iowa, in 1894. Fruit small, ovate; cavity broad, shallow; suture clearly denned; yellowish-red; bloom thin; flesh brownish-yellow, sugary, sweet; quality best; stone large, flattened, clinging; mid-season.

Wahre Frühzwetsche. Domestica. 1. Lucas Vollst. Hand. Obst. 473. 1894. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 453. 1889.  August Zwetsche 2. Couetsche Précoce 2. Couetsche Précoce La Vraie 2. DieVs August Zwetsche 2. Frühe Gemeine Zwetsche 2. Frilhe Haus Zwetsche 2. Frühe Zwetsche 2. Précoce Veritable 2.
Tree large, a quick grower; fruit medium, oval, dark blue; stone completely free; valuable for dessert and drying.

Wahre Weisse Diapree. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Norn. Pom. 453. 1889.  DorelVs Neue Weisse Diapree.

Wakapa. Triflora X Americana. 1. 5. Dak. Sta. Bul. 108. 1908.
A hybrid between De Soto and Red June reported by Hansen, the originator, in the preceding reference as worthy of further testing.

Walker Seedling. Domestica. 1. Can. Hort. 21:390. 1898.
A seedling raised by A. W. Walker, Clarksburg, Ontario. Fruit of medium size, dark maroon; flesh greenish, tender, moderately juicy, sweet, pleasant; freestone; early.

Wallace. Americana. 1. Meneray Cat.
A seedling of Harrison grown by H. A. Terry; introduced by F. W. Meneray, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Tree healthy, vigorous and productive; fruit large, inclined to oblong, bright yellow overspread with red; flesh firm; good; semi-clinging; mid-season.

Walter. Domestica. 1. Oberdieck Dent. Obst. Sort. 431. 1881.
Produced by Herr Walter in Altenburg, Germany; valuable for table and market purposes. Tree vigorous; shoots glabrous; fruit roundish-oval, medium; suture deep; halves usually equal; stem thick, straight, strongly hairy; skin not adherent, dark brown; bloom thick; flesh yellow, tender, very juicy; like Reine Claude in flavor; early.

Walther Pflaume. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 453. 1889.
The reference by Mathieu came from Monatsschrift fur Pomologie 281. 1858.

Ward October Red. Rivularis X ? 1. Munson Cat. 10. 1902-3.
Found in Clay County, Texas, by Robert Ward; introduced by T. V. Munson, Denison, Texas. Tree very vigorous and hardy, spreading habit, very productive; fruit dark bright red with meaty flesh; excellent quality; stone small; ripens in Texas in September and October.

Warner. Domestica. 1. W. N. Y. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 31:60. 1886. 2. Cornell Sta. Bul. 131:193- 1897.   Warner's Late 1. Warner's Late Red 2.
Warner originated in Schoharie County, New York, and was introduced by S. D. Willard, Geneva, New York. It is a late variety too small and unattractive for commercial purposes. Fruit below medium in size, roundish; cavity shallow; suture a line; stem three-quarters of an inch long; skin moderately thick, dull greenish-red; bloom thin; flesh yellow, juicy, firm, sweet, mild; quality fair to good; stone oval, slightly flattened, clinging; season very late.

Warren. Americana. 1. Terry Cat. 5. 1900.
Grown from seed of Hawkeye by H. A. Terry; first fruited in 1897. Fruit large, mottled light red, with thin bloom; late.

Wastesa. Species? 1. Cir. S. Dak. Exp. Sta. 1910.  State Fair No. 16 1.
A seedling of some native plum; grown and sent out by N. E. Hansen of the South Dakota Experiment Station.

Waterloo Pflaume. Domestica ? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 453. 1889.  Due de Waterloo 1. Prune de Waterloo 1.
This may be identical with Golden Drop although Mathieu separates them.


Watson. Triflora X Angustifolia varians? 1. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:21. 1898.
A seedling of Kelsey thought to have been pollinated by Lone Star; originated with D. H. Watson, Brenham, Texas; introduced by W. A. Yates in 1897. Tree vigorous, open; fruit large, pointed, red when fully ripe; flesh yellow, juicy, melting; stone nearly free, small.

Watts. Species? 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 166. 1885.
Mentioned as grown by Dr. D. S. Watts of Madison County, Mississippi.

Waugh. Triflora X Hortulana. 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 14:273. 1901. 2. Rural N. Y. 61:658. 1902. 3. Ibid. 65:730. 1906.
Grown by J. W. Kerr, Denton, Maryland, from seed of Chabot fertilized with Wayland; introduced in 1901. Favorably reported where tested. Tree vigorous, rapid and shapely in growth; fruit medium to large, roundish inclining to oblong; cavity shallow; stem slender; dark purplish-red; dots few and indistinct; flesh yellow, firm, meaty; very good; stone small, semi-clinging; mid-season or early.

Wax. Domestica. 1. Cultivator 3:19. 1855. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 425. 1889.  Cire 2. Wax Plum 2.
Raised by Elisha Dorr of Albany, New York; thought to be a cross between Bleeker and Denniston Superb; resembles Bleeker in growth and productiveness of tree; fruit large, slightly oval; stem very long; deep yellow overspread with carmine; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, firm, sweet with a sprightly flavor; clingstone; late.

Wazata. Nigra? 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:42. 1892. 2. Bailey Ev. Nat. Fruits 190. 1898. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 171. 1901.
Found wild in Minnesota; introduced by P. M. Gideon and W. F. Heikes. Tree upright, very ornamental in bloom; fruit small to medium, round, dull red; flesh yellow; inferior; clingstone; mid-season to late.

Webster Gage. Domestica. 1. Watkins Cat. 1892. 2. Guide Prat. 157, 364. 1895. 3. Garden 56:344. 1899.  Reine-Claude de Webster 2. Webster Gage 2. Webster's Gage 1, 3.
Tree bears regularly but sparsely; fruit larger than Reine Claude, a little more oval in shape, yellowish-green; flesh yellowish, tender, soft, juicy, rich; mid-season.

Weeping Blood. Triflora. 1. Hill Side Nursery Sp. Cir. 1895-6.
From J. L. Normand of Marksville, Louisiana; produces blood-red plums of good quality; valuable only as an ornamental.

Weisses oder Grimes Zeiberl. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 454. 1889.  Weisse Zeiberl 1.  Mathieu found reference to this variety in Wiener Garten-Zeitung 290. 1884.

Welch. Americana. 1. Meneray Cat.
Grown by H. A. Terry from seed of Hammer; introduced by F. W. Meneray, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Tree upright, vigorous; fruit large, bright red on a yellow ground; flesh yellow, rich; clingstone; mid-season.

Welcome. Americana. 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 100. 1903.
A handsome seedling of De Soto grown by the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada. Tree vigorous and productive; fruit above medium size, oval, flattened; cavity narrow, shallow; rich yellow, more or less washed with red; dots very small, yellow, indistinct; bloom thin; skin moderately thick, tough; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet, pleasant; good; mid-season.

Weisse Kaiserin. Domestica. 1. Oberdieck Deut. Obst. Sort. 418. 1881. 2. Mathieu Norn. Pom. 431. 1889.  Datte Jaune 2. Gelbe Marunke 2. Grosse Gelbe Dattel Pflaume 2. Grosse Gelbe Dattel Zwetsche 2. Imperial Jaune 2. Prune Datte 2. Weisse Kaiserin 2.
Probably of German origin; tree medium in size, a rapid grower, productive; fruit medium in size, roundish-oval; suture shallow; stem short, glabrous; skin not adherent, whitish-yellow, the sunny side dull red, sometimes dotted with red; dots numerous, fine, yellowish; bloom thin; flesh whitish-yellow, firm, very juicy, highly flavored; good for dessert and cooking; clingstone; late.

Werder'sche Frühzwetsche, Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 454. 1889.  Stengel Pflaume. Wetherell. Domestica. 1. Mag. Hort. 6:92. 1840. Col. Wetherell 1.
Originated by Henry Corse, Montreal, Canada, about 1830. Spoken of highly at the time of its origin; valuable for commercial purposes.

Wetherill's Sweet. Insititia. 1. Prince Treat. Hort. 27. 1828. 2. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 154. 1831.
A Damson-like plum; small, sweet and delicious; clingstone; early.

Whatisit. Prunus besseyi X Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 18. 1899-1900.
Grown by Theodore Williams of Nebraska from seed of Prunus besseyi pollinated by an Americana; introduced by J. W. Kerr. Tree upright and vigorous, bears early, productive; fruit small, spherical inclining to oblong, dark purplish-red.

Wheat. Insititia. i. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576. 1629. 2. Rea Flora 209. 1676. 3. Ray Hist. Plant. 2:1529. 1688. 4. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 154. 1831. 5. Floy-Lindley Guide Orch. Gard. 293, ^S- 1846. 6. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 913. 1869. 7. Hogg Fruit Man. 730. 1884.  English Wheat 6. Great Whitton 4. Nutmeg 2. Nutmeg 4, 5, 6. Red Wheate 1. Wheaten 3. Wheaten 4, 5. Whitton 4, 5. Wheat Plum 5. Wheat Plum 6. Wheaton 6. Whitlow 6.
During the Seventeenth Century this name was applied to all Insititia plums and is still so used in parts of Europe.

Whitaker. Munsoniana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:51, 86. 1892. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 74. 1895. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 190. 1901. 4. III. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 212. 1904. Whitacre 4.
Whitaker is a seedling of Wild Goose raised and introduced by J. T. Whitaker of Tyler, Texas. Fruit of medium size, oval; cavity shallow; suture a line; skin thin; bright red; bloom thin; dots many, distinct; flesh yellow, sweet; quality fair; stone small, long-oval, pointed, flat, clinging; mid-season. Listed in the catalog of the American Pomological Society since 1899.

Whitby. Species? 1, Can. Hort. 18:350. 1895.
A seedling exhibited at the Toronto Industrial Fair in 1895 by the originator, J. K. Gordon, Whitby, Canada.

White Corn. Domestica. Mentioned in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 154. 1831.

White Diaper. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 952. 1869.  Diapre Blanc 1. Diapre e Blanche 1.
This variety seems to have been known only by Downing who says it is a small, round plum with a whitish-green skin covered with bloom; flesh rather firm, pale yellow, sweet; good; mid-season.

White Honey Damson. Insititia. 1. Wild Bros. Cat. 1892.
A sweet yellow Damson.

White Muscle. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576. 1629. White Mussell 1.
A strain of the Muscle plum differing from it only in its greenish-white color.

White Otschakoff. Domestica, 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 61. 1887. 2. Bailey Ann. Hort. 18. 1889. Bielaya Otschakorskaya 1.
One of the numerous varieties imported from East Europe by the Iowa Agricultural College about 1882. At one time recommended for the prairie states by Professor Budd.

White Pear. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576. 1629. 2, Langley Pomona 96, 97. 1729. 3. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 154. 1831. 4. Prince Pom. Man. 2: 104. 1831. Late White Pear 1.
A variety of ancient and unknown origin. Fruit medium in size, obovate; flesh adhering to the stone.

White Peascod. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576. 1629. 2. Rea Flora 208. 1676. Peascod Plum 2. White Pescod 1.
Mentioned by the early writers; similar to the Green and Red Peascod.

White Prune. Americana. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 228. 1909.
Grown by H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa; not yet introduced. Fruit long-oval, yellow, partly over-spread with red; bloom thick, conspicuous; skin thick, tough, acrid; flesh very firm, meaty, -sweetish; good; freestone.

White Queen. Domestica. 1. Ann. Pom. Beige 7:95, PL 1859. 2. Mas he Verger 6:101, fig. 1866-73. 3. Hogg Fruit Man. 721. 1884. 4. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 454. 1889. 5. Mich. Sta. Bul. 177:42, 43. 1899.  Neue Weisse Kaiserin 4. Prune Reine Blanche 1. Reine Blanche 2, 3. Reine Blanche 2, 4. Reine Blanche de Galopin 4. Weisse Konigin 2. Weisse Kdnigin 4.
Raised by M. Galopin, a nurseryman of Liege, Belgium, about 1844; introduced into America by the United States Department of Agriculture about 1890. Tree vigorous, upright; fruit medium in size, roundish-ovate, flattened at the ends, yellowish-white, sometimes tinged with red; suture shallow; cavity shallow, wide; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, aromatic; good; stone small, oval, clinging; late.

White Sweet Damson. Insititia. 1. Mag. Hort. 6:123. 1840.
Originated as a seedling in Essex County, New York, sometime previous to 1840.

White Wheat. Insititia. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576. 1629. 2. Knoop Fructologie 2:63. 1771. Spilling Jaune-simple 2. White Wheate 1.
A yellow variety of the Wheat plum of Europe. Fruit small, oval, yellow; fair quality.

White Virginal. Domestica. 1. Prince Pom. Man. 2:73. 1831. 2. Poiteau Pom. Franc. 1. 1846. 3. U. S. Pat. Off. Rpt. 306. 1854. 4. Bridgeman Gard. Ass't 130. 1857. 5. Mas Le Verger 6:129. 1866-73. 6. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 454. 1889. 7. Guide Prat. 158, 367. 1895. Altesse Blanche! 6, 7. Double Beurre Wittel 6, 7. Peach 3. Précoce 7. Prune Précocet 6. Prune Virginale 2. Virginal a gros fruit blanc 1. Virginal blanc 1. Vir-ginale 4. Virginale a Fruit Blanc 6, 7. Virginale a gros fruit blanc 5, 6, 7. Virginal Blanche 6. Virginale blanche 3, 5, 7. Virgin 6. White Virginal 4. White Virginale 6. Weisse Jungfernpflaume 6. Weisse Jungfernpflaume 5, 7.
A variety confused by Downing with the Red Virginal. Fruit medium in size, roundish-oblate; suture a line; greenish-yellow; bloom heavy; flesh pale greenish, juicy, melting, sweet, pleasant; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Whyte. Nigra. 1. Can. Exp. Farm. Bul. 2nd Ser. 3:57. 1900. 2. Ibid. 43:39. 1903.  Whyte's Red Seedling 1.
Grown by R. B. Whyte, Ottawa, Canada; under test at the Central Experimental Farm, under the name "Whyte R. B., No. 3." Fruit medium in size, roundish; cavity narrow; suture a line; apex rounded; deep red; dots and bloom lacking; skin thin, tender; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet; good; stone long, semi-clinging; mid-season.

Whitley. Domestica. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 731. 1884. Whitley's 1.
Fruit below medium size, round; suture faint; stem on a slight elevation, of medium length, slender; red with yellow dots, darker on the side next the sun; flesh yellow with white veins, juicy, sweet and well flavored; clingstone; late.

Wier. Americana. 1. Am. Gard. 13:460. 1892. 2. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:45, 86. 1892. 3. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:63. 1897.  Wier Large Red 1. Wier's Large Red 2, 3.
Originated by D. B. Wier of Illinois; resembles Miner, but is no better than that variety. Fruit large, round; skin thin, red; flesh yellow, moderately firm; fair to good; clingstone.

Wier No. 50. Americana. 1. Kerr Cat. 1894. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:63. 1897. Wier's No. 50, 1, 2.
From D. B. Wier of Illinois. Tree vigorous, healthy, productive, bears annually; fruit large, round, dark red over yellow; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Wilde. Domestica. 1. Horticulturist 7:402. 1852. 2. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 953. 1869. Wilde's 1.
Raised by a Mr. Comack from a stone brought from Italy by R. H. Wilde. Tree productive; fruit medium to large, oval-oblong, greenish-yellow; flesh yellowish-green, firm, dry, sweet; clingstone; early.

Wilder. Munsoniana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:78. 1892. 2. Terry Cat. 1899. 3. Ala. Coll. Sta. Bul. 112:178. 1900. 4, Waugh Plum Cult. 175. 1901.  Col. Wilder 1, 2. Colonel Wilder 4. President Wilder 3.
Wilder was grown from seed of Wild Goose in 1885 by H. A. Terry, Crescent, Iowa. Fruit of medium size, roundish-oval; suture a line; skin firm, dark red; bloom thin; dots distinct; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet; quality good; stone large, oval, clinging; mid-season.

Wild Goose Improved. Munsoniana. 1. Stark Cat. 29. 1910.
An improved strain of Wild Goose introduced by Stark Brothers, Louisiana, Missouri, in 1910.

Wildrose. Americana. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 134. 1887. 2, Cornell Sta. Bul. 38: 45, 86. 1892. 3. Wis. Sta. Bui 63:64. 1897.
A wild seedling found in Minnesota; introduced in 1880 by A. W. Sias, Rochester, Minnesota. Fruit large, round, yellow blushed with red; flesh firm; clingstone; early to mid-season.

Wilkinson. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 400. 1857.
Tree vigorous; branches smooth, rather slender; fruit of medium size, oval, slightly necked; skin reddish-purple; bloom thick; stalk medium, set in a small cavity; flesh dark yellow, firm, sweet, not rich; semi-clinging; late.

Willamette. Domestica.
For a discussion of this plum see the Pacific.

Williams. Nigra? i.Keir Cat. 1894. 2. Ibid. 15. 1897. 3. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:64. 1897.
Tree vigorous, healthy, moderately productive; fruit large, oblong, pointed, red; clingstone; early.

Wilmeth Late. Species? 1. Tex. Sta. Bul. 32:490. 1894.
Noticed in the preceding reference as on trial.

Wilson. Americana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:64. 1897.
Noted in the preceding reference as a very early fine plum.

Wine Plum. Domestica. 1. Coxe Cult. Fr. Trees 237. 1817. 2. Prince Pom. Man. 2: 101, 1832.
Much like the Yellow Egg in appearance but smaller, oblong, pale green; stem long; flesh rich, juicy and well flavored; early.

Winesour. Insititia. 1. Forsyth Treat. Fr. Trees 21. 1803. 2. Prince Pom. Man. 2:1,01. 1832. 3. Floy-Lindley Guide Orch. Card. 294, 383. 1846. 4. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:17. 1873. 5. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 453. 1889. 6. Guide Prat. 163, 367. 1895.
Rotherham 3, 5, 6. Sauere Weinpflaume 4. Sauere Wein Pflaume Von Yorkshire 5, 6. Sour Wine Plum of Yorkshire 5, 6. Vineuse acidule 4, 5. Vineuse-Acidule 6. Vinisour 6. Weinsauerliche Pflaume 5. Weinsauerliche Zwetsche 4, 6. Winesour 6. Winesour Plum 5. Yorkshire Winesour 5, 6.
An old English variety from Rotherham in Yorkshire, where it is highly esteemed for making preserves. Fruit of the Damson type, small, oval; stem one-half inch long; dark purple; dots dark colored; flesh greenish-yellow, sometimes tinged with red towards the stone, sour; stone long, slender, pointed, clinging; late.

Winnebago. Americana. 1. Ia. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 286. 1887. 2. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:64. 1897. 3. Colo. Sta. Bul. 50:47. 1898.
From Minnesota; tree vigorous, rigid and thorny, moderately productive; fruit medium in size, round, irregular; stem long, slender; cavity deep; yellow overspread with deep red; skin thin; flesh yellowish, soft, of inferior flavor; stone elliptical, somewhat oblique, rather flat, rounded at both ends, clinging; mid-season.

Winter Creke. Domestica. 1. Parkinson Par. Ter. 576. 1629.
Noted by Parkinson as very late.

Winter Damson. Insititia. 1. Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 146. 1831. 2. Prince Pont. Man. 2:89. 1832. 3. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 297. 1845. 4. Hooper W. Fr. Book 244. 1857. 5. Mas Pom. Gen. 2:145. I^73-  Black Damson 3. Blue Damson 2. Blue Damascene 2. Common Blue Damson 2. Common Damson 3. Dam as d'Hiver 5. Damson 2. Damson 2, 3. Damson Winter 4. Early Damson 3. Late Damson 2. Late Purple Damson 2. Purple Damson 3. Purple Winter Damson 2. Winter Damson 2, 5.
Mas thought that this variety originated in America, but since it was first noted in England it is probably an importation to the New World from that country. Downing distinguished it from the common Damson by its extreme lateness. Tree medium in size; fruit roundish, small; suture a line; purplish-black; bloom thick; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, acid, with a slight astringency; good for preserving; clingstone.

Wiseman. Domestica. Mentioned in Wild Bros. Cat. 1908. Wiseman's Prune.

Wohanka. Triflora X Americana. 1. S. Dak. Sta. Bul. 108. 1908.
A hybrid between De Soto and Red June grown by Hansen of the South Dakota Experiment Station who considers it worthy of trial.

Wolf and Japan. Triflora X Americana mollis. 1. ///. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 424. 1905.
Listed with a number of plums which were tested by H. T. Thompson, Marengo, Illinois.

Wolf Clingstone. Americana mollis. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 87:18. 1901. 2. 5". Dak. Sta. Bul. 93:13. 1905. Clingstone Wolf. Wolf Cling 1.
Propagated and sent out in many cases as the true Wolf which it much resembles except that it is darker in color and is a clingstone. It seems to be more resistant to diseases and insects than Wolf.

Woolston. Domestica. 1. Mclntosh Bk. Card. 2:53. 1855. 2. Horticulturist 13:168. 1858. 3. Mas Le Verger 6:153, fig. 77. 1866-73. 4. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 454. 1889. 5. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 433. 1905.  Reine-Claude de Woolston 5. Reine-Claude Noire de Woolston 3. Woolston Black 4. Woolston Black Gage 1. Woolston Gage 2. Woolston's Black Gage 3, 4. Woolston's Violette Reine-Claude 4.
Raised by a Mr. Dowling of Southampton, England. Tree vigorous, productive; fruit medium in size, roundish, purplish-black; suture not pronounced; cavity deep and wide; stem medium in length, slender; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet, sugary, tender, aromatic; very good; freestone; mid-season.

Wooster. Munsoniana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:65. 1897.
Mentioned in the preceding reference as not being hardy in Minnesota.

Wooten. Munsoniana. i. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:65. 1892. 2. Thomas Am. Fruit Cult. 492. 1897. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 191. 1901. Wootton 2.
Wooten was found growing wild in Burnet County, Texas, in 1876, by F. T. Ramsey; introduced by A. N. Ramsey et Son. Fruit oval; cavity shallow; suture a line; skin thin; bright red; bloom thin; flesh yellow; quality good; stone large, clinging; mid-season.

Worth. Americana. I. Kerr Cat. 7. 1902-3.
Originated by Theodore Williams of Nebraska; named and introduced by J. W. Kerr in 1902. Tree vigorous, healthy and productive; fruit large, round-oblong, purplish-red on a greenish-yellow ground; semi-clinging; mid-season.

Wragg. Americana. 1. Meneray Cat.
A seedling of Hawkeye grown by H. A. Terry; introduced by F. W. Meneray, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Tree vigorous, healthy, productive; fruit very large, yellow blotched with dark red; flesh yellow, firm, rich; good; clingstone; mid-season.

Wragg Freestone. Species? 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 87:18. 1901.
Received by the Wisconsin Experiment Station from Edson Gaylord, Nora Springs, Iowa. Fruit medium to small, roundish, dark purplish-red with numerous elongated yellowish markings; bloom heavy; stem long, slender; skin tender, not harsh; flesh greenish-yellow, crisp, very rich but harsh near the center; stone round, grooved, semi-clinging.

Wunder von New York. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 454. 1889.  Merville de New York.

Wyandotte. Species? 1. Mich. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 290. 1889.
Professor Budd of Iowa mentioned this plum as hardy and as bearing continuously.

Wyant and Japan. Triflora X Americana. 1. ///. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 420. 1905.
Mentioned in a list of varieties under test by H. T. Thompson, Marengo, Illinois. Said to be a hybrid seedling; fruit light red; fair quality; freestone; mid-season.

Wyckoff. Munsoniana. 1. Linn County Nur. Cat.
Wyckoff was found growing wild along the Cedar River, Iowa, by a Mr. Wyckoff; introduced by Snyder Brothers, Center Point, Iowa.

Wyedale. Domestica. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 732. 1884. 2. Garden 58:395. 1900. 3. Thompson Gard. Ass't 4:159. 1901.
From Yorkshire, England; much grown in the northern parts of England. Tree very productive, strong and upright in growth; fruit small, oval; cavity small; dark purple, almost black; flesh greenish-yellow, brisk, juicy, agreeably flavored; clingstone; late.

Wyzerka. Domestica. 1. Kan. Sta. Bul. 73:191. 1897. 2. Ibid. 101:121, PI. 6 fig. 1. 1901. 3. Budd-Hansen Am. Hort. Man. 328. 1903.  Wiezerka 1, 2.
Wyzerka is one of the numerous Russian varieties imported by J. L. Budd of the Iowa Experiment Station. There seems to have been some confusion in the distribution of this plum, for Budd and Hansen, in reference three, describe Wyzerka as a large, oval, yellow plum with a fine peach-like flavor; the variety sent to this Station under this name bears a small, purplish-black, Damson-like fruit, long-oval in form, cavity shallow; suture a line; skin thin; bloom very heavy; flesh yellow, juicy, slightly fibrous, sweet, mild; flavor good; stone oval, small, free; mid-season.


Yates. Triflora X Angustifolia varians. 1. Vt. Sta. Bul. 67:22. 1898. 2. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 14:275. 1901.
From seed of Kelsey thought to have been pollinated with Lone Star; originated with D. H. Watson, Brenham, Texas; introduced by W. A. Yates, 1897. Tree thrifty, healthy; fruit large, roundish, red when fully ripe; clingstone; mid-season.

Yellow Americana. Species? Letter from Kerr.
Originated by Theodore Williams, Benson, Nebraska.

Yellow Egg. Species? 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:66. 1897.
Goff mentions a variety under this name which differs from the older plum of the same name. Tree of weeping habit, productive; fruit long; freestone.

Yellow, 43 Fischer. Domestica. 1. Bailey Ann. Hort. 18. 1889.
Introduced into this country from Russia by Professor J. L. Budd of Ames, Iowa.

Yellow Imp^ratrice. Domestica. 1. Ann. Pom. Beige 55, PL 1853. 2. Pom. France 7:No. 11. 1871. 3. Mas Le Verger 6:113, fig. 1866-73. 4. Hogg Fruit Man, 732. 1884. 5. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 431. 1889. 6. Cat. Cong. Pom. France 461. 1906. Altcsse Blanche 4, 5. UAltesse Blanche 6. De Monsieur Jaune 3. Gelbe Herrn Pflaume 5. Imperatrice Jaune 3, ?5. Jaune de Monsieur 2. Jaune de Monsieur 5, 6. Monsieur a Fruits Jaune 4, 5. Monsieur a Fruits Jaunes 3. Monsieur a Fruits Jaunes 5, 6. Monsieur Jaune 6. Prune de Monsieur Jaune 5. Prune de Monsieur Jaune 1. Prune de Monsieur, Variete Jaune 5. Prune Monsieur Jaune 2. Prune d'Altesse Blanche 2, 5. Virginale Blanche 4, ?5; Yellow Imperatrice ?3, 5.
M. Jacquin, nurseryman of Paris, France, obtained this plum from seed of a cross between the Orleans and the Reine Claude planted about 1820; brought to notice in 1845. Mas considered Hogg's and Downing's Yellow Imperatrice as different from the French variety. Tree medium in vigor; fruit medium in size, usually roundish-oval; suture broad; halves unequal; skin not adhering, golden-yellow, dotted and streaked with carmine-red; flesh yellow, juicy, very sweet and aromatic; freestone; mid-season.

Yellow Imperial. Domestica. 1. Prince Pom. Man. 2:59. I^32-  Imperial jaune 1. Impe'riale jaune 1.
Described by Prince as distinct from Yellow Egg which it much resembles but differing in that it is somewhat smaller, about two weeks earlier and slightly more acid.

Yellow Jack. Domestica. Mentioned in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 154. 1831.

Yellow Jerusalem. Domestica. 1. Hogg Fruit Man. 732. 1884. 2. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 436. 1889.  Jahns Gelbe Jerusalems Pflaume 2. Jahn9s Jerusalems Pflaume 2. Jerusalem Jaune 1, 2. John's Gelbe Jerusalems-pflaume 1. Yellow Jerusalem 2.
Fruit of medium size, roundish-oval; suture a .line; cavity deep; deep yellow with crimson specks next the sun; flesh yellow, with white veins, tender, juicy, brisk, sweet, very good; clingstone; mid-season.

Yellow Magnum Bonum. Domestica. i. Jour. Hort. N. S. 17:228. 1869.
According to the preceding reference this variety is distinct from the Yellow Egg (White Magnum Bonum). Fruit medium in size, oval, dull yellow sprinkled with red dots; rich; clingstone; young shoots smooth.

Yellow Nagate. Triflora. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 106. 1891. 2. Can. Exp. Farm Bul. 2nd Ser. 3:57. 1900.
A little known Triflora very closely resembling if not identical with some of the standard yellow Trifloras.

Yellow Oregon. Hortulana. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:66. 1897. 2. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 11:287. 1898.
Described by Waugh from specimens received by him from B. A. Matthews, Iowa. Fruit small, nearly spherical; suture a faint line; bright golden-yellow; dots many, whitish; skin thick and strong; flesh yellow and not very firm; quality medium; stone large, smooth, clinging; inferior in size and quality to Captain or Cumberland.

Yellow Panhandle. Angustifolia watsoni. 1. Wis. Sta. Bul. 63:66. 1897. 2. Bailey Ev. Nat. Fruits 222, 223. 1898. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 234. 1901. 4. Ga. Sta. Bul. 67:285. 1904.
A variety from the Panhandle of Texas; introduced by F. T. Ramsey of Austin, Texas. Tree forms a close symmetrical head; fruit small, roundish-oblong, yellow overspread with clear bright red; dots few, indistinct; skin tough; flesh yellow, hard; quality poor; stone medium, oval, turgid, clinging.

Yellow Roman Bullace. Insititia. Mentioned in Lond. Hort. Soc. Cat. 144. 1831.

Yellow Sweet. Americana. 1. Cornell Sta. Bul. 38:46. 1892. 2. Colo. Sta. Bul. 50: 47. 1898. 3. Waugh Plum Cult. 168. 1901.
Thought to have originated in Minnesota. Tree small; fruit large, round inclining to oblong; suture distinct; stem short and stout; yellow more or less mottled and shaded with red; bloom thin; flesh firm, juicy, rich, sweet; good; stone round, flat, clinging.

Yellow Transparent. Angustifolia varians. 1. Am. Pom. Soc. Rpt. 162. 1881. 2. Am. Pom. Soc. Cat. 25. 1897. 3. Ohio Sta. Bul. 113:156. 1899. 4. Waugh Plum Cult. 200. 1901.  Transparent 4 incor. Transparent Yellow 2.
Selected from a seedling orchard of two thousand trees planted near Denison, Texas, by J. L. Freeman. Tree vigorous, forming a handsome top, productive; fruit medium in size, oblong, bright yellow; skin thin and tough, reported to crack badly in some localities; flesh soft and watery, sweet and good; clingstone; early.

Yellow Wildgoose. Munsoniana? 1. Van Lindley Cat. 42. 1899.
Said to have been introduced by R. Bates of Jackson, South Carolina. Fruit large, equal in size to Wild Goose with better quality; ripens at the same time.

Yellow Yosemite. Species? 1. Card. Mon. 20:176. 1878. 2. Mich. Sta. Bul. 118:52, 55. 1895. Yosemite 1. Yosemite Yellow 2.
Yellow Yosemite came from the " Rocky Mountains " about 1870 with the Purple Yosemite; introduced by W. S. Carpenter, Rye, New York. Fruit roundish; suture aline; skin thick, tough, yellow, with reddish tinge; flesh yellow, sweet, tender; stone roundish-ovate, clinging; mid-season.

Yohe. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 954. 1869. Yohes Eagle 1.
Noticed by Downing who says it is an accidental seedling in the garden of Caleb iTohe, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.

York State Prune. Domestica. 1. Thomas Am. Fruit Cult. 504, 505. 1897. 2* Greene Cat. 1897. 3. Sweet Cat. 13. 1897. 4. W. N. Y. Hort. Soc. Rpt. 44:92. 1899.  Large German Prune 3. York State Prune 3.
A seedling grown near Dansville, New York. As tested at this Station and by many fruit-growers it is identical with Italian Prune.

Young. Domestica. 1. Downing Fr. Trees Am. 955. 1869. Young's Seedling 1.
From Pennsylvania. Tree vigorous; fruit medium in size, roundish-oval, deep reddish-purple; flesh yellow, sweet; good; freestone; mid-season.

Yukon. Nigra? 1. Can. Exp. Farms Rpt. 426. 1900.
A seedling grown at Indian Head Experimental Farm, Canada. Fruit of medium size, red; skin thick; good; early.

Yuteca. Species? 1. Cir. S. Dak. Exp. Sta. 1910. South Dakota No.8 1.
A very early ripening seedling of some native plum grown by N. E. Hansen of the South Dakota Experiment Station; sent out in 1907.


Zahlbruckner Damascene. Species? Mentioned in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 455. 1889. 

Zahlbruckner's Violette Damascene. Zekanta. Species? i.'Cir. S. Dak. Exp. Sta. 1910.
A large yellow seedling of some native plum grown and introduced by N. E. Hansen of the South Dakota Experiment Station.

Zucchetta GialIa. Species? Listed in Mathieu Nom. Pom. 455. 1889.

Zulu. Species? 1. Vt. Sta. An. Rpt. 12:230. 1899.
Grown by Luther Burbank who says in regard to its parentage "It is a mystery, being three or four generations from innumerable crosses, and resembles no other known species or variety." Fruit medium in size, round or somewhat oblate; suture shallow; cavity broad, open; stem short, strong; very dark dull red, almost black; dots many, minute, whitish; bloom thick; skin thin and tender; flesh firm, juicy, red, rich and sweet; quality good to best; stone medium large, rounded, only slightly flattened, clinging.

Zuzac. Domestica. 1. Kerr Cat. 25. 1897.
Similar in appearance to Townsend.

Zwergpflaume. Domestica. 1. Kraft Pom. Aust. 2:35, Tab. 183 fig. 2. 1796.  Die kleine Zwergpflaume 1. Prune nain 1.
Tree low; leaves lance-shaped, short-stemmed; flowers small, fragrant; petals long, not widely opened; fruit hanging on a long stem, the size and appearance of a cherry except that it is more elongated; pleasant; sometimes sourish and flat.

Zwetsche Professor Wittmack. Species? 1. Mathieu Nom. Pom. 455. 1889.
Referenced by Mathieu from Garten-flora 142. 1888.

Zwetsche Von der Worms. Species? i. Mathieu Norn. Pom. 455. 1889. 2. Guide Prat. 163, 368. 1895.  Grosse Blaue Zwetsche Von der Worms 1,2. Quetsche Grosse Blaue de la Worms 1,2.
Tree vigorous, productive; fruit large, oval, bluish-black; flesh greenish-yellow, juicy, firm; mid-season.